Connect with us

Uhuru Kenyatta

  •  President Kenyatta meets with United States Senator Coons
    President Kenyatta meets with United States Senator Coons
     President Kenyatta meets with United States Senator Coons
    President Kenyatta meets with United States Senator Coons
    Africa9 hours ago

    President Kenyatta meets with United States Senator Coons

    President Uhuru Kenyatta met Thursday and held talks with US Senator Chris Coons, who paid him a courtesy call at Government House in Nairobi.

    Senator Coons, who is leading a congressional delegation from the US Senate and House of Representatives, praised President Kenyatta for ensuring that peace and stability prevailed during the election period.

    “We are heartened by the peace that Kenya has continued to experience during this period,” Senator Coons said.

    For his part, President Kenyatta said that Kenya will remain firm in upholding the principles of good governance to ensure that the country maintains its position as a shining example of democracy on the continent by maintaining peace during this transition period.

    "My greatest wish is that peace prevails and we can set an example on the continent and the world," said President Kenyatta.

    Also present during the talks were Cabinet Secretaries Raychelle Omamo (Foreign Affairs), Betty Maina (Commerce), and US Ambassador to Kenya Meg Whitman, among others.

  •  President Kenyatta Holds Talks with Religious Leaders
    President Kenyatta Holds Talks with Religious Leaders
     President Kenyatta Holds Talks with Religious Leaders
    President Kenyatta Holds Talks with Religious Leaders
    Africa9 hours ago

    President Kenyatta Holds Talks with Religious Leaders

    President Uhuru Kenyatta today met and held talks with religious leaders at State House, Nairobi, who paid him a courtesy call.

    The interfaith group, including Archbishop Martin Kivuva of the Catholic Archdiocese of Mombasa, Archbishop Antony Muheria of Nyeri, Anglican Archbishop Jackson Ole Sapit and Supreme Council of Muslims of Kenya (SUPKEM) Deputy Secretary General Hassan Ole Naado, commended the President Kenyatta for his leadership that has ensured peace, stability and cohesion among Kenyan communities.

    The religious leaders expressed their gratitude to the Head of State for working for a united Kenya by creating a path of inclusion for all Kenyans.

    Other members of the clergy who attended the meeting included Sheikh Yusuf Nasur Maki of the Catholic Archdiocese of Nairobi, Archbishop Philip Anyolo, Bishop Emeritus David Oginde, Bishop Emeritus Silas Yego, Bishop Robert Langat, Canon Chris Kinyanjui and Father Ferdinand Lugonzo.

    The President thanked the religious leaders for their support and assured them that the transition process will be smooth.

  •  Timi Frank congratulates Kenya s President elect Ruto
    Timi Frank congratulates Kenya’s President-elect, Ruto
     Timi Frank congratulates Kenya s President elect Ruto
    Timi Frank congratulates Kenya’s President-elect, Ruto
    General news1 day ago

    Timi Frank congratulates Kenya’s President-elect, Ruto

    Timi Frank congratulates Kenya’s President-elecMr Timi Frank, a former Deputy National Publicity Secretary of the All Progressives Congress (APC), has congratulated the President-elect of Kenya, Mr William Ruto. Frank, who is the United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP) Ambassador to East Africa and Middle East, gave the congratulatory message in a statement he issued on Wednesday in Abuja.

    He lauded the people of Kenya for their peaceful disposition during the election and for voting for change in the East African country.

    Frank called on the people of Kenya to stand with Ruto, who represents a complete break from the established system of political succession in the country.

    He said that the political succession in the country had appeared to be restricted to the offsprings of former leaders who fought for the independence of the country.

    Frank called on President Uhuru Kenyatta to initiate a peace and reconciliation process among the key actors in order to curb the pockets of restiveness in some parts of the country.

    The ULMWP Ambassador urged Kenyatta to follow the precedent laid by President Goodluck Jonathan in 2015 by officially congratulating Ruto. He said: “The people of Kenya have decided that the ‘Hustler-In-Chief-of-Kenya’ should be their next President through the ballot.

    Therefore, let the will of the people prevail.

    “Kenya needs peace to move forward and Kenyatta has a great role to play in bringing parties in the electoral conflict to the discussion table just like he did during the last election whose results were highly disputed.

    “Kenya is a peaceful country; therefore, the political actors must eschew any action that can plunge the nation into a needless political crisis following the emergence of Ruto as president.

    “The election of Ruto marks a new political dawn for Kenya, therefore, let the votes count,” he said.

    Ruto called on the President-elect to be magnanimous in victory by reaching out to his opponents with assurances of his readiness to work with them in the interest of peace and development of the country.

    Frank equally called on the presidential candidate of the opposition party, Raila Odinga, to as a matter of necessity call his supporters to order in the interest of peace for the generality of Kenyans.

    (www.

    nannews.

    ng)
    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  Kenya s Odinga vows to pursue legal options over vote defeat
    Kenya’s Odinga vows to pursue ‘legal options’ over vote defeat
     Kenya s Odinga vows to pursue legal options over vote defeat
    Kenya’s Odinga vows to pursue ‘legal options’ over vote defeat
    Foreign2 days ago

    Kenya’s Odinga vows to pursue ‘legal options’ over vote defeat

    Kenya’s defeated presidential candidate Raila Odinga vowed Tuesday to pursue “all constitutional and legal options” after rejecting the outcome of elections that awarded victory to his rival William Ruto.The 77-year-old veteran politician branded the result of the August 9 race a “travesty” but stopped short of explicitly announcing that he would mount a challenge at the Supreme Court.

    “What we saw yesterday (Monday) was a travesty and a blatant disregard of the consitution and the laws of Kenya,” he told a press conference in Nairobi, blaming the head of the commission that oversaw the poll.

    “I do not want to fully address our strategies going forward but… we will be pursuing all constitutional and legal options available to us.

    ” Odinga narrowly lost his fifth bid for the top job to Deputy President Ruto, who was proclaimed president-elect Monday after a nail-biting wait for results.

    His supporters had cried foul over the outcome, which also triggered divisions in the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC), which issued the results.

    The poll’s aftermath is being keenly watched as a test of democratic maturity in the East African powerhouse, where past elections have been tarnished by claims of rigging and bloodshed.

    Odinga lost by around 230,000 votes despite the support of his old foe, the outgoing President Uhuru Kenyatta, and the weight of the ruling party machinery behind him.

    No presidential poll outcome has gone uncontested in Kenya since 2002, and Odinga says he was already cheated of victory in the 2007, 2013 and 2017 elections.

    ‘We don’t need to protest’In August 2017, the Supreme Court annulled the election after Odinga rejected a Kenyatta victory.

    Dozens of people were killed by police in post-poll protests.

    Kenya’s worst electoral violence occurred after the 2007 vote, when more than 1,100 people died in bloodletting between rival tribes.

    On the campaign trail, both frontrunners pledged to resolve any disputes in court rather than on the streets.

    Violent protests nevertheless erupted in Odinga’s strongholds in Nairobi slums and the lakeside city of Kisumu on Monday evening, although the situation was calm Tuesday.

    Odinga on Tuesday commended his supporters “for remaining calm and keeping the peace”.

    “Let no-one take the law into their own hands,” he said.

    Weary Kenyans, already struggling with a severe cost of living crisis, say they just want to get on with their lives.

    “I don’t think we need to protest.

    We need to fend for our families.

    Protests are expensive.

    It can even cost you your life,” said Bernard Isedia, a 32-year-old taxi driver and father of two who voted for Odinga.

    “Life has to return to normal,” he told AFP.

    “Raila Odinga should come out and tell people to calm down.

    His word alone will calm this country down.

    ” Ruto, the 55-old deputy president who was banished to the sidelines after Kenyatta’s pact with Odinga, was conciliatory in his victory speech Monday.

    “I will work with all leaders in Kenya so that we can fashion a country that leaves nobody behind,” Ruto said, pledging to run a “transparent, democratic, open government”.

    “There is no room for vengeance.

    ” ‘Opaque’ processThe race remained unpredictable to the end, with Ruto scoring 50.

    49 percent of the vote compared to 48.

    85 percent for Odinga, IEBC chairman Wafula Chebukati said.

    But in an extraordinary move shortly before the announcement, four of the IEBC’s seven commissioners disowned the results.

    Vice-chair Julia Cherera said at a press conference Tuesday that the aggregated percentages of the votes for the four presidential candidates was 100.

    01 percent — a “mathematical absurdity”.

    Analysts however said the discrepancy could be explained by rounding up the percentages.

    The IEBC had faced intense pressure to produce a clean and transparent vote after facing stinging criticism over its handling of the annulled 2017 election.

    Chebukati, who was IEBC boss in 2017, insisted he had carried out his duties according to the law of the land despite “intimidation and harassment”.

    Zaynab Mohamed, the political analyst at Oxford Economics, said Odinga lost despite the odds being stacked in his favour.

    “He essentially had all the support he needed to secure a victory, except that of the majority of the people,” she added.

    Any challenge must be made within seven days to the Supreme Court, which then has 14 days to issue a ruling.

    If it orders an annulment, a new vote must be held within 60 days.

    If there is no court petition, Ruto will take the oath of office in two weeks’ time, becoming the fifth president since independence.

    But he will inherit a country burdened with soaring prices, a crippling drought that has left millions hungry, endemic corruption and disenchantment with the political elite.

  •  Jittery Kenya waits to hear from presidential loser after disputed vote
    Jittery Kenya waits to hear from presidential loser after disputed vote
     Jittery Kenya waits to hear from presidential loser after disputed vote
    Jittery Kenya waits to hear from presidential loser after disputed vote
    Foreign2 days ago

    Jittery Kenya waits to hear from presidential loser after disputed vote

    Jittery Kenyans were waiting Tuesday to hear from president-elect William Ruto’s defeated rival Raila Odinga, with many speculating he will mount a legal challenge to the outcome of the country’s close election race.

    Ruto’s opponents cried foul Monday after he was declared winner of the August 9 election in a close race with Odinga, and the outcome also triggered divisions in the body responsible for overseeing the vote.

    The poll’s aftermath is being keenly watched as a test of democratic maturity in the East African powerhouse where previous elections have been tarnished by claims of rigging and bloodshed.

    Veteran opposition leader Odinga failed in his fifth stab at the top job even after running with the support of his old foe, the outgoing President Uhuru Kenyatta.

    The 77-year-old has made no public comments since polling day, but his party agent on Monday described the election process as “shambolic”, saying it had been marred by irregularities and mismanagement.

    Odinga now is set to address the nation at 2 pm (1100 GMT).

    Kenya could be in for a long period of political uncertainty if there is a court challenge by Odinga, who says he was cheated of victory in the 2007, 2013 and 2017 presidential elections.

    ‘We don’t need to protest’In August 2017, the Supreme Court annulled the election after Odinga rejected a Kenyatta victory and dozens of people were killed by police in ensuing protests.

    The worst electoral violence in Kenya’s history occurred after a disputed vote in 2007 which Odinga also lost, when more than 1,100 people were killed in bloodletting between rival tribes.

    On the campaign trail, both frontrunners pledged to deal with any disputes in court rather than on the streets.

    Violent protests neverthelesss erupted in Odinga’s strongholds in Nairobi slums and the lakeside city of Kisumu on Monday evening, although the situation was calm Tuesday.

    Weary Kenyans, already struggling with a severe cost of living crisis, say they just want to get on with their lives.

    “I don’t think we need to protest.

    We need to fend for our families.

    Protests are expensive.

    It can even cost you your life,” said Bernard Isedia, a 32-year-old taxi driver and father of two who voted for Odinga.

    “Life has to return to normal,” he told AFP.

    “Raila Odinga should come out and tell people to calm down.

    His word alone will calm this country down.

    ” ‘ No room for vengeance’Ruto, the 55-old deputy president who was banished to the sidelines after Kenyatta’s pact with Odinga, was conciliatory in his victory speech Monday.

    “I will work with all leaders in Kenya so that we can fashion a country that leaves nobody behind,” Ruto said, pledging to run a “transparent, democratic, open government”.

    “There is no room for vengeance.

    ” He said the poll had been fought on issues as much as “ethnic configurations” in a country where tribal affiliations have affected every election since independence from Britain in 1963.

    No presidential poll outcome has gone uncontested in Kenya since 2002, and a court challenge by Odinga is seen as almost certain, with his running mate Martha Karua saying on Twitter: “It is not over till it is over.

    ” – ‘Opaque’ process –The race remained unpredictable to the end, with Ruto scoring 50.

    49 percent of the vote compared to 48.

    85 percent for Odinga, according to Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission chairman Wafula Chebukati.

    But in an extraordinary move shortly before the announcement, four of the IEBC’s seven commissioners disowned the results, with one describing the process as “opaque” but giving no details.

    The IEBC was under intense pressure to produce a clean and transparent vote after it faced stinging criticism over its handling of the annulled 2017 election.

    Chebukati, who was IEBC boss in 2017, insisted he had carried out his duties according to the law of the land despite “intimidation and harassment”.

    Any challenge must be made within seven days to the Supreme Court, which then has 14 days to issue a ruling.

    If it orders an annulment, a new vote must be held within 60 days.

    “The election is far from over,” Nic Cheeseman, a political scientist at the University of Birmingham in England, said on Twitter.

    “Expect a lot of controversy.

    Expect a court case.

    Expect this to run and run.

    ” If there is no court petition, Ruto will take the oath of office in two weeks’ time, becoming the fifth president since independence.

    But he will inherit a country already struggling with soaring prices, a crippling drought that has left millions hungry, endemic corruption and disenchantment with the political elite.

    While a host of African leaders congratulated Ruto, the US embassy instead issued plaudits to Kenya’s voters, while urging political rivals to settle their differences peacefully.

  •  Ruto wins Kenyan presidential election Buhari applauds exercise
    Ruto wins Kenyan presidential election, Buhari applauds exercise
     Ruto wins Kenyan presidential election Buhari applauds exercise
    Ruto wins Kenyan presidential election, Buhari applauds exercise
    Foreign3 days ago

    Ruto wins Kenyan presidential election, Buhari applauds exercise

    Deputy President, William Ruto, has won Kenya’s presidential election, the electoral commission chairman has said.

    He narrowly beat his rival, Raila Odinga, taking 50.

    4 per cent of the vote.

    The announcement was delayed amid scuffles and allegations of vote rigging by Odinga’s campaign team.

    Four of the seven members of the electoral commission refused to endorse the announcement, saying the results were opaque.

    “We cannot take ownership of the result that is going to be announced because of the opaque nature of this last phase of the general election.

    “We are going to give a comprehensive statement…and again we urge Kenyans to keep calm.

    There is an open door that people can go to court and the rule of law will prevail,” said Juliana Cherera, the vice-chairperson of Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC).

    Odinga’s party agents earlier alleged there were irregularities and mismanagement in the election.

    This is the first time Ruto, 55, has run for president.

    He has served as deputy president for 10 years, but fell out with President Uhuru Kenyatta, who backed Odinga to succeed him.

    Ruto, during the election, pledged: “I will run a transparent, open and democratic government.

    I want to promise all the people of Kenya, whichever way they voted, that this would be their government.

    ” MEANWHILE, President Muhammadu Buhari has congratulated Ruto on his victory.

    He also commended the people of Kenya for the peaceful and transparent outcome of the elections.

    Buhari said Nigeria values Kenya as a strategic partner in the fight against terrorism and violence extremism, buoyed by a long history of friendship, economic and trade ties, and effective collaboration through international organisations, such as the African Union, the United Nations and the Commonwealth.

    In a statement signed by his Special Adviser on Media and Publicity, Femi Adesina, Buhari also saluted President Uhuru Kenyatta for his statesmanship and exemplary leadership to the people of Kenya in the past nine years and the legacies of his administration on infrastructure, education, healthcare reforms and tourism as well as support on regional security.

  •  Kenya moves closer to results of tight election race
    Kenya moves closer to results of tight election race
     Kenya moves closer to results of tight election race
    Kenya moves closer to results of tight election race
    Foreign3 days ago

    Kenya moves closer to results of tight election race

    Kenya was moving closer Monday to learning the outcome of its closely-fought presidential election after days of anxious waiting.

    Deputy President William Ruto was leading with slightly more than 51 percent of the vote against 48 percent for Raila Odinga, based on official results from more than 80 percent of constituencies, according to a tally published by the Daily Nation newspaper.

    Both men had on Sunday appealed for calm as the wait for the final results of the August 9 vote dragged on.

    Polling day passed off largely peacefully, but memories of vote-rigging and deadly violence in 2007-08 and 2017 still haunt Kenyans.

    The Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission is under intense pressure to deliver a clean poll in a country regarded as a beacon of stability in a troubled region.

    Results must be issued by Tuesday at the latest, according to Kenya’s constitution.

    Ruto, 55, is deputy president but is effectively running as the challenger after outgoing President Uhuru Kenyatta threw his support behind his former foe Odinga, the 77-year-old veteran opposition leader making his fifth bid for the top job.

    Kenyans voted in six elections, choosing a new president as well as senators, governors, lawmakers, women representatives and some 1,500 county officials.

    Turnout was lower than expected at around 65 percent of Kenya’s 22 million registered voters, with observers blaming disenchantment with the political elite in a country battling a severe cost of living crisis.

    The IEBC had faced sharp criticism of its handling of the August 2017 poll, which in a historic first for Africa was annulled by the Supreme Court after Odinga challenged the outcome.

    Dozens of people were killed in the chaos that followed the election, with police brutality blamed for the deaths.

    Kenyatta went on to win the October rerun after a boycott by Odinga.

  •  Calls for peace as Kenya awaits results of tight presidential race
    Calls for peace as Kenya awaits results of tight presidential race
     Calls for peace as Kenya awaits results of tight presidential race
    Calls for peace as Kenya awaits results of tight presidential race
    Foreign4 days ago

    Calls for peace as Kenya awaits results of tight presidential race

    Kenyans prayed for peace Sunday as they waited anxiously for the final outcome of the presidential election, with the two frontrunners almost neck and neck, according to partial official results.

    As of Sunday morning, Deputy President William Ruto was slightly ahead of his rival Raila Odinga, data from the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) showed, before cutting off the live feed displaying the percentage of votes won by both men.

    The IEBC, which has now tallied votes from over 70 percent of constituencies, did not give an explanation for the decision.

    But a running tally at the Daily Nation newspaper, citing the official data, said Ruto had so far scored 52.

    54 percent of the vote, while Odinga had 46.

    78 percent.

    Tuesday’s vote passed off largely peacefully but after previous elections sparked deadly violence and rigging claims, the IEBC is under intense pressure to deliver a clean poll and release results by Tuesday.

    Riot police were deployed overnight inside the commission’s heavily guarded tallying centre in the capital Nairobi after political party agents disrupted the process, hurling rigging allegations at each other.

    IEBC chairman Wafula Chebukati has accused party agents of delaying the tallying process by haranguing election workers with unnecessary questions.

    More than a dozen civil society groups, trade unions as well as the Kenyan chapters of Amnesty International and Transparency International issued a statement Sunday urging calm.

    “We call on all political candidates, their supporters and the public to exercise restraint.

    We must all avoid raising tensions that could easily trigger violence,” the 14 organisations said.

    The poll pitted Odinga, a veteran opposition leader now backed by the ruling party, against Ruto, who was widely expected to succeed President Uhuru Kenyatta until his boss joined hands with former foe Odinga in a dramatic shift of political allegiances.

    ‘Let us have peace’ Both candidates have pledged to maintain calm, with the memory of the 2007-08 and 2017 post-poll violence still fresh for many Kenyans.

    “We have voted peacefully, we have gone through this process peacefully and it’s my prayer that we end this process peacefully,” Ruto, 55, said at a church service in Nairobi on Sunday.

    Speaking at a separate service in the capital, Odinga, 77, recited the opening lines of the Peace Prayer of St Francis and said: “I want to become an instrument to bring peace, to heal, to unite and keep the hope alive in our country.

    ” Worshippers in Odinga’s stronghold of Kisumu also prayed for a peaceful outcome, with bishop Washington Ogonyo Ngede telling his 300-strong flock: “Don’t let politics divide us.

    We must remain united.

    ”“Because leaders come and go but the country of Kenya lives forever,” said Ngede, a lifelong friend of the Odinga family.

    “Let us have peace,” he said to cheers and ululations.

    In Ruto’s Rift Valley bastion of Eldoret, the clergy and congregants alike called for calm and patience.

    “We have come here to pray for peace, for our country, for our politicians to ask them (to) be very cautious and prudent in their utterances,” said bishop Dominic Kimengich.

    “We have gone through this as Kenyans, we know that any imprudent remark… can easily trigger conflict and that’s what we don’t want,” he told AFP.

    Churchgoer Mary Wanjiru, 59, told AFP she didn’t “want to hear any incitement from politicians.

    ” “We want a peaceful Kenya.

    ”Lower turnout Kenyans voted in six elections, choosing a new president as well as senators, governors, lawmakers, women representatives and some 1,500 county officials.

    Lawyer David Mwaure — one of the four presidential candidates, along with former spy George Wajackoyah — conceded on Sunday, endorsing Ruto, whose party won a key gubernatorial race when Johnson Sakaja secured control of Nairobi, Kenya’s richest city.

    The election is being closely watched by an international community that views Kenya as a pillar of stability in a volatile region.

    Turnout was about 65 percent, much lower than the 78 percent recorded in 2017, a reflection, some observers say, of the disenchantment with the political elite, particularly among young people.

    The winner of the presidential race needs to secure 50 percent plus one vote and at least a quarter of the votes in 24 of Kenya’s 47 counties.

    If not, the country will be forced to hold a runoff within 30 days of the original vote.

    Observers say that with the race so close, an appeal to the Supreme Court by the losing candidate is almost certain, meaning it could be many weeks before a new president takes office.

  •  President Kenyatta meets with election observers
    President Kenyatta meets with election observers
     President Kenyatta meets with election observers
    President Kenyatta meets with election observers
    Africa5 days ago

    President Kenyatta meets with election observers

    President Uhuru Kenyatta met a team of AU/COMESA election observers at State House, Nairobi on Saturday, who briefed him on their observations on the electoral process.

    The team led by former Sierra Leone President Ernest Bai Koroma said the electoral process has been relatively transparent and all observers have given positive reports.

    In their report to President Kenyatta, the team, which included former Presidents Domitien Ndayizeye (Burundi) and Mulatu Teshome (Ethiopia), as well as Ambassador Marie-Pierre Lloyd of Seychelles, noted that the electoral system and institutions worked within of the law and the best international standards.

    practice.

    Election observers emphasized that they have learned a lot from the Kenyan elections and will share the good example of real democracy, institutional credibility and defense of the rule of law to build the “Africa we want”.

    They cited the deployment of technology as well as respect for the Constitution and institutions during the electoral process as some of the examples of good practices that should be emulated.

    Congratulating President Kenyatta and the Kenyan people for vigorous campaigns that were peaceful and inclusive, observers looked forward to a credible and peaceful outcome, as well as a post-election process that will be part of President Kenyatta's legacy.

    Thanking the Electoral Observer Mission in Kenya for their commitment, the President said that he was proud of the peaceful and orderly manner of the campaigns and votes that witnessed a reduction in ethnic tension and focused on the issues.

    “The only anxiety that has been witnessed has been anticipation, but not fear,” President Kenyatta said.

    He said that his attention is focused on the completion of the electoral process, the maintenance of peace and security, as well as the transition to the new leadership.

    Present were foreigners Cabinet Secretary for Foreign Affairs Ambassador Raychelle Omamo and Principal Secretary Ambassador Macharia Kamau.

  •  Early signs show tight Kenyan presidential election
    Early signs show tight Kenyan presidential election
     Early signs show tight Kenyan presidential election
    Early signs show tight Kenyan presidential election
    Foreign1 week ago

    Early signs show tight Kenyan presidential election

    Preliminary results from Kenya’s presidential election showed a tight race between the two main candidates vying to replace outgoing President Uhuru Kenyatta.

    The Tuesday election was an important test for stability in East Africa’s biggest economy after two of its three last elections were marred by violence following disputes over accusations of rigging.

    The frontrunners, Deputy President William Ruto and veteran opposition leader Raila Odinga, were neck and neck with 1.2 million votes each, results tabulated by the private Citizen Television early on Wednesday showed, putting them at just over 49 per cent each.

    The winning candidate must get 50 per cent plus one vote.

    The election commission, the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC), posted images of more than 90 per cent of election result forms, from a total of 46,663 polling stations.

    But for now, the commission is only posting pictures, not numbers.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN