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  •   The UAE delegation attended the fifth day of high level meetings on the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly Khalifa Shaheen Al Marar Minister of State today participated in a ministerial level meeting hosted by the United States with the Gulf Cooperation Council GCC and Egypt Iraq Jordan and Yemen Al Marar also met with Geir Pedersen Special Envoy of the United Nations Secretary General for Syria For his part Sheikh Shakhboot bin Nahyan bin Mubarak Al Nahyan Minister of State met with His Majesty King Mswati III of Eswatini and Dr Barnaba Marial Benjamin Minister of Presidential Affairs of South Sudan He also had productive discussions with Cristina Duarte United Nations Under Secretary General and Special Advisor to the Secretary General on Africa and Michael Moussa Adamo Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Gabonese Republic In addition Sheikh Shakhboot met with former Nigerian President Mahamadou Issoufou Chairman of the UN High Level Panel on Security and Development in the Sahel He also participated in an event organized by the Hedayah Center on efforts to counter extremism and best practices for rehabilitation and reintegration For his part Ahmed Ali Al Sayegh Minister of State met with Ali Sabry Minister of Foreign Affairs of Sri Lanka Also today Omar Saif Ghobash Deputy Minister of Culture and Public Diplomacy met with Frederick Mitchell Minister of Foreign Affairs and Public Service of the Bahamas and Rodolfo Sabonge Secretary General of the Association of Caribbean States ACS Sultan Al Shamsi Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation for International Development Affairs participated in the UN High Level Virtual Side Event on Diasporas as Key Partners in the Humanitarian Development Peace Nexus Al Shamsi also attended UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres high level event on ending the COVID 19 pandemic through equitable access to testing treatment and vaccines He also attended the high level launch event for the new Women in Conflict Zones initiative to empower women in societies affected by conflict war and poverty In addition Yacoub Yousef Al Hosani Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation for International Organization Affairs participated in a ministerial meeting of the Group of 77 G77
    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) delegation attends the fifth day of meetings on the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA)
      The UAE delegation attended the fifth day of high level meetings on the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly Khalifa Shaheen Al Marar Minister of State today participated in a ministerial level meeting hosted by the United States with the Gulf Cooperation Council GCC and Egypt Iraq Jordan and Yemen Al Marar also met with Geir Pedersen Special Envoy of the United Nations Secretary General for Syria For his part Sheikh Shakhboot bin Nahyan bin Mubarak Al Nahyan Minister of State met with His Majesty King Mswati III of Eswatini and Dr Barnaba Marial Benjamin Minister of Presidential Affairs of South Sudan He also had productive discussions with Cristina Duarte United Nations Under Secretary General and Special Advisor to the Secretary General on Africa and Michael Moussa Adamo Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Gabonese Republic In addition Sheikh Shakhboot met with former Nigerian President Mahamadou Issoufou Chairman of the UN High Level Panel on Security and Development in the Sahel He also participated in an event organized by the Hedayah Center on efforts to counter extremism and best practices for rehabilitation and reintegration For his part Ahmed Ali Al Sayegh Minister of State met with Ali Sabry Minister of Foreign Affairs of Sri Lanka Also today Omar Saif Ghobash Deputy Minister of Culture and Public Diplomacy met with Frederick Mitchell Minister of Foreign Affairs and Public Service of the Bahamas and Rodolfo Sabonge Secretary General of the Association of Caribbean States ACS Sultan Al Shamsi Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation for International Development Affairs participated in the UN High Level Virtual Side Event on Diasporas as Key Partners in the Humanitarian Development Peace Nexus Al Shamsi also attended UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres high level event on ending the COVID 19 pandemic through equitable access to testing treatment and vaccines He also attended the high level launch event for the new Women in Conflict Zones initiative to empower women in societies affected by conflict war and poverty In addition Yacoub Yousef Al Hosani Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation for International Organization Affairs participated in a ministerial meeting of the Group of 77 G77
    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) delegation attends the fifth day of meetings on the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA)
    Africa17 hours ago

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) delegation attends the fifth day of meetings on the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA)

    The UAE delegation attended the fifth day of high-level meetings on the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly.

    Khalifa Shaheen Al Marar, Minister of State, today participated in a ministerial-level meeting hosted by the United States with the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) and Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, and Yemen.

    Al Marar also met with Geir Pedersen, Special Envoy of the United Nations Secretary-General for Syria.

    For his part, Sheikh Shakhboot bin Nahyan bin Mubarak Al Nahyan, Minister of State, met with His Majesty⁠ King Mswati III of Eswatini and Dr. Barnaba Marial Benjamin, Minister of Presidential Affairs of South Sudan .

    He also had productive discussions with Cristina Duarte, United Nations Under-Secretary-General and Special Advisor to the Secretary-General on Africa, and Michael Moussa Adamo, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Gabonese Republic.

    In addition, Sheikh Shakhboot met with former Nigerian President Mahamadou Issoufou, Chairman of the UN High-Level Panel on Security and Development in the Sahel.

    He also participated in an event organized by the Hedayah Center on efforts to counter extremism and best practices for rehabilitation and reintegration.

    For his part, Ahmed Ali Al Sayegh, Minister of State, met with Ali Sabry, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Sri Lanka.

    Also today, Omar Saif Ghobash, Deputy Minister of Culture and Public Diplomacy, met with ⁠Frederick Mitchell, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Public Service of the Bahamas, and Rodolfo Sabonge, Secretary General of the Association of Caribbean States (ACS).

    Sultan Al Shamsi, Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation for International Development Affairs, participated in the UN High-Level Virtual Side Event on "Diasporas as Key Partners in the Humanitarian Development-Peace Nexus".

    Al Shamsi also attended UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres' high-level event on ending the COVID-19 pandemic through equitable access to testing, treatment and vaccines.

    He also attended the high-level launch event for the new "Women in Conflict Zones" initiative to empower women in societies affected by conflict, war and poverty.

    In addition, Yacoub Yousef Al Hosani, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation for International Organization Affairs, participated in a ministerial meeting of the Group of 77 (G77)

  •   In Somalia hundreds of thousands are already facing hunger today and staggering levels of malnutrition are expected among children under the age of five warned the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO and the World Program for Food WFP Large scale deaths from starvation are increasingly likely in the East African nation UN agencies continued noting that unless adequate aid arrives analysts expect by December up to four children or two adults for every 10 000 people will die every day Complex Roots In addition to the emergency already unfolding in Somalia UN agencies pinpointed 18 more deeply related hunger hotspots whose problems have been created by conflict drought economic uncertainty the COVID and Russia s invasion of Ukraine Aid workers are particularly concerned about Afghanistan Ethiopia South Sudan Somalia and Yemen where a record 970 000 people are expected to face catastrophic hunger and are either starving or are forecast to starve or are at risk of worsening hunger to catastrophic conditions if no action is taken the UN agencies said This is 10 times more than six years ago when only two countries had such food insecure populations the FAO and WFP said in a new report Large scale and urgent humanitarian action is needed in all these at risk countries to save lives and livelihoods and prevent famine the UN agencies insisted Hard winter harvest According to the FAO and WFP acute food insecurity around the world will worsen from October to January In addition to Somalia they highlighted that the problem was also serious in the Horn of Africa where the longest drought in more than 40 years is forecast to continue pushing people to the brink of starvation Successive failed rains have destroyed people s crops and killed their livestock on which their survival depends said FAO Director General QU Dongyu warning that people in the poorest countries were at risk increased risk due to dire food security that was increasing rapidly and spreading all over the world FAO s QU calls for a massive increase in aid Vulnerable communities have yet to recover from the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic and are suffering from the domino effects of ongoing conflicts in terms of prices food and fertilizer supplies as well as the weather emergency the FAO chief continued He insisted that without a massively scaled up humanitarian response to sustain agriculture the situation is likely to worsen in many countries in the coming months Echoing that message WFP Executive Director David Beasley called for immediate action to prevent people from dying We urgently need to get help to those in grave danger of starvation in Somalia and other hunger hotspots around the world he said Perfect storm of trouble This is the third time in 10 years that Somalia has been threatened by a devastating famine Mr Beasley continued The 2011 famine was caused by two consecutive failed rainy seasons as well as the conflict Today we are facing a perfect storm a probable fifth consecutive failed rainy season that will cause a drought that will last well into 2023 In addition to skyrocketing food prices people most at risk of acute food insecurity also have very limited opportunities to earn a living due to the pandemic the WFP chief explained as relief teams prepare to famine in the Somali districts of Baidoa and Burhakaba in the Bay region come October Below the highest alert countries identified as Afghanistan Ethiopia Nigeria South Sudan Somalia and Yemen the joint FAO WFP report notes that the Democratic Republic of the Congo Haiti Kenya the Sahel Sudan and Syria are very worrying in addition to the newcomers Central African Republic and Pakistan Guatemala Honduras and Malawi have also been added to the list of countries with hunger hotspots joining Madagascar Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe Barriers to aid Humanitarian assistance is crucial to saving lives and preventing hunger death and the complete collapse of livelihoods the FAO and WFP insist while highlighting chronic access problems caused by insecurity administrative and bureaucratic impediments movement restrictions and physical barriers in 11 of the 19 hotspot countries This includes the six countries where populations face or are projected to face famine or are at risk of deterioration toward catastrophic conditions they said
    Famine looms in Somalia, but many ‘hunger hotspots’ are in deep trouble
      In Somalia hundreds of thousands are already facing hunger today and staggering levels of malnutrition are expected among children under the age of five warned the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO and the World Program for Food WFP Large scale deaths from starvation are increasingly likely in the East African nation UN agencies continued noting that unless adequate aid arrives analysts expect by December up to four children or two adults for every 10 000 people will die every day Complex Roots In addition to the emergency already unfolding in Somalia UN agencies pinpointed 18 more deeply related hunger hotspots whose problems have been created by conflict drought economic uncertainty the COVID and Russia s invasion of Ukraine Aid workers are particularly concerned about Afghanistan Ethiopia South Sudan Somalia and Yemen where a record 970 000 people are expected to face catastrophic hunger and are either starving or are forecast to starve or are at risk of worsening hunger to catastrophic conditions if no action is taken the UN agencies said This is 10 times more than six years ago when only two countries had such food insecure populations the FAO and WFP said in a new report Large scale and urgent humanitarian action is needed in all these at risk countries to save lives and livelihoods and prevent famine the UN agencies insisted Hard winter harvest According to the FAO and WFP acute food insecurity around the world will worsen from October to January In addition to Somalia they highlighted that the problem was also serious in the Horn of Africa where the longest drought in more than 40 years is forecast to continue pushing people to the brink of starvation Successive failed rains have destroyed people s crops and killed their livestock on which their survival depends said FAO Director General QU Dongyu warning that people in the poorest countries were at risk increased risk due to dire food security that was increasing rapidly and spreading all over the world FAO s QU calls for a massive increase in aid Vulnerable communities have yet to recover from the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic and are suffering from the domino effects of ongoing conflicts in terms of prices food and fertilizer supplies as well as the weather emergency the FAO chief continued He insisted that without a massively scaled up humanitarian response to sustain agriculture the situation is likely to worsen in many countries in the coming months Echoing that message WFP Executive Director David Beasley called for immediate action to prevent people from dying We urgently need to get help to those in grave danger of starvation in Somalia and other hunger hotspots around the world he said Perfect storm of trouble This is the third time in 10 years that Somalia has been threatened by a devastating famine Mr Beasley continued The 2011 famine was caused by two consecutive failed rainy seasons as well as the conflict Today we are facing a perfect storm a probable fifth consecutive failed rainy season that will cause a drought that will last well into 2023 In addition to skyrocketing food prices people most at risk of acute food insecurity also have very limited opportunities to earn a living due to the pandemic the WFP chief explained as relief teams prepare to famine in the Somali districts of Baidoa and Burhakaba in the Bay region come October Below the highest alert countries identified as Afghanistan Ethiopia Nigeria South Sudan Somalia and Yemen the joint FAO WFP report notes that the Democratic Republic of the Congo Haiti Kenya the Sahel Sudan and Syria are very worrying in addition to the newcomers Central African Republic and Pakistan Guatemala Honduras and Malawi have also been added to the list of countries with hunger hotspots joining Madagascar Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe Barriers to aid Humanitarian assistance is crucial to saving lives and preventing hunger death and the complete collapse of livelihoods the FAO and WFP insist while highlighting chronic access problems caused by insecurity administrative and bureaucratic impediments movement restrictions and physical barriers in 11 of the 19 hotspot countries This includes the six countries where populations face or are projected to face famine or are at risk of deterioration toward catastrophic conditions they said
    Famine looms in Somalia, but many ‘hunger hotspots’ are in deep trouble
    Africa4 days ago

    Famine looms in Somalia, but many ‘hunger hotspots’ are in deep trouble

    In Somalia, "hundreds of thousands are already facing hunger today and staggering levels of malnutrition are expected among children under the age of five," warned the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Program for Food (WFP).

    "Large-scale deaths from starvation" are increasingly likely in the East African nation, UN agencies continued, noting that unless "adequate" aid arrives, analysts expect by December, "up to four children or two adults for every 10,000 people, will die every day."

    Complex Roots In addition to the emergency already unfolding in Somalia, UN agencies pinpointed 18 more deeply related "hunger hotspots" whose problems have been created by conflict, drought, economic uncertainty, the COVID and Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

    Aid workers are particularly concerned about Afghanistan, Ethiopia, South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen, where a record 970,000 people are expected to "face catastrophic hunger and are either starving or are forecast to starve or are at risk of worsening hunger."

    to catastrophic conditions, if no action is taken.

    ”, the UN agencies said.

    This is 10 times more than six years ago, when only two countries had such food-insecure populations, the FAO and WFP said in a new report.

    Large-scale and urgent humanitarian action is needed in all these at-risk countries "to save lives and livelihoods" and prevent famine, the UN agencies insisted.

    Hard winter harvest According to the FAO and WFP, acute food insecurity around the world will worsen from October to January.

    In addition to Somalia, they highlighted that the problem was also serious in the Horn of Africa, where the longest drought in more than 40 years is forecast to continue, pushing people “to the brink of starvation”.

    Successive failed rains have destroyed people's crops and killed their livestock "on which their survival depends", said FAO Director-General QU Dongyu, warning that "people in the poorest countries" were at risk.

    increased risk due to dire food security that was "increasing rapidly."

    and spreading all over the world.

    FAO's QU calls for a massive increase in aid Vulnerable communities "have yet to recover from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and are suffering from the domino effects of ongoing conflicts, in terms of prices, food and fertilizer supplies as well as the weather.

    emergency,” the FAO chief continued.

    He insisted that "without a massively scaled-up humanitarian response" to sustain agriculture, "the situation is likely to worsen in many countries in the coming months."

    Echoing that message, WFP Executive Director David Beasley called for immediate action to prevent people from dying.

    “We urgently need to get help to those in grave danger of starvation in Somalia and other hunger hotspots around the world,” he said.

    Perfect storm of trouble “This is the third time in 10 years that Somalia has been threatened by a devastating famine,” Mr Beasley continued.

    “The 2011 famine was caused by two consecutive failed rainy seasons, as well as the conflict.

    Today we are facing a perfect storm: a probable fifth consecutive failed rainy season that will cause a drought that will last well into 2023.” In addition to skyrocketing food prices, people most at risk of acute food insecurity also have "very limited opportunities" to earn a living due to the pandemic, the WFP chief explained, as relief teams prepare to famine in the Somali districts of Baidoa and Burhakaba.

    in the Bay region, come October.

    Below the "highest alert" countries, identified as Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Nigeria, South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen, the joint FAO-WFP report notes that the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Kenya, the Sahel, Sudan and Syria are "very worrying", in addition to the newcomers Central African Republic and Pakistan.

    Guatemala, Honduras and Malawi have also been added to the list of countries with hunger hotspots, joining Madagascar, Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe.

    Barriers to aid Humanitarian assistance is crucial to saving lives and preventing hunger, death and the complete collapse of livelihoods, the FAO and WFP insist, while highlighting chronic access problems caused by “ insecurity, administrative and bureaucratic impediments, movement restrictions and physical barriers” in 11 of the 19 hotspot countries.

    This includes “the six countries where populations face or are projected to face famine…or are at risk of deterioration toward catastrophic conditions,” they said.

  •   The number of people facing acute food insecurity around the world is expected to continue to skyrocket as the food crisis tightens its grip on 19 hunger hotspots fueled by rising conflict weather extremes and the economic instability aggravated by the pandemic and the domino effect of the crisis in Ukraine according to a joint UN report published today The report Hunger Hotspots FAO and WFP Early Warnings on Acute Food Insecurity published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO and the World Food Program WFP of the United Nations calls for urgent humanitarian action to save lives and livelihoods and prevent famine in hotspot countries where acute food insecurity is expected to worsen between October 2022 and January 2023 The report sets out country specific recommendations on priorities for anticipatory action short term protective measures that are implemented before new humanitarian needs materialize and emergency response actions to address existing humanitarian needs The severe drought in the Horn of Africa has brought people to the brink of starvation destroying crops and killing the livestock on which their survival depends Acute food insecurity is increasing rapidly and spreading throughout the world In particular people in the poorest countries that have not yet recovered from the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic are suffering from the effects of ongoing conflicts in terms of prices food and fertilizer supplies as well as the emergency climate Without a massively scaled up humanitarian response with urgent and vital agricultural assistance at its core the situation is likely to worsen in many countries in the coming months said FAO Director General QU Dongyu This is the third time in 10 years that Somalia has been threatened by a devastating famine The 2011 famine was caused by two consecutive failed rainy seasons as well as the conflict We are facing a perfect storm today a likely fifth consecutive failed rainy season that will lead to a drought that will last well into 2023 But people in the thick of the current crisis are also facing rising food prices and severely limited opportunities to earn a living following the pandemic We urgently need to help those who are at grave risk of starvation in Somalia and in other hunger hotspots around the world said David Beasley WFP Executive Director The report highlights the hunger crisis in the Horn of Africa where the longest drought in over 40 years is forecast to continue with a failed fifth consecutive rainy season on the horizon adding to the cumulative and devastating effects of successive rainfall deficits Economic crises and conflicts have had on vulnerable households since 2020 Water scarcity has led to below average harvests livestock deaths and has forced hundreds of thousands of people off their land in search of livelihood while increasing the risk of resource based and inter community conflict Up to 26 million people are expected to face crisis levels or worse IPC Phase 3 and above of food insecurity in Somalia southern and eastern Ethiopia and northern and eastern Kenya With humanitarian assistance at risk of being cut due to funding shortages the specter of large scale starvation looms over Somalia with famine likely to grip Baidoa and Burhakaba districts in the region of Bay from October Without an adequate humanitarian response analysts expect that by December as many as four children or two adults per 10 000 people will die each day Hundreds of thousands are already facing hunger today and staggering levels of malnutrition are expected among children under the age of 5 Globally an all time high of 970 000 people are expected to face catastrophic hunger IPC Phase 5 and are starving or projected to starve or at risk of deterioration to catastrophic conditions in Afghanistan Ethiopia South Sudan Somalia and Yemen if no action is taken ten times higher than six years ago when only two countries had Phase 5 populations Key Findings According to the report Afghanistan Ethiopia Nigeria South Sudan Somalia The US and Yemen remain on high alert as hotspots alone accounting for nearly a million people facing catastrophic levels of hunger IPC Phase 5 Catastrophe with hunger and death a daily reality and where Extreme levels of mortality and malnutrition can develop without immediate action The Democratic Republic of the Congo Haiti Kenya the Sahel Sudan and Syria continue to be very worrying due to deteriorating conditions as in the June edition of the quarterly report but the alert extends to the Central African Republic and Pakistan Meanwhile Guatemala Honduras and Malawi have been added to the list of countries joining Sri Lanka Zimbabwe and Madagascar that remain hotspots of hunger Violent conflict remains the main driver of acute hunger and analysis indicates a continuation of this trend in 2022 with particular concern for Ethiopia where escalating conflict and inter ethnic violence in several regions is expected to further escalate increasing humanitarian needs Extreme weather events such as floods tropical storms and droughts remain critical factors in many parts of the world and a new normal of back to back extreme weather events is becoming apparent especially in hotspots Devastating floods have affected 33 million people this year alone in Pakistan and South Sudan is facing a fourth consecutive year of extreme flooding Meanwhile a third consecutive below average rainy season is projected in Syria For the first time in 20 years the La Ni a weather event has continued for three consecutive years affecting agriculture and causing crop and livestock losses in many parts of the world including Afghanistan West and East Africa and Syria On the economic front persistently high global prices for food fuel and fertilizer continue to drive high domestic prices and economic instability Rising inflation rates have forced governments to enact monetary tightening measures in advanced economies that have also increased the cost of credit for low income countries This is restricting the ability of highly indebted countries the number of countries has increased significantly in recent years to finance the import of essential items Faced with these macroeconomic challenges many governments are forced to introduce austerity measures that affect income and purchasing power particularly among the most vulnerable families These trends are expected to increase in the coming months the report notes with rising poverty and acute food insecurity as well as risks of civil unrest caused by rising socio economic grievances Humanitarian assistance is crucial to saving lives and preventing starvation death and the total collapse of livelihoods says the report which highlights that insecurity administrative and bureaucratic impediments movement restrictions and physical barriers limit The access of humanitarian responders to people facing acute hunger in eleven of the hotspot countries including the six countries where populations face or are projected to face hunger IPC Phase 5 or are at risk of severe hunger deteriorate to catastrophic conditions Humanitarian action is critical to prevent hunger and death The report calls for targeted humanitarian action to save lives and livelihoods in the 19 famine hotspots noting that in Afghanistan Ethiopia Nigeria Somalia South Sudan and Yemen humanitarian action will be essential to prevent further hunger and death
    Food crisis tightens its grip on 19 ‘hunger hotspots’ as famine looms in Horn of Africa – New report
      The number of people facing acute food insecurity around the world is expected to continue to skyrocket as the food crisis tightens its grip on 19 hunger hotspots fueled by rising conflict weather extremes and the economic instability aggravated by the pandemic and the domino effect of the crisis in Ukraine according to a joint UN report published today The report Hunger Hotspots FAO and WFP Early Warnings on Acute Food Insecurity published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO and the World Food Program WFP of the United Nations calls for urgent humanitarian action to save lives and livelihoods and prevent famine in hotspot countries where acute food insecurity is expected to worsen between October 2022 and January 2023 The report sets out country specific recommendations on priorities for anticipatory action short term protective measures that are implemented before new humanitarian needs materialize and emergency response actions to address existing humanitarian needs The severe drought in the Horn of Africa has brought people to the brink of starvation destroying crops and killing the livestock on which their survival depends Acute food insecurity is increasing rapidly and spreading throughout the world In particular people in the poorest countries that have not yet recovered from the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic are suffering from the effects of ongoing conflicts in terms of prices food and fertilizer supplies as well as the emergency climate Without a massively scaled up humanitarian response with urgent and vital agricultural assistance at its core the situation is likely to worsen in many countries in the coming months said FAO Director General QU Dongyu This is the third time in 10 years that Somalia has been threatened by a devastating famine The 2011 famine was caused by two consecutive failed rainy seasons as well as the conflict We are facing a perfect storm today a likely fifth consecutive failed rainy season that will lead to a drought that will last well into 2023 But people in the thick of the current crisis are also facing rising food prices and severely limited opportunities to earn a living following the pandemic We urgently need to help those who are at grave risk of starvation in Somalia and in other hunger hotspots around the world said David Beasley WFP Executive Director The report highlights the hunger crisis in the Horn of Africa where the longest drought in over 40 years is forecast to continue with a failed fifth consecutive rainy season on the horizon adding to the cumulative and devastating effects of successive rainfall deficits Economic crises and conflicts have had on vulnerable households since 2020 Water scarcity has led to below average harvests livestock deaths and has forced hundreds of thousands of people off their land in search of livelihood while increasing the risk of resource based and inter community conflict Up to 26 million people are expected to face crisis levels or worse IPC Phase 3 and above of food insecurity in Somalia southern and eastern Ethiopia and northern and eastern Kenya With humanitarian assistance at risk of being cut due to funding shortages the specter of large scale starvation looms over Somalia with famine likely to grip Baidoa and Burhakaba districts in the region of Bay from October Without an adequate humanitarian response analysts expect that by December as many as four children or two adults per 10 000 people will die each day Hundreds of thousands are already facing hunger today and staggering levels of malnutrition are expected among children under the age of 5 Globally an all time high of 970 000 people are expected to face catastrophic hunger IPC Phase 5 and are starving or projected to starve or at risk of deterioration to catastrophic conditions in Afghanistan Ethiopia South Sudan Somalia and Yemen if no action is taken ten times higher than six years ago when only two countries had Phase 5 populations Key Findings According to the report Afghanistan Ethiopia Nigeria South Sudan Somalia The US and Yemen remain on high alert as hotspots alone accounting for nearly a million people facing catastrophic levels of hunger IPC Phase 5 Catastrophe with hunger and death a daily reality and where Extreme levels of mortality and malnutrition can develop without immediate action The Democratic Republic of the Congo Haiti Kenya the Sahel Sudan and Syria continue to be very worrying due to deteriorating conditions as in the June edition of the quarterly report but the alert extends to the Central African Republic and Pakistan Meanwhile Guatemala Honduras and Malawi have been added to the list of countries joining Sri Lanka Zimbabwe and Madagascar that remain hotspots of hunger Violent conflict remains the main driver of acute hunger and analysis indicates a continuation of this trend in 2022 with particular concern for Ethiopia where escalating conflict and inter ethnic violence in several regions is expected to further escalate increasing humanitarian needs Extreme weather events such as floods tropical storms and droughts remain critical factors in many parts of the world and a new normal of back to back extreme weather events is becoming apparent especially in hotspots Devastating floods have affected 33 million people this year alone in Pakistan and South Sudan is facing a fourth consecutive year of extreme flooding Meanwhile a third consecutive below average rainy season is projected in Syria For the first time in 20 years the La Ni a weather event has continued for three consecutive years affecting agriculture and causing crop and livestock losses in many parts of the world including Afghanistan West and East Africa and Syria On the economic front persistently high global prices for food fuel and fertilizer continue to drive high domestic prices and economic instability Rising inflation rates have forced governments to enact monetary tightening measures in advanced economies that have also increased the cost of credit for low income countries This is restricting the ability of highly indebted countries the number of countries has increased significantly in recent years to finance the import of essential items Faced with these macroeconomic challenges many governments are forced to introduce austerity measures that affect income and purchasing power particularly among the most vulnerable families These trends are expected to increase in the coming months the report notes with rising poverty and acute food insecurity as well as risks of civil unrest caused by rising socio economic grievances Humanitarian assistance is crucial to saving lives and preventing starvation death and the total collapse of livelihoods says the report which highlights that insecurity administrative and bureaucratic impediments movement restrictions and physical barriers limit The access of humanitarian responders to people facing acute hunger in eleven of the hotspot countries including the six countries where populations face or are projected to face hunger IPC Phase 5 or are at risk of severe hunger deteriorate to catastrophic conditions Humanitarian action is critical to prevent hunger and death The report calls for targeted humanitarian action to save lives and livelihoods in the 19 famine hotspots noting that in Afghanistan Ethiopia Nigeria Somalia South Sudan and Yemen humanitarian action will be essential to prevent further hunger and death
    Food crisis tightens its grip on 19 ‘hunger hotspots’ as famine looms in Horn of Africa – New report
    Africa4 days ago

    Food crisis tightens its grip on 19 ‘hunger hotspots’ as famine looms in Horn of Africa – New report

    The number of people facing acute food insecurity around the world is expected to continue to skyrocket, as the food crisis tightens its grip on 19 'hunger hotspots', fueled by rising conflict, weather extremes and the economic instability aggravated by the pandemic and the domino effect.

    of the crisis in Ukraine, according to a joint UN report published today.

    The report 'Hunger Hotspots: FAO and WFP Early Warnings on Acute Food Insecurity', published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Food Program (WFP) of the United Nations, calls for urgent humanitarian action to save lives and livelihoods.

    and prevent famine in hotspot countries where acute food insecurity is expected to worsen between October 2022 and January 2023.

    The report sets out country-specific recommendations on priorities for anticipatory action: short-term protective measures that are implemented before new humanitarian needs materialize.

    ; and emergency response: actions to address existing humanitarian needs.

    “The severe drought in the Horn of Africa has brought people to the brink of starvation, destroying crops and killing the livestock on which their survival depends.

    Acute food insecurity is increasing rapidly and spreading throughout the world.

    In particular, people in the poorest countries that have not yet recovered from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic are suffering from the effects of ongoing conflicts, in terms of prices, food and fertilizer supplies, as well as the emergency climate.

    Without a massively scaled-up humanitarian response with urgent and vital agricultural assistance at its core, the situation is likely to worsen in many countries in the coming months,” said FAO Director-General QU Dongyu.

    “This is the third time in 10 years that Somalia has been threatened by a devastating famine.

    The 2011 famine was caused by two consecutive failed rainy seasons, as well as the conflict.

    We are facing a perfect storm today: a likely fifth consecutive failed rainy season that will lead to a drought that will last well into 2023.

    But people in the thick of the current crisis are also facing rising food prices and severely limited opportunities to earn a living.

    following the pandemic.

    We urgently need to help those who are at grave risk of starvation in Somalia and in other hunger hotspots around the world,” said David Beasley, WFP Executive Director.

    The report highlights the hunger crisis in the Horn of Africa, where the longest drought in over 40 years is forecast to continue, with a failed fifth consecutive rainy season on the horizon, adding to the cumulative and devastating effects of successive rainfall deficits, Economic crises and conflicts have had on vulnerable households since 2020.

    Water scarcity has led to below-average harvests, livestock deaths and has forced hundreds of thousands of people off their land in search of livelihood, while increasing the risk of resource-based and inter-community conflict.

    .

    Up to 26 million people are expected to face crisis levels or worse (IPC Phase 3 and above) of food insecurity in Somalia, southern and eastern Ethiopia, and northern and eastern Kenya.

    With humanitarian assistance at risk of being cut due to funding shortages, the specter of large-scale starvation looms over Somalia, with famine likely to grip Baidoa and Burhakaba districts in the region.

    of Bay from October.

    Without an adequate humanitarian response, analysts expect that by December, as many as four children or two adults per 10,000 people will die each day.

    Hundreds of thousands are already facing hunger today and staggering levels of malnutrition are expected among children under the age of 5.

    Globally, an all-time high of 970,000 people are expected to face catastrophic hunger (IPC Phase 5) and are starving or projected to starve or at risk of deterioration to catastrophic conditions in Afghanistan, Ethiopia , South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen, if no action is taken, ten times higher than six years ago when only two countries had Phase 5 populations.

    Key Findings According to the report, Afghanistan , Ethiopia, Nigeria, South Sudan, Somalia The US and Yemen remain on 'high alert' as hotspots, alone accounting for nearly a million people facing catastrophic levels of hunger (IPC Phase 5 'Catastrophe') with hunger and death a daily reality and where Extreme levels of mortality and malnutrition can develop without immediate action.

    The Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Kenya, the Sahel, Sudan and Syria continue to be "very worrying" due to deteriorating conditions, as in the June edition of the quarterly report, but the alert extends to the Central African Republic and Pakistan .

    Meanwhile, Guatemala, Honduras and Malawi have been added to the list of countries, joining Sri Lanka, Zimbabwe and Madagascar that remain hotspots of hunger.

    Violent conflict remains the main driver of acute hunger and analysis indicates a continuation of this trend in 2022, with particular concern for Ethiopia, where escalating conflict and inter-ethnic violence in several regions is expected to further escalate, increasing humanitarian needs.

    Extreme weather events such as floods, tropical storms and droughts remain critical factors in many parts of the world, and a "new normal" of back-to-back extreme weather events is becoming apparent, especially in hotspots.

    Devastating floods have affected 33 million people this year alone in Pakistan and South Sudan is facing a fourth consecutive year of extreme flooding.

    Meanwhile, a third consecutive below-average rainy season is projected in Syria.

    For the first time in 20 years, the La Niña weather event has continued for three consecutive years, affecting agriculture and causing crop and livestock losses in many parts of the world, including Afghanistan, West and East Africa, and Syria.

    On the economic front, persistently high global prices for food, fuel, and fertilizer continue to drive high domestic prices and economic instability.

    Rising inflation rates have forced governments to enact monetary tightening measures in advanced economies that have also increased the cost of credit for low-income countries.

    This is restricting the ability of highly indebted countries (the number of countries has increased significantly in recent years) to finance the import of essential items.

    Faced with these macroeconomic challenges, many governments are forced to introduce austerity measures that affect income and purchasing power, particularly among the most vulnerable families.

    These trends are expected to increase in the coming months, the report notes, with rising poverty and acute food insecurity, as well as risks of civil unrest caused by rising socio-economic grievances.

    Humanitarian assistance is crucial to saving lives and preventing starvation, death and the total collapse of livelihoods, says the report, which highlights that insecurity, administrative and bureaucratic impediments, movement restrictions and physical barriers limit The access of humanitarian responders to people facing acute hunger in eleven of the hotspot countries, including the six countries where populations face or are projected to face hunger (IPC Phase 5), or are at risk of severe hunger.

    deteriorate to catastrophic conditions.

    Humanitarian action is critical to prevent hunger and death The report calls for targeted humanitarian action to save lives and livelihoods in the 19 famine hotspots, noting that in Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen, humanitarian action will be essential to prevent further hunger and death.

  •   UNHCR the UN Refugee Agency today published new guidance on eligibility for refugee status for Somalis fleeing their country The guide is intended to assist those adjudicating international protection applications for asylum seekers from Somalia and those responsible for setting government policy on this issue The ongoing armed conflict and widespread human rights violations continue to affect the civilian population putting lives at risk and forcing many to flee their homes in search of safety Insecurity and attacks against civilians continue in much of the country Ethnic and social minorities women children and people with disabilities are among the recipients A recent attack on the Hayat Hotel in Mogadishu left at least 21 civilians dead and 117 wounded UNHCR believes that other people at risk include clan elders electoral delegates government workers and officials police officers off duty soldiers and humanitarian workers among others The deteriorating security situation including human rights violations exacerbates the humanitarian crisis in Somalia and undermines the response capacity of the government and humanitarian actors Somalia is facing its worst drought in 40 years and there is a risk of widespread famine in the coming months The new UNHCR guidelines say that states must allow people fleeing Somalia to seek safety and have their refugee claims assessed in accordance with international law Those fleeing violence human rights abuses and persecution would meet the criteria for refugee status under the 1951 Refugee Convention or under regional instruments or UNHCR s broader mandate At the end of 2021 there were 836 300 Somali refugees and asylum seekers worldwide the majority of them nearly 80 percent more than 650 000 hosted in neighboring and regional countries including Ethiopia Kenya Yemen Djibouti Uganda and Sudan We applaud the commitment of neighboring countries to meet their international legal obligations by keeping their borders open to Somalis fleeing to safety But we urge all countries including those further afield to do the same They can also help provide more support to regional host countries and increase resettlement places for Somalis and other refugees at higher risk in countries of asylum
    The United Nations (UN) Refugee Agency publishes a new legal guide on the protection of Somali refugees
      UNHCR the UN Refugee Agency today published new guidance on eligibility for refugee status for Somalis fleeing their country The guide is intended to assist those adjudicating international protection applications for asylum seekers from Somalia and those responsible for setting government policy on this issue The ongoing armed conflict and widespread human rights violations continue to affect the civilian population putting lives at risk and forcing many to flee their homes in search of safety Insecurity and attacks against civilians continue in much of the country Ethnic and social minorities women children and people with disabilities are among the recipients A recent attack on the Hayat Hotel in Mogadishu left at least 21 civilians dead and 117 wounded UNHCR believes that other people at risk include clan elders electoral delegates government workers and officials police officers off duty soldiers and humanitarian workers among others The deteriorating security situation including human rights violations exacerbates the humanitarian crisis in Somalia and undermines the response capacity of the government and humanitarian actors Somalia is facing its worst drought in 40 years and there is a risk of widespread famine in the coming months The new UNHCR guidelines say that states must allow people fleeing Somalia to seek safety and have their refugee claims assessed in accordance with international law Those fleeing violence human rights abuses and persecution would meet the criteria for refugee status under the 1951 Refugee Convention or under regional instruments or UNHCR s broader mandate At the end of 2021 there were 836 300 Somali refugees and asylum seekers worldwide the majority of them nearly 80 percent more than 650 000 hosted in neighboring and regional countries including Ethiopia Kenya Yemen Djibouti Uganda and Sudan We applaud the commitment of neighboring countries to meet their international legal obligations by keeping their borders open to Somalis fleeing to safety But we urge all countries including those further afield to do the same They can also help provide more support to regional host countries and increase resettlement places for Somalis and other refugees at higher risk in countries of asylum
    The United Nations (UN) Refugee Agency publishes a new legal guide on the protection of Somali refugees
    Africa5 days ago

    The United Nations (UN) Refugee Agency publishes a new legal guide on the protection of Somali refugees

    UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, today published new guidance on eligibility for refugee status for Somalis fleeing their country.

    The guide is intended to assist those adjudicating international protection applications for asylum seekers from Somalia and those responsible for setting government policy on this issue.

    The ongoing armed conflict and widespread human rights violations continue to affect the civilian population, putting lives at risk and forcing many to flee their homes in search of safety.

    Insecurity and attacks against civilians continue in much of the country.

    Ethnic and social minorities, women, children and people with disabilities are among the recipients.

    A recent attack on the Hayat Hotel in Mogadishu left at least 21 civilians dead and 117 wounded.

    UNHCR believes that other people at risk include clan elders, electoral delegates, government workers and officials, police officers, off-duty soldiers and humanitarian workers, among others.

    The deteriorating security situation, including human rights violations, exacerbates the humanitarian crisis in Somalia and undermines the response capacity of the government and humanitarian actors.

    Somalia is facing its worst drought in 40 years and there is a risk of widespread famine in the coming months.

    The new UNHCR guidelines say that states must allow people fleeing Somalia to seek safety and have their refugee claims assessed in accordance with international law.

    Those fleeing violence, human rights abuses and persecution would meet the criteria for refugee status under the 1951 Refugee Convention, or under regional instruments, or UNHCR's broader mandate.

    At the end of 2021, there were 836,300 Somali refugees and asylum seekers worldwide, the majority of them, nearly 80 percent (more than 650,000), hosted in neighboring and regional countries, including Ethiopia, Kenya, Yemen, Djibouti, Uganda and Sudan.

    We applaud the commitment of neighboring countries to meet their international legal obligations by keeping their borders open to Somalis fleeing to safety.

    But we urge all countries, including those further afield, to do the same.

    They can also help provide more support to regional host countries and increase resettlement places for Somalis and other refugees at higher risk in countries of asylum.

  •   The Minister of State for Foreign Affairs and Parliamentary Affairs Shri V Muraleedharan will pay an official visit to the Republic of Djibouti on September 21 22 2022 This will be his first visit to the country 1 During the visit MoS will visit the Prime Minister of Djibouti H E Mr Abdoulkader Kamil Mohamed and will hold talks with the Minister of Foreign Affairs Mr Mahmoud Ali Youssouf and other dignitaries on bilateral regional and international issues of mutual interest He will also interact with the Indian community in Djibouti 2 During the visit an Agreement on exemption from the visa requirement for holders of Diplomatic and Official Service Passports and a memorandum of understanding will also be signed between the Sushma Swaraj Institute of Foreign Service SSIFS and the Djibouti Institute of Diplomatic Studies IDS 3 India and Djibouti share warm and friendly relations underpinned by historical and cultural ties Djibouti had provided extraordinary support in the evacuation of Indian nationals from war torn Yemen in 2015 Operation Rahat Shri Ram Nath Kovind the then President of India paid a state visit to Djibouti in October 2017 India opened a mission in Djibouti in 2019 Bilateral trade between the two countries was valued at US 755 million in 2021 22 A sizeable Indian community lives in Djibouti 4 The visit is expected to provide a further boost to the bilateral ties between India and Djibouti
    India: Visit of the Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Shri V. Muraleedharan to the Republic of Djibouti (September 21-22, 2022)
      The Minister of State for Foreign Affairs and Parliamentary Affairs Shri V Muraleedharan will pay an official visit to the Republic of Djibouti on September 21 22 2022 This will be his first visit to the country 1 During the visit MoS will visit the Prime Minister of Djibouti H E Mr Abdoulkader Kamil Mohamed and will hold talks with the Minister of Foreign Affairs Mr Mahmoud Ali Youssouf and other dignitaries on bilateral regional and international issues of mutual interest He will also interact with the Indian community in Djibouti 2 During the visit an Agreement on exemption from the visa requirement for holders of Diplomatic and Official Service Passports and a memorandum of understanding will also be signed between the Sushma Swaraj Institute of Foreign Service SSIFS and the Djibouti Institute of Diplomatic Studies IDS 3 India and Djibouti share warm and friendly relations underpinned by historical and cultural ties Djibouti had provided extraordinary support in the evacuation of Indian nationals from war torn Yemen in 2015 Operation Rahat Shri Ram Nath Kovind the then President of India paid a state visit to Djibouti in October 2017 India opened a mission in Djibouti in 2019 Bilateral trade between the two countries was valued at US 755 million in 2021 22 A sizeable Indian community lives in Djibouti 4 The visit is expected to provide a further boost to the bilateral ties between India and Djibouti
    India: Visit of the Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Shri V. Muraleedharan to the Republic of Djibouti (September 21-22, 2022)
    Africa5 days ago

    India: Visit of the Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Shri V. Muraleedharan to the Republic of Djibouti (September 21-22, 2022)

    The Minister of State for Foreign Affairs and Parliamentary Affairs, Shri V.

    Muraleedharan, will pay an official visit to the Republic of Djibouti on September 21-22, 2022.

    This will be his first visit to the country.

    1.

    During the visit, MoS will visit the Prime Minister of Djibouti, H.E. Mr. Abdoulkader Kamil Mohamed, and will hold talks with the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr. Mahmoud Ali Youssouf, and other dignitaries on bilateral, regional and international issues of mutual interest.

    He will also interact with the Indian community in Djibouti.

    2.

    During the visit, an Agreement on exemption from the visa requirement for holders of Diplomatic and Official/Service Passports; and a memorandum of understanding will also be signed between the Sushma Swaraj Institute of Foreign Service (SSIFS) and the Djibouti Institute of Diplomatic Studies (IDS).

    3.

    India and Djibouti share warm and friendly relations underpinned by historical and cultural ties.

    Djibouti had provided extraordinary support in the evacuation of Indian nationals from war-torn Yemen in 2015 (Operation Rahat).

    Shri Ram Nath Kovind, the then President of India, paid a state visit to Djibouti in October 2017.

    India opened a mission in Djibouti in 2019.

    Bilateral trade between the two countries was valued at US$755 million in 2021-22 .

    A sizeable Indian community lives in Djibouti.

    4.

    The visit is expected to provide a further boost to the bilateral ties between India and Djibouti.

  •  Inspite record government donations this year the United Nations lacks the humanitarian aid funds required to make it through the year UN agencies were short 32 billion U S dollar to meet increased global needs until the end of December the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs OCHA reported on Friday in Geneva A total of 17 6 billion dollars was received this year more than ever before but the deficit remained larger than ever as funding requirements reached 49 5 billion dollars this year Worldwide hunger displacement conflicts and the effects of the climate crisis had contributed to the dire situation leaving 204 million of the world s most vulnerable people in need of help UN humanitarian chief Martin Griffths said millions of people suffered unprecedented hardship in conflicts droughts floods and other humanitarian emergencies where the scale of needs had vastly outpaced the resources we have available In some states and regions less than 20 per cent of the required aid to provide people with food shelter and medical assistance has been received an OCHA spokesperson said This included Myanmar El Salvador and Mozambique for example The best funded areas included Libya Somalia and the Central African Republic where between 69 per cent and 79 per cent of estimated required aid had been provided Griffiths released 100 million dollars from the Central Emergency Response Fund CERF on Friday to help aid underfunded humanitarian operations That brought the total amount released from the fund to 250 million dollars this year a record high The money would be distributed across 11 states including Yemen South Sudan Myanmar Nigeria and Bangladesh NewsSourceCredit NAN
    UN humanitarian aid funds fall short inspite record donations
     Inspite record government donations this year the United Nations lacks the humanitarian aid funds required to make it through the year UN agencies were short 32 billion U S dollar to meet increased global needs until the end of December the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs OCHA reported on Friday in Geneva A total of 17 6 billion dollars was received this year more than ever before but the deficit remained larger than ever as funding requirements reached 49 5 billion dollars this year Worldwide hunger displacement conflicts and the effects of the climate crisis had contributed to the dire situation leaving 204 million of the world s most vulnerable people in need of help UN humanitarian chief Martin Griffths said millions of people suffered unprecedented hardship in conflicts droughts floods and other humanitarian emergencies where the scale of needs had vastly outpaced the resources we have available In some states and regions less than 20 per cent of the required aid to provide people with food shelter and medical assistance has been received an OCHA spokesperson said This included Myanmar El Salvador and Mozambique for example The best funded areas included Libya Somalia and the Central African Republic where between 69 per cent and 79 per cent of estimated required aid had been provided Griffiths released 100 million dollars from the Central Emergency Response Fund CERF on Friday to help aid underfunded humanitarian operations That brought the total amount released from the fund to 250 million dollars this year a record high The money would be distributed across 11 states including Yemen South Sudan Myanmar Nigeria and Bangladesh NewsSourceCredit NAN
    UN humanitarian aid funds fall short inspite record donations
    Foreign1 week ago

    UN humanitarian aid funds fall short inspite record donations

    Inspite record government donations this year, the United Nations lacks the humanitarian aid funds required to make it through the year.

    UN agencies were short 32 billion U.

    S. dollar to meet increased global needs until the end of December, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) reported on Friday in Geneva.

    A total of 17.6 billion dollars was received this year, more than ever before, but the deficit remained larger than ever as funding requirements reached 49.5 billion dollars this year.

    Worldwide hunger, displacement, conflicts and the effects of the climate crisis had contributed to the dire situation, leaving 204 million of the world’s most vulnerable people in need of help.

    UN humanitarian chief Martin Griffths said millions of people suffered unprecedented hardship in conflicts, droughts, floods and other humanitarian emergencies where the scale of needs had vastly outpaced the resources we have available.

    “In some states and regions, less than 20 per cent of the required aid to provide people with food, shelter and medical assistance has been received, an OCHA spokesperson said.

    This included Myanmar, El Salvador and Mozambique, for example.

    The best funded areas included Libya, Somalia and the Central African Republic, where between 69 per cent and 79 per cent of estimated required aid had been provided.

    Griffiths released 100 million dollars from the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) on Friday to help aid underfunded humanitarian operations.

    That brought the total amount released from the fund to 250 million dollars this year, a record high.

    The money would be distributed across 11 states including Yemen, South Sudan, Myanmar, Nigeria and Bangladesh.

    ==
    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   The head of Humanitarian Affairs Martin Griffiths recalled previous warnings about the impact of the conflict in Ethiopia Somalia He spoke about his recent trip to Somalia where more than 200 000 people are currently at risk of famine a figure expected to reach 300 000 by November with millions more on the brink of starvation Recent humanitarian assessments have identified hundreds of thousands of people facing catastrophic levels of hunger or phase 5 of the Integrated Phase Classification system the final and most devastating stage There is simply nothing worse than that the OCHA chief said noting that the widespread suffering boils down to the direct and indirect impact of the conflict and the behavior of the parties to the conflict Tactics of war Mr Griffiths observed that a similar pattern repeats itself in every context highlighting how civilians are killed and wounded forcibly displaced families interruption of access to the market and work looting of food reserves while the general economic decline puts food out of reach for the vulnerable In the most extreme cases warring parties have deliberately cut off access to commercial supplies and essential services that civilians depend on for survival he said Hunger is used as a tactic of war While aid workers have extended relief lifelines interference harassment and attacks often prevent access to those in need Aid workers will stay and deliver but conditions in some contexts are unacceptable the OCHA chief said Fueling hunger Meanwhile drought rising global commodity prices and the impacts of COVID 19 and the war in Ukraine are also exacerbating food insecurity and destitution And people in South Sudan Nigeria Ethiopia Yemen Afghanistan and Somalia are literally on the front lines of climate change facing droughts floods desertification and water scarcity Snapshots More than seven years of armed conflict in Yemen have wreaked havoc leaving some 19 million people acutely food insecure An estimated 160 000 people are facing a catastrophe and 538 000 children are severely malnourished the Relief Coordinator said warning that funding gaps could make the situation worse Last year South Sudan was one of the most dangerous places to work as an aid worker with 319 violent incidents against humanitarian staff and goods Meanwhile more than 13 million people in Afar Amhara and Tigray in Ethiopia are in need of vital food assistance While improvements were seen in the delivery of humanitarian assistance in northern Ethiopia the resumption of hostilities in recent weeks is undoing recent progress he said As for northeast Nigeria the UN projects that 4 1 million people face high levels of acute food insecurity in the conflict affected states of Adamawa Borno and Yobe including 588 000 people who already faced emergency levels between June and August almost half of which were unreachable for humanitarian assistance Food security assessments could not be done in these areas but we fear that some people are already at the catastrophe level and are at risk of dying he said Taking action The humanitarian chief reminded the ambassadors that action can be taken starting with leaving no stone unturned in the search for peaceful and negotiated resolutions to conflicts and other violent situations Second states and armed groups must comply with their obligations under international humanitarian and human rights law to ensure the unimpeded passage of humanitarian aid Mr Griffiths also highlighted climate change as an issue central to peace and security both now and for decades to come He implored all member states to prioritize a longer term approach and secure a substantial proportion of financing as grants not loans for climate adaptation and mitigation Time is not on our side he concluded Fanning the flames Fresh from a trip to Central America World Food Program WFP chief David Beasley saw firsthand how the conflict is adding fire to the flames of what is already a serious food crisis hunger From the arduous crossing of the Darien Gap to Guatemala he told tragic stories of people migrating north out of sheer desperation The impact of the climate crisis and the ongoing knock on effects of COVID have already strained the ability of many families to cope he said People feel like they have nothing left they can either stay and starve or go and risk dying for the chance of a better future Unprecedented global emergency The WFP chief argued that under the threat of growing famine and mass starvation we are facing a global emergency of unprecedented magnitude And since the Ukraine conflict began a wave of hunger has turned into a tsunami he continued noting that as many as 345 million people in 82 countries are moving towards starvation This is a record now more than 2 5 times the number of acutely food insecure people before the pandemic started Mr Beasley presented staggering statistics on the dire situation facing hundreds of millions of people around the world As violent conflict pushes millions of innocent civilians ever closer to starvation and famine he called on the Council to demonstrate the humanitarian leadership that the world urgently needs right now and break the vicious cycle of hunger and conflict which is fueling a global food shortage insecurity crisis that threatens to get out of control The hungry people of the world are counting on us to do the right thing and we must not let them down concluded Mr Beasley
    ‘Hunger tsunami’ could trigger multiple famines, Security Council warned
      The head of Humanitarian Affairs Martin Griffiths recalled previous warnings about the impact of the conflict in Ethiopia Somalia He spoke about his recent trip to Somalia where more than 200 000 people are currently at risk of famine a figure expected to reach 300 000 by November with millions more on the brink of starvation Recent humanitarian assessments have identified hundreds of thousands of people facing catastrophic levels of hunger or phase 5 of the Integrated Phase Classification system the final and most devastating stage There is simply nothing worse than that the OCHA chief said noting that the widespread suffering boils down to the direct and indirect impact of the conflict and the behavior of the parties to the conflict Tactics of war Mr Griffiths observed that a similar pattern repeats itself in every context highlighting how civilians are killed and wounded forcibly displaced families interruption of access to the market and work looting of food reserves while the general economic decline puts food out of reach for the vulnerable In the most extreme cases warring parties have deliberately cut off access to commercial supplies and essential services that civilians depend on for survival he said Hunger is used as a tactic of war While aid workers have extended relief lifelines interference harassment and attacks often prevent access to those in need Aid workers will stay and deliver but conditions in some contexts are unacceptable the OCHA chief said Fueling hunger Meanwhile drought rising global commodity prices and the impacts of COVID 19 and the war in Ukraine are also exacerbating food insecurity and destitution And people in South Sudan Nigeria Ethiopia Yemen Afghanistan and Somalia are literally on the front lines of climate change facing droughts floods desertification and water scarcity Snapshots More than seven years of armed conflict in Yemen have wreaked havoc leaving some 19 million people acutely food insecure An estimated 160 000 people are facing a catastrophe and 538 000 children are severely malnourished the Relief Coordinator said warning that funding gaps could make the situation worse Last year South Sudan was one of the most dangerous places to work as an aid worker with 319 violent incidents against humanitarian staff and goods Meanwhile more than 13 million people in Afar Amhara and Tigray in Ethiopia are in need of vital food assistance While improvements were seen in the delivery of humanitarian assistance in northern Ethiopia the resumption of hostilities in recent weeks is undoing recent progress he said As for northeast Nigeria the UN projects that 4 1 million people face high levels of acute food insecurity in the conflict affected states of Adamawa Borno and Yobe including 588 000 people who already faced emergency levels between June and August almost half of which were unreachable for humanitarian assistance Food security assessments could not be done in these areas but we fear that some people are already at the catastrophe level and are at risk of dying he said Taking action The humanitarian chief reminded the ambassadors that action can be taken starting with leaving no stone unturned in the search for peaceful and negotiated resolutions to conflicts and other violent situations Second states and armed groups must comply with their obligations under international humanitarian and human rights law to ensure the unimpeded passage of humanitarian aid Mr Griffiths also highlighted climate change as an issue central to peace and security both now and for decades to come He implored all member states to prioritize a longer term approach and secure a substantial proportion of financing as grants not loans for climate adaptation and mitigation Time is not on our side he concluded Fanning the flames Fresh from a trip to Central America World Food Program WFP chief David Beasley saw firsthand how the conflict is adding fire to the flames of what is already a serious food crisis hunger From the arduous crossing of the Darien Gap to Guatemala he told tragic stories of people migrating north out of sheer desperation The impact of the climate crisis and the ongoing knock on effects of COVID have already strained the ability of many families to cope he said People feel like they have nothing left they can either stay and starve or go and risk dying for the chance of a better future Unprecedented global emergency The WFP chief argued that under the threat of growing famine and mass starvation we are facing a global emergency of unprecedented magnitude And since the Ukraine conflict began a wave of hunger has turned into a tsunami he continued noting that as many as 345 million people in 82 countries are moving towards starvation This is a record now more than 2 5 times the number of acutely food insecure people before the pandemic started Mr Beasley presented staggering statistics on the dire situation facing hundreds of millions of people around the world As violent conflict pushes millions of innocent civilians ever closer to starvation and famine he called on the Council to demonstrate the humanitarian leadership that the world urgently needs right now and break the vicious cycle of hunger and conflict which is fueling a global food shortage insecurity crisis that threatens to get out of control The hungry people of the world are counting on us to do the right thing and we must not let them down concluded Mr Beasley
    ‘Hunger tsunami’ could trigger multiple famines, Security Council warned
    Africa1 week ago

    ‘Hunger tsunami’ could trigger multiple famines, Security Council warned

    The head of Humanitarian Affairs, Martin Griffiths, recalled previous warnings about the impact of the conflict in Ethiopia, Somalia.

    He spoke about his recent trip to Somalia, where more than 200,000 people are currently at risk of famine, a figure expected to reach 300,000 by November, "with millions more" on the brink of starvation.

    Recent humanitarian assessments have identified hundreds of thousands of people facing catastrophic levels of hunger, or phase 5 of the Integrated Phase Classification system, the final and most devastating stage.

    “There is simply nothing worse than that,” the OCHA chief said, noting that the widespread suffering boils down to the direct and indirect impact of the conflict and “the behavior of the parties to the conflict.” 'Tactics of war' Mr. Griffiths observed that “a similar pattern repeats itself in every context”, highlighting how civilians are killed and wounded; forcibly displaced families; interruption of access to the market and work; looting of food reserves; while the general economic decline puts food out of reach for the vulnerable.

    "In the most extreme cases, warring parties have deliberately cut off access to commercial supplies and essential services that civilians depend on for survival," he said.

    "Hunger is used as a tactic of war."

    While aid workers have extended "relief lifelines", interference, harassment and attacks often prevent access to those in need.

    “Aid workers will stay and deliver, but conditions in some contexts are unacceptable,” the OCHA chief said.

    Fueling hunger Meanwhile, drought, rising global commodity prices, and the impacts of COVID-19 and the war in Ukraine are also exacerbating food insecurity and destitution.

    And people in South Sudan, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Yemen, Afghanistan and Somalia are "literally on the front lines of climate change" facing droughts, floods, desertification and water scarcity.

    Snapshots More than seven years of armed conflict in Yemen have wreaked havoc, leaving some 19 million people acutely food insecure.

    “An estimated 160,000 people are facing a catastrophe and 538,000 children are severely malnourished,” the Relief Coordinator said, warning that funding gaps could make the situation worse.

    Last year, South Sudan was one of the most dangerous places to work as an aid worker, with 319 violent incidents against humanitarian staff and goods.

    Meanwhile, more than 13 million people in Afar, Amhara and Tigray in Ethiopia are in need of vital food assistance.

    While improvements were seen in the delivery of humanitarian assistance in northern Ethiopia, "the resumption of hostilities in recent weeks is undoing recent progress," he said.

    As for northeast Nigeria, the UN projects that 4.1 million people face high levels of acute food insecurity in the conflict-affected states of Adamawa, Borno and Yobe, including 588,000 people who already faced emergency levels between June and August, almost half of which were unreachable for humanitarian assistance.

    “Food security assessments could not be done in these areas, but we fear that some people are already at the catastrophe level and are at risk of dying,” he said.

    Taking action The humanitarian chief reminded the ambassadors that action can be taken, starting with leaving no stone unturned in the search for "peaceful and negotiated resolutions" to conflicts and other violent situations.

    Second, states and armed groups must comply with their obligations under international humanitarian and human rights law to ensure the unimpeded passage of humanitarian aid.

    Mr. Griffiths also highlighted climate change as an issue “central to peace and security” both now “and for decades to come”.

    He implored all member states to prioritize "a longer-term approach and secure a substantial proportion of financing, as grants, not loans, for climate adaptation and mitigation."

    "Time is not on our side," he concluded.

    Fanning the flames Fresh from a trip to Central America, World Food Program (WFP) chief David Beasley saw firsthand how the conflict is "adding fire to the flames" of what is already a serious food crisis.

    hunger.

    From the arduous crossing of the Darien Gap to Guatemala, he told "tragic stories" of people migrating north "out of sheer desperation."

    “The impact of the climate crisis and the ongoing knock-on effects of COVID have already strained the ability of many families to cope,” he said.

    "People feel like they have nothing left: they can either stay and starve, or go and risk dying for the chance of a better future."

    'Unprecedented' global emergency The WFP chief argued that under the threat of growing famine and mass starvation, "we are facing a global emergency of unprecedented magnitude".

    And since the Ukraine conflict began, "a wave of hunger has turned into" a tsunami ", he continued, noting that as many as 345 million people in 82 countries are "moving towards starvation."

    “This is a record – now more than 2.5 times the number of acutely food insecure people before the pandemic started.” Mr. Beasley presented staggering statistics on the dire situation facing hundreds of millions of people around the world.

    As violent conflict pushes millions of "innocent civilians ever closer to starvation and famine," he called on the Council to "demonstrate the humanitarian leadership that the world urgently needs right now and...

    break the vicious cycle of hunger and conflict, which is fueling a global food shortage.

    insecurity crisis that threatens to get out of control”.

    “The hungry people of the world are counting on us to do the right thing, and we must not let them down,” concluded Mr. Beasley.

  •   Pope Francis renewed calls for peace Wednesday for the beloved Ukrainian people on the war torn country s Independence Day and the six month anniversary of the start of Russia s invasion Following his weekly general audience at the Vatican Francis directed his address to the beloved Ukrainian people who for six months today have been suffering the horror of war while warning of the risk of nuclear catastrophe in the region I hope that concrete steps will be taken to put an end to the war and to avert the risk of a nuclear disaster in Zaporizhzhia he said referring to the Russian controlled nuclear plant in southern Ukraine Europe s largest that has been the target of military strikes blamed by each side on the other The 85 year old pope cited so many innocents who are paying for madness whether prisoners refugees children or orphans as the war drags on I think of that poor girl who died because of a bomb under the seat of her car in Moscow added Francis referring to Daria Dugina the daughter of a Russian ultranationalist intellectual allied with President Vladimir Putin killed by a car bomb Saturday Those who profit from war and the arms trade are criminals who kill humanity the pope said while denouncing long standing military conflicts in Syria Yemen and Myanmar Ukraine s ambassador to the Holy See Andriy Yurash wrote on Twitter he was disappointed in Francis speech saying the pontiff should not have put aggressor and victim in the same category
    Pope appeals for peace to ‘beloved’ Ukraine on Independence Day
      Pope Francis renewed calls for peace Wednesday for the beloved Ukrainian people on the war torn country s Independence Day and the six month anniversary of the start of Russia s invasion Following his weekly general audience at the Vatican Francis directed his address to the beloved Ukrainian people who for six months today have been suffering the horror of war while warning of the risk of nuclear catastrophe in the region I hope that concrete steps will be taken to put an end to the war and to avert the risk of a nuclear disaster in Zaporizhzhia he said referring to the Russian controlled nuclear plant in southern Ukraine Europe s largest that has been the target of military strikes blamed by each side on the other The 85 year old pope cited so many innocents who are paying for madness whether prisoners refugees children or orphans as the war drags on I think of that poor girl who died because of a bomb under the seat of her car in Moscow added Francis referring to Daria Dugina the daughter of a Russian ultranationalist intellectual allied with President Vladimir Putin killed by a car bomb Saturday Those who profit from war and the arms trade are criminals who kill humanity the pope said while denouncing long standing military conflicts in Syria Yemen and Myanmar Ukraine s ambassador to the Holy See Andriy Yurash wrote on Twitter he was disappointed in Francis speech saying the pontiff should not have put aggressor and victim in the same category
    Pope appeals for peace to ‘beloved’ Ukraine on Independence Day
    Foreign1 month ago

    Pope appeals for peace to ‘beloved’ Ukraine on Independence Day

    Pope Francis renewed calls for peace Wednesday “for the beloved Ukrainian people” on the war-torn country’s Independence Day and the six-month anniversary of the start of Russia’s invasion.

    Following his weekly general audience at the Vatican, Francis directed his address to “the beloved Ukrainian people who for six months today have been suffering the horror of war,” while warning of the risk of nuclear catastrophe in the region.

    “I hope that concrete steps will be taken to put an end to the war and to avert the risk of a nuclear disaster in Zaporizhzhia,” he said, referring to the Russian-controlled nuclear plant in southern Ukraine — Europe’s largest – that has been the target of military strikes, blamed by each side on the other.

    The 85-year-old pope cited “so many innocents who are paying for madness” — whether prisoners, refugees, children or orphans — as the war drags on.

    “I think of that poor girl who died because of a bomb under the seat of her car in Moscow,” added Francis, referring to Daria Dugina, the daughter of a Russian ultranationalist intellectual allied with President Vladimir Putin, killed by a car bomb Saturday.

    “Those who profit from war and the arms trade are criminals who kill humanity,” the pope said, while denouncing long-standing military conflicts in Syria, Yemen, and Myanmar.

    Ukraine’s ambassador to the Holy See, Andriy Yurash, wrote on Twitter he was disappointed in Francis’ speech, saying the pontiff should not have put “aggressor and victim” in the same category.

  •  Millions of children in the Philippines returned to school as the academic year started on Monday with many taking their seats in classrooms for the first time since the Covid 19 pandemic hit The Philippines is one of the last countries in the world to resume full time in person lessons sparking warnings that the prolonged closure of classrooms had worsened an education crisis in the country Children in masks and uniforms lined up for a temperature check and squirt of hand sanitiser at Pedro Guevara Elementary School in Manila which had shut classrooms since March 2020 The school has adopted a hybrid system of in person and remote learning as it transitions its nearly 6 000 students back to face to face classes by November a deadline set by President Ferdinand Marcos Jr soon after he took office two months ago Grade six student Sophia Macahilig said she was excited to meet her classmates and teachers after two years of Zoom lessons We used to have fun and now I can have fun again 11 year old Macahilig told AFP But many students have a lot of catching up to do Even before the pandemic nine out of 10 Filipino children could not read a simple text with comprehension by age 10 the World Bank and other agencies said in a recent report Only 10 countries were worse off including Afghanistan Laos Chad and Yemen Lagging behind After Philippine schools closed a blended learning programme involving online classes printed materials and lessons broadcast on television and social media was introduced As face to face classes resume old problems persist large class sizes outdated teaching methods poverty and lack of basic infrastructure such as toilets have been blamed for contributing to the education crisis Pedro Guevara science teacher Ethel Tumanan 32 said she was worried that students had missed out on valuable learning over the past two years As a teacher we really prefer face to face at least we are the ones who can gauge and assess where our pupils are at In the lead up to the reopening of classrooms the government has been ramping up a vaccination drive and will provide students with free public transport until the end of the calendar year On Saturday the government began handing out cash aid to students and parents struggling to cover expenses leading to chaotic scenes outside distribution centres In the city of Zamboanga 29 people were injured when several thousand tried to push through the gate of a high school
    Philippine classrooms reopen after more than two years
     Millions of children in the Philippines returned to school as the academic year started on Monday with many taking their seats in classrooms for the first time since the Covid 19 pandemic hit The Philippines is one of the last countries in the world to resume full time in person lessons sparking warnings that the prolonged closure of classrooms had worsened an education crisis in the country Children in masks and uniforms lined up for a temperature check and squirt of hand sanitiser at Pedro Guevara Elementary School in Manila which had shut classrooms since March 2020 The school has adopted a hybrid system of in person and remote learning as it transitions its nearly 6 000 students back to face to face classes by November a deadline set by President Ferdinand Marcos Jr soon after he took office two months ago Grade six student Sophia Macahilig said she was excited to meet her classmates and teachers after two years of Zoom lessons We used to have fun and now I can have fun again 11 year old Macahilig told AFP But many students have a lot of catching up to do Even before the pandemic nine out of 10 Filipino children could not read a simple text with comprehension by age 10 the World Bank and other agencies said in a recent report Only 10 countries were worse off including Afghanistan Laos Chad and Yemen Lagging behind After Philippine schools closed a blended learning programme involving online classes printed materials and lessons broadcast on television and social media was introduced As face to face classes resume old problems persist large class sizes outdated teaching methods poverty and lack of basic infrastructure such as toilets have been blamed for contributing to the education crisis Pedro Guevara science teacher Ethel Tumanan 32 said she was worried that students had missed out on valuable learning over the past two years As a teacher we really prefer face to face at least we are the ones who can gauge and assess where our pupils are at In the lead up to the reopening of classrooms the government has been ramping up a vaccination drive and will provide students with free public transport until the end of the calendar year On Saturday the government began handing out cash aid to students and parents struggling to cover expenses leading to chaotic scenes outside distribution centres In the city of Zamboanga 29 people were injured when several thousand tried to push through the gate of a high school
    Philippine classrooms reopen after more than two years
    Foreign1 month ago

    Philippine classrooms reopen after more than two years

    Millions of children in the Philippines returned to school as the academic year started on Monday, with many taking their seats in classrooms for the first time since the Covid-19 pandemic hit.

    The Philippines is one of the last countries in the world to resume full-time, in-person lessons — sparking warnings that the prolonged closure of classrooms had worsened an education crisis in the country.

    Children in masks and uniforms lined up for a temperature check and squirt of hand sanitiser at Pedro Guevara Elementary School in Manila, which had shut classrooms since March 2020.

    The school has adopted a hybrid system of in-person and remote learning as it transitions its nearly 6,000 students back to face-to-face classes by November — a deadline set by President Ferdinand Marcos Jr soon after he took office two months ago.

    Grade six student Sophia Macahilig said she was “excited” to meet her classmates and teachers after two years of Zoom lessons.

    “We used to have fun and now I can have fun again,” 11-year-old Macahilig told AFP.

    But many students have a lot of catching up to do.

    Even before the pandemic, nine out of 10 Filipino children could “not read a simple text with comprehension” by age 10, the World Bank and other agencies said in a recent report.

    Only 10 countries were worse off, including Afghanistan, Laos, Chad and Yemen.

    Lagging behind After Philippine schools closed, a “blended learning” programme involving online classes, printed materials and lessons broadcast on television and social media was introduced.

    As face-to-face classes resume, old problems persist: large class sizes, outdated teaching methods, poverty, and lack of basic infrastructure — such as toilets — have been blamed for contributing to the education crisis.

    Pedro Guevara science teacher Ethel Tumanan, 32, said she was worried that students had missed out on valuable learning over the past two years.

    “As a teacher, we really prefer face-to-face, at least we are the ones who can gauge and assess where our pupils are at.

    ” In the lead-up to the reopening of classrooms, the government has been ramping up a vaccination drive and will provide students with free public transport until the end of the calendar year.

    On Saturday, the government began handing out cash aid to students and parents struggling to cover expenses, leading to chaotic scenes outside distribution centres.

    In the city of Zamboanga, 29 people were injured when several thousand tried to push through the gate of a high school.

  •   UN special envoy underscores need tThe United Nations UN Security Council says it has the responsibility to help Yemen take necessary and decisive steps towards peace Hans Grundberg the UN Special Envoy to Yemen said on Tuesday While continuing to count on international support to implement extend and expand the current truce Grundberg underscored the need to end the conflict not merely manage it We all need to remind ourselves that failure to reach an agreement to extend the truce will lead to renewed cycles of escalation and violence with predictable and devastating consequences for Yemen s population He told the UN Security Council and called on all relevant parties to build a lasting peace The diplomat lauded the parties for extending the truce until Oct 2 continuing the longest pause in fighting since the war began over seven years ago The agreement provided two months for negotiations to improve Yemeni lives and find further steps to end the conflict as well as humanitarian and economic measures including airport opening and fuel imports flow The UN brokered truce came into effect on April 2 and has been extended bi monthly ever since Four and a half months in the current truce continues to broadly hold in military terms Grundberg noted While there was a significant decline in civilian casualties he flagged a worrying development that child casualties were surging and now constitute about 40 per cent of reported civilian casualties Grundberg said that relevant parties of the agreement have continued to emphasise the need to build on the existing truce to include more economic and security priorities and durable solutions for political issues He proposed an expanded truce that includes a transparent disbursement mechanism to regularly pay civil servant salaries and civilian pensions The road openings regular fuel flow and a durable ceasefire to prepare for the resumption of a Yemeni led political process under UN auspices www nannews ng NewsSourceCredit NAN
    UN special envoy underscores need to end conflict in Yemen
      UN special envoy underscores need tThe United Nations UN Security Council says it has the responsibility to help Yemen take necessary and decisive steps towards peace Hans Grundberg the UN Special Envoy to Yemen said on Tuesday While continuing to count on international support to implement extend and expand the current truce Grundberg underscored the need to end the conflict not merely manage it We all need to remind ourselves that failure to reach an agreement to extend the truce will lead to renewed cycles of escalation and violence with predictable and devastating consequences for Yemen s population He told the UN Security Council and called on all relevant parties to build a lasting peace The diplomat lauded the parties for extending the truce until Oct 2 continuing the longest pause in fighting since the war began over seven years ago The agreement provided two months for negotiations to improve Yemeni lives and find further steps to end the conflict as well as humanitarian and economic measures including airport opening and fuel imports flow The UN brokered truce came into effect on April 2 and has been extended bi monthly ever since Four and a half months in the current truce continues to broadly hold in military terms Grundberg noted While there was a significant decline in civilian casualties he flagged a worrying development that child casualties were surging and now constitute about 40 per cent of reported civilian casualties Grundberg said that relevant parties of the agreement have continued to emphasise the need to build on the existing truce to include more economic and security priorities and durable solutions for political issues He proposed an expanded truce that includes a transparent disbursement mechanism to regularly pay civil servant salaries and civilian pensions The road openings regular fuel flow and a durable ceasefire to prepare for the resumption of a Yemeni led political process under UN auspices www nannews ng NewsSourceCredit NAN
    UN special envoy underscores need to end conflict in Yemen
    Foreign1 month ago

    UN special envoy underscores need to end conflict in Yemen

    UN special envoy underscores need tThe United Nations (UN) Security Council says it has the responsibility to help Yemen take necessary and decisive steps towards peace.

    Hans Grundberg, the UN Special Envoy to Yemen said on Tuesday.

    While continuing to count on international support to implement, extend, and expand the current truce, Grundberg underscored the “need to end the conflict, not merely manage it.

    ’’ “We all need to remind ourselves that failure to reach an agreement to extend the truce will lead to renewed cycles of escalation and violence, with predictable and devastating consequences for Yemen’s population.

    ’’ He told the UN Security Council and called on all relevant parties to build a lasting peace.

    The diplomat lauded the parties for extending the truce until Oct. 2, continuing the longest pause in fighting since the war began over seven years ago.

    The agreement provided two months for negotiations to improve Yemeni lives and find further steps to end the conflict, as well as humanitarian and economic measures, including airport opening and fuel imports flow.

    The UN-brokered truce came into effect on April 2 and has been extended bi-monthly ever since.

    Four and a half months in, the current truce continues to broadly hold in military terms, Grundberg noted.

    While there was a significant decline in civilian casualties, he flagged a worrying development that child casualties were surging and now constitute about 40 per cent of reported civilian casualties.

    Grundberg said that relevant parties of the agreement have continued to emphasise the need to build on the existing truce to include more economic and security priorities and durable solutions for political issues.

    He proposed an expanded truce that includes a transparent disbursement mechanism to regularly pay civil servant salaries and civilian pensions.

    The road openings, regular fuel flow and a durable ceasefire to prepare for the resumption of a Yemeni-led political process under UN auspices.

    (www.

    nannews.

    ng)
    NewsSourceCredit: NAN