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  •  Burundian troops deploy in DR Congo after peace deal
    Burundian troops deploy in DR Congo after peace deal
     Burundian troops deploy in DR Congo after peace deal
    Burundian troops deploy in DR Congo after peace deal
    Foreign16 hours ago

    Burundian troops deploy in DR Congo after peace deal

    Burundian troops began deploying Monday in the troubled eastern Democratic Republic of Congo to help enforce a peace initiative backed by a seven-nation regional bloc, the DRC’s military said.

    “The Burundi defence forces contingent officially entered DRC (today)… under the forces pooling framework put forward by the heads of state of the EAC,” East African Community, said Lieutenant Marc Elongo, army spokesman in South Kivu province.

    The contingent, comprising “a large number of soldiers”, is under the command of the DRC forces and is currently stationed at a training facility in the Uvira area, he told AFP.

    The Burundians and their DRC counterparts “are tasked with hunting down all foreign and local armed groups in order to restore peace” in eastern Congo, he said.

    South Kivu’s head of military operations, General Ramazani Fundi, urged the public “to be calm and work honestly with loyalist forces in order to put an end to this activity by irregular forces”, said Elongo.

    In June, EAC leaders decided to set up a regional force that would work with the DRC’s army to quell armed groups roaming the east of the country.

    An estimated 120 armed groups are active in the mineral-rich region, many of them a legacy of wars that flared in the final years of the 20th century.

    Regional force criticisedThe idea of a regional force has run into criticism within DR Congo.

    Opponents point to past chapters of meddling in the east by neighbours, and instead are clamouring for reforms and funding for the national armed forces.

    Critics include 2018 Nobel Peace co-laureate Denis Mukwege, a gynaecologist and surgeon who has treated thousands of women victims of rape in the conflict region.

    The EAC comprises Burundi, the DRC, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda.

    Separately, the army said Monday it had killed 10 members of the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF), one of the most notorious armed groups in the region, and captured six others, including two child soldiers.

    The operation was carried out on Sunday in the Boga and Mitego areas of Irumu territory in Ituri province, provincial army spokesman Jules Ngongo told AFP.

    The two children, both aged under 10, were of Congolese and Ugandan nationality, he added.

    The ADF — which the Islamic State group claims as its Central African offshoot — has been accused of slaughtering thousands of Congolese civilians and carrying out bomb attacks in neighbouring Uganda.

    In November last year, Ugandan troops joined DR Congo’s army in a bid to crush the ADF, but the attacks have continued.

    Five bodies of “civilians killed by the ADF” were found on Sunday near the Mutuweyi River in Mambasa territory, local youth leader Vincent Telamboli said.

    On August 5, 15 civilians and an army captain were killed in the Ituri villages of Bandiboli and Kandoyi.

  •  ACTIF2022 African participants to benefit from Barbados visa waiver
    ACTIF2022: African participants to benefit from Barbados visa waiver 
     ACTIF2022 African participants to benefit from Barbados visa waiver
    ACTIF2022: African participants to benefit from Barbados visa waiver 
    Economy5 days ago

    ACTIF2022: African participants to benefit from Barbados visa waiver 

    African participants in the first-ever AfriCaribbean Trade and Investment Forum (ACTIF2022) taking place in Bridgetown, Barbados, from Sept. 1 to Sept 3, 2022, would enjoy visa waiver requirements for passport holders from 24 African countries.

    The development was contained in a statement signed by Deborah Ross, Senior Public Relations Director, BrandComms, on Thursday.

    According to the statement, the benefitting countries would have otherwise needed visas to enter Barbados.

    It said that citizens of the remaining African countries do not require visas to travel to Barbados.

    It added that citizens of the 24 countries who register to participate in ACTIF2022, would be eligible for the visa waiver programme which allows covered visitors to enter Barbados without visas and to stay for up to 90 days.

    “ACTIF2022, which is being held under the theme “One People, One Destiny: Uniting and Reimagining Our Future”, is being hosted by the Government of Barbados and the African Export-Import Bank (Afreximbank).

    “The 24 African countries to which the visa waiver decision applies are: Algeria, Angola, Benin, Cape Verde, Central Africa Republic, Chad, Comoros, Republic of Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Djibouti.

    “Others are Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Madagascar, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Sao Tomé and Principe, Sudan, South Sudan and Togo,” it said.

    The statement quoted Kay Sealy, acting Permanent Secretary, Barbadian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, who said that the move to add these countries to Barbados’ visa waiver list was to enhance business and investment opportunities.

    She added that the visa waiver, also being extended to 19 non-African countries would facilitate the ease of travel for tourists.

    “Participants in ACTIF2022 will include African and Caribbean heads of state and government, senior government representatives, business leaders, representatives of business associations, development agencies, multilateral finance institutions, think-tanks and research institutions from Africa and the Caribbean.

    “ACTIF2022 is being held in collaboration with the African Union Commission, the African Continental Free Trade Area Secretariat, the Africa Business Council, the CARICOM Secretariat, and the Caribbean Export Development Agency.

    “It is co-managed by Invest Barbados and Export Barbados,” she said.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  Statement by UNMISS on the announcement of the agreement on the road map towards peaceful democratic transition
    Statement by UNMISS on the announcement of the agreement on the road map towards peaceful, democratic transition
     Statement by UNMISS on the announcement of the agreement on the road map towards peaceful democratic transition
    Statement by UNMISS on the announcement of the agreement on the road map towards peaceful, democratic transition
    Africa5 days ago

    Statement by UNMISS on the announcement of the agreement on the road map towards peaceful, democratic transition

    The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) welcomes the announcement on 4 August 2022 of an agreement by the parties to the Revitalized Peace Agreement (R-ARCSS) on a roadmap extending the period of current transition in 24 months.

    This extension is to allow the implementation of key to-dos in the R-ARCSS.

    UNMISS commends the Government of South Sudan for obtaining the consent and agreement of all signatories to the R-ARCSS and urges the authorities to undertake further efforts to engage other stakeholders, guarantors and witnesses.

    The UN Mission urges all parties and signatories to the Agreement to work together, in an expeditious manner, towards the full implementation of the remaining key benchmarks, to ensure that an atmosphere conducive to the conduct of free, fair elections is created.

    and credible at the end of the extended period.

    UNMISS remains committed to supporting an inclusive democratic process and stands with the people of South Sudan in their quest for lasting peace, stability and development.

  •  WFP UNHCR RRS Request for funding to continue feeding more than 750 000 refugees in Ethiopia
    WFP ,UNHCR, RRS Request for funding to continue feeding more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia
     WFP UNHCR RRS Request for funding to continue feeding more than 750 000 refugees in Ethiopia
    WFP ,UNHCR, RRS Request for funding to continue feeding more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia
    Africa7 days ago

    WFP ,UNHCR, RRS Request for funding to continue feeding more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia

    The United Nations World Food Program (WFP), the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the Ethiopian Government's Refugee and Return Service (RRS) today requested US$73 million to provide food rations.

    food to more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia over the next six months.

    .

    WFP will run out of food for refugees in October, leaving vulnerable families dependent on food assistance at risk of malnutrition, micronutrient deficiency, disease/infection susceptibility and heightened protection risks, the three agencies warn.

    Due to prolonged funding shortages, WFP has already been forced to cut rations for 750,000 registered refugees living in 22 camps and five host community sites in Afar, Amhara, Benishangul-Gumuz, Gambella, Somali and Tigray of Ethiopia.

    Food rations for refugees in Ethiopia were first reduced by 16% in November 2015, 40% in November 2021 and 50% in June 2022.

    Food insecurity among refugees has increased as a result of cutbacks and is further exacerbated by ongoing global constraints on food availability, economic crises, rising food and energy costs, the fallout from COVID-19, conflict and insecurity.

    To understand the impact of ration cuts on the food security and socio-economic situation of refugees, WFP, UNHCR and RRS conducted a rapid assessment in April based on 1,215 households residing in camps located in Afar, Beneshangul- Gumuz, Gambella and Somali regions.

    The results show that more households continued to adopt negative coping strategies by reducing the number of meals consumed in a day, consuming less expensive or less preferred foods, or limiting the portion of meals served.

    More households reported engaging in degrading activities, including involving children in income-generating activities, collecting and selling firewood, while several borrowed money and relied on friends/relatives for food.

    This forces refugees to rely on the resources of the host community and the environment in which they live, which also increases the likelihood of resource-based conflicts between refugees and host communities.

    More resources must be urgently mobilized to meet the immediate food and non-food needs of refugees to prevent further suffering, while similar investments are made to enable sustainable food solutions embedded in the commitments made in the Global Compact for Refugees (GCR)[1] and the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF)[2] for refugees and host communities through livelihoods and cash programmes, in line with UNHCR and RRS strategies.

    As a short-term measure, WFP and its partners continue to prioritize the needs of children aged 6–23 months and pregnant and lactating women under the malnutrition prevention program (general supplementary feeding).

    “Three-quarters of a million refugees will go without food in a matter of weeks unless we receive funding immediately,” said Claude Jibidar, WFP Representative and Country Director for Ethiopia.

    “The priority for all of us must be to restore assistance to at least minimal levels for the refugees, all of whom rely solely on WFP food and cash assistance to survive.” “We have a shortfall of $73 million for the minimum needs of refugees and we are deeply concerned that if funding cuts continue, they may consider returning to their places of origin when it is not safe.” If there is an immediate response from donors, WFP will be able to purchase food available in the region and transport it to meet the dietary needs of the refugees.

    WFP will also transfer cash to refugees, giving them a choice on how to meet their immediate needs and stimulating local markets.

    “We are very concerned about the lack of food for the refugees.

    The continuing lack of full rations for refugees, coupled with the impact of the most severe drought the country has experienced in more than 40 years, will greatly undermine the gains made in refugee protection and risk affecting the peaceful coexistence between refugees and their hosts.

    communities,” said UNHCR Deputy Representative in Ethiopia, Margaret Atieno.

    “We are grateful for what donors have provided so far, but more funds are needed, and quickly.” “Ethiopia, with its progressive refugee policy and commitments, has striven to ensure the sustainable self-reliance of refugees and host communities with its meager resources, struggling with recurring funding gaps from the international community.

    The subsequent deduction from the general fund for humanitarian assistance to refugees in Ethiopia in recent years has not only affected the immediate basic needs of the refugees, but has also hampered the long-term sustainable self-reliance and coexistence of refugees and families.

    host communities”.

    RRS CEO Tesfahun Gobezay said.

    “Ongoing resource constraints create conflict and stress due to competition for scarce existing local resources.

    Persistent budget cuts and the recent deduction of 50% of food and cash assistance to refugees from the recommended minimum standard severely affect the lives of refugees, exposing them to chronic hunger, anemia, sexual exploitation and death, as more than 85 percent of the refugees in Ethiopia are totally dependent on WFP's monthly food rations.

    This will undermine the positive development of Ethiopia to ensure the self-reliance and coexistence of refugees and host communities and, above all, will hamper all efforts to save lives.” WFP, UNHCR and RRS continue to prioritize the food needs of refugees and have established an effective system to identify the food assistance needs of refugees through biometric verification, ensuring accountability and the right to receive food assistance and in monthly cash.

    The three agencies call on all partners to strengthen efforts to address the medium and long-term food needs of refugees, in line with the 2019 Refugee Proclamation of the Government of Ethiopia and the commitments contained in the GCR and the CRRF.

    Ethiopia hosts more than a million registered refugees and asylum seekers.

    Most of them are from South Sudan, Somalia, Eritrea and Sudan.

    Of these, some 750,000 are totally dependent on humanitarian food assistance.

    RRS is managing the distribution of food and cash assistance to refugees in a more accountable and transparent way according to the biometric database.

    RRS will continue to ensure that asylum seekers and refugees have access to biometric registration (level three) to meet their assistance and protection needs.

    WFP, UNHCR and RRS continue to count on the donor community to expand financial support to refugees based on the principle of shared responsibility to implement life-saving core humanitarian activities.

  •  Prisoners rights emphasized when United Nations UN police trained prison officers
    Prisoners’ rights emphasized when United Nations (UN) police trained prison officers
     Prisoners rights emphasized when United Nations UN police trained prison officers
    Prisoners’ rights emphasized when United Nations (UN) police trained prison officers
    Africa7 days ago

    Prisoners’ rights emphasized when United Nations (UN) police trained prison officers

    Human rights are universal.

    They encompass each one of us, including women and men in prison.

    Explaining the existence and importance of protecting prisoners' rights was the main focus of a three-day capacity-building forum recently organized in Bor by UN police officers serving with the United Nations Mission in Sudan.

    of the South (UNMISS).

    Bringing all prison officers in South Sudan up to speed is, as Maj. Gen. Isaac Mabil Choul, director of the National Correctional Services in Jonglei state, admitted, a work in progress.

    “We are still in transition from guerrilla-like rules, but as our knowledge of correct procedures grows, we are gradually approaching international standards for the treatment of inmates,” he said.

    The substance of such international standards was discussed in depth by the 50 participating officers, 24 of whom were women, as were a handful of national laws relating to the rights and stipulated protection of prisoners.

    Prison riots and instances of fights between groups of inmates have not always been handled properly, sometimes resulting in both vulnerable prisoners and guards being threatened or even injured.

    For this reason, conflict management and how to maintain both staff and inmates were part of the technical advice offered by the UN police officers who delivered the training.

    “Modern laws give prisoners the right to decent living conditions and to be protected when there are tensions and the risk of violence breaking out,” said Maj. Gen. Priscilla Nyankot Kuot, Director of Gender Affairs at the National Prison Service, who he also praised the inclusion of a gender perspective during the workshop.

    The fact that gender-based violence, sexual or otherwise, is a crime wherever it occurs, including behind bars, was constantly highlighted throughout the training.

    “It is essential that prison officials understand the human rights implications involved in law enforcement practices.

    We want and need corrections officers to become good ambassadors for human rights and the protection of all civilians, both inside prisons and in their communities,” said UNMISS Police Adviser Paskazia Raymond, concluding the session.

    capacity development.

  •  The United Nations World Food Program WFP the United Nations Refugee Agency UNHCR the Refugee and Returnee Service RRS request funds to continue feeding more than 750 000 refugees in Ethiopia
    The United Nations World Food Program (WFP), the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), the Refugee and Returnee Service (RRS) request funds to continue feeding more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia
     The United Nations World Food Program WFP the United Nations Refugee Agency UNHCR the Refugee and Returnee Service RRS request funds to continue feeding more than 750 000 refugees in Ethiopia
    The United Nations World Food Program (WFP), the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), the Refugee and Returnee Service (RRS) request funds to continue feeding more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia
    Africa7 days ago

    The United Nations World Food Program (WFP), the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), the Refugee and Returnee Service (RRS) request funds to continue feeding more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia

    The United Nations World Food Program (WFP), the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the Ethiopian Government's Refugee and Return Service (RRS) today requested US$73 million to provide food rations.

    food to more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia over the next six months.

    .

    WFP will run out of food for refugees in October, leaving vulnerable families dependent on food assistance at risk of malnutrition, micronutrient deficiency, disease/infection susceptibility and heightened protection risks, the three agencies warn.

    Due to prolonged funding shortages, WFP has already been forced to cut rations for 750,000 registered refugees living in 22 camps and five host community sites in Afar, Amhara, Benishangul-Gumuz, Gambella, Somali and Tigray of Ethiopia.

    Food rations for refugees in Ethiopia were first reduced by 16% in November 2015, 40% in November 2021 and 50% in June 2022.

    Food insecurity among refugees has increased as a result of cutbacks and is further exacerbated by ongoing global constraints on food availability, economic crises, rising food and energy costs, the fallout from COVID-19, conflict and insecurity.

    To understand the impact of ration cuts on the food security and socio-economic situation of refugees, WFP, UNHCR and RRS conducted a rapid assessment in April based on 1,215 households residing in camps located in Afar, Beneshangul- Gumuz, Gambella and Somali regions.

    The results show that more households continued to adopt negative coping strategies by reducing the number of meals consumed in a day, consuming less expensive or less preferred foods, or limiting the portion of meals served.

    More households reported engaging in degrading activities, including involving children in income-generating activities, collecting and selling firewood, while several borrowed money and relied on friends/relatives for food.

    This forces refugees to rely on the resources of the host community and the environment in which they live, which also increases the likelihood of resource-based conflicts between refugees and host communities.

    More resources must be urgently mobilized to meet the immediate food and non-food needs of refugees to prevent further suffering, while similar investments are made to enable sustainable food solutions embedded in the commitments made in the Global Compact for Refugees (GCR)[1] and the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF)[2] for refugees and host communities through livelihoods and cash programmes, in line with UNHCR and RRS strategies.

    As a short-term measure, WFP and its partners continue to prioritize the needs of children aged 6–23 months and pregnant and lactating women under the malnutrition prevention program (general supplementary feeding).

    “Three-quarters of a million refugees will go without food in a matter of weeks unless we receive funding immediately,” said Claude Jibidar, WFP Representative and Country Director for Ethiopia.

    “The priority for all of us must be to restore assistance to at least minimal levels for the refugees, all of whom rely solely on WFP food and cash assistance to survive.” “We have a shortfall of $73 million for the minimum needs of refugees and we are deeply concerned that if funding cuts continue, they may consider returning to their places of origin when it is not safe.” If there is an immediate response from donors, WFP will be able to purchase food available in the region and transport it to meet the dietary needs of the refugees.

    WFP will also transfer cash to refugees, giving them a choice on how to meet their immediate needs and stimulating local markets.

    “We are very concerned about the lack of food for the refugees.

    The continuing lack of full rations for refugees, coupled with the impact of the most severe drought the country has experienced in more than 40 years, will greatly undermine the gains made in refugee protection and risk affecting the peaceful coexistence between refugees and their hosts.

    communities,” said UNHCR Deputy Representative in Ethiopia, Margaret Atieno.

    “We are grateful for what donors have provided so far, but more funds are needed, and quickly.” “Ethiopia, with its progressive refugee policy and commitments, has striven to ensure the sustainable self-reliance of refugees and host communities with its meager resources, struggling with recurring funding gaps from the international community.

    The subsequent deduction from the general fund for humanitarian assistance to refugees in Ethiopia in recent years has not only affected the immediate basic needs of the refugees, but has also hampered the long-term sustainable self-reliance and coexistence of refugees and families.

    host communities”.

    RRS CEO Tesfahun Gobezay said.

    “Ongoing resource constraints create conflict and stress due to competition for scarce existing local resources.

    Persistent budget cuts and the recent deduction of 50% of food and cash assistance to refugees from the recommended minimum standard severely affect the lives of refugees, exposing them to chronic hunger, anemia, sexual exploitation and death, as more than 85 percent of the refugees in Ethiopia are totally dependent on WFP's monthly food rations.

    This will undermine the positive development of Ethiopia to ensure the self-reliance and coexistence of refugees and host communities and, above all, will hamper all efforts to save lives.” WFP, UNHCR and RRS continue to prioritize the food needs of refugees and have established an effective system to identify the food assistance needs of refugees through biometric verification, ensuring accountability and the right to receive food assistance and in monthly cash.

    The three agencies call on all partners to strengthen efforts to address the medium and long-term food needs of refugees, in line with the 2019 Refugee Proclamation of the Government of Ethiopia and the commitments contained in the GCR and the CRRF.

    Ethiopia hosts more than a million registered refugees and asylum seekers.

    Most of them are from South Sudan, Somalia, Eritrea and Sudan.

    Of these, some 750,000 are totally dependent on humanitarian food assistance.

    RRS is managing the distribution of food and cash assistance to refugees in a more accountable and transparent way according to the biometric database.

    RRS will continue to ensure that asylum seekers and refugees have access to biometric registration (level three) to meet their assistance and protection needs.

    WFP, UNHCR and RRS continue to count on the donor community to expand financial support to refugees based on the principle of shared responsibility to implement life-saving core humanitarian activities.

    [1] The Global Compact on Refugees (GCR), affirmed by the UN General Assembly on December 17, 2018, is designed to promote shared responsibility between host countries and communities to better support refugees.

    [2] As set out in the 2016 New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF) focuses on the importance of supporting countries and communities hosting large numbers of refugees, promoting inclusion of refugees in host communities and develop a 'whole of society' approach to refugee responses.

  •  United States Food Security Assistance for Sub Saharan Africa
    United States Food Security Assistance for Sub-Saharan Africa
     United States Food Security Assistance for Sub Saharan Africa
    United States Food Security Assistance for Sub-Saharan Africa
    Africa7 days ago

    United States Food Security Assistance for Sub-Saharan Africa

    Secretary Blinken is traveling to South Africa, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Rwanda this week, where the United States has been deploying resources and working in partnership with African governments, institutions, businesses, scientists, and other leaders to prevent hunger and combat the global hunger crisis.

    food security and, at the same time, address the rising rates of malnutrition, which has hit the African continent the hardest.

    At the G7 summit in June, President Biden and the G7 leaders announced more than $4.5 billion to address global food security, more than half of which will come from the United States.

    This $2.76 billion in funding from the US government will help protect the world's most vulnerable populations and mitigate the impacts of growing food insecurity and malnutrition, including from Russia's war in Ukraine, by building more resilient agricultural and food production and systems around the world, and responding to immediate emergency food needs.

    We have recognized the need for immediate action to avert far-reaching consequences, and we are responding with targeted support for Africa's own plans for food security and food systems transformation.

    Of this $2.76 billion, $760 million will go to short-term sustainable food assistance to help mitigate further increases in poverty, hunger and malnutrition in vulnerable countries affected by high food, fertilizer and fuel prices.

    Of this amount, we are working with Congress to appropriate $336.5 million for bilateral programs for countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including Burkina Faso, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe and regional programs in Southern Africa, West Africa, and the Sahel.

    Also of this $2.76 billion, USAID is programming $2 billion in emergency food security assistance over the next three months.

    As of August 8, 2022, the US has provided nearly $1 billion specifically to countries in Africa for this $2 billion commitment, including the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mali , Mozambique, Nigeria, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan and Uganda.

    In addition to the President's G7 commitment, the US has announced the reduction of the balance of the Bill Emerson Humanitarian Fund, an effort in coordination with the US Department of Agriculture that will provide an additional $670 million in food assistance to respond to historical levels of acute food insecurity around the world.

    The funds announced in July and August 2022 will be used to purchase food products from the US to bolster existing emergency food operations in countries facing severe food insecurity.

    The resources will be delivered to: Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan and Sudan.

    President Biden also announced that the United States is expanding sustainable food production in Africa through the US government's flagship global food security initiative to eight additional African countries, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania and Zambia.

    This expansion brings the number of priority countries globally to 20 and delivers on President Biden's commitment in September 2021 to work with Congress to provide $5 billion through Feed the Future to end hunger and malnutrition.

    in the world and build sustainable, resilient and inclusive food systems abroad.

    Finally, the US government will also contribute to international efforts to support livelihoods and nutrition and help vulnerable countries build resilience to shocks, including food price volatility, supply chain issues, climate impacts and other long-term threats.

    Subject to notification from Congress, the US plans to provide $120 million for the following efforts: The African Development Bank's (AfDB) African Emergency Food Production Fund (AEFPF) to increase production of wheat, maize, climate-adapted rice and soybeans for the next four growing seasons in Africa.

    The Crisis Response Initiative (CRI) of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) to help protect livelihoods and build resilience in rural communities.

    The Africa Adaptation Initiative (AAI) to develop a portfolio of bankable projects in Africa, to leverage private capital.

    The Africa Risk Capacity (ARC) Africa Disaster Risk Financing Program (ADRiFi) to help African governments respond to food system crises by increasing access to risk insurance products.

    A fertilizer efficiency and innovation program to improve the efficiency of fertilizer use in countries where fertilizers tend to be over-applied.

    Support to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) will fund multi-country mapping of soils to provide insights that enable smarter water use, greater fertilizer conservation and better climate resilience impacts .

  •  The United Nations Mission in South Sudan UNMISS delivers a new maternity ward to communities in Magwi County
    The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) delivers a new maternity ward to communities in Magwi County
     The United Nations Mission in South Sudan UNMISS delivers a new maternity ward to communities in Magwi County
    The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) delivers a new maternity ward to communities in Magwi County
    Africa1 week ago

    The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) delivers a new maternity ward to communities in Magwi County

    The return of refugees and internally displaced persons to their homes is welcome news, but with population growth so does the demand for basic services.

    For this reason, the United Nations Mission in South Sudan has funded and delivered a new maternity ward to communities in the Moli-Tokuro area of ​​Magwi County.

    “Seeing this ward standing here is a relief for us women, both here and in neighboring towns.

    Before the addition of this new wing, the health center was not big enough, and male patients sometimes stayed in the same room where women gave birth,” said Mandera Rachele Mania, women's representative at Moli- Tokuro.

    The new building, built by the Community Needs Initiative, includes a maternity ward, an intake ward, consultation and delivery rooms, as well as three solar-powered staff units.

    “Our women used to travel 60 kilometers to access health services such as antenatal and postnatal care in Nimule, but that will no longer be necessary.

    It means a lot to all of us,” said Area Director Margret Oliver.

    Lodai Pascal Woyakori, State Minister of Health, highlighted another advantage of better access to health care in this part of Magwi County, a county that has recently been affected by inter-communal violence between farmers and cattle herders.

    “This is also something that will bring the communities that live here back together, so I see it as an important development to foster peace as well,” he said.

  •  Kenya to have free and fair elections says incoming US envoy
    Kenya to have free and fair elections, says incoming US envoy
     Kenya to have free and fair elections says incoming US envoy
    Kenya to have free and fair elections, says incoming US envoy
    Africa1 week ago

    Kenya to have free and fair elections, says incoming US envoy

    The incoming US ambassador to Kenya, Margaret Whitman, on Friday night expressed her confidence that the general election on August 9 will be free and fair.

    Speaking as she presented her credentials to President Uhuru Kenyatta, Ambassador Whitman said that Kenya too will have a peaceful transition.

    “…I have no doubt that Kenya will show the world what free and fair elections look like and how peaceful transitions work,” said the new ambassador to Kenya.

    Ambassador Whitman pledged to use her experience to enhance bilateral trade and investment ties between the two countries, noting that Kenya is a dynamic economic engine and technology leader in East Africa.

    “Before I left Washington, President Biden reminded me that a quarter of the world's population will reside in Africa by 2050.

    Noting Kenya's leadership on the continent and beyond, President Biden asked me to use every tool at my disposal.

    readiness to deepen the ties between our great nations,” he said.

    During the brief ceremony at Government House in Nairobi, President Kenyatta also received credentials from incoming ambassadors Sebastian Groth of Germany, Kamal Gubara Mohamed of Sudan and Bacha Debele Buta of Ethiopia.

    The new German ambassador to Kenya said that his country has been a close and committed partner of Kenya for decades and that he is determined to further develop that cooperation.

    For their part, the new ambassadors from Ethiopia and Sudan pledged to work hard to ensure that they succeed in enhancing the strong multifaceted diplomatic relations between Kenya and their respective countries.

    Upon receiving the credentials of the new envoys, President Kenyatta assured them of his support as they embark on their tour of duty in the country.

    At a separate function at Government House in Nairobi, President Kenyatta handed over land titles to five East African countries that have been allocated land in the Naivasha Special Economic Zone. The five countries were Burundi, Rwanda, DR Congo, Uganda and South Sudan.

    The Secretary of the Cabinet for Foreign Affairs, Amb. Raychelle Omamo and Principal Secretary Amb. Macharia Kamau among others.

  •  The United Nations Mission in South Sudan UNMISS and a partner organization provide infrastructure for clean water in Malakal prison
    The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) and a partner organization provide infrastructure for clean water in Malakal prison
     The United Nations Mission in South Sudan UNMISS and a partner organization provide infrastructure for clean water in Malakal prison
    The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) and a partner organization provide infrastructure for clean water in Malakal prison
    Africa2 weeks ago

    The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) and a partner organization provide infrastructure for clean water in Malakal prison

    Water is life, but if it is not clean it can also mean death, or at least all kinds of diseases.

    Some 80 inmates at Malakal prison, who both bathed and drank raw water from the river next to the penitentiary, know all about it, but thanks to a joint project implemented by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) and World Vision, can now consider the skin rashes and dripping episodes in the story.

    “Now we finally have fresh drinking water at our disposal.

    It will help us improve our personal hygiene and reduce the risk of contracting diseases from contact with dirty water,” said a grateful 25-year-old inmate as newly installed pipes and a water tank with 20,000 liters of clean, filtered water were handed over.

    .

    to the prison authorities.

    While he justifiably appreciated the contribution of the two organizations, the young man could also have thanked himself and some of his friends for spending time behind bars.

    Supervised by engineering troops serving in the peacekeeping mission, a group of inmates helped excavate and connect pipes through which water flows from a treatment plant to the water tank.

    “It was really gratifying for us to see how involved both prison leaders and convicts were in the process of making this happen,” said prison officer Ivica Markovic, who serves with UNMISS.

    An important part of the mandate of the peacekeeping mission in South Sudan is to help build the capacity and infrastructure of all links in the country's justice system, including prisons.

    Leda Limann, Head of the Mission Field Office in Malakal, assured those attending the handover ceremony that this kind of support and cooperation with the Upper Nile State government will continue.

    “I encourage you as prison inmates and professionals to defend the principles of human rights and guarantee the dignity of its inmates.

    After their reform, they will become free citizens who can contribute to the development of the country, as those who participated in this project have already shown,” she said.