Connect with us

Zambia

  •  Yellow Pay Yellow Card s new payment feature that simplifies money transfers through its crypto rails
    Yellow Pay: Yellow Card’s new payment feature that simplifies money transfers through its crypto rails
     Yellow Pay Yellow Card s new payment feature that simplifies money transfers through its crypto rails
    Yellow Pay: Yellow Card’s new payment feature that simplifies money transfers through its crypto rails
    Africa4 days ago

    Yellow Pay: Yellow Card’s new payment feature that simplifies money transfers through its crypto rails

    Yellow Card Financial (https://YellowCard.io/) is proud to announce its new payment feature: Yellow Pay (https://bit.ly/3C4C5cm).

    This innovative solution will make it easy for customers to send and receive money through the Yellow Card cryptocurrency exchange platform, without additional fees, instantly and from the comfort of their home.

    Oparinde Babatunde, director of operations at Yellow Card, says that one of the biggest challenges in Africa is the difficulty of transferring money.

    She stating that it is easier to send money from Nigeria to the US than it is to send money from Nigeria to Ghana (https://bit.ly/3C0kfHv) or Zambia.

    And in cases where it is possible, it is usually through USD.

    “Yellow Pay simplifies the transfer of money between African countries by creating a solution that understands how Africans already interact with financial products.

    We've managed to make it even simpler by dramatically reducing the costs and waiting time for remittances across the continent compared to traditional money transfer channels.

    With Yellow Pay, Africans can send money across borders using their phones,” she says.

    Yellow Pay uses the Yellow Card crypto exchange platform to complete customer transactions in USDT.

    It is important to note that Yellow Pay is not a money transfer or foreign currency exchange service.

    Rather, Yellow Pay is an advanced crypto exchange product.

    There are several benefits to using Yellow Pay. First of all, the service is powered by blockchain technology, which makes it cheaper.

    Second, transactions are instant so there is no waiting period.

    Finally, money transfers are totally free.

    And finally, the uses are endless: send money for businesses, schools, and health care.

    Offer cash to friends and family across Africa, pay suppliers in other countries, get paid for services, pay bills and fees in other African currencies, and much more.

    Oparinde adds that “the people who will benefit most from Yellow Pay are the unbanked and underserved people living in peri-urban and rural areas of the continent.

    In general, they do not meet the necessary requirements to open a dollar account in banks and, therefore, they are completely cut off.

    Yellow Pay will serve this market.” The launch of Yellow Pay (https://bit.ly/3Qmjaht) not only makes it easier to transfer money, but also opens up the continent to more investment, access to credit, business grants, and will generally improve the ease of making business.

    Use Yellow Pay today for an instant, easy and secure way to send and receive money across borders instantly, for free.

  •  Children in Malawi and Zambia push to change the school calendar in response to climate change
    Children in Malawi and Zambia push to change the school calendar in response to climate change
     Children in Malawi and Zambia push to change the school calendar in response to climate change
    Children in Malawi and Zambia push to change the school calendar in response to climate change
    Africa7 days ago

    Children in Malawi and Zambia push to change the school calendar in response to climate change

    Children in Malawi and Zambia are calling on their governments to change the school calendar and close for the winter months of June and July as climate change brings colder temperatures leaving students unable to concentrate and missing classes, Save the Children said today.

    Schools are currently closed for the winter in the two countries between mid-August and September, as many classrooms are unheated.

    However, changes in the weather have made winters increasingly cold and children want the holidays to come earlier so they can stay at home where they have a better chance of staying warm.

    Average temperatures in June and July in the two countries range between 9°C and 23°C**.

    Although in many parts of the world they are not considered frosty, the nations of southern Africa are not used to such temperatures, and houses and schools are not built with adequate heating or insulation.

    While winter weather data in Zambia and Malawi is sparse, in southern Africa there has been an increase in the frequency of extreme cold events induced by changes in regional weather patterns, such as the number of cold fronts moving over South Africa.

    .

    Since the start of winter in June, children in southern African countries have complained that extremely cold days take a toll on their lives and prevent them from enjoying their right to education.

    Faith, 13, a child rights activist from Malawi, is passionate about climate change and how it is affecting children.

    She told Save the Children that she has noticed a change in the weather pattern in recent years.

    “The cold was there, but it was not like the one we are experiencing now.

    It was cold, of course, but sometimes the sun could be there.

    But this cold that we are going through… it is difficult to bear.” Malawi and Zambia are among the countries most vulnerable to climate change, and the full impact of the climate crisis is already being felt in the form of extreme weather events such as droughts, floods and landslides.

    They also topped the list of unreported global crises in 2021.

    Earlier this year, Save the Children said that Zambia is experiencing a slow and silent climate crisis that has pushed around 13% of the population into severe food shortages.

    , with 1.58 million people, including an estimated 821,000 children, facing an unreported environmental disaster, including late rains, prolonged droughts, extremely high temperatures, devastating insect swarms and floods.

    In Malawi, a third of the population (5.4 million people out of 16.6 million) is on the brink of extreme hunger driven by poverty and climate change-induced food system crises.

    But while parents struggle to feed their families, kids like Faith struggle to stay sharp in class and keep their dreams alive.

    Faith said: *“Climate change is affecting me a lot because I am skipping classes and my right to education is affected because I am not enjoying my education like I used to.

    And another thing that is affecting is my right of aspiration and inspiration of what I want to become… I want to become the president of Malawi.

    * “It is a cold season, of course, but the cold goes further because it reaches the point where the children do not go to school and I am learning in a boarding school.

    And then it happens that we have to take a bath with cold water.

    It's too much for us, so we skip classes at some point."

    Pohamba, 14, lives with her mother and brother in Lusaka, Zambia.

    She said she has noticed a rapid change in the weather pattern that is affecting the children in many ways, including those living with disabilities like him "In Zambia, the weather patterns have really changed...* maybe since seven years ago.

    I was young, but I still have a little memory of what was happening**.

    When it was raining, it wasn't raining like it is raining now.

    And when it's summer, it wasn't that hot.

    The climate **right now **is *just changing.

    "People who have disabilities are affected by climate change in a lot of ways.

    When it comes to school, like I said, it's cold or it's too hot and it's hard to concentrate.

    They (extreme weather events) could get worse if they don't we started to treat our environment in the right way.

    Jo Musonda, Country Director for Save the Children in Zambia, said: “The * Extreme weather conditions, including cold seasons, have become common in southern Africa and a cause for concern for families and children.

    Save the Children supports children in their quest to have the school calendar overhauled and we will heed this call and include it in our ongoing advocacy and dialogue with the Ministry of Education and look forward to positive outcomes for children.”* Country Director of Save the Children in Malawi, Kim Koch, said: “We know that climate change affects children first and worst and prevents them from enjoying their basic rights, including the right to education.

    As the number of weather-related disasters has tripled in the last 30 years, frequent and recurring weather shocks such as floods and cyclones are repeatedly endangering the lives and dreams of children, our future generation.

    "We call on African governments and world leaders to listen to children and give them a seat at the table in decisions that affect their lives now and in the future."

    Save the Children has been working in Zambia for almost 40 years, running health, nutrition, education and protection programs across the country.

    In response to the climate crisis, Save the Children is supporting children and their families affected by drought and floods, providing educational support, emergency cash and voucher assistance, and school feeding programmes.

    In Malawi, Save the Children works in 25 of 28 districts, delivering programmes, advocating for children's rights and building capacity to respond to emergencies.

    Through its partners, Save the Children is empowering children to become child rights advocates and supports advocacy on a range of issues affecting children in Zambia and Malawi, including climate change.

  •  United States Food Security Assistance for Sub Saharan Africa
    United States Food Security Assistance for Sub-Saharan Africa
     United States Food Security Assistance for Sub Saharan Africa
    United States Food Security Assistance for Sub-Saharan Africa
    Africa7 days ago

    United States Food Security Assistance for Sub-Saharan Africa

    Secretary Blinken is traveling to South Africa, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Rwanda this week, where the United States has been deploying resources and working in partnership with African governments, institutions, businesses, scientists, and other leaders to prevent hunger and combat the global hunger crisis.

    food security and, at the same time, address the rising rates of malnutrition, which has hit the African continent the hardest.

    At the G7 summit in June, President Biden and the G7 leaders announced more than $4.5 billion to address global food security, more than half of which will come from the United States.

    This $2.76 billion in funding from the US government will help protect the world's most vulnerable populations and mitigate the impacts of growing food insecurity and malnutrition, including from Russia's war in Ukraine, by building more resilient agricultural and food production and systems around the world, and responding to immediate emergency food needs.

    We have recognized the need for immediate action to avert far-reaching consequences, and we are responding with targeted support for Africa's own plans for food security and food systems transformation.

    Of this $2.76 billion, $760 million will go to short-term sustainable food assistance to help mitigate further increases in poverty, hunger and malnutrition in vulnerable countries affected by high food, fertilizer and fuel prices.

    Of this amount, we are working with Congress to appropriate $336.5 million for bilateral programs for countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Burkina Faso, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe and regional programs in Southern Africa, West Africa, and the Sahel.

    Also of this $2.76 billion, USAID is programming $2 billion in emergency food security assistance over the next three months.

    As of August 8, 2022, the US has provided nearly $1 billion specifically to countries in Africa for this $2 billion commitment, including the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mali , Mozambique, Nigeria, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan and Uganda.

    In addition to the President's G7 commitment, the US has announced the reduction of the balance of the Bill Emerson Humanitarian Fund, an effort in coordination with the US Department of Agriculture that will provide an additional $670 million in food assistance to respond to historical levels of acute food insecurity around the world.

    The funds announced in July and August 2022 will be used to purchase food products from the US to bolster existing emergency food operations in countries facing severe food insecurity.

    The resources will be delivered to: Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan and Sudan.

    President Biden also announced that the United States is expanding sustainable food production in Africa through the US government's flagship global food security initiative to eight additional African countries, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania and Zambia.

    This expansion brings the number of priority countries globally to 20 and delivers on President Biden's commitment in September 2021 to work with Congress to provide $5 billion through Feed the Future to end hunger and malnutrition.

    in the world and build sustainable, resilient and inclusive food systems abroad.

    Finally, the US government will also contribute to international efforts to support livelihoods and nutrition and help vulnerable countries build resilience to shocks, including food price volatility, supply chain issues, climate impacts and other long-term threats.

    Subject to notification from Congress, the US plans to provide $120 million for the following efforts: The African Development Bank's (AfDB) African Emergency Food Production Fund (AEFPF) to increase production of wheat, maize, climate-adapted rice and soybeans for the next four growing seasons in Africa.

    The Crisis Response Initiative (CRI) of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) to help protect livelihoods and build resilience in rural communities.

    The Africa Adaptation Initiative (AAI) to develop a portfolio of bankable projects in Africa, to leverage private capital.

    The Africa Risk Capacity (ARC) Africa Disaster Risk Financing Program (ADRiFi) to help African governments respond to food system crises by increasing access to risk insurance products.

    A fertilizer efficiency and innovation program to improve the efficiency of fertilizer use in countries where fertilizers tend to be over-applied.

    Support to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) will fund multi-country mapping of soils to provide insights that enable smarter water use, greater fertilizer conservation and better climate resilience impacts .

  •  The Executive Director of the Merck Foundation launched the songs Like Them and I am Not Everyone s Bride Take Me to School to end child marriage and support girls education in Africa
    The Executive Director of the Merck Foundation launched the songs “Like Them” and “I am Not Everyone’s Bride, Take Me to School” to end child marriage and support girls’ education in Africa
     The Executive Director of the Merck Foundation launched the songs Like Them and I am Not Everyone s Bride Take Me to School to end child marriage and support girls education in Africa
    The Executive Director of the Merck Foundation launched the songs “Like Them” and “I am Not Everyone’s Bride, Take Me to School” to end child marriage and support girls’ education in Africa
    Africa1 week ago

    The Executive Director of the Merck Foundation launched the songs “Like Them” and “I am Not Everyone’s Bride, Take Me to School” to end child marriage and support girls’ education in Africa

    Merck Foundation (https://Merck-Foundation.com), the philanthropic arm of Merck KGaA Germany, releases two new songs called 'Like Them' by Ugandan singer Kenneth Mugabi and 'I am Not Everyone's Bride, Take Me to School' by Zambian singer Wezi, to raise awareness for ending child marriage and supporting girls' education across Africa.

    Speaking about the release of the new songs, Senator Dr. Rasha Kelej, Executive Director of the Merck Foundation, said: “I am very happy to share two beautiful songs 'Like Them' and 'I am Not Everyone's Bride, Take Me to School'.

    The songs have been released as part of our 'Educating Linda' program, which is part of the Merck Foundation's 'More Than a Mother' campaign.

    The songs have been created with the goal of raising awareness in our communities about the importance of ending child marriage and supporting girls' education, which is critical to building stronger families and communities."

    Listen to the song 'Like Them' here: https://bit.ly/3PciA4p Listen to the song 'I AM Not Nobody's Bride, Take Me to School' here: https://bit.ly/3SrwaUu In sub-Saharan Africa, a a staggering 40 percent of girls are married before the age of 18.

    Girls who marry young are often denied a range of human rights: many must stop their education, face serious health risks from early and multiple pregnancies, and experience sexual and domestic violence.

    “I firmly believe that girls' education is the best investment in the global economy, when a girl receives an education, she is better equipped to be economically independent.

    Girls' education can also help end child marriage, as educated girls tend to marry later, make better decisions to achieve their goals, and are also able to take better care of their families,” Senator Rasha added.

    Through the 'Educating Linda' program in partnership with the African First Ladies, the Merck Foundation has provided scholarships and school supplies to thousands of bright young students.

    “These scholarships and grants cover school fees, school uniforms and other essentials like notebooks, pens and math tools so these young women can fulfill their potential and pursue their dreams,” explained Senator Dr. Rasha Kelej.

    In addition to the "Educating Linda" program, the Merck Foundation has also announced the MARS Awards to appreciate and recognize 'Best Female African Researchers' and 'Best Young African Researcher'.

    The aim is to empower women and young African researchers, improve their research capacity and promote their contribution to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics).

    Senator Dr. Rasha Kelej further emphasized: “In partnership with African First Ladies, we have been building healthcare capacity through training healthcare providers in many medical specialties.

    Of the total of 1,334 scholarships, more than 590 scholarships have been awarded to female doctors in critical and neglected specialties.

    This is a great achievement for us.” The Merck Foundation has also released many other songs by popular African artists to promote girls' education in African communities.

    They have also launched inspiring children's storybooks to emphasize the importance of girls' education and also to highlight immoral practices in society, including child marriage and the dowry system, such as "Jackline's Rescue", "Ride into the Future " and "Educating Linda".

    ”.

  •  United States of America stays ahead Germany moves up to Second
    United States of America stays ahead, Germany moves up to Second
     United States of America stays ahead Germany moves up to Second
    United States of America stays ahead, Germany moves up to Second
    Africa1 week ago

    United States of America stays ahead, Germany moves up to Second

    The United States continues to lead the Women's World Ranking; Changes to the top three; A record 185 teams listed in the rankings.

    July 2022 was a busy month for women's football, with five major tournaments taking place around the world.

    In addition to UEFA Women's Euro 2022, continental championships were held in Africa, South America, North America and Oceania, serving as qualifying events for the FIFA Women's World Cup 2023™.

    Since June 17, 2022, when the FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking was last published, no fewer than 221 matches have been played, generating considerable movement up the rankings.

    And while the USA (1st, -), recent winners of the CONCACAF Women's Championship, remain the team to catch, the Stars and Stripes have a new challenger in the form of Germany (2nd, plus 3).

    The EURO 2022 runners-up overtake Sweden (third, minus 1), whose own European title ambitions came to an end in the semi-finals.

    Newly crowned continental champions, England (4th, plus 4) moved up four places ahead of France (5th, minus 2).

    The relegations of the Netherlands (6th, minus 2), Canada (7th, minus 1) and Spain (8th, minus 1) are the other significant changes in the Top 10 of this edition.

    Like the Lionesses, South Africa (54th, plus 4) also moved up four places thanks to their 2022 CAF Women's Africa Cup of Nations title.

    Semi-finalists in that tournament, Zambia (80th, plus 23) are the team that has improved the most in this edition after ascending 23 positions.

    Nigeria (46th, minus 7), which surprisingly lost 1-0 to She-polopolo in the match for third place, recorded the biggest decline in terms of points (minus 69.33).

    Another notable improvement in this edition is Jamaica, who achieved their highest placement (42, plus 9), after their third place in the Concacaf Championship.

    Also enjoying record highs are Iceland (14 plus 3), the Republic of Ireland (26 plus 1), Portugal (27 plus 3) and Zambia.

    Four new teams have joined the Ranking since June 2022: Cambodia (120, -), Turkmenistan (137, -) Timor-Leste (152, -) and Guinea-Bissau (169, -), giving the August edition of 2022 a record - breaking 185 FIFA member associations.

    Click HERE (https://fifa.fans/3QhktOi) to see the full standings.

    The next edition of the FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking will be published on 13 October 2022, ahead of the FIFA Women's World Cup 2023™ Draw on Saturday 22 October 2022 in Auckland/Tāmaki Makaurau.

    Leader USA (no change) Moves into top 10 None Moves out of top 10 None Total games played 221 Most games played England, Philippines, Senegal (9 each) Most movement by points Zambia (plus 89.78) Most movement by ranks Zambia (23+ places) Biggest Drop by Points Nigeria (minus 69.33)Biggest Drop by Ranks Mexico (10+ places)Newly Qualified Teams Cambodia, Turkmenistan, Timor-Leste, Guinea-BissauTeams No Longer Qualified None

  •  FIFA Ranking Super Falcons slip by 7 spots now world 46th
    FIFA Ranking: Super Falcons slip by 7 spots, now world 46th
     FIFA Ranking Super Falcons slip by 7 spots now world 46th
    FIFA Ranking: Super Falcons slip by 7 spots, now world 46th
    General news2 weeks ago

    FIFA Ranking: Super Falcons slip by 7 spots, now world 46th

    The Super Falcons of Nigeria have dropped by seven spots in the July FIFA Ranking, to be placed 46th, after ending 4th at the 2022 Women’s Africa Cup of Nations (WAFCON) in Morocco.

    In the ranking table published on the website of the world football governing body on Friday, Nigeria garnered 1535.09 points in the month under review and lost 69.33 points, which is the biggest decline in terms of points.

    The News Agency of Nigeria recalls that the former African champions surprisingly went down 1-0 to the She-polopolo of Zambia in the match for the third place match of 2022 WAFCON.

    At the continental level, the drop in spot however did not displace the Falcons as the 1st placed team in Africa with the current WAFCON winner, South Africa placed 2nd.

    Cameroon, Ghana and Ivory Coast  are the 3rd, 4th and 5th placed teams, respectively.

    South Africa (54th, plus 4) moved up four places on the back of their title triumph at the 2022 CAF Women’s Africa Cup of Nations.

    Semi-finalists at that tournament, Zambia (80th, plus 23) are this edition’s most-improved side after surging 23 places.

    At the global scene, July 2022 was a busy month for women’s football, with five major tournaments taking place across the globe.

    In addition to the UEFA Women’s EURO 2022, continental championships were held in Africa, South America, North America and Oceania, all serving as qualifying events for the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023™.

    Since 17 June 2022, when the -Cola Women’s World Ranking was last published, no fewer than 221 matches have been played, generating considerable movement in the standings.

    And while USA (1st), recent winners of the CONCACAF Women’s Championship, remain the team to catch, the Stars and Stripes have a new pursuer in the shape of Germany (2nd, plus 3).

    The EURO 2022 runners-up move ahead of Sweden (3rd, minus 1), whose own European title ambitions came to an end in the semi-finals.

    Freshly crowned continental champions, England (4th, plus 4) moved up four places ahead of France (5th, minus 2).

    Drops for the Netherlands (6th, minus 2), Canada (7th, minus 1), and Spain (8th, minus 1) are the other significant changes in this edition’s Top 10. Another notable improver in this edition is Jamaica, who achieved their highest-ever placing (42nd, plus 9), following their third-place at the Concacaf Championship.

    Also enjoying all-time highs are Iceland (14th, plus 3), the Republic of Ireland (26th, plus 1), Portugal (27th, plus 3) and Zambia.

    The News Agency of Nigeria reports that four new teams have joined the Ranking since June 2022 namely Cambodia (120th), Turkmenistan (137th) Timor-Leste (152nd) and Guinea-Bissau (169th), giving the August 2022 edition a record-breaking 185 FIFA member associations.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  BBNaija Five ways to vote for housemates nominated for eviction
    BBNaija: Five ways to vote for housemates nominated for eviction
     BBNaija Five ways to vote for housemates nominated for eviction
    BBNaija: Five ways to vote for housemates nominated for eviction
    Entertainment2 weeks ago

    BBNaija: Five ways to vote for housemates nominated for eviction

    Info Digital Africa, the Public Relations consulting firm for the ongoing television reality show, Big Brother Naija, has revealed five ways to vote for housemates nominated for eviction during the show.  

    The firm said this in a statement made available to newsmen on Thursday in Lagos.  

    The News Agency of Nigeria   reports that as the “Level Up” edition of the show runs into the third week, Amaka, Christy-O, Cyph, Khalid and Phyna are the first five housemates up for possible eviction.  

    NAN reports that voting which had been opened on Monday at 9.00pm for viewers to save their favourites from eviction, will close on Thursday at 9.00pm.  

    The statement said that the voting process could be done through: voting on the website, mobile site, use of the MyDStv app, voting on the MyGOtv app and play games for additional votes through MyDStv or MyGOtv App.   “To vote on the website, all you need to do is register with your name, surname, year of birth, gender, location, and cell phone number.  

    “The website will give you 100 votes per round, website voting is open to over 45 countries across Africa.  

    “Voting through the mobile site will allow you to receive 100 votes per voting round when you register, it is also open to voting across over 45 countries continent-wide.  

    “Using the MyDStv app method is only open to active DStv subscribers and requires you to download the MyDStv app.  

    “You will then receive the total votes allotted to your subscription package,” it said.  

    The statement said that premium subscribers would receive 2,500 votes, while compact plus and compact customers would receive 1,500 and 750 votes respectively.  

    Also, subscribers would  get 500 votes, and subscribers would  receive 200 votes, as voting through the DStv app is open to 31 countries across Africa.  

    “For voting on the MyGOtv app, only active GOtv subscribers can access this voting platform, where votes are allocated based on subscription packages.  

    “The app is available to BBNaija fans who wish to vote for their favourite housemates on android and IOS.  

    “GOtv Supa subscribers will receive 500 votes for each voting round, while those with the GOtv Max package will receive 350 votes.  

    “GOtv with active subscriptions will have 200 votes, voting through MyGotv App is only available in Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, Uganda, and Zambia,” it said.  

    It said for  individuals who choose to vote through play games for additional votes through “the MyDStv or MyGOtv App”, the voting option was only available to active DStv subscribers with eligible packages.  

    “Check out how to get more votes by playing the games below: Download the MyDStv or MyGOtv App from the Google Play Store or the Apple App Store.  

    “Log in to the app by selecting your subscription country and using your surname, mobile number or number.  

    “Once you have logged into your MyDStv or MyGOtv app account page, look for the “Explore More” button.  

    “Click on the “Play Now” option and follow the instructions to play the games, after playing each game, click “Vote Now” to convert your points to votes, or click on “More Games” to play more games.  

    “You can get up to 200 additional votes to save your favourite housemate,” it said.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  UNECA chief seeks increased urgent funding to mitigate climate change in Africa
    UNECA chief seeks increased, urgent funding to mitigate climate change in Africa
     UNECA chief seeks increased urgent funding to mitigate climate change in Africa
    UNECA chief seeks increased, urgent funding to mitigate climate change in Africa
    Foreign2 weeks ago

    UNECA chief seeks increased, urgent funding to mitigate climate change in Africa

    Vera Songwe, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) has called for urgent and increased funding to mitigate the impact of climate change in Africa.

    Songwe, made the call at a climate-themed event held in Addis Ababa.

    “Urgent development funds need to flow to Africa for climate change adaptation and resilience-building across the continent.

    “Noting that Africa emits the lowest amount of greenhouse gases.

    ’’ The UNECA chief called for a transparent and fair carbon pricing mechanism so that Africa would be able to receive about 180 billion U.

    S. dollars a year to mitigate the effects of climate change.

    She urged African countries to build food self-sufficiency by making use of their fertile lands and boosting their capacity for production of fertiliser in the continent.

    She said at least 23 African countries have seen their currencies depreciate by over 15 per cent owing to the recent disruption of food supply to the continent.

    “The Ukraine crisis highly affects Africa’s capacity to be able to afford the already escalating food, fuel, and fertiliser prices.

    “The continent is highly dependent on food imports from Russia and Ukraine.

    ’’ Songwe advised countries in the continent, especially South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Zambia, to enhance their agricultural productivity by making use of their fertile lands and fertiliser produced in other parts of the continent.

    According to her, Africa exports more volume of fertiliser than it consumes.

    The UNECA chief urged countries such as Morocco, Egypt, Nigeria, and Tanzania to produce high quality and cleaner fertiliser to meet demands in the continent.

    “On average, in Africa, we use about 15 kilograms of fertilizer per hectare, compared to about 171 kilogrammes in Ukraine and Russia.

    ` “That is why we are importing food from them,” Songwe said.

    (
    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  High Net Worth Individuals Corporations and Institutions to Benefit from Yellow Card s Over the Counter OTC Crypto Desk
    High Net Worth Individuals, Corporations, and Institutions to Benefit from Yellow Card’s Over-the-Counter (OTC) Crypto Desk
     High Net Worth Individuals Corporations and Institutions to Benefit from Yellow Card s Over the Counter OTC Crypto Desk
    High Net Worth Individuals, Corporations, and Institutions to Benefit from Yellow Card’s Over-the-Counter (OTC) Crypto Desk
    Africa2 weeks ago

    High Net Worth Individuals, Corporations, and Institutions to Benefit from Yellow Card’s Over-the-Counter (OTC) Crypto Desk

    The African cryptocurrency market is growing rapidly and has become a financial solution for many.

    While most crypto trading is P2P, few companies have the capacity to cater to high net worth individuals and companies looking to buy, sell, or move large amounts of USDC and USDT stablecoins.

    Yellow Card Financial, the fastest growing cryptocurrency company on the continent, offers a personalized trading service through its world-class Crypto Over-The-Counter (OTC) desk (https://bit.ly/3zvpRqs) for those looking to trade any volume worth more than $50,000 to millions of dollars.

    The OTC office, launched in 2021, provides access to a massive global network across the 16 African countries where the company operates, including South Africa, Nigeria, Uganda, Ghana, Kenya, Cameroon, Botswana, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Zambia, to name a few.

    few.

    Yellow Card complies with global AML, Sanctions, FATF Travel Rules and KYC (https://bit.ly/3QhCIDu) requirements for all our customers in all jurisdictions.

    We are also registered with GoAML and with local financial intelligence units in most of our jurisdictions to help report on AML, sanctions and financial crime matters.

    One of the largest crypto markets in Africa is undoubtedly Nigeria (https://bit.ly/3QdJ1Yz), cited in the 2021 Global Crypto Adoption Index among the 20 fastest growing crypto countries.

    Munachi Ogueke, CBO of Yellow Card Financial, says that despite challenges related to regulation and currency availability, Yellow Card has always provided customers with personalized service at competitive rates with no limits on trading volumes.

    “One of the challenges customers face is the inability to buy USD with NGN.

    We have the solution by providing USDT as an alternative,” says Munachi.

    Yellow Card has a wide range of liquidity providers, helping to serve customers with the most competitive rates for large transactions at a fraction of the cost of trading on an open exchange, paying fees and slippage.

    “Our biggest competitive advantage is definitely our extremely deep liquidity pools that fill orders of any size at any time,” adds Munachi.

    With a full range of fiat currencies available, the African blockchain leader can trade the pair that suits each client's needs.

    We currently sell or buy USDT and USDC for these currencies: US Dollar, South African Rand, Nigerian Naira, Botswana Pula, Ghana Cedi, Ugandan Shilling, Kenyan Shilling, Zambian Kwacha, Central African Franc, Rwandan Franc and Tanzanian Shilling.

    Sign up (https://bit.ly/3vDHFOV) for a Yellow Card account today and experience a fast, secure, personalized and secure solution from the comfort of your home or workplace.

  •  The stars are aligned now is the time to transform health care in sub Saharan Africa by Eyong Ebai
    The stars are aligned: now is the time to transform health care in sub-Saharan Africa (by Eyong Ebai)
     The stars are aligned now is the time to transform health care in sub Saharan Africa by Eyong Ebai
    The stars are aligned: now is the time to transform health care in sub-Saharan Africa (by Eyong Ebai)
    Africa2 weeks ago

    The stars are aligned: now is the time to transform health care in sub-Saharan Africa (by Eyong Ebai)

    By Eyong Ebai, General Manager, Sub-Saharan Africa, GE Healthcare (www.GEHealthcare.in) The tremendous commitment, activity, and positive results that have emerged from the Africa Health ExCon ​​recently held in Cairo, Egypt, reflect a moment of opportunity broader as the stars align to drive the development of health care infrastructure in sub-Saharan Africa At the event, we saw the meeting of multilateral financing entities, non-profit organizations, governments, private health care providers, groups of civil society and financial institutions with a shared vision and commitment to health care.

    development on the continent.

    That momentum is limiting headwinds from the Covid pandemic and government financial constraints, global inflation, logistics bottlenecks, and complementing tailwinds found in tremendous financial commitments from development agencies.

    Institutions such as the Islamic Development Bank, the World Bank, the African Development Bank and the African Export-Import Bank have made significant allocations of concessional loans and grants, amounting to billions of dollars, to help expand healthcare infrastructure to communities around the world.

    continent.

    Government action At the same time, government initiatives in key markets are expanding, and some are already bearing fruit with the construction of intensive care units, the development and renovation of secondary public hospitals, and the construction of specialized hospitals.

    This reflects a commitment to implementing a world-class, multi-tier healthcare infrastructure across the public and private sectors.

    This approach recognizes primary health care as the critical enabling platform for delivering better patient care.

    Digitization Digitization is an exciting trend that is helping to expand access and quality of healthcare.

    This has now gained much wider and faster acceptance as seen in the Covid era.

    It's helping us communicate faster with clients, which in turn means faster action on project approvals, implementation and completion.

    Even more importantly, digitizing healthcare infrastructure means bringing expertise and resources to patients and communities that previously might not have had those resources available—another important source of better patient outcomes in rural areas.

    Cross-Border Growth Another component of regional optimism is the rise of private health care groups looking to expand across borders.

    We are seeing a proliferation of African healthcare groups bringing their expertise to other countries on the continent.

    Companies from Egypt, the GCC and South Africa are setting up new facilities or acquiring existing entities in countries such as Nigeria, Uganda, Rwanda, Ghana, Zambia and Kenya.

    Localization Supports Healthcare Ambitions GE Healthcare is the only international provider of healthcare technology with a 50-year history and continent-wide presence in Africa.

    We are well positioned to support public and private sector clients as they complete their health care priorities.

    With our local teams and decades of experience, we understand the nuances, challenges and solutions required to unlock and engage local and global healthcare ecosystems.

    With more than 1,000 GE Healthcare employees on the continent, and up to 95% of them from the local communities we serve, we have a deeply localized ecosystem of sales managers, field engineers, and specialists working to world-class standards.

    world to provide technologies that help physicians identify diseases earlier and expand treatment options.

    The result is faster diagnosis and treatment, whether in district hospitals or specialized centers, which translates into better outcomes and less intensive and more sustainable demand on health systems.

    At the same time, when needed, we can leverage our global centers of excellence to access global experts.

    Technological Leap An important aspect of this drive is that we have an opportunity to leapfrog health care technologies to reach more mature markets.

    Rather than a step-by-step approach from X-ray to MRI to CT to PET/CT to on-site cyclotrons, countries in Africa can jump straight to the most advanced care technologies, with all the benefits it offers, patients and providers .

    GEHC Supports the HC Ecosystem With all that is happening in the industry, it is important to recognize, both globally and in Africa, that no one can build the future of healthcare alone.

    GE Healthcare is helping customers bring together all the key players in the healthcare ecosystem, including finance and development agencies, commercial banks, multi-lateral financial institutions, project managers, architects, contractors and technology providers.

    This is crucial, because while money is becoming more readily available, connecting capital and providers remains a challenge.

    We help by supporting suppliers with feasibility studies and business plans to make projects bankable.

    Keeping the momentum going As the Africa Health ExCon ​​showed, this is a really exciting time to be in the health industry in Africa.

    With all the key players, from governments, development banks, private players and international technology providers like GE Healthcare, working in the same direction, the opportunity to transform healthcare in Africa has never been closer.

    Let us build on the momentum of the Cairo event to provide healthcare infrastructure in Africa that can produce a brighter world for all its citizens.