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  •   The Central and West Africa CSO Spotlight Knowledge Exchange Forum held from August 9 to 10 in Dakar Senegal brought together Civil Society Organizations CSOs through the Africa Regional Program of the Initiative Spotlight SIARP to share promising practices on Eliminating Violence Against Women and Girls EVAWG Harmful Practices HR and Promoting Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights SRHRR Five civil society organizations CSOs were selected to showcase their promising practices from the 8 Spotlight implementing countries in Africa in their work on the EVAWG ranging from prevention to response including providing assistance to survivors of gender violence offering programs that promote the economic empowerment of women women s access to justice financial education temporary one stop centers shelters and legal support among others UN Women recognizes the critical role that CSOs and women s networks collectively play in advocating and working to end gender based violence and harmful practices on the continent said Ms Sunita Caminha Policy Specialist at EVAW at UN Women Eastern and Southern Africa in her opening remarks The UN Women representative also highlighted the need to engage in regional processes and build on and communicate successes to improve visibility as well as strategize how learning spaces could be regularized and systematized to inform programming and intervention at the community level grassroots as well as regional level law work Ms Victoria Maloka Head of the Coordination and Outreach Division of the AUC Women Gender Development and Youth Directorate WGYD emphasized the remarkable resilience of African women and the need for women to work together to raise their voices to challenge to innovate and elevate interventions Let us seize the opportunity created by the Spotlight Initiative to elevate our efforts to bring lasting change from the community to the continental level declared Ms Victoria Maloka in her opening remarks Stories of Hope CSOs selected to present their programs under the Spotlight Initiative have taken center stage at the two day Forum presenting their promising practices and lessons learned to end gender based violence in their countries under the Spotlight Initiative African Center for Leadership Strategy and Development Centre LSD in Nigeria implemented the Male Engagement Program with a strategic approach to work with men traditional and religious leaders The greatest success of the program was the abolition of the money woman tradition in Becheve by the Council of Chiefs of the village The abolition of this harmful practice reduced girls to objects of trade and pleasure Development Education Network Liberia DEN L in Liberia supports the capacity of CSOs in advocacy and facilitates programs that promote economic justice and gender equality DEN L trained over 100 CSOs with skills in advocacy SGBV stakeholder engagement and resource mobilization to better address VAWG Girl Child Rights GCR in Mozambique supports women and girls through service packages self employment start up kits business mentoring and financial education GCR supported 1 800 adolescents and young women with disabilities to manage 60 women led business groups and granted 24 business licenses to women led businesses The Justice Centers JCU in Uganda implemented the Improving Access to Quality Essential Legal Aid and Referral Services for Women and Girls Experiencing Violence programme which offers a wide range of legal services JCU supported 231 women to get out of prison and sensitized 23 000 women about gender based violence Musasa in Zimbabwe launched the mobile One Stop Center OSC to provide medical treatment legal advice and therapy to survivors with access to counsellors lawyers and ministry representatives Musasa reached 1 674 survivors through the mobile One Stop Centre and increased the reporting and protection of child marriage survivors in remote areas The Forum came to a close with the closing remarks of Ms Oulimata Sarr Regional Director of the Regional Office for West and Central Africa of UN Women The power of storytelling and comprehensive approaches have come to light hard By telling our stories we make survivors visible to duty bearers and stakeholders designing the right interventions There is also power in designing justice mechanisms for survivors which was shown in the stories of two CSOs providing mobile legal aid services to women By equipping survivors of violence to tell their stories we empower them to transform their realities said the UN Women Regional Director The West and Central Africa forum was a follow up to the East and Southern Africa CSO forum that took place on July 6 7 in Addis Ababa Ethiopia
    Spotlight Initiative Africa Regional Program: “CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum” concluded with inspiring stories from civil society organizations
      The Central and West Africa CSO Spotlight Knowledge Exchange Forum held from August 9 to 10 in Dakar Senegal brought together Civil Society Organizations CSOs through the Africa Regional Program of the Initiative Spotlight SIARP to share promising practices on Eliminating Violence Against Women and Girls EVAWG Harmful Practices HR and Promoting Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights SRHRR Five civil society organizations CSOs were selected to showcase their promising practices from the 8 Spotlight implementing countries in Africa in their work on the EVAWG ranging from prevention to response including providing assistance to survivors of gender violence offering programs that promote the economic empowerment of women women s access to justice financial education temporary one stop centers shelters and legal support among others UN Women recognizes the critical role that CSOs and women s networks collectively play in advocating and working to end gender based violence and harmful practices on the continent said Ms Sunita Caminha Policy Specialist at EVAW at UN Women Eastern and Southern Africa in her opening remarks The UN Women representative also highlighted the need to engage in regional processes and build on and communicate successes to improve visibility as well as strategize how learning spaces could be regularized and systematized to inform programming and intervention at the community level grassroots as well as regional level law work Ms Victoria Maloka Head of the Coordination and Outreach Division of the AUC Women Gender Development and Youth Directorate WGYD emphasized the remarkable resilience of African women and the need for women to work together to raise their voices to challenge to innovate and elevate interventions Let us seize the opportunity created by the Spotlight Initiative to elevate our efforts to bring lasting change from the community to the continental level declared Ms Victoria Maloka in her opening remarks Stories of Hope CSOs selected to present their programs under the Spotlight Initiative have taken center stage at the two day Forum presenting their promising practices and lessons learned to end gender based violence in their countries under the Spotlight Initiative African Center for Leadership Strategy and Development Centre LSD in Nigeria implemented the Male Engagement Program with a strategic approach to work with men traditional and religious leaders The greatest success of the program was the abolition of the money woman tradition in Becheve by the Council of Chiefs of the village The abolition of this harmful practice reduced girls to objects of trade and pleasure Development Education Network Liberia DEN L in Liberia supports the capacity of CSOs in advocacy and facilitates programs that promote economic justice and gender equality DEN L trained over 100 CSOs with skills in advocacy SGBV stakeholder engagement and resource mobilization to better address VAWG Girl Child Rights GCR in Mozambique supports women and girls through service packages self employment start up kits business mentoring and financial education GCR supported 1 800 adolescents and young women with disabilities to manage 60 women led business groups and granted 24 business licenses to women led businesses The Justice Centers JCU in Uganda implemented the Improving Access to Quality Essential Legal Aid and Referral Services for Women and Girls Experiencing Violence programme which offers a wide range of legal services JCU supported 231 women to get out of prison and sensitized 23 000 women about gender based violence Musasa in Zimbabwe launched the mobile One Stop Center OSC to provide medical treatment legal advice and therapy to survivors with access to counsellors lawyers and ministry representatives Musasa reached 1 674 survivors through the mobile One Stop Centre and increased the reporting and protection of child marriage survivors in remote areas The Forum came to a close with the closing remarks of Ms Oulimata Sarr Regional Director of the Regional Office for West and Central Africa of UN Women The power of storytelling and comprehensive approaches have come to light hard By telling our stories we make survivors visible to duty bearers and stakeholders designing the right interventions There is also power in designing justice mechanisms for survivors which was shown in the stories of two CSOs providing mobile legal aid services to women By equipping survivors of violence to tell their stories we empower them to transform their realities said the UN Women Regional Director The West and Central Africa forum was a follow up to the East and Southern Africa CSO forum that took place on July 6 7 in Addis Ababa Ethiopia
    Spotlight Initiative Africa Regional Program: “CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum” concluded with inspiring stories from civil society organizations
    Africa5 months ago

    Spotlight Initiative Africa Regional Program: “CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum” concluded with inspiring stories from civil society organizations

    The “Central and West Africa CSO Spotlight Knowledge Exchange Forum”, held from August 9 to 10 in Dakar, Senegal, brought together Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) through the Africa Regional Program of the Initiative Spotlight (SIARP) to share promising practices on Eliminating Violence Against Women and Girls (EVAWG), Harmful Practices (HR), and Promoting Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHRR).

    Five civil society organizations (CSOs) were selected to showcase their promising practices from the 8 Spotlight implementing countries in Africa in their work on the EVAWG ranging from prevention to response, including providing assistance to survivors of gender violence, offering programs that promote the economic empowerment of women.

    , women's access to justice, financial education, temporary one-stop centers, shelters and legal support, among others.

    “UN Women recognizes the critical role that CSOs and women's networks collectively play in advocating and working to end gender-based violence and harmful practices on the continent,” said Ms. Sunita Caminha, Policy Specialist at EVAW.

    at UN Women Eastern and Southern Africa, in her opening remarks.

    The UN Women representative also highlighted the need to engage in regional processes and build on and communicate successes to improve visibility, as well as strategize how learning spaces could be regularized and systematized to inform programming and intervention at the community level.

    grassroots as well as regional level.

    law work.

    Ms. Victoria Maloka, Head of the Coordination and Outreach Division of the AUC Women, Gender, Development and Youth Directorate (WGYD), emphasized the remarkable resilience of African women and the need for women to work together to raise their voices, to challenge, to innovate and elevate interventions: “Let us seize the opportunity created by the Spotlight Initiative to elevate our efforts to bring lasting change from the community to the continental level”, declared Ms. Victoria Maloka, in her opening remarks .

    Stories of Hope: CSOs selected to present their programs under the Spotlight Initiative have taken center stage at the two-day Forum, presenting their promising practices and lessons learned to end gender-based violence in their countries, under the Spotlight Initiative.

    : African Center for Leadership, Strategy and Development (Centre LSD), in Nigeria, implemented the “Male Engagement Program”, with a strategic approach to work with men, traditional and religious leaders.

    The greatest success of the program was the abolition of the “money-woman” tradition in Becheve, by the Council of Chiefs of the village.

    The abolition of this harmful practice reduced girls to objects of trade and pleasure.

    Development Education Network-Liberia (DEN-L), in Liberia, supports the capacity of CSOs in advocacy and facilitates programs that promote economic justice and gender equality.

    DEN-L trained over 100 CSOs with skills in advocacy, SGBV, stakeholder engagement, and resource mobilization to better address VAWG.

    Girl Child Rights (GCR), in Mozambique, supports women and girls through service packages, self-employment start-up kits, business mentoring and financial education.

    GCR supported 1,800 adolescents and young women with disabilities to manage 60 women-led business groups and granted 24 business licenses to women-led businesses.

    The Justice Centers (JCU), in Uganda, implemented the “Improving Access to Quality Essential Legal Aid and Referral Services for Women and Girls Experiencing Violence” programme, which offers a wide range of legal services.

    JCU supported 231 women to get out of prison and sensitized 23,000 women about gender-based violence.

    Musasa in Zimbabwe launched the mobile 'One Stop Center (OSC)' to provide medical treatment, legal advice and therapy to survivors with access to counsellors, lawyers and ministry representatives.

    Musasa reached 1,674 survivors through the mobile 'One Stop Centre' and increased the reporting and protection of child marriage survivors in remote areas.

    The Forum came to a close with the closing remarks of Ms. Oulimata Sarr, Regional Director of the Regional Office for West and Central Africa of UN Women: “The power of storytelling and comprehensive approaches have come to light hard.

    By telling our stories, we make survivors visible to duty bearers and stakeholders designing the right interventions.

    There is also power in designing justice mechanisms for survivors, which was shown in the stories of two CSOs providing mobile legal aid services to women.

    By equipping survivors of violence to tell their stories, we empower them to transform their realities,” said the UN Women Regional Director.

    The West and Central Africa forum was a follow-up to the East and Southern Africa CSO forum that took place on July 6-7 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

  •   The United Nations World Food Program WFP the United Nations Refugee Agency UNHCR and the Ethiopian Government s Refugee and Return Service RRS today requested US 73 million to provide food rations food to more than 750 000 refugees in Ethiopia over the next six months WFP will run out of food for refugees in October leaving vulnerable families dependent on food assistance at risk of malnutrition micronutrient deficiency disease infection susceptibility and heightened protection risks the three agencies warn Due to prolonged funding shortages WFP has already been forced to cut rations for 750 000 registered refugees living in 22 camps and five host community sites in Afar Amhara Benishangul Gumuz Gambella Somali and Tigray of Ethiopia Food rations for refugees in Ethiopia were first reduced by 16 in November 2015 40 in November 2021 and 50 in June 2022 Food insecurity among refugees has increased as a result of cutbacks and is further exacerbated by ongoing global constraints on food availability economic crises rising food and energy costs the fallout from COVID 19 conflict and insecurity To understand the impact of ration cuts on the food security and socio economic situation of refugees WFP UNHCR and RRS conducted a rapid assessment in April based on 1 215 households residing in camps located in Afar Beneshangul Gumuz Gambella and Somali regions The results show that more households continued to adopt negative coping strategies by reducing the number of meals consumed in a day consuming less expensive or less preferred foods or limiting the portion of meals served More households reported engaging in degrading activities including involving children in income generating activities collecting and selling firewood while several borrowed money and relied on friends relatives for food This forces refugees to rely on the resources of the host community and the environment in which they live which also increases the likelihood of resource based conflicts between refugees and host communities More resources must be urgently mobilized to meet the immediate food and non food needs of refugees to prevent further suffering while similar investments are made to enable sustainable food solutions embedded in the commitments made in the Global Compact for Refugees GCR 1 and the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework CRRF 2 for refugees and host communities through livelihoods and cash programmes in line with UNHCR and RRS strategies As a short term measure WFP and its partners continue to prioritize the needs of children aged 6 23 months and pregnant and lactating women under the malnutrition prevention program general supplementary feeding Three quarters of a million refugees will go without food in a matter of weeks unless we receive funding immediately said Claude Jibidar WFP Representative and Country Director for Ethiopia The priority for all of us must be to restore assistance to at least minimal levels for the refugees all of whom rely solely on WFP food and cash assistance to survive We have a shortfall of 73 million for the minimum needs of refugees and we are deeply concerned that if funding cuts continue they may consider returning to their places of origin when it is not safe If there is an immediate response from donors WFP will be able to purchase food available in the region and transport it to meet the dietary needs of the refugees WFP will also transfer cash to refugees giving them a choice on how to meet their immediate needs and stimulating local markets We are very concerned about the lack of food for the refugees The continuing lack of full rations for refugees coupled with the impact of the most severe drought the country has experienced in more than 40 years will greatly undermine the gains made in refugee protection and risk affecting the peaceful coexistence between refugees and their hosts communities said UNHCR Deputy Representative in Ethiopia Margaret Atieno We are grateful for what donors have provided so far but more funds are needed and quickly Ethiopia with its progressive refugee policy and commitments has striven to ensure the sustainable self reliance of refugees and host communities with its meager resources struggling with recurring funding gaps from the international community The subsequent deduction from the general fund for humanitarian assistance to refugees in Ethiopia in recent years has not only affected the immediate basic needs of the refugees but has also hampered the long term sustainable self reliance and coexistence of refugees and families host communities RRS CEO Tesfahun Gobezay said Ongoing resource constraints create conflict and stress due to competition for scarce existing local resources Persistent budget cuts and the recent deduction of 50 of food and cash assistance to refugees from the recommended minimum standard severely affect the lives of refugees exposing them to chronic hunger anemia sexual exploitation and death as more than 85 percent of the refugees in Ethiopia are totally dependent on WFP s monthly food rations This will undermine the positive development of Ethiopia to ensure the self reliance and coexistence of refugees and host communities and above all will hamper all efforts to save lives WFP UNHCR and RRS continue to prioritize the food needs of refugees and have established an effective system to identify the food assistance needs of refugees through biometric verification ensuring accountability and the right to receive food assistance and in monthly cash The three agencies call on all partners to strengthen efforts to address the medium and long term food needs of refugees in line with the 2019 Refugee Proclamation of the Government of Ethiopia and the commitments contained in the GCR and the CRRF Ethiopia hosts more than a million registered refugees and asylum seekers Most of them are from South Sudan Somalia Eritrea and Sudan Of these some 750 000 are totally dependent on humanitarian food assistance RRS is managing the distribution of food and cash assistance to refugees in a more accountable and transparent way according to the biometric database RRS will continue to ensure that asylum seekers and refugees have access to biometric registration level three to meet their assistance and protection needs WFP UNHCR and RRS continue to count on the donor community to expand financial support to refugees based on the principle of shared responsibility to implement life saving core humanitarian activities
    WFP ,UNHCR, RRS Request for funding to continue feeding more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia
      The United Nations World Food Program WFP the United Nations Refugee Agency UNHCR and the Ethiopian Government s Refugee and Return Service RRS today requested US 73 million to provide food rations food to more than 750 000 refugees in Ethiopia over the next six months WFP will run out of food for refugees in October leaving vulnerable families dependent on food assistance at risk of malnutrition micronutrient deficiency disease infection susceptibility and heightened protection risks the three agencies warn Due to prolonged funding shortages WFP has already been forced to cut rations for 750 000 registered refugees living in 22 camps and five host community sites in Afar Amhara Benishangul Gumuz Gambella Somali and Tigray of Ethiopia Food rations for refugees in Ethiopia were first reduced by 16 in November 2015 40 in November 2021 and 50 in June 2022 Food insecurity among refugees has increased as a result of cutbacks and is further exacerbated by ongoing global constraints on food availability economic crises rising food and energy costs the fallout from COVID 19 conflict and insecurity To understand the impact of ration cuts on the food security and socio economic situation of refugees WFP UNHCR and RRS conducted a rapid assessment in April based on 1 215 households residing in camps located in Afar Beneshangul Gumuz Gambella and Somali regions The results show that more households continued to adopt negative coping strategies by reducing the number of meals consumed in a day consuming less expensive or less preferred foods or limiting the portion of meals served More households reported engaging in degrading activities including involving children in income generating activities collecting and selling firewood while several borrowed money and relied on friends relatives for food This forces refugees to rely on the resources of the host community and the environment in which they live which also increases the likelihood of resource based conflicts between refugees and host communities More resources must be urgently mobilized to meet the immediate food and non food needs of refugees to prevent further suffering while similar investments are made to enable sustainable food solutions embedded in the commitments made in the Global Compact for Refugees GCR 1 and the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework CRRF 2 for refugees and host communities through livelihoods and cash programmes in line with UNHCR and RRS strategies As a short term measure WFP and its partners continue to prioritize the needs of children aged 6 23 months and pregnant and lactating women under the malnutrition prevention program general supplementary feeding Three quarters of a million refugees will go without food in a matter of weeks unless we receive funding immediately said Claude Jibidar WFP Representative and Country Director for Ethiopia The priority for all of us must be to restore assistance to at least minimal levels for the refugees all of whom rely solely on WFP food and cash assistance to survive We have a shortfall of 73 million for the minimum needs of refugees and we are deeply concerned that if funding cuts continue they may consider returning to their places of origin when it is not safe If there is an immediate response from donors WFP will be able to purchase food available in the region and transport it to meet the dietary needs of the refugees WFP will also transfer cash to refugees giving them a choice on how to meet their immediate needs and stimulating local markets We are very concerned about the lack of food for the refugees The continuing lack of full rations for refugees coupled with the impact of the most severe drought the country has experienced in more than 40 years will greatly undermine the gains made in refugee protection and risk affecting the peaceful coexistence between refugees and their hosts communities said UNHCR Deputy Representative in Ethiopia Margaret Atieno We are grateful for what donors have provided so far but more funds are needed and quickly Ethiopia with its progressive refugee policy and commitments has striven to ensure the sustainable self reliance of refugees and host communities with its meager resources struggling with recurring funding gaps from the international community The subsequent deduction from the general fund for humanitarian assistance to refugees in Ethiopia in recent years has not only affected the immediate basic needs of the refugees but has also hampered the long term sustainable self reliance and coexistence of refugees and families host communities RRS CEO Tesfahun Gobezay said Ongoing resource constraints create conflict and stress due to competition for scarce existing local resources Persistent budget cuts and the recent deduction of 50 of food and cash assistance to refugees from the recommended minimum standard severely affect the lives of refugees exposing them to chronic hunger anemia sexual exploitation and death as more than 85 percent of the refugees in Ethiopia are totally dependent on WFP s monthly food rations This will undermine the positive development of Ethiopia to ensure the self reliance and coexistence of refugees and host communities and above all will hamper all efforts to save lives WFP UNHCR and RRS continue to prioritize the food needs of refugees and have established an effective system to identify the food assistance needs of refugees through biometric verification ensuring accountability and the right to receive food assistance and in monthly cash The three agencies call on all partners to strengthen efforts to address the medium and long term food needs of refugees in line with the 2019 Refugee Proclamation of the Government of Ethiopia and the commitments contained in the GCR and the CRRF Ethiopia hosts more than a million registered refugees and asylum seekers Most of them are from South Sudan Somalia Eritrea and Sudan Of these some 750 000 are totally dependent on humanitarian food assistance RRS is managing the distribution of food and cash assistance to refugees in a more accountable and transparent way according to the biometric database RRS will continue to ensure that asylum seekers and refugees have access to biometric registration level three to meet their assistance and protection needs WFP UNHCR and RRS continue to count on the donor community to expand financial support to refugees based on the principle of shared responsibility to implement life saving core humanitarian activities
    WFP ,UNHCR, RRS Request for funding to continue feeding more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia
    Africa6 months ago

    WFP ,UNHCR, RRS Request for funding to continue feeding more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia

    The United Nations World Food Program (WFP), the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the Ethiopian Government's Refugee and Return Service (RRS) today requested US$73 million to provide food rations.

    food to more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia over the next six months.

    .

    WFP will run out of food for refugees in October, leaving vulnerable families dependent on food assistance at risk of malnutrition, micronutrient deficiency, disease/infection susceptibility and heightened protection risks, the three agencies warn.

    Due to prolonged funding shortages, WFP has already been forced to cut rations for 750,000 registered refugees living in 22 camps and five host community sites in Afar, Amhara, Benishangul-Gumuz, Gambella, Somali and Tigray of Ethiopia.

    Food rations for refugees in Ethiopia were first reduced by 16% in November 2015, 40% in November 2021 and 50% in June 2022.

    Food insecurity among refugees has increased as a result of cutbacks and is further exacerbated by ongoing global constraints on food availability, economic crises, rising food and energy costs, the fallout from COVID-19, conflict and insecurity.

    To understand the impact of ration cuts on the food security and socio-economic situation of refugees, WFP, UNHCR and RRS conducted a rapid assessment in April based on 1,215 households residing in camps located in Afar, Beneshangul- Gumuz, Gambella and Somali regions.

    The results show that more households continued to adopt negative coping strategies by reducing the number of meals consumed in a day, consuming less expensive or less preferred foods, or limiting the portion of meals served.

    More households reported engaging in degrading activities, including involving children in income-generating activities, collecting and selling firewood, while several borrowed money and relied on friends/relatives for food.

    This forces refugees to rely on the resources of the host community and the environment in which they live, which also increases the likelihood of resource-based conflicts between refugees and host communities.

    More resources must be urgently mobilized to meet the immediate food and non-food needs of refugees to prevent further suffering, while similar investments are made to enable sustainable food solutions embedded in the commitments made in the Global Compact for Refugees (GCR)[1] and the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF)[2] for refugees and host communities through livelihoods and cash programmes, in line with UNHCR and RRS strategies.

    As a short-term measure, WFP and its partners continue to prioritize the needs of children aged 6–23 months and pregnant and lactating women under the malnutrition prevention program (general supplementary feeding).

    “Three-quarters of a million refugees will go without food in a matter of weeks unless we receive funding immediately,” said Claude Jibidar, WFP Representative and Country Director for Ethiopia.

    “The priority for all of us must be to restore assistance to at least minimal levels for the refugees, all of whom rely solely on WFP food and cash assistance to survive.” “We have a shortfall of $73 million for the minimum needs of refugees and we are deeply concerned that if funding cuts continue, they may consider returning to their places of origin when it is not safe.” If there is an immediate response from donors, WFP will be able to purchase food available in the region and transport it to meet the dietary needs of the refugees.

    WFP will also transfer cash to refugees, giving them a choice on how to meet their immediate needs and stimulating local markets.

    “We are very concerned about the lack of food for the refugees.

    The continuing lack of full rations for refugees, coupled with the impact of the most severe drought the country has experienced in more than 40 years, will greatly undermine the gains made in refugee protection and risk affecting the peaceful coexistence between refugees and their hosts.

    communities,” said UNHCR Deputy Representative in Ethiopia, Margaret Atieno.

    “We are grateful for what donors have provided so far, but more funds are needed, and quickly.” “Ethiopia, with its progressive refugee policy and commitments, has striven to ensure the sustainable self-reliance of refugees and host communities with its meager resources, struggling with recurring funding gaps from the international community.

    The subsequent deduction from the general fund for humanitarian assistance to refugees in Ethiopia in recent years has not only affected the immediate basic needs of the refugees, but has also hampered the long-term sustainable self-reliance and coexistence of refugees and families.

    host communities”.

    RRS CEO Tesfahun Gobezay said.

    “Ongoing resource constraints create conflict and stress due to competition for scarce existing local resources.

    Persistent budget cuts and the recent deduction of 50% of food and cash assistance to refugees from the recommended minimum standard severely affect the lives of refugees, exposing them to chronic hunger, anemia, sexual exploitation and death, as more than 85 percent of the refugees in Ethiopia are totally dependent on WFP's monthly food rations.

    This will undermine the positive development of Ethiopia to ensure the self-reliance and coexistence of refugees and host communities and, above all, will hamper all efforts to save lives.” WFP, UNHCR and RRS continue to prioritize the food needs of refugees and have established an effective system to identify the food assistance needs of refugees through biometric verification, ensuring accountability and the right to receive food assistance and in monthly cash.

    The three agencies call on all partners to strengthen efforts to address the medium and long-term food needs of refugees, in line with the 2019 Refugee Proclamation of the Government of Ethiopia and the commitments contained in the GCR and the CRRF.

    Ethiopia hosts more than a million registered refugees and asylum seekers.

    Most of them are from South Sudan, Somalia, Eritrea and Sudan.

    Of these, some 750,000 are totally dependent on humanitarian food assistance.

    RRS is managing the distribution of food and cash assistance to refugees in a more accountable and transparent way according to the biometric database.

    RRS will continue to ensure that asylum seekers and refugees have access to biometric registration (level three) to meet their assistance and protection needs.

    WFP, UNHCR and RRS continue to count on the donor community to expand financial support to refugees based on the principle of shared responsibility to implement life-saving core humanitarian activities.

  •   The United Nations World Food Program WFP the United Nations Refugee Agency UNHCR and the Ethiopian Government s Refugee and Return Service RRS today requested US 73 million to provide food rations food to more than 750 000 refugees in Ethiopia over the next six months WFP will run out of food for refugees in October leaving vulnerable families dependent on food assistance at risk of malnutrition micronutrient deficiency disease infection susceptibility and heightened protection risks the three agencies warn Due to prolonged funding shortages WFP has already been forced to cut rations for 750 000 registered refugees living in 22 camps and five host community sites in Afar Amhara Benishangul Gumuz Gambella Somali and Tigray of Ethiopia Food rations for refugees in Ethiopia were first reduced by 16 in November 2015 40 in November 2021 and 50 in June 2022 Food insecurity among refugees has increased as a result of cutbacks and is further exacerbated by ongoing global constraints on food availability economic crises rising food and energy costs the fallout from COVID 19 conflict and insecurity To understand the impact of ration cuts on the food security and socio economic situation of refugees WFP UNHCR and RRS conducted a rapid assessment in April based on 1 215 households residing in camps located in Afar Beneshangul Gumuz Gambella and Somali regions The results show that more households continued to adopt negative coping strategies by reducing the number of meals consumed in a day consuming less expensive or less preferred foods or limiting the portion of meals served More households reported engaging in degrading activities including involving children in income generating activities collecting and selling firewood while several borrowed money and relied on friends relatives for food This forces refugees to rely on the resources of the host community and the environment in which they live which also increases the likelihood of resource based conflicts between refugees and host communities More resources must be urgently mobilized to meet the immediate food and non food needs of refugees to prevent further suffering while similar investments are made to enable sustainable food solutions embedded in the commitments made in the Global Compact for Refugees GCR 1 and the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework CRRF 2 for refugees and host communities through livelihoods and cash programmes in line with UNHCR and RRS strategies As a short term measure WFP and its partners continue to prioritize the needs of children aged 6 23 months and pregnant and lactating women under the malnutrition prevention program general supplementary feeding Three quarters of a million refugees will go without food in a matter of weeks unless we receive funding immediately said Claude Jibidar WFP Representative and Country Director for Ethiopia The priority for all of us must be to restore assistance to at least minimal levels for the refugees all of whom rely solely on WFP food and cash assistance to survive We have a shortfall of 73 million for the minimum needs of refugees and we are deeply concerned that if funding cuts continue they may consider returning to their places of origin when it is not safe If there is an immediate response from donors WFP will be able to purchase food available in the region and transport it to meet the dietary needs of the refugees WFP will also transfer cash to refugees giving them a choice on how to meet their immediate needs and stimulating local markets We are very concerned about the lack of food for the refugees The continuing lack of full rations for refugees coupled with the impact of the most severe drought the country has experienced in more than 40 years will greatly undermine the gains made in refugee protection and risk affecting the peaceful coexistence between refugees and their hosts communities said UNHCR Deputy Representative in Ethiopia Margaret Atieno We are grateful for what donors have provided so far but more funds are needed and quickly Ethiopia with its progressive refugee policy and commitments has striven to ensure the sustainable self reliance of refugees and host communities with its meager resources struggling with recurring funding gaps from the international community The subsequent deduction from the general fund for humanitarian assistance to refugees in Ethiopia in recent years has not only affected the immediate basic needs of the refugees but has also hampered the long term sustainable self reliance and coexistence of refugees and families host communities RRS CEO Tesfahun Gobezay said Ongoing resource constraints create conflict and stress due to competition for scarce existing local resources Persistent budget cuts and the recent deduction of 50 of food and cash assistance to refugees from the recommended minimum standard severely affect the lives of refugees exposing them to chronic hunger anemia sexual exploitation and death as more than 85 percent of the refugees in Ethiopia are totally dependent on WFP s monthly food rations This will undermine the positive development of Ethiopia to ensure the self reliance and coexistence of refugees and host communities and above all will hamper all efforts to save lives WFP UNHCR and RRS continue to prioritize the food needs of refugees and have established an effective system to identify the food assistance needs of refugees through biometric verification ensuring accountability and the right to receive food assistance and in monthly cash The three agencies call on all partners to strengthen efforts to address the medium and long term food needs of refugees in line with the 2019 Refugee Proclamation of the Government of Ethiopia and the commitments contained in the GCR and the CRRF Ethiopia hosts more than a million registered refugees and asylum seekers Most of them are from South Sudan Somalia Eritrea and Sudan Of these some 750 000 are totally dependent on humanitarian food assistance RRS is managing the distribution of food and cash assistance to refugees in a more accountable and transparent way according to the biometric database RRS will continue to ensure that asylum seekers and refugees have access to biometric registration level three to meet their assistance and protection needs WFP UNHCR and RRS continue to count on the donor community to expand financial support to refugees based on the principle of shared responsibility to implement life saving core humanitarian activities 1 The Global Compact on Refugees GCR affirmed by the UN General Assembly on December 17 2018 is designed to promote shared responsibility between host countries and communities to better support refugees 2 As set out in the 2016 New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework CRRF focuses on the importance of supporting countries and communities hosting large numbers of refugees promoting inclusion of refugees in host communities and develop a whole of society approach to refugee responses
    The United Nations World Food Program (WFP), the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), the Refugee and Returnee Service (RRS) request funds to continue feeding more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia
      The United Nations World Food Program WFP the United Nations Refugee Agency UNHCR and the Ethiopian Government s Refugee and Return Service RRS today requested US 73 million to provide food rations food to more than 750 000 refugees in Ethiopia over the next six months WFP will run out of food for refugees in October leaving vulnerable families dependent on food assistance at risk of malnutrition micronutrient deficiency disease infection susceptibility and heightened protection risks the three agencies warn Due to prolonged funding shortages WFP has already been forced to cut rations for 750 000 registered refugees living in 22 camps and five host community sites in Afar Amhara Benishangul Gumuz Gambella Somali and Tigray of Ethiopia Food rations for refugees in Ethiopia were first reduced by 16 in November 2015 40 in November 2021 and 50 in June 2022 Food insecurity among refugees has increased as a result of cutbacks and is further exacerbated by ongoing global constraints on food availability economic crises rising food and energy costs the fallout from COVID 19 conflict and insecurity To understand the impact of ration cuts on the food security and socio economic situation of refugees WFP UNHCR and RRS conducted a rapid assessment in April based on 1 215 households residing in camps located in Afar Beneshangul Gumuz Gambella and Somali regions The results show that more households continued to adopt negative coping strategies by reducing the number of meals consumed in a day consuming less expensive or less preferred foods or limiting the portion of meals served More households reported engaging in degrading activities including involving children in income generating activities collecting and selling firewood while several borrowed money and relied on friends relatives for food This forces refugees to rely on the resources of the host community and the environment in which they live which also increases the likelihood of resource based conflicts between refugees and host communities More resources must be urgently mobilized to meet the immediate food and non food needs of refugees to prevent further suffering while similar investments are made to enable sustainable food solutions embedded in the commitments made in the Global Compact for Refugees GCR 1 and the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework CRRF 2 for refugees and host communities through livelihoods and cash programmes in line with UNHCR and RRS strategies As a short term measure WFP and its partners continue to prioritize the needs of children aged 6 23 months and pregnant and lactating women under the malnutrition prevention program general supplementary feeding Three quarters of a million refugees will go without food in a matter of weeks unless we receive funding immediately said Claude Jibidar WFP Representative and Country Director for Ethiopia The priority for all of us must be to restore assistance to at least minimal levels for the refugees all of whom rely solely on WFP food and cash assistance to survive We have a shortfall of 73 million for the minimum needs of refugees and we are deeply concerned that if funding cuts continue they may consider returning to their places of origin when it is not safe If there is an immediate response from donors WFP will be able to purchase food available in the region and transport it to meet the dietary needs of the refugees WFP will also transfer cash to refugees giving them a choice on how to meet their immediate needs and stimulating local markets We are very concerned about the lack of food for the refugees The continuing lack of full rations for refugees coupled with the impact of the most severe drought the country has experienced in more than 40 years will greatly undermine the gains made in refugee protection and risk affecting the peaceful coexistence between refugees and their hosts communities said UNHCR Deputy Representative in Ethiopia Margaret Atieno We are grateful for what donors have provided so far but more funds are needed and quickly Ethiopia with its progressive refugee policy and commitments has striven to ensure the sustainable self reliance of refugees and host communities with its meager resources struggling with recurring funding gaps from the international community The subsequent deduction from the general fund for humanitarian assistance to refugees in Ethiopia in recent years has not only affected the immediate basic needs of the refugees but has also hampered the long term sustainable self reliance and coexistence of refugees and families host communities RRS CEO Tesfahun Gobezay said Ongoing resource constraints create conflict and stress due to competition for scarce existing local resources Persistent budget cuts and the recent deduction of 50 of food and cash assistance to refugees from the recommended minimum standard severely affect the lives of refugees exposing them to chronic hunger anemia sexual exploitation and death as more than 85 percent of the refugees in Ethiopia are totally dependent on WFP s monthly food rations This will undermine the positive development of Ethiopia to ensure the self reliance and coexistence of refugees and host communities and above all will hamper all efforts to save lives WFP UNHCR and RRS continue to prioritize the food needs of refugees and have established an effective system to identify the food assistance needs of refugees through biometric verification ensuring accountability and the right to receive food assistance and in monthly cash The three agencies call on all partners to strengthen efforts to address the medium and long term food needs of refugees in line with the 2019 Refugee Proclamation of the Government of Ethiopia and the commitments contained in the GCR and the CRRF Ethiopia hosts more than a million registered refugees and asylum seekers Most of them are from South Sudan Somalia Eritrea and Sudan Of these some 750 000 are totally dependent on humanitarian food assistance RRS is managing the distribution of food and cash assistance to refugees in a more accountable and transparent way according to the biometric database RRS will continue to ensure that asylum seekers and refugees have access to biometric registration level three to meet their assistance and protection needs WFP UNHCR and RRS continue to count on the donor community to expand financial support to refugees based on the principle of shared responsibility to implement life saving core humanitarian activities 1 The Global Compact on Refugees GCR affirmed by the UN General Assembly on December 17 2018 is designed to promote shared responsibility between host countries and communities to better support refugees 2 As set out in the 2016 New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework CRRF focuses on the importance of supporting countries and communities hosting large numbers of refugees promoting inclusion of refugees in host communities and develop a whole of society approach to refugee responses
    The United Nations World Food Program (WFP), the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), the Refugee and Returnee Service (RRS) request funds to continue feeding more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia
    Africa6 months ago

    The United Nations World Food Program (WFP), the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), the Refugee and Returnee Service (RRS) request funds to continue feeding more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia

    The United Nations World Food Program (WFP), the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the Ethiopian Government's Refugee and Return Service (RRS) today requested US$73 million to provide food rations.

    food to more than 750,000 refugees in Ethiopia over the next six months.

    .

    WFP will run out of food for refugees in October, leaving vulnerable families dependent on food assistance at risk of malnutrition, micronutrient deficiency, disease/infection susceptibility and heightened protection risks, the three agencies warn.

    Due to prolonged funding shortages, WFP has already been forced to cut rations for 750,000 registered refugees living in 22 camps and five host community sites in Afar, Amhara, Benishangul-Gumuz, Gambella, Somali and Tigray of Ethiopia.

    Food rations for refugees in Ethiopia were first reduced by 16% in November 2015, 40% in November 2021 and 50% in June 2022.

    Food insecurity among refugees has increased as a result of cutbacks and is further exacerbated by ongoing global constraints on food availability, economic crises, rising food and energy costs, the fallout from COVID-19, conflict and insecurity.

    To understand the impact of ration cuts on the food security and socio-economic situation of refugees, WFP, UNHCR and RRS conducted a rapid assessment in April based on 1,215 households residing in camps located in Afar, Beneshangul- Gumuz, Gambella and Somali regions.

    The results show that more households continued to adopt negative coping strategies by reducing the number of meals consumed in a day, consuming less expensive or less preferred foods, or limiting the portion of meals served.

    More households reported engaging in degrading activities, including involving children in income-generating activities, collecting and selling firewood, while several borrowed money and relied on friends/relatives for food.

    This forces refugees to rely on the resources of the host community and the environment in which they live, which also increases the likelihood of resource-based conflicts between refugees and host communities.

    More resources must be urgently mobilized to meet the immediate food and non-food needs of refugees to prevent further suffering, while similar investments are made to enable sustainable food solutions embedded in the commitments made in the Global Compact for Refugees (GCR)[1] and the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF)[2] for refugees and host communities through livelihoods and cash programmes, in line with UNHCR and RRS strategies.

    As a short-term measure, WFP and its partners continue to prioritize the needs of children aged 6–23 months and pregnant and lactating women under the malnutrition prevention program (general supplementary feeding).

    “Three-quarters of a million refugees will go without food in a matter of weeks unless we receive funding immediately,” said Claude Jibidar, WFP Representative and Country Director for Ethiopia.

    “The priority for all of us must be to restore assistance to at least minimal levels for the refugees, all of whom rely solely on WFP food and cash assistance to survive.” “We have a shortfall of $73 million for the minimum needs of refugees and we are deeply concerned that if funding cuts continue, they may consider returning to their places of origin when it is not safe.” If there is an immediate response from donors, WFP will be able to purchase food available in the region and transport it to meet the dietary needs of the refugees.

    WFP will also transfer cash to refugees, giving them a choice on how to meet their immediate needs and stimulating local markets.

    “We are very concerned about the lack of food for the refugees.

    The continuing lack of full rations for refugees, coupled with the impact of the most severe drought the country has experienced in more than 40 years, will greatly undermine the gains made in refugee protection and risk affecting the peaceful coexistence between refugees and their hosts.

    communities,” said UNHCR Deputy Representative in Ethiopia, Margaret Atieno.

    “We are grateful for what donors have provided so far, but more funds are needed, and quickly.” “Ethiopia, with its progressive refugee policy and commitments, has striven to ensure the sustainable self-reliance of refugees and host communities with its meager resources, struggling with recurring funding gaps from the international community.

    The subsequent deduction from the general fund for humanitarian assistance to refugees in Ethiopia in recent years has not only affected the immediate basic needs of the refugees, but has also hampered the long-term sustainable self-reliance and coexistence of refugees and families.

    host communities”.

    RRS CEO Tesfahun Gobezay said.

    “Ongoing resource constraints create conflict and stress due to competition for scarce existing local resources.

    Persistent budget cuts and the recent deduction of 50% of food and cash assistance to refugees from the recommended minimum standard severely affect the lives of refugees, exposing them to chronic hunger, anemia, sexual exploitation and death, as more than 85 percent of the refugees in Ethiopia are totally dependent on WFP's monthly food rations.

    This will undermine the positive development of Ethiopia to ensure the self-reliance and coexistence of refugees and host communities and, above all, will hamper all efforts to save lives.” WFP, UNHCR and RRS continue to prioritize the food needs of refugees and have established an effective system to identify the food assistance needs of refugees through biometric verification, ensuring accountability and the right to receive food assistance and in monthly cash.

    The three agencies call on all partners to strengthen efforts to address the medium and long-term food needs of refugees, in line with the 2019 Refugee Proclamation of the Government of Ethiopia and the commitments contained in the GCR and the CRRF.

    Ethiopia hosts more than a million registered refugees and asylum seekers.

    Most of them are from South Sudan, Somalia, Eritrea and Sudan.

    Of these, some 750,000 are totally dependent on humanitarian food assistance.

    RRS is managing the distribution of food and cash assistance to refugees in a more accountable and transparent way according to the biometric database.

    RRS will continue to ensure that asylum seekers and refugees have access to biometric registration (level three) to meet their assistance and protection needs.

    WFP, UNHCR and RRS continue to count on the donor community to expand financial support to refugees based on the principle of shared responsibility to implement life-saving core humanitarian activities.

    [1] The Global Compact on Refugees (GCR), affirmed by the UN General Assembly on December 17, 2018, is designed to promote shared responsibility between host countries and communities to better support refugees.

    [2] As set out in the 2016 New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF) focuses on the importance of supporting countries and communities hosting large numbers of refugees, promoting inclusion of refugees in host communities and develop a 'whole of society' approach to refugee responses.

  •   Civil Society Organizations CSOs will gather July 6 7 in Addis Ababa Ethiopia for the Outstanding CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum to share stories lessons learned and promising practices to end all forms of violence against women and girls in Africa The Spotlight CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum to be held July 6 7 in Addis Ababa will bring together five CSOs that are implementing projects under the Spotlight Initiative to share knowledge on Ending Violence Against Women and Girls EVAWG Harmful Practices HR and Promoting Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights SRHRR as well as how to engage in African Union Commission AUC processes Government counterparts members of the AUC other civil society organizations and development partners will also be present at the Forum CSOs and women s rights networks in Africa are doing essential work in designing and implementing initiatives to end violence against women and girls The CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum aims to fully harness the stories and learnings from CSO life changing initiatives said Ms Awa Ndiaye Seck UN Women Special Representative to the African Union AU and the Economic Commission for Africa ECA The CSOs that will be present at the Forum were selected by UN Women after a call for papers for regional interventions to end violence against women and girls in their countries through the support of the Spotlight initiative The selected CSOs that will share their stories in the Forum are 1 African Center for Leadership Strategy and Development Centre LSD Nigeria 2 Development Education Network Liberia DEN L Liberia 3 Girl Rights GCR Mozambique 4 Justice Centers JCU Uganda 5 Musasa Zimbabwe The five CSOs have provided assistance to survivors of gender based violence in their regions offering programs that promote women s economic empowerment women s access to justice financial education temporary shelters legal support among others stories of hope As part of its work to restore dignity and confidence to women in various provinces of Zimbabwe Musasa launched the mobile One Stop Centre to provide temporary accommodation medical treatment legal advice food medicine life skills and advice women and girls who suffer gender based violence As two adolescents who suffered gender based violence explain We could have missed the opportunity to take Post Exposure Prophylaxis PEP due to lack of information and long distances to clinical services Thanks to Musasa we are safe and our search for justice was a success The two girls are among 1 674 survivors served through the mobile One Stop Center implemented by the Musasa Center under the Spotlight Initiative Recognizing the role of men in breaking the cycle of violence against women the African Center for Leadership Strategy and Development Centre LSD in Nigeria implemented the Men s Participation Program for the Reduction of Based Violence on gender SRHR HP with a strategic approach to work with men traditional and religious leaders and youth groups At the Spotlight CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum the LSD Center will share its experience working with men and boys in abolishing the money woman tradition that involved child marriage and the use of girls for debt settlement The tradition was abolished in August 2020 during the Spotlight Initiative project in Obanliku Nigeria The resolution to end the ancient practice of money woman was not that easy We have taken the necessary traditional steps to eliminate the practice We have also carried out advocacy and information activities in the community and beyond to get to where we are today shares Mr Vincent Dania Program Coordinator at Center LSD Civil society and women led organizations play a critical role in advancing gender equality in African countries The Highlight CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum provides an opportunity for CSOs to highlight the interventions they are making in their regions but more importantly creates a space to learn from each other s practices and lessons for build a just and equitable peace future of women and girls in Africa
    Spotlight CSOs Knowledge Sharing Forum: Stories from Civil Society Organizations (CSO) in preventing violence against women and girls
      Civil Society Organizations CSOs will gather July 6 7 in Addis Ababa Ethiopia for the Outstanding CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum to share stories lessons learned and promising practices to end all forms of violence against women and girls in Africa The Spotlight CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum to be held July 6 7 in Addis Ababa will bring together five CSOs that are implementing projects under the Spotlight Initiative to share knowledge on Ending Violence Against Women and Girls EVAWG Harmful Practices HR and Promoting Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights SRHRR as well as how to engage in African Union Commission AUC processes Government counterparts members of the AUC other civil society organizations and development partners will also be present at the Forum CSOs and women s rights networks in Africa are doing essential work in designing and implementing initiatives to end violence against women and girls The CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum aims to fully harness the stories and learnings from CSO life changing initiatives said Ms Awa Ndiaye Seck UN Women Special Representative to the African Union AU and the Economic Commission for Africa ECA The CSOs that will be present at the Forum were selected by UN Women after a call for papers for regional interventions to end violence against women and girls in their countries through the support of the Spotlight initiative The selected CSOs that will share their stories in the Forum are 1 African Center for Leadership Strategy and Development Centre LSD Nigeria 2 Development Education Network Liberia DEN L Liberia 3 Girl Rights GCR Mozambique 4 Justice Centers JCU Uganda 5 Musasa Zimbabwe The five CSOs have provided assistance to survivors of gender based violence in their regions offering programs that promote women s economic empowerment women s access to justice financial education temporary shelters legal support among others stories of hope As part of its work to restore dignity and confidence to women in various provinces of Zimbabwe Musasa launched the mobile One Stop Centre to provide temporary accommodation medical treatment legal advice food medicine life skills and advice women and girls who suffer gender based violence As two adolescents who suffered gender based violence explain We could have missed the opportunity to take Post Exposure Prophylaxis PEP due to lack of information and long distances to clinical services Thanks to Musasa we are safe and our search for justice was a success The two girls are among 1 674 survivors served through the mobile One Stop Center implemented by the Musasa Center under the Spotlight Initiative Recognizing the role of men in breaking the cycle of violence against women the African Center for Leadership Strategy and Development Centre LSD in Nigeria implemented the Men s Participation Program for the Reduction of Based Violence on gender SRHR HP with a strategic approach to work with men traditional and religious leaders and youth groups At the Spotlight CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum the LSD Center will share its experience working with men and boys in abolishing the money woman tradition that involved child marriage and the use of girls for debt settlement The tradition was abolished in August 2020 during the Spotlight Initiative project in Obanliku Nigeria The resolution to end the ancient practice of money woman was not that easy We have taken the necessary traditional steps to eliminate the practice We have also carried out advocacy and information activities in the community and beyond to get to where we are today shares Mr Vincent Dania Program Coordinator at Center LSD Civil society and women led organizations play a critical role in advancing gender equality in African countries The Highlight CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum provides an opportunity for CSOs to highlight the interventions they are making in their regions but more importantly creates a space to learn from each other s practices and lessons for build a just and equitable peace future of women and girls in Africa
    Spotlight CSOs Knowledge Sharing Forum: Stories from Civil Society Organizations (CSO) in preventing violence against women and girls
    Africa7 months ago

    Spotlight CSOs Knowledge Sharing Forum: Stories from Civil Society Organizations (CSO) in preventing violence against women and girls

    Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) will gather July 6-7 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for the “Outstanding CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum” to share stories, lessons learned and promising practices to end all forms of violence against women and girls in Africa.

    The “Spotlight CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum”, to be held July 6-7 in Addis Ababa, will bring together five CSOs that are implementing projects under the Spotlight Initiative, to share knowledge on Ending Violence Against Women and Girls (EVAWG), Harmful Practices (HR) and Promoting Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHRR), as well as how to engage in African Union Commission (AUC) processes. Government counterparts, members of the AUC, other civil society organizations and development partners will also be present at the Forum.

    “CSOs and women's rights networks in Africa are doing essential work in designing and implementing initiatives to end violence against women and girls. The CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum aims to fully harness the stories and learnings from CSO life-changing initiatives,” said Ms. Awa Ndiaye-Seck, UN Women Special Representative to the African Union (AU). and the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA).

    The CSOs that will be present at the Forum were selected by UN Women after a call for papers for regional interventions to end violence against women and girls in their countries through the support of the Spotlight initiative. The selected CSOs that will share their stories in the Forum are:

    1. African Center for Leadership, Strategy and Development (Centre LSD), Nigeria 2. Development Education Network-Liberia (DEN-L), Liberia 3. Girl Rights (GCR) Mozambique 4. Justice Centers (JCU), Uganda 5. Musasa, Zimbabwe

    The five CSOs have provided assistance to survivors of gender-based violence in their regions, offering programs that promote women's economic empowerment, women's access to justice, financial education, temporary shelters, legal support, among others.

    stories of hope

    As part of its work to restore dignity and confidence to women in various provinces of Zimbabwe, Musasa launched the mobile 'One Stop Centre' to provide temporary accommodation, medical treatment, legal advice, food, medicine, life skills and advice. women and girls who suffer gender-based violence.

    As two adolescents who suffered gender-based violence explain: “We could have missed the opportunity to take Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) due to lack of information and long distances to clinical services. Thanks to Musasa we are safe and our search for justice was a success.” The two girls are among 1,674 survivors served through the mobile 'One Stop Center' implemented by the Musasa Center under the Spotlight Initiative.

    Recognizing the role of men in breaking the cycle of violence against women, the African Center for Leadership, Strategy and Development (Centre LSD), in Nigeria, implemented the "Men's Participation Program for the Reduction of Based Violence on gender/SRHR/HP", with a strategic approach. to work with men, traditional and religious leaders and youth groups.

    At the 'Spotlight CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum', the LSD Center will share its experience working with men and boys in abolishing the 'money-woman' tradition that involved child marriage and the use of girls for debt settlement. The tradition was abolished in August 2020 during the Spotlight Initiative project in Obanliku, Nigeria.

    "The resolution to end the ancient practice of 'money-woman' was not that easy. We have taken the necessary traditional steps to eliminate the practice. We have also carried out advocacy and information activities in the community and beyond to get to where we are today,” shares Mr. Vincent Dania, Program Coordinator at Center LSD.

    Civil society and women-led organizations play a critical role in advancing gender equality in African countries. The 'Highlight CSO Knowledge Exchange Forum' provides an opportunity for CSOs to highlight the interventions they are making in their regions but, more importantly, creates a space to learn from each other's practices and lessons for build a just and equitable peace. future of women and girls in Africa.

  •  The Federal Government is committed to the implementation of the Global Compact on Refugees GCR in Nigeria The Federal Commissioner of the National Commission for Refugees Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons NCFRMI Ms Imaan Sulaiman Ibrahim made this known in Abuja during an event to commemorate the World Refugee Day It has as theme the Right to Seek Safety The News Agency of Nigeria reports that World Refugee Day is an international day celebrated every June 20 and it is designated by the United Nations UN to honour refugees around the globe The day is also set aside to celebrate the strength and courage of people who have been forced to flee their home country to escape conflict or persecution Sulaiman Ibrahim said that Nigerian government would continue to support persons of concern in the country She added that the commission had undertaken the registration of refugees into the National Health Insurance Scheme According to her the importance of this message is that every person has the right to seek safety whoever they are wherever they come from and whenever they are forced to flee To live in dignity safety and peace does not discriminate against race skin colour tribe social status placement or class It is a fundamental human right We will continue to give them assistance support and protection We have also embarked on a massive training of our registration protection staff to do more for refugees and persons of concern She said that this year s theme captured and pointed to the fact that people seeking asylum due to persecution conflict or human rights abuse were simply exercising their basic human rights to life and dignity To such vulnerable people international borders should be open without discrimination to facilitate their flight to safety zones of choice Sulaiman Ibrahim who also spoke on the implementation of the Global Compact on Refugees GCR pledges said that the commission in collaboration with other relevant stakeholders had commenced bilateral meetings with relevant implementing bodies This she said was to enhance buy in and implementation process We have carried out GCR sensitisation programmes in Cross River and Taraba states with a view to ensuring that states begin to effectively key into the implementation process she said She therefore commended President Muhammadu Buhari and the Minister of Humanitarian Affairs and Disaster Management Hajiya Sadiya Umar Farouq for providing one of the best environments for refugees to operate in The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the UNHCR says Nigeria is home to over 77 000 refugees and asylum seekers The UN said some 67 000 women men and children fled violence in Cameroon NAN reports that the UN commended the federal government for providing land for refugee settlements NewsSourceCredit NAN
    FG committed to protecting refugees, says Commissioner
     The Federal Government is committed to the implementation of the Global Compact on Refugees GCR in Nigeria The Federal Commissioner of the National Commission for Refugees Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons NCFRMI Ms Imaan Sulaiman Ibrahim made this known in Abuja during an event to commemorate the World Refugee Day It has as theme the Right to Seek Safety The News Agency of Nigeria reports that World Refugee Day is an international day celebrated every June 20 and it is designated by the United Nations UN to honour refugees around the globe The day is also set aside to celebrate the strength and courage of people who have been forced to flee their home country to escape conflict or persecution Sulaiman Ibrahim said that Nigerian government would continue to support persons of concern in the country She added that the commission had undertaken the registration of refugees into the National Health Insurance Scheme According to her the importance of this message is that every person has the right to seek safety whoever they are wherever they come from and whenever they are forced to flee To live in dignity safety and peace does not discriminate against race skin colour tribe social status placement or class It is a fundamental human right We will continue to give them assistance support and protection We have also embarked on a massive training of our registration protection staff to do more for refugees and persons of concern She said that this year s theme captured and pointed to the fact that people seeking asylum due to persecution conflict or human rights abuse were simply exercising their basic human rights to life and dignity To such vulnerable people international borders should be open without discrimination to facilitate their flight to safety zones of choice Sulaiman Ibrahim who also spoke on the implementation of the Global Compact on Refugees GCR pledges said that the commission in collaboration with other relevant stakeholders had commenced bilateral meetings with relevant implementing bodies This she said was to enhance buy in and implementation process We have carried out GCR sensitisation programmes in Cross River and Taraba states with a view to ensuring that states begin to effectively key into the implementation process she said She therefore commended President Muhammadu Buhari and the Minister of Humanitarian Affairs and Disaster Management Hajiya Sadiya Umar Farouq for providing one of the best environments for refugees to operate in The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the UNHCR says Nigeria is home to over 77 000 refugees and asylum seekers The UN said some 67 000 women men and children fled violence in Cameroon NAN reports that the UN commended the federal government for providing land for refugee settlements NewsSourceCredit NAN
    FG committed to protecting refugees, says Commissioner
    General news7 months ago

    FG committed to protecting refugees, says Commissioner

    The Federal Government is committed to the implementation of the Global Compact on Refugees (GCR) in Nigeria.

    The Federal Commissioner of the National Commission for Refugees, Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons (NCFRMI), Ms Imaan Sulaiman-Ibrahim, made this known in Abuja during an event to commemorate the World Refugee Day.

    It has as theme: “the Right to Seek Safety.”

    The News Agency of Nigeria reports that World Refugee Day is an international day celebrated every June 20 and it is designated by the United Nations (UN) to honour refugees around the globe.

    The day is also set aside to celebrate the strength and courage of people who have been forced to flee their home country to escape conflict or persecution.

    Sulaiman-Ibrahim said that Nigerian government would continue to support persons of concern in the country.

    She added that the commission had undertaken the registration of refugees into the National Health Insurance Scheme.

    According to her, the importance of this message is that every person has the right to seek safety, whoever they are, wherever they come from and whenever they are forced to flee.

    “To live in dignity, safety and peace does not discriminate against race, skin colour, tribe, social status, placement or class. It is a fundamental human right.

    “We will continue to give them assistance, support and protection.

    “We have also embarked on a massive training of our registration protection staff to do more for refugees and persons of concern”.

    She said that this year’s theme captured and pointed to the fact that people seeking asylum due to persecution, conflict or human rights abuse were simply exercising their basic human rights to life and dignity.

    “To such vulnerable people, international borders should be open without discrimination to facilitate their flight to safety-zones of choice”.

    Sulaiman-Ibrahim who also spoke on the implementation of the Global Compact on Refugees (GCR) pledges, said that the commission in collaboration with other relevant stakeholders had commenced bilateral meetings with relevant implementing bodies.

    This, she said was to enhance buy-in and implementation process.

    “We have carried out GCR sensitisation programmes in Cross River and Taraba states with a view to ensuring that states begin to effectively key into the implementation process,” she said.

    She therefore, commended President Muhammadu Buhari and the Minister of Humanitarian Affairs and Disaster Management, Hajiya Sadiya Umar Farouq, for providing one of the best environments for refugees to operate in.

    The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the UNHCR says Nigeria is home to over 77,000 refugees and asylum-seekers.

    The UN said some 67,000 women, men and children – fled violence in Cameroon. 

    NAN reports that the UN commended the federal government for providing land for refugee settlements. (

    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   Presco Plc has announced the issuance of N34 5 billion Series 1 seven year fixed rate bonds under its N50 billion bond issuance programme This is contained in a statement that Nwabuko the company s Managing Director made available to the Nigerian News Agency in Benin on Tuesday Nwabuko said the bond attracted participation from a wide range of investors including pension funds asset managers insurance companies banks and high net worth individuals He praised the institutional investor community for supporting the transaction during the signing ceremony for the bond issue that took place on Tuesday at the company s Obaretin Estate Benin Edo Nwabuko said the bond issue was 24 percent underwritten and had a coupon price of 12 85 percent Presco sought to raise N30 billion but the order book closed at N74 billion so the company chose to issue an additional 15 per cent to investors thus raising a total of N34 5 billion Stanbic IBTC Capital Ltd acted as lead issuer of the bond issue while CardinalStone Partners Ltd and Quantum Zenith Capital and Investments Ltd acted as joint issuers of the bond issue Nwabuko said We are pleased with our first bond issue and grateful to our institutional investor community for supporting the transaction This is a landmark transaction for Presco and has expanded our long term funding sources The success of this transaction demonstrates the resilience of our business its strong cash generation and a long term future with enormous potential for sustainable growth in a fundamental sector for the country s agri food promotion strategy which made its positioning possible in Nigeria the largest country in Africa palm oil product market This is supported by Agusto Co s rating and GCR s A rating Caption From left to right Director of Fice Presco Plc Mr Kenneth Crocket Managing Director Presco Plc Mr Feix Nwabuko Managing Director Stanbic IBTC Funsho Akere and Acting Group CEO Siat Group Mr Jan Van Eykeren at the signing of Presco Plc N34 5billion Series 1 Bond on Tuesday in Benin Edo StateHe said the bond would be listed on the Nigerian Exchange Ltd and the FMDQ Securities Exchange Also speaking Mr Funso Akere CEO of Stanbic IBTC Capital said Stanbic IBTC Capital CardinalStone Partners and Quantum Zenith Capital are delighted to have advised Presco on its first issuance in the Nigerian debt capital markets We thank the institutional investor community for supporting the issue as its success should encourage other similar companies to access the domestic debt capital markets for their strategic financing needs We also thank the Presco board of directors and management for giving the issuers carte blanche to guide the process Stanbic IBTC Capital is particularly pleased to have worked on this historic issue having handled Presco s Initial Public Offering and listed on the Nigerian Exchange Ltd two decades ago Additionally Quantum Zenith Capital Managing Director CEO Kennedy Ichibor and Michael Nzewi of Cardinal Stone praised the firm for creating an environment conducive to the transaction They praised the company for maintaining its growth path over the years
    Presco issues N34.5bn bond
      Presco Plc has announced the issuance of N34 5 billion Series 1 seven year fixed rate bonds under its N50 billion bond issuance programme This is contained in a statement that Nwabuko the company s Managing Director made available to the Nigerian News Agency in Benin on Tuesday Nwabuko said the bond attracted participation from a wide range of investors including pension funds asset managers insurance companies banks and high net worth individuals He praised the institutional investor community for supporting the transaction during the signing ceremony for the bond issue that took place on Tuesday at the company s Obaretin Estate Benin Edo Nwabuko said the bond issue was 24 percent underwritten and had a coupon price of 12 85 percent Presco sought to raise N30 billion but the order book closed at N74 billion so the company chose to issue an additional 15 per cent to investors thus raising a total of N34 5 billion Stanbic IBTC Capital Ltd acted as lead issuer of the bond issue while CardinalStone Partners Ltd and Quantum Zenith Capital and Investments Ltd acted as joint issuers of the bond issue Nwabuko said We are pleased with our first bond issue and grateful to our institutional investor community for supporting the transaction This is a landmark transaction for Presco and has expanded our long term funding sources The success of this transaction demonstrates the resilience of our business its strong cash generation and a long term future with enormous potential for sustainable growth in a fundamental sector for the country s agri food promotion strategy which made its positioning possible in Nigeria the largest country in Africa palm oil product market This is supported by Agusto Co s rating and GCR s A rating Caption From left to right Director of Fice Presco Plc Mr Kenneth Crocket Managing Director Presco Plc Mr Feix Nwabuko Managing Director Stanbic IBTC Funsho Akere and Acting Group CEO Siat Group Mr Jan Van Eykeren at the signing of Presco Plc N34 5billion Series 1 Bond on Tuesday in Benin Edo StateHe said the bond would be listed on the Nigerian Exchange Ltd and the FMDQ Securities Exchange Also speaking Mr Funso Akere CEO of Stanbic IBTC Capital said Stanbic IBTC Capital CardinalStone Partners and Quantum Zenith Capital are delighted to have advised Presco on its first issuance in the Nigerian debt capital markets We thank the institutional investor community for supporting the issue as its success should encourage other similar companies to access the domestic debt capital markets for their strategic financing needs We also thank the Presco board of directors and management for giving the issuers carte blanche to guide the process Stanbic IBTC Capital is particularly pleased to have worked on this historic issue having handled Presco s Initial Public Offering and listed on the Nigerian Exchange Ltd two decades ago Additionally Quantum Zenith Capital Managing Director CEO Kennedy Ichibor and Michael Nzewi of Cardinal Stone praised the firm for creating an environment conducive to the transaction They praised the company for maintaining its growth path over the years
    Presco issues N34.5bn bond
    Business10 months ago

    Presco issues N34.5bn bond

    Presco Plc has announced the issuance of N34.5 billion Series 1 seven-year fixed rate bonds under its N50 billion bond issuance programme.

    This is contained in a statement that Nwabuko, the company's Managing Director, made available to the Nigerian News Agency in Benin on Tuesday.

    Nwabuko said the bond attracted participation from a wide range of investors, including pension funds, asset managers, insurance companies, banks and high net worth individuals.

    He praised the institutional investor community for supporting the transaction during the signing ceremony for the bond issue that took place on Tuesday at the company's Obaretin Estate, Benin, Edo.

    Nwabuko said the bond issue was 24 percent underwritten and had a coupon price of 12.85 percent.

    “Presco sought to raise N30 billion, but the order book closed at N74 billion, so the company chose to issue an additional 15 per cent to investors, thus raising a total of N34.5 billion.

    "Stanbic IBTC Capital Ltd acted as lead issuer of the bond issue, while CardinalStone Partners Ltd and Quantum Zenith Capital and Investments Ltd acted as joint issuers of the bond issue."

    Nwabuko said: “We are pleased with our first bond issue and grateful to our institutional investor community for supporting the transaction.

    “This is a landmark transaction for Presco and has expanded our long-term funding sources.

    “The success of this transaction demonstrates the resilience of our business, its strong cash generation and a long-term future with enormous potential for sustainable growth, in a fundamental sector for the country's agri-food promotion strategy, which made its positioning possible. in Nigeria, the largest country in Africa. palm oil product market.

    "This is supported by Agusto & Co's + rating and GCR's A- rating."

    Caption: From left to right: Director of Fice, Presco Plc, Mr. Kenneth Crocket, Managing Director, Presco Plc, Mr. Feix Nwabuko, Managing Director, Stanbic IBTC, Funsho Akere and Acting Group CEO, Siat Group, Mr. Jan Van Eykeren, at the signing of Presco Plc N34.5billion Series 1 Bond on Tuesday in Benin, Edo State

    He said the bond would be listed on the Nigerian Exchange Ltd and the FMDQ Securities Exchange.

    Also speaking, Mr. Funso Akere, CEO of Stanbic IBTC Capital, said: “Stanbic IBTC Capital, CardinalStone Partners and Quantum Zenith Capital are delighted to have advised Presco on its first issuance in the Nigerian debt capital markets.

    “We thank the institutional investor community for supporting the issue, as its success should encourage other similar companies to access the domestic debt capital markets for their strategic financing needs.

    “We also thank the Presco board of directors and management for giving the issuers carte blanche to guide the process.

    "Stanbic IBTC Capital is particularly pleased to have worked on this historic issue, having handled Presco's Initial Public Offering and listed on the Nigerian Exchange Ltd two decades ago."

    Additionally, Quantum Zenith Capital Managing Director/CEO Kennedy Ichibor and Michael Nzewi of Cardinal Stone praised the firm for creating an environment conducive to the transaction.

    They praised the company for maintaining its growth path over the years.

  •   By combining GCR s successful domestic operations with Moody s global experience we have a unique opportunity to expand Moody s presence in a high growth region NEW YORK United States of America February 2 2022 APO Group Moody s Corporation NYSE MCO www Moodys com announced today that it has agreed to acquire a majority 51 interest in Global Credit Rating Company Limited GCR GCR is a leading credit rating agency in Africa with operations across the continent including in South Africa Nigeria Senegal Kenya and Mauritius GCR s ratings play an important role in the growth of Africa s financial markets by providing critical credit information across a variety of economies and sectors said Rob Fauber Moody s Chairman and CEO By combining GCR s successful domestic operations with Moody s global experience we have a unique opportunity to expand Moody s presence in a high growth region This is an important milestone in GCR s history said Marc Joffe CEO of GCR This transaction will allow us to leverage our deep local market knowledge and a quarter century of growth across the continent It will also provide the opportunity to further develop solutions that meet a variety of client needs including credit ratings credit risk solutions and ESG capabilities Moody s is committed to economic transformation in South Africa and views empowerment as an important part of the future success of its investment in GCR To this end Moody s is collaborating with a South Africa based empowerment partner who will provide local strategic support through a substantial shareholding and board representation of GCR South Africa Moody s and GCR are also committed to playing a positive social role In South Africa Moody s and GCR intend to promote corporate social responsibility initiatives including social enterprises that provide education and support to women owned businesses and entrepreneurs Following the transaction GCR will continue to develop its own rating methodologies issue its own credit ratings and maintain a separate management team The transaction is subject to customary regulatory approvals Terms of the transaction were not disclosed and it will be financed with available cash The transaction is expected to close in the second quarter of 2022 and will not have a material impact on Moody s 2022 financial results
    Moody’s to Acquire Majority Stake in GCR Ratings, Expanding Presence in Africa
      By combining GCR s successful domestic operations with Moody s global experience we have a unique opportunity to expand Moody s presence in a high growth region NEW YORK United States of America February 2 2022 APO Group Moody s Corporation NYSE MCO www Moodys com announced today that it has agreed to acquire a majority 51 interest in Global Credit Rating Company Limited GCR GCR is a leading credit rating agency in Africa with operations across the continent including in South Africa Nigeria Senegal Kenya and Mauritius GCR s ratings play an important role in the growth of Africa s financial markets by providing critical credit information across a variety of economies and sectors said Rob Fauber Moody s Chairman and CEO By combining GCR s successful domestic operations with Moody s global experience we have a unique opportunity to expand Moody s presence in a high growth region This is an important milestone in GCR s history said Marc Joffe CEO of GCR This transaction will allow us to leverage our deep local market knowledge and a quarter century of growth across the continent It will also provide the opportunity to further develop solutions that meet a variety of client needs including credit ratings credit risk solutions and ESG capabilities Moody s is committed to economic transformation in South Africa and views empowerment as an important part of the future success of its investment in GCR To this end Moody s is collaborating with a South Africa based empowerment partner who will provide local strategic support through a substantial shareholding and board representation of GCR South Africa Moody s and GCR are also committed to playing a positive social role In South Africa Moody s and GCR intend to promote corporate social responsibility initiatives including social enterprises that provide education and support to women owned businesses and entrepreneurs Following the transaction GCR will continue to develop its own rating methodologies issue its own credit ratings and maintain a separate management team The transaction is subject to customary regulatory approvals Terms of the transaction were not disclosed and it will be financed with available cash The transaction is expected to close in the second quarter of 2022 and will not have a material impact on Moody s 2022 financial results
    Moody’s to Acquire Majority Stake in GCR Ratings, Expanding Presence in Africa
    Africa12 months ago

    Moody’s to Acquire Majority Stake in GCR Ratings, Expanding Presence in Africa

    By combining GCR's successful domestic operations with Moody's global experience, we have a unique opportunity to expand Moody's presence in a high-growth region.

    NEW YORK, United States of America, February 2, 2022/APO Group/ --

    Moody's Corporation (NYSE: MCO) (www.Moodys.com) announced today that it has agreed to acquire a majority (51%) interest in Global Credit Rating Company Limited (GCR). GCR is a leading credit rating agency in Africa with operations across the continent, including in South Africa, Nigeria, Senegal, Kenya and Mauritius.

    "GCR's ratings play an important role in the growth of Africa's financial markets by providing critical credit information across a variety of economies and sectors," said Rob Fauber, Moody's Chairman and CEO. "By combining GCR's successful domestic operations with Moody's global experience, we have a unique opportunity to expand Moody's presence in a high-growth region."

    “This is an important milestone in GCR's history,” said Marc Joffe, CEO of GCR. “This transaction will allow us to leverage our deep local market knowledge and a quarter-century of growth across the continent. It will also provide the opportunity to further develop solutions that meet a variety of client needs, including credit ratings, credit risk solutions and ESG capabilities."

    Moody's is committed to economic transformation in South Africa and views empowerment as an important part of the future success of its investment in GCR. To this end, Moody's is collaborating with a South Africa-based empowerment partner who will provide local strategic support through a substantial shareholding and board representation of GCR South Africa.

    Moody's and GCR are also committed to playing a positive social role. In South Africa, Moody's and GCR intend to promote corporate social responsibility initiatives, including social enterprises that provide education and support to women-owned businesses and entrepreneurs.

    Following the transaction, GCR will continue to develop its own rating methodologies, issue its own credit ratings and maintain a separate management team.

    The transaction is subject to customary regulatory approvals. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed and it will be financed with available cash. The transaction is expected to close in the second quarter of 2022 and will not have a material impact on Moody's 2022 financial results.

  •   With more than 1 56 million refugees in its territory Uganda is the largest refugee host country in Africa and the fifth largest in the world GENEVA Switzerland December 14 2021 APO Group Uganda will participate virtually today and tomorrow in the High Level Officials Meeting HLOM a forum organized by UNHCR the UN Refugee Agency and held every four years to assess progress in achieving the goals of the Global Compact on Refugees The meeting will feature discussions on ways to scale up support to refugees and their host and host countries advancing the implementation of the promises announced at the first Global Refugee Forum GRF in 2019 and identifying areas that need more support Participants include international organizations humanitarian and development actors international and regional financial institutions members of the host community and refugees among many others The Ugandan delegation in the discussions will be led by the Minister of State for Relief Disaster Preparedness and Refugees Esther Anyakun The Acting Commissioner for Refugees Douglas Asiimwe will also participate in the meeting We have come a long way in advancing an inclusive and responsible refugee response despite the recent challenges posed by the COVID 19 pandemic Minister Anyakun said But the journey is not over As the numbers and needs of refugees increase Uganda calls on the international community to shoulder its responsibility by supporting refugees and the communities that host them to maintain our progressive refugee model he added With more than 1 56 million refugees in its territory Uganda is the largest refugee host country in Africa and the fifth largest in the world after Turkey Colombia Germany and Pakistan In the last three years Uganda has taken concrete steps to fulfill the six commitments made in the GRF maintaining an open door refugee policy commitment 2 which includes refugees in national development plans and statistics commitment 2 promoting inclusion refugee and host communities in the national education system commitment 3 and health services commitment 4 promoting the sustainable management of natural resources and ecosystems commitment 5 and ensuring the integrity of the system of asylum commitment 6 Through the new National Development Plan III 2020 2024 Uganda clearly articulated the need to include refugees in national sectoral and local development plans Under the leadership of relevant ministries and with the support of UNHCR partners and donors the government launched four sector plans to improve the delivery of social services for refugees and local communities in refugee hosting districts namely Education Health Water and Environment and Jobs and livelihoods A fifth sustainable energy plan is underway The HLOM will also review donor efforts to mobilize additional resources and help ease pressures on countries hosting large numbers of refugees It is estimated that more than 2 5 billion has been invested in Uganda s refugee hosting districts in the past three years to improve service delivery and infrastructure such as roads schools hospitals and water systems This includes around 1 billion provided by development partners such as Belgium Denmark the European Union Germany Ireland Japan the Netherlands Norway the Republic of Korea Sweden the United Kingdom the United States of America and the World Bank as well as approximately US 170 7 million that governments and the private sector explicitly pledged during the GRF In the same period the Ugandan Government and host communities continued to provide land for refugee settlement and share social services such as health water and education with them The operationalization of the Global Compact has changed the rules of the game for the response to Ugandan refugees providing practical entry points for additional investment especially along the humanitarian aid and development nexus said Joel Boutroue UNHCR Representative in Uganda I wish to thank Uganda and its people for the exemplary display of hospitality and solidarity with refugees crisis after crisis and I am counting on the international community to do its part and share more responsibility with the largest refugee hosting country in Africa Even with these contributions from the international community and donors the refugee response in Uganda remains highly underfunded with only US 350 9 million received so far in 2021 compared to financial needs of US 767 million 46 In the run up to the HLOM the East African country participated in three of five virtual roundtables on the GCR s Indicators Report Partnerships and Solutions to help inform global discussions
    Uganda joins High-Level Officials Meeting amid record number of refugees in the country
      With more than 1 56 million refugees in its territory Uganda is the largest refugee host country in Africa and the fifth largest in the world GENEVA Switzerland December 14 2021 APO Group Uganda will participate virtually today and tomorrow in the High Level Officials Meeting HLOM a forum organized by UNHCR the UN Refugee Agency and held every four years to assess progress in achieving the goals of the Global Compact on Refugees The meeting will feature discussions on ways to scale up support to refugees and their host and host countries advancing the implementation of the promises announced at the first Global Refugee Forum GRF in 2019 and identifying areas that need more support Participants include international organizations humanitarian and development actors international and regional financial institutions members of the host community and refugees among many others The Ugandan delegation in the discussions will be led by the Minister of State for Relief Disaster Preparedness and Refugees Esther Anyakun The Acting Commissioner for Refugees Douglas Asiimwe will also participate in the meeting We have come a long way in advancing an inclusive and responsible refugee response despite the recent challenges posed by the COVID 19 pandemic Minister Anyakun said But the journey is not over As the numbers and needs of refugees increase Uganda calls on the international community to shoulder its responsibility by supporting refugees and the communities that host them to maintain our progressive refugee model he added With more than 1 56 million refugees in its territory Uganda is the largest refugee host country in Africa and the fifth largest in the world after Turkey Colombia Germany and Pakistan In the last three years Uganda has taken concrete steps to fulfill the six commitments made in the GRF maintaining an open door refugee policy commitment 2 which includes refugees in national development plans and statistics commitment 2 promoting inclusion refugee and host communities in the national education system commitment 3 and health services commitment 4 promoting the sustainable management of natural resources and ecosystems commitment 5 and ensuring the integrity of the system of asylum commitment 6 Through the new National Development Plan III 2020 2024 Uganda clearly articulated the need to include refugees in national sectoral and local development plans Under the leadership of relevant ministries and with the support of UNHCR partners and donors the government launched four sector plans to improve the delivery of social services for refugees and local communities in refugee hosting districts namely Education Health Water and Environment and Jobs and livelihoods A fifth sustainable energy plan is underway The HLOM will also review donor efforts to mobilize additional resources and help ease pressures on countries hosting large numbers of refugees It is estimated that more than 2 5 billion has been invested in Uganda s refugee hosting districts in the past three years to improve service delivery and infrastructure such as roads schools hospitals and water systems This includes around 1 billion provided by development partners such as Belgium Denmark the European Union Germany Ireland Japan the Netherlands Norway the Republic of Korea Sweden the United Kingdom the United States of America and the World Bank as well as approximately US 170 7 million that governments and the private sector explicitly pledged during the GRF In the same period the Ugandan Government and host communities continued to provide land for refugee settlement and share social services such as health water and education with them The operationalization of the Global Compact has changed the rules of the game for the response to Ugandan refugees providing practical entry points for additional investment especially along the humanitarian aid and development nexus said Joel Boutroue UNHCR Representative in Uganda I wish to thank Uganda and its people for the exemplary display of hospitality and solidarity with refugees crisis after crisis and I am counting on the international community to do its part and share more responsibility with the largest refugee hosting country in Africa Even with these contributions from the international community and donors the refugee response in Uganda remains highly underfunded with only US 350 9 million received so far in 2021 compared to financial needs of US 767 million 46 In the run up to the HLOM the East African country participated in three of five virtual roundtables on the GCR s Indicators Report Partnerships and Solutions to help inform global discussions
    Uganda joins High-Level Officials Meeting amid record number of refugees in the country
    Africa1 year ago

    Uganda joins High-Level Officials Meeting amid record number of refugees in the country

    With more than 1.56 million refugees in its territory, Uganda is the largest refugee host country in Africa and the fifth largest in the world.

    GENEVA, Switzerland, December 14, 2021 / APO Group / -

    Uganda will participate virtually today and tomorrow in the High Level Officials Meeting (HLOM), a forum organized by UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency and held every four years to assess progress in achieving the goals of the Global Compact on Refugees.

    The meeting will feature discussions on ways to scale up support to refugees and their host and host countries, advancing the implementation of the promises announced at the first Global Refugee Forum (GRF) in 2019 and identifying areas that need more support. .

    Participants include international organizations, humanitarian and development actors, international and regional financial institutions, members of the host community, and refugees, among many others.

    The Ugandan delegation in the discussions will be led by the Minister of State for Relief, Disaster Preparedness and Refugees, Esther Anyakun. The Acting Commissioner for Refugees, Douglas Asiimwe, will also participate in the meeting.

    "We have come a long way in advancing an inclusive and responsible refugee response, despite the recent challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic," Minister Anyakun said.

    But the journey is not over. As the numbers and needs of refugees increase, Uganda calls on the international community to shoulder its responsibility by supporting refugees and the communities that host them to maintain our progressive refugee model, "he added.

    With more than 1.56 million refugees in its territory, Uganda is the largest refugee host country in Africa and the fifth largest in the world, after Turkey, Colombia, Germany and Pakistan.

    In the last three years, Uganda has taken concrete steps to fulfill the six commitments made in the GRF, maintaining an open-door refugee policy (commitment 2), which includes refugees in national development plans and statistics (commitment 2 ), promoting inclusion. refugee and host communities in the national education system (commitment 3) and health services (commitment 4), promoting the sustainable management of natural resources and ecosystems (commitment 5) and ensuring the integrity of the system of asylum (commitment 6).

    Through the new National Development Plan III (2020-2024), Uganda clearly articulated the need to include refugees in national, sectoral and local development plans. Under the leadership of relevant ministries and with the support of UNHCR, partners and donors, the government launched four sector plans to improve the delivery of social services for refugees and local communities in refugee-hosting districts, namely Education , Health, Water and Environment. and Jobs and livelihoods. A fifth sustainable energy plan is underway.

    The HLOM will also review donor efforts to mobilize additional resources and help ease pressures on countries hosting large numbers of refugees.

    It is estimated that more than $ 2.5 billion has been invested in Uganda's refugee-hosting districts in the past three years to improve service delivery and infrastructure, such as roads, schools, hospitals and water systems.

    This includes around $ 1 billion provided by development partners such as Belgium, Denmark, the European Union, Germany, Ireland, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, the Republic of Korea, Sweden, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and the World Bank. as well as approximately US $ 170.7 million that governments and the private sector explicitly pledged during the GRF.

    In the same period, the Ugandan Government and host communities continued to provide land for refugee settlement and share social services such as health, water and education with them.

    "The operationalization of the Global Compact has changed the rules of the game for the response to Ugandan refugees, providing practical entry points for additional investment, especially along the humanitarian aid and development nexus," said Joel Boutroue. , UNHCR Representative in Uganda. "I wish to thank Uganda and its people for the exemplary display of hospitality and solidarity with refugees, crisis after crisis, and I am counting on the international community to do its part and share more responsibility with the largest refugee-hosting country in Africa." .

    Even with these contributions from the international community and donors, the refugee response in Uganda remains highly underfunded, with only US $ 350.9 million received so far in 2021 compared to financial needs of US $ 767 million (46% ).

    In the run-up to the HLOM, the East African country participated in three of five virtual roundtables on the GCR's Indicators Report, Partnerships and Solutions to help inform global discussions.

  •  LAGOS NIGERIA 29th October 2021 Wema Bank PLC has announced its unaudited 9M 2021 financial results Commenting on the results the Chief Finance Officer Mr Tunde Mabawonku said we are delighted to announce the Bank s 9M 2021 results which shows strong growth in key financial metrics despite the challenging macro economic environment arising from heightened inflation supply chain disruptions and the continued pass through impact of the Covid 19 pandemic The numbers show the Bank continues to grow and improve its market share We have now comfortably crossed the 1trillion mark in total assets and have a share of close to 3 of industry deposits Wema Bank recorded an increase of 135 8 in profit before tax PBT to close the quarter at N7 2billion This follows a Year on Year growth of 9 1 in gross earnings to 63 1billion in 9M 2021 from 57 8billion in 9M 2020 According to Tunde Mabawonku The key measure of success for us is growth in customer numbers and customer activity and we are glad that we are reporting strong growth here Deposit Liabilities grew by 9 3 to 879 8billion in 9M 2021 from 804 9billion in FY 2020 while Total Asset increased by 10 7 to 1 08trillion in 9M 2021 from 979 5billion in FY 2020 We have also unveiled our new Mission and Vision statements which align to our strategy We want to be the dominant digital platform in Africa delivering seamless financial services This plan started with the launch of ALAT a few years ago and is now being accelerated in the last few months We are sure to close the year with an even stronger performance we will also continue to focus on our digital business which is a key boost for customer acquisition consumer lending and transaction volumes while not neglecting our corporate and commercial play On our commercial business we will continue our aggressive strategy to improve our commercial lending business alongside trade and other revenue lines Income Statement Gross earnings increased by 1 Y o Y to 63 1billion in 9M 2021 from 57 8billion in 9M 2020 Profit before Tax PBT and Profit After Tax PAT of 2billion and 6 2billion respectively an increase of 135 8 in 9M 2021 9M 2020 3 1billion PBT 2 6billion PAT Net Interest Income grew to 4billion in 9M 2021from 20 1billion in 9M 2020 growth of 41 5 Non Interest Income also increased from 4billion in 9M 2021 to 11 5billion growth of 0 9 Statement of Financial Position Deposit Liabilities up by 3 to 879 8billion in 9M 2021 from 804 9billion in FY 2020 Loans and Advances to Customers rose by 3 to 397 3billion in 9M 2021 from 360 1billion in FY 2020 Total Asset increased by 7 to 1 07trillion in 9M 2021 from 979 5billion in FY 2020 Key Ratios Return on average equity of 15 04 in 9M 2021 9M 2020 7 26 Return on average assets of 0 90 in Q9M 2021 9M 2020 0 48 30 Non performing loan ratio 9M 2020 4 67 Capital adequacy ratio of 11 64 9M 2020 11 35 Operational Achievements Fitch re affirms Wema Bank s National Long term rating at BBB GCR and Agusto re affirm Wema s National Long term rating at BBB Financial Performance Highlights Below is the performance summary of the Bank Income statement N bn 9M 2021 9M 2020 Gross Earnings 61 57 57 83 3 74 6 5 Interest Income 50 04 46 2 3 84 8 3 Net Interest Income 28 5 20 1 8 4 42 Non interest income 12 11 4 0 6 5 Operating expense 32 4 26 6 5 8 22 Profit before Tax 7 21 2 65 4 5 172 Profit after Tax 6 24 3 1 3 11 101 Earnings Per Share 21 6kobo 9 2kobo 12 4 134 Balance Sheet N 9M 2021 FY 2020 Total Assets 1 07trn 864bn 206bn 23 84 Loans and Advances 397 2bn 360bn 37 2bn 10 3 Deposits 808 9bn 701 8bn 107 1bn 15 2 Shareholders Funds 63 9bn 59 3bn 4 3bn 8 Key Ratios in 9M 2021 9M 2020 Return on Average Equity 15 04 7 26 7 9 Return on Average Asset 1 0 5 0 5 Yield on Asset 11 21 13 43 2 22 Net Interest Margin 6 4 5 84 0 6 Capital Adequacy Ratio 11 64 11 35 0 3 Loan to Deposit Ratio 43 94 49 64 5 7 Non Performing Loans Ratio 4 30 4 67 0 37 Cost to Income Ratio 81 6 89 7 8 1
    WEMA BANK Announces Growth of 135.8% in Profit Before Tax, Total Assets Now Above ₦1trillion Naira
     LAGOS NIGERIA 29th October 2021 Wema Bank PLC has announced its unaudited 9M 2021 financial results Commenting on the results the Chief Finance Officer Mr Tunde Mabawonku said we are delighted to announce the Bank s 9M 2021 results which shows strong growth in key financial metrics despite the challenging macro economic environment arising from heightened inflation supply chain disruptions and the continued pass through impact of the Covid 19 pandemic The numbers show the Bank continues to grow and improve its market share We have now comfortably crossed the 1trillion mark in total assets and have a share of close to 3 of industry deposits Wema Bank recorded an increase of 135 8 in profit before tax PBT to close the quarter at N7 2billion This follows a Year on Year growth of 9 1 in gross earnings to 63 1billion in 9M 2021 from 57 8billion in 9M 2020 According to Tunde Mabawonku The key measure of success for us is growth in customer numbers and customer activity and we are glad that we are reporting strong growth here Deposit Liabilities grew by 9 3 to 879 8billion in 9M 2021 from 804 9billion in FY 2020 while Total Asset increased by 10 7 to 1 08trillion in 9M 2021 from 979 5billion in FY 2020 We have also unveiled our new Mission and Vision statements which align to our strategy We want to be the dominant digital platform in Africa delivering seamless financial services This plan started with the launch of ALAT a few years ago and is now being accelerated in the last few months We are sure to close the year with an even stronger performance we will also continue to focus on our digital business which is a key boost for customer acquisition consumer lending and transaction volumes while not neglecting our corporate and commercial play On our commercial business we will continue our aggressive strategy to improve our commercial lending business alongside trade and other revenue lines Income Statement Gross earnings increased by 1 Y o Y to 63 1billion in 9M 2021 from 57 8billion in 9M 2020 Profit before Tax PBT and Profit After Tax PAT of 2billion and 6 2billion respectively an increase of 135 8 in 9M 2021 9M 2020 3 1billion PBT 2 6billion PAT Net Interest Income grew to 4billion in 9M 2021from 20 1billion in 9M 2020 growth of 41 5 Non Interest Income also increased from 4billion in 9M 2021 to 11 5billion growth of 0 9 Statement of Financial Position Deposit Liabilities up by 3 to 879 8billion in 9M 2021 from 804 9billion in FY 2020 Loans and Advances to Customers rose by 3 to 397 3billion in 9M 2021 from 360 1billion in FY 2020 Total Asset increased by 7 to 1 07trillion in 9M 2021 from 979 5billion in FY 2020 Key Ratios Return on average equity of 15 04 in 9M 2021 9M 2020 7 26 Return on average assets of 0 90 in Q9M 2021 9M 2020 0 48 30 Non performing loan ratio 9M 2020 4 67 Capital adequacy ratio of 11 64 9M 2020 11 35 Operational Achievements Fitch re affirms Wema Bank s National Long term rating at BBB GCR and Agusto re affirm Wema s National Long term rating at BBB Financial Performance Highlights Below is the performance summary of the Bank Income statement N bn 9M 2021 9M 2020 Gross Earnings 61 57 57 83 3 74 6 5 Interest Income 50 04 46 2 3 84 8 3 Net Interest Income 28 5 20 1 8 4 42 Non interest income 12 11 4 0 6 5 Operating expense 32 4 26 6 5 8 22 Profit before Tax 7 21 2 65 4 5 172 Profit after Tax 6 24 3 1 3 11 101 Earnings Per Share 21 6kobo 9 2kobo 12 4 134 Balance Sheet N 9M 2021 FY 2020 Total Assets 1 07trn 864bn 206bn 23 84 Loans and Advances 397 2bn 360bn 37 2bn 10 3 Deposits 808 9bn 701 8bn 107 1bn 15 2 Shareholders Funds 63 9bn 59 3bn 4 3bn 8 Key Ratios in 9M 2021 9M 2020 Return on Average Equity 15 04 7 26 7 9 Return on Average Asset 1 0 5 0 5 Yield on Asset 11 21 13 43 2 22 Net Interest Margin 6 4 5 84 0 6 Capital Adequacy Ratio 11 64 11 35 0 3 Loan to Deposit Ratio 43 94 49 64 5 7 Non Performing Loans Ratio 4 30 4 67 0 37 Cost to Income Ratio 81 6 89 7 8 1
    WEMA BANK Announces Growth of 135.8% in Profit Before Tax, Total Assets Now Above ₦1trillion Naira
    Banking1 year ago

    WEMA BANK Announces Growth of 135.8% in Profit Before Tax, Total Assets Now Above ₦1trillion Naira

    LAGOS, NIGERIA – 29th October 2021 – Wema Bank PLC has announced its unaudited 9M 2021 financial results. Commenting on the results, the Chief Finance Officer Mr Tunde Mabawonku said, “we are delighted to announce the Bank’s 9M 2021 results which shows strong growth in key financial metrics despite the challenging macro-economic environment arising from heightened inflation, supply chain disruptions and the continued pass-through impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.” “The numbers show the Bank continues to grow and improve its market share. We have now comfortably crossed the 1trillion mark in total assets and have a share of close to 3% of industry deposits”. Wema Bank recorded an increase of 135.8% in profit before tax (PBT) to close the quarter at N7.2billion. This follows a Year-on-Year growth of 9.1% in gross earnings to 63.1billion in 9M 2021 from 57.8billion in 9M 2020. According to Tunde Mabawonku, “The key measure of success for us is growth in customer numbers and customer activity – and we are glad that we are reporting strong growth here.” Deposit Liabilities grew by 9.3% to 879.8billion in 9M 2021 from 804.9billion in FY 2020 while Total Asset increased by 10.7% to 1.08trillion in 9M 2021 from 979.5billion in FY 2020. We have also unveiled our new Mission and Vision statements which align to our strategy. We want to be the dominant digital platform in Africa delivering seamless financial services. This plan started with the launch of ALAT a few years ago and is now being accelerated in the last few months. “We are sure to close the year with an even stronger performance; we will also continue to focus on our digital business, which is a key boost for customer acquisition, consumer lending and transaction volumes while not neglecting our corporate and commercial play.  On our commercial business, we will continue our aggressive strategy to improve our commercial lending business alongside trade and other revenue lines’. Income Statement

    • Gross earnings increased by 1% (Y-o-Y) to 63.1billion in 9M 2021 from 57.8billion in 9M 2020.
    • Profit before Tax (PBT) and Profit After Tax (PAT) of 2billion and 6.2billion respectively, an increase of 135.8% in 9M 2021 (9M 2020; ₦3.1billion PBT, ₦2.6billion PAT).
    • Net-Interest Income grew to 4billion in 9M 2021from 20.1billion in 9M 2020; growth of 41.5%.
    • Non-Interest Income also increased from 4billion in 9M 2021 to 11.5billion; growth of 0.9%.
    Statement of Financial Position
    • Deposit Liabilities up by 3% to 879.8billion in 9M 2021 from 804.9billion in FY 2020.
    • Loans and Advances to Customers rose by 3% to 397.3billion in 9M 2021 from 360.1billion in FY 2020.
    • Total Asset increased by 7% to 1.07trillion in 9M 2021 from 979.5billion in FY 2020.
    Key Ratios
    • Return on average equity of 15.04% in 9M 2021 (9M 2020; 7.26%)
    • Return on average assets of 0.90% in Q9M 2021 (9M 2020; 0.48%)
    • 30% Non-performing loan ratio (9M 2020; 4.67%)
    • Capital adequacy ratio of 11.64% (9M 2020; 11.35%)
    Operational Achievements
    • Fitch re-affirms Wema Bank’s National Long-term rating at (BBB)
    • GCR and Agusto re-affirm Wema’s National Long-term rating at (BBB-)
      Financial Performance Highlights Below is the performance summary of the Bank.
    Income statement (N’bn) 9M 2021 9M 2020 (∆) (∆%)
    Gross Earnings 61.57 57.83 3.74 6.5%
    Interest Income 50.04 46.2 3.84 8.3%
    Net Interest Income 28.5 20.1 8.4 42%
    Non-interest income 12 11.4 0.6 5%
    Operating expense 32.4 26.6 5.8 22%
    Profit before Tax 7.21 2.65 4.5 172%
    Profit after Tax 6.24 3.1 3.11 101%
    Earnings Per Share 21.6kobo 9.2kobo 12.4 134%
    Balance Sheet (N) 9M 2021   FY 2020 (∆) (∆%)
    Total Assets 1.07trn 864bn 206bn 23.84%
    Loans and Advances 397.2bn 360bn 37.2bn 10.3%
    Deposits 808.9bn 701.8bn 107.1bn 15.2%
    Shareholders’ Funds 63.9bn 59.3bn 4.3bn 8%
    Key Ratios (in %) 9M 2021 9M 2020 (∆)
    Return on Average Equity 15.04 7.26 7.9
    Return on Average Asset 1 0.5 0.5
    Yield on Asset 11.21 13.43 -2.22
    Net Interest Margin 6.4          5.84 0.6
    Capital Adequacy Ratio 11.64 11.35 0.3
    Loan-to-Deposit Ratio 43.94 49.64 -5.7
    Non-Performing Loans Ratio 4.30 4.67 -0.37
    Cost to Income Ratio 81.6 89.7 -8.1
       

  •   By Ismail AbdulazizNigeria s Dangote Cement Plc DCP is expected to pay N40 39 billion in taxation to the nation s treasury from its operational result in the first quarter of 2021 According to the financial result published by the country s largest cement manufacturer on the amount is due from corporate tax for the period ended March 31 2021 The amount of corporate tax due from Dangote Cement in the first three months of this year is higher by 47 3 per cent compared with the N27 42 billion paid in the corresponding period of 2020 financial year In addition the company currently pays over N240 million Value Added Tax VAT daily to the government making DCP one of the biggest private sector tax payers in the country In line with the government s quest to boost infrastructural development in the country DCP opted to provide funding for the constructions of major roads in Lagos and Kogi States The roads are the critical Lagos Apapa Port road leading to the old toll gate and the Lokoja Obajana Kabba road between Kogi and Kwara states Further analysis of the financial report showed that the company ramped up production capacity in the Obajana Line 5 and resumed production at the Gboko plant to meet increased demand for its products Dangote Cement also increased total volume of cement sold in the first three months of the year from its Nigerian operations to 4 9Mt compared to the 4 0Mt sold in the first quarter of 2020 Pan African operations sold 2 6Mt of cement in the period under review compared to 2 3Mt sold in the corresponding period in 2020 The cement maker said it is making efforts to start the Okpella Plant before the end of June in order to meet the increasing demand for cement in the country and help to moderate prices in the market Commenting on the financial result DCP GMD Chief Executive Officer Michel Puchercos said that the company started the first quarter of 2021 on a positive note and recorded increase in revenue and profitability He stated that the cement company posted a profit after tax of N89 7 billion We took the strategic decision to pause our clinker exports to ensure we meet the rapid volume growth in the Nigerian domestic market We are improving the output of our existing and new assets and aim to recommence clinker exports in the second quarter Our Pan Africa operations have reached new heights with an EBITDA margin of 25 5 per cent and volume growth of 12 8 per cent reported during the quarter One of our priorities in 2021 is to strengthen our alternative fuel initiative It focuses on leveraging the circular economy business model optimising costs and reducing exposure of our cost base to foreign currency fluctuations As ever we are committed to keeping our staff and communities safe by being fully compliant with health and safety measures in all our territories of operation DCP is sub Saharan Africa s largest cement producer with an installed capacity of 48 6Mta across 10 African countries and operates a fully integrated quarry to customer business with activities covering manufacturing sales and distribution of cement It has a long term credit rating of AAA by GCR and Aa2 ng by Moody s due to its market leading position significant operational scale and strong financial profile This is evidenced by the company s robust operating and net profit margins relative to regional and global peers adequate working capital satisfactory cash flow and low leverage It is a subsidiary of Dangote Industries Limited a diversified and fully integrated conglomerate as well as a leading brand across Africa in businesses such as cement sugar salt beverages and real estate with new multi billion dollar projects underway in the oil and gas petrochemical fertiliser and agricultural sectors NAN PR NAN
    Dangote Cement to pay N40.39bn tax in Q1
      By Ismail AbdulazizNigeria s Dangote Cement Plc DCP is expected to pay N40 39 billion in taxation to the nation s treasury from its operational result in the first quarter of 2021 According to the financial result published by the country s largest cement manufacturer on the amount is due from corporate tax for the period ended March 31 2021 The amount of corporate tax due from Dangote Cement in the first three months of this year is higher by 47 3 per cent compared with the N27 42 billion paid in the corresponding period of 2020 financial year In addition the company currently pays over N240 million Value Added Tax VAT daily to the government making DCP one of the biggest private sector tax payers in the country In line with the government s quest to boost infrastructural development in the country DCP opted to provide funding for the constructions of major roads in Lagos and Kogi States The roads are the critical Lagos Apapa Port road leading to the old toll gate and the Lokoja Obajana Kabba road between Kogi and Kwara states Further analysis of the financial report showed that the company ramped up production capacity in the Obajana Line 5 and resumed production at the Gboko plant to meet increased demand for its products Dangote Cement also increased total volume of cement sold in the first three months of the year from its Nigerian operations to 4 9Mt compared to the 4 0Mt sold in the first quarter of 2020 Pan African operations sold 2 6Mt of cement in the period under review compared to 2 3Mt sold in the corresponding period in 2020 The cement maker said it is making efforts to start the Okpella Plant before the end of June in order to meet the increasing demand for cement in the country and help to moderate prices in the market Commenting on the financial result DCP GMD Chief Executive Officer Michel Puchercos said that the company started the first quarter of 2021 on a positive note and recorded increase in revenue and profitability He stated that the cement company posted a profit after tax of N89 7 billion We took the strategic decision to pause our clinker exports to ensure we meet the rapid volume growth in the Nigerian domestic market We are improving the output of our existing and new assets and aim to recommence clinker exports in the second quarter Our Pan Africa operations have reached new heights with an EBITDA margin of 25 5 per cent and volume growth of 12 8 per cent reported during the quarter One of our priorities in 2021 is to strengthen our alternative fuel initiative It focuses on leveraging the circular economy business model optimising costs and reducing exposure of our cost base to foreign currency fluctuations As ever we are committed to keeping our staff and communities safe by being fully compliant with health and safety measures in all our territories of operation DCP is sub Saharan Africa s largest cement producer with an installed capacity of 48 6Mta across 10 African countries and operates a fully integrated quarry to customer business with activities covering manufacturing sales and distribution of cement It has a long term credit rating of AAA by GCR and Aa2 ng by Moody s due to its market leading position significant operational scale and strong financial profile This is evidenced by the company s robust operating and net profit margins relative to regional and global peers adequate working capital satisfactory cash flow and low leverage It is a subsidiary of Dangote Industries Limited a diversified and fully integrated conglomerate as well as a leading brand across Africa in businesses such as cement sugar salt beverages and real estate with new multi billion dollar projects underway in the oil and gas petrochemical fertiliser and agricultural sectors NAN PR NAN
    Dangote Cement to pay N40.39bn tax in Q1
    Economy2 years ago

    Dangote Cement to pay N40.39bn tax in Q1

    By Ismail Abdulaziz
    Nigeria’s Dangote Cement Plc (DCP) is expected to pay N40.39 billion in taxation to the nation’s treasury from its operational result in the first quarter of 2021.

    According to the financial result published by the country’s largest cement manufacturer on, the amount is due from corporate tax for the period ended March 31, 2021.

    The amount of corporate tax due from Dangote Cement in the first three months of this year is higher by 47.3 per cent compared with the N27.42 billion paid in the corresponding period of 2020 financial year.

    In addition, the company currently pays over N240 million Value Added Tax (VAT) daily to the government, making DCP one of the biggest private sector tax payers in the country.

    In line with the government’s quest to boost infrastructural development in the country, DCP opted to provide funding for the constructions of major roads in Lagos and Kogi States.

    The roads are the critical Lagos Apapa Port road leading to the old toll gate and the Lokoja-Obajana-Kabba road between Kogi and Kwara states.

    Further analysis of the financial report showed that the company ramped up production capacity in the Obajana Line 5 and resumed production at the Gboko plant to meet increased demand for its products.

    Dangote Cement also increased total volume of cement sold in the first three months of the year from its Nigerian operations to 4.9Mt compared to the 4.0Mt sold in the first quarter of 2020.

    Pan-African operations sold 2.6Mt of cement in the period under review compared to 2.3Mt sold in the corresponding period in 2020.

    The cement maker said it is making efforts to start the Okpella Plant before the end of June in order to meet the increasing demand for cement in the country and help to moderate prices in the market.

    Commenting on the financial result, DCP GMD/Chief Executive Officer, Michel Puchercos, said that the company started the first quarter of 2021 on a positive note and recorded increase in revenue and profitability.

    He stated that the cement company posted a profit after tax of N89.7 billion.

    “We took the strategic decision to pause our clinker exports to ensure we meet the rapid volume growth in the Nigerian domestic market. We are improving the output of our existing and new assets and aim to recommence clinker exports in the second quarter.

    “Our Pan-Africa operations have reached new heights, with an EBITDA margin of 25.5 per cent and volume growth of 12.8 per cent reported during the quarter.

    “One of our priorities in 2021 is to strengthen our alternative fuel initiative. It focuses on leveraging the circular economy business model, optimising costs and reducing exposure of our cost base to foreign currency fluctuations.

    As ever, we are committed to keeping our staff and communities safe by being fully compliant with health and safety measures in all our territories of operation.”

    DCP is sub-Saharan Africa’s largest cement producer with an installed capacity of 48.6Mta across 10 African countries and operates a fully integrated “quarry-to-customer” business with activities covering manufacturing, sales and distribution of cement.

    It has a long-term credit rating of AAA+ by GCR and Aa2.ng by Moody’s due to its market leading position, significant operational scale and strong financial profile.

    This is evidenced by the company’s robust operating and net profit margins relative to regional and global peers, adequate working capital, satisfactory cash flow and low leverage.

    It is a subsidiary of Dangote Industries Limited, a diversified and fully integrated conglomerate as well as a leading brand across Africa in businesses such as cement, sugar, salt, beverages, and real estate, with new multi-billion dollar projects underway in the oil and gas, petrochemical, fertiliser and agricultural sectors.(NAN)
    PR

    (NAN)

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