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UNPOL trains South Sudanese women police on preventing violations against children

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  Prolonged flooding and subsequent displacement the COVID 19 pandemic and general insecurity in Jonglei have led to an increase in sexual abuse among young people reveals Colonel Joseph Malual Alou director general of the Jonglei Special Police Unit Jonglei Colonel Alou was speaking at a two day workshop facilitated by United Nations Police Officers UNPOL serving with the United Nations Mission in South Sudan UNMISS for 25 policewomen from the South Sudan National Police Service South Sudan The topic of this training session prevention of sexual abuse and exploitation among communities As a state Jonglei is spread over a large area adds Colonel Alou The size itself coupled with the difficult terrain makes it impossible for us to record every case But we are aware that women and young girls are suffering because of this and it is up to us to do everything we can and face this scourge head on Another factor that the local police believe is contributing to these problems is the continuing displacement of people from Jonglei to Bor town Displaced people lack the social protection and support provided by their original settlements Therefore they are frequently the target of sexually motivated crimes Displacement is rooted not only in natural calamities such as floods but also in a sharp rise in intercommunal conflict as well as crime in the Jonglei metropolitan region The other important factor that Colonel Alou highlighted is the cultural and traditional beliefs that influence survivors of sexual violence not to report crimes committed against them This is a huge hurdle for law enforcement personnel coupled with the fact that the majority of South Sudanese are completely ignorant of the protections they are entitled to under our nation s laws said Colonel Bernard Norgah one of the UNPOL officers who facilitated the workshop revealed that the participants were taken through the rule of law and human rights practices that uphold the rights of citizens who come to them for help or of those they arrest He also learned how these are violated by the perpetrators We guide them through these topics so they have a better understanding of the factors that lead to sexual exploitation and abuse He confirmed that the practice appears to be widespread in the communities We hear about these cases in our patrols all the time But people are reluctant to report them So when policewomen are fully aware of their responsibilities and take the message to the communities hopefully we will be able to easily stop those who commit such acts Bernard explained Participants said they found the sessions enlightening and useful The workshop has empowered us and we look forward to spreading the knowledge we have gained among our communities and building their trust in us as police officers Perhaps this is the beginning of a breakthrough for women and girls to more judiciously report any crime or sexual abuse they have been subjected to and we can make progress in preventing such events said Maj Akur Ayom of Police Social Welfare Unit in Bor Most cases are never reported to the police until someone becomes pregnant or health issues arise By then the perpetrators may have left the area and as police officers we are unable to bring justice to the survivors I hope we can change this mindset she added Section 247 of the South Sudan Penal Code 2008 clearly prohibits any form of sexual exploitation or abuse nbsp
UNPOL trains South Sudanese women police on preventing violations against children

Malual Alou

“Prolonged flooding and subsequent displacement, the COVID-19 pandemic and general insecurity in Jonglei have led to an increase in sexual abuse among young people,” reveals Colonel Joseph Malual Alou, director general of the Jonglei Special Police Unit. Jonglei.

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Colonel Alou

Colonel Alou was speaking at a two-day workshop facilitated by United Nations Police Officers (UNPOL) serving with the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) for 25 policewomen from the South Sudan National Police Service. South Sudan.

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The topic of this training session: prevention of sexual abuse and exploitation among communities.

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Colonel Alou

“As a state, Jonglei is spread over a large area,” adds Colonel Alou. “The size itself, coupled with the difficult terrain, makes it impossible for us to record every case. But we are aware that women and young girls are suffering because of this and it is up to us to do everything we can and face this scourge head on.”

Another factor that the local police believe is contributing to these problems is the continuing displacement of people from Jonglei to Bor town. Displaced people lack the social protection and support provided by their original settlements. Therefore, they are frequently the target of sexually motivated crimes.

Displacement is rooted not only in natural calamities such as floods, but also in a sharp rise in intercommunal conflict as well as crime in the Jonglei metropolitan region.

Colonel Alou

The other important factor that Colonel Alou highlighted is the cultural and traditional beliefs that influence survivors of sexual violence not to report crimes committed against them.

South Sudanese

“This is a huge hurdle for law enforcement personnel, coupled with the fact that the majority of South Sudanese are completely ignorant of the protections they are entitled to under our nation’s laws,” said Colonel .

Bernard Norgah

Bernard Norgah, one of the UNPOL officers, who facilitated the workshop, revealed that the participants were taken through the rule of law and human rights practices that uphold the rights of citizens who come to them for help or of those they arrest. He also learned how these are violated by the perpetrators.

“We guide them through these topics so they have a better understanding of the factors that lead to sexual exploitation and abuse.”

He confirmed that the practice appears to be widespread in the communities. “We hear about these cases in our patrols all the time. But people are reluctant to report them. So when policewomen are fully aware of their responsibilities and take the message to the communities, hopefully we will be able to easily stop those who commit such acts,” Bernard explained.

Participants said they found the sessions enlightening and useful.

Akur Ayom of Police Social Welfare

“The workshop has empowered us and we look forward to spreading the knowledge we have gained among our communities and building their trust in us as police officers. Perhaps this is the beginning of a breakthrough for women and girls to more judiciously report any crime or sexual abuse they have been subjected to and we can make progress in preventing such events,” said Maj. Akur Ayom of Police Social Welfare. Unit in Bor.

“Most cases are never reported to the police until someone becomes pregnant or health issues arise. By then the perpetrators may have left the area and as police officers we are unable to bring justice to the survivors. I hope we can change this mindset,” she added.

South Sudan Penal Code

Section 247 of the South Sudan Penal Code (2008) clearly prohibits any form of sexual exploitation or abuse.

 

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