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  •  The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control and Prevention NCDC says it is aware of the ongoing outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease EVD caused by the Sudan strain of the Ebola Virus EV in Uganda The Director General NCDC Dr Ifedayo Adetifa in a statement on Tuesday made available to News Agency of Nigeria in Abuja said that Uganda had on Sept 20 declared the outbreak of the virus and that it was on an alert mode NAN reports that the outbreak has also been confirmed by the World Health Organization WHO The Sudan strain of the Ebola virus is the known cause of EVD having caused previous outbreaks in Uganda South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo The Uganda Virus Research Institute confirmed the virus in samples collected from a 24 year old male who had exhibited symptoms of the disease and later died in Mubende District in the Central Region about 175km from the capital Kampala As of Sept 29 the Ugandan Ministry of Health reported 54 cases 35 confirmed and 19 probable and 25 deaths 7 confirmed and 18 probable The Ugandan Ministry of Health with the support of WHO is working to effectively respond to and contain the spread of the virus The NCDC boss said that the agency s led multisectoral National Emerging Viral Haemorrhagic Diseases Technical Working Group NEVHD TWG working with partners and stakeholders had conducted a rapid risk assessment to guide in country preparedness activities The NEVHD TWG coordinates preparedness efforts for EVD and other emerging viral haemorrhagic diseases Based on available data the overall risk of importation of the Ebola virus and the impact on the health of Nigerians has been assessed as high for the following reasons The Sudan Ebola Virus does not currently have an effective drug for treatment or licensed vaccine for prevention The extent of the outbreak in Uganda has not yet been ascertained as investigations have shown that some persons may have died with similar symptoms which were not reported to health authorities In addition their burials were not conducted safely to prevent transmission The case fatality rate of the Sudan virus varied from 41 per cent to 100 per cent in past outbreaks The likelihood of importation to Nigeria is high due to the increased air travel between Nigeria and Uganda especially through Kenya s Nairobi airport a regional transport hub and other neighbouring countries that shared a direct border with Uganda The likelihood of spread in Nigeria following importation is high due to the gatherings and travel associated with politics the coming yuletide as well as other religious gatherings and festivals during the last few months of the year he outlined He said that in spite of the risk assessment the country had the capacity technical human health workforce and diagnostic to respond effectively in the event of an outbreak This is exemplified by our successful response to the Ebola outbreak in 2014 as well as improvements in our capacity for health emergency response during the COVID 19 pandemic We have the diagnostic capacity to test for the EVD presently at the National Reference Laboratory in Abuja and the Lagos University Teaching Hospital s Centre for Human and Zoonotic Virology Laboratory he said He however said that diagnostic capacity would be scaled up to other laboratories in cities with important Points of Entry POE and others as might be required An effective response system is in place with the availability of control capacities trained rapid response teams and an effective infection prevention and control programme to limit the risk of spread in the event of a single imported case Currently no case of EVD has been reported in Nigeria Nonetheless the Nigerian Government through NCDC s multisectoral NEVHD TWG has put several measures in place to prevent and prepare for immediate control of any outbreak of the disease in country The NCDC Incident Coordination Centre ICC is now in alert mode Development of an incident action plan for the first few cases of EVD has commenced POE surveillance has been heightened using the passenger pre boarding health declaration and screening form in the Nigeria International Travel Portal NITP platform Passengers arriving from Uganda and persons who transited in Uganda are being followed up for 21 days of their arrival in Nigeria on their health status Trained Rapid Response Teams are on standby to be deployed in the event of an outbreak Public Health Emergency Operations Centres PHEOCs in states with major POE i e Lagos Kano Abuja and Rivers are on standby A medical counter measures plan is available He said amplification of risk communication and engagement with states and partners to strengthen preparedness activities including a review of risk communication protocols plans and messages in the event of an outbreak had been done Adetifa said the country had an active infection Prevention and Control IPC programme nationwide with guidelines and training packages developed for healthcare workers NAN reports that Ebola virus disease is a severe often fatal illness affecting humans The strain responsible for the current outbreak was first reported in southern Sudan in June 1976 Since then seven outbreaks caused by this strain had been reported four in Uganda and three in Sudan with previous outbreaks fatality ratio ranging from 41 to 100 per cent Just like other types of Ebola virus people infected cannot spread the disease until the development of symptoms including fever fatigue muscle pain headache and sore throat later followed by vomiting diarrhoea rash symptoms of impaired kidney and liver function Symptoms may appear anywhere from two to 21 days after exposure to the virus but the average is 8 to 10 days Currently there are no vaccines or therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of this strain of the virus However the early initiation of supportive treatment has been shown to significantly reduce deaths Recovery from EVD depends on good supportive clinical care management of co morbidities and the patient s immune response People who recover from Ebola virus infection develop antibodies that last for at least 10 years www ng NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Nigeria on alert mode as Ebola resurfaces in Uganda—NCDC
     The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control and Prevention NCDC says it is aware of the ongoing outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease EVD caused by the Sudan strain of the Ebola Virus EV in Uganda The Director General NCDC Dr Ifedayo Adetifa in a statement on Tuesday made available to News Agency of Nigeria in Abuja said that Uganda had on Sept 20 declared the outbreak of the virus and that it was on an alert mode NAN reports that the outbreak has also been confirmed by the World Health Organization WHO The Sudan strain of the Ebola virus is the known cause of EVD having caused previous outbreaks in Uganda South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo The Uganda Virus Research Institute confirmed the virus in samples collected from a 24 year old male who had exhibited symptoms of the disease and later died in Mubende District in the Central Region about 175km from the capital Kampala As of Sept 29 the Ugandan Ministry of Health reported 54 cases 35 confirmed and 19 probable and 25 deaths 7 confirmed and 18 probable The Ugandan Ministry of Health with the support of WHO is working to effectively respond to and contain the spread of the virus The NCDC boss said that the agency s led multisectoral National Emerging Viral Haemorrhagic Diseases Technical Working Group NEVHD TWG working with partners and stakeholders had conducted a rapid risk assessment to guide in country preparedness activities The NEVHD TWG coordinates preparedness efforts for EVD and other emerging viral haemorrhagic diseases Based on available data the overall risk of importation of the Ebola virus and the impact on the health of Nigerians has been assessed as high for the following reasons The Sudan Ebola Virus does not currently have an effective drug for treatment or licensed vaccine for prevention The extent of the outbreak in Uganda has not yet been ascertained as investigations have shown that some persons may have died with similar symptoms which were not reported to health authorities In addition their burials were not conducted safely to prevent transmission The case fatality rate of the Sudan virus varied from 41 per cent to 100 per cent in past outbreaks The likelihood of importation to Nigeria is high due to the increased air travel between Nigeria and Uganda especially through Kenya s Nairobi airport a regional transport hub and other neighbouring countries that shared a direct border with Uganda The likelihood of spread in Nigeria following importation is high due to the gatherings and travel associated with politics the coming yuletide as well as other religious gatherings and festivals during the last few months of the year he outlined He said that in spite of the risk assessment the country had the capacity technical human health workforce and diagnostic to respond effectively in the event of an outbreak This is exemplified by our successful response to the Ebola outbreak in 2014 as well as improvements in our capacity for health emergency response during the COVID 19 pandemic We have the diagnostic capacity to test for the EVD presently at the National Reference Laboratory in Abuja and the Lagos University Teaching Hospital s Centre for Human and Zoonotic Virology Laboratory he said He however said that diagnostic capacity would be scaled up to other laboratories in cities with important Points of Entry POE and others as might be required An effective response system is in place with the availability of control capacities trained rapid response teams and an effective infection prevention and control programme to limit the risk of spread in the event of a single imported case Currently no case of EVD has been reported in Nigeria Nonetheless the Nigerian Government through NCDC s multisectoral NEVHD TWG has put several measures in place to prevent and prepare for immediate control of any outbreak of the disease in country The NCDC Incident Coordination Centre ICC is now in alert mode Development of an incident action plan for the first few cases of EVD has commenced POE surveillance has been heightened using the passenger pre boarding health declaration and screening form in the Nigeria International Travel Portal NITP platform Passengers arriving from Uganda and persons who transited in Uganda are being followed up for 21 days of their arrival in Nigeria on their health status Trained Rapid Response Teams are on standby to be deployed in the event of an outbreak Public Health Emergency Operations Centres PHEOCs in states with major POE i e Lagos Kano Abuja and Rivers are on standby A medical counter measures plan is available He said amplification of risk communication and engagement with states and partners to strengthen preparedness activities including a review of risk communication protocols plans and messages in the event of an outbreak had been done Adetifa said the country had an active infection Prevention and Control IPC programme nationwide with guidelines and training packages developed for healthcare workers NAN reports that Ebola virus disease is a severe often fatal illness affecting humans The strain responsible for the current outbreak was first reported in southern Sudan in June 1976 Since then seven outbreaks caused by this strain had been reported four in Uganda and three in Sudan with previous outbreaks fatality ratio ranging from 41 to 100 per cent Just like other types of Ebola virus people infected cannot spread the disease until the development of symptoms including fever fatigue muscle pain headache and sore throat later followed by vomiting diarrhoea rash symptoms of impaired kidney and liver function Symptoms may appear anywhere from two to 21 days after exposure to the virus but the average is 8 to 10 days Currently there are no vaccines or therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of this strain of the virus However the early initiation of supportive treatment has been shown to significantly reduce deaths Recovery from EVD depends on good supportive clinical care management of co morbidities and the patient s immune response People who recover from Ebola virus infection develop antibodies that last for at least 10 years www ng NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Nigeria on alert mode as Ebola resurfaces in Uganda—NCDC
    General news2 months ago

    Nigeria on alert mode as Ebola resurfaces in Uganda—NCDC

    The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (NCDC) says it is aware of the ongoing outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) caused by the Sudan strain of the Ebola Virus (EV) in Uganda.

    The Director-General, NCDC, Dr Ifedayo Adetifa, in a statement on Tuesday made available to News Agency of Nigeria in Abuja, said that Uganda had, on Sept. 20, declared the outbreak of the virus and that it was on an alert mode.

    NAN reports that the outbreak has also been confirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO).

    The Sudan strain of the Ebola virus is the known cause of EVD, having caused previous outbreaks in Uganda, South Sudan, and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    The Uganda Virus Research Institute confirmed the virus in samples collected from a 24-year old male, who had exhibited symptoms of the disease and later died in Mubende District in the Central Region, about 175km from the capital, Kampala.

    As of Sept. 29, the Ugandan Ministry of Health reported 54 cases (35 confirmed and 19 probable) and 25 deaths (7 confirmed and 18 probable).

    The Ugandan Ministry of Health, with the support of WHO, is working to effectively respond to and contain the spread of the virus.

    The NCDC boss said that the agency’s -led multisectoral National Emerging Viral Haemorrhagic Diseases Technical Working Group (NEVHD TWG), working with partners and stakeholders, had conducted a rapid risk assessment to guide in-country preparedness activities.

    “The NEVHD TWG coordinates preparedness efforts for EVD and other emerging viral haemorrhagic diseases.

    “Based on available data, the overall risk of importation of the Ebola virus and the impact on the health of Nigerians has been assessed as high for the following reasons: “The Sudan Ebola Virus does not currently have an effective drug for treatment or licensed vaccine for prevention.

    “The extent of the outbreak in Uganda has not yet been ascertained as investigations have shown that some persons may have died with similar symptoms which were not reported to health authorities.

    “In addition, their burials were not conducted safely to prevent transmission.

    “The case fatality rate of the Sudan virus varied from 41 per cent to 100 per cent in past outbreaks.

    “The likelihood of importation to Nigeria is high, due to the increased air travel between Nigeria and Uganda, especially through Kenya’s Nairobi airport, a regional transport hub, and other neighbouring countries that shared a direct border with Uganda.

    “The likelihood of spread in Nigeria following importation is high due to the gatherings and travel associated with politics, the coming yuletide as well as other religious gatherings and festivals during the last few months of the year,” he outlined.

    He said that in spite of the risk assessment, the country had the capacity – technical, human (health workforce), and diagnostic – to respond effectively in the event of an outbreak.

    “This is exemplified by our successful response to the Ebola outbreak in 2014, as well as improvements in our capacity for health emergency response during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    “We have the diagnostic capacity to test for the EVD presently at the National Reference Laboratory in Abuja and the Lagos University Teaching Hospital’s Centre for Human and Zoonotic Virology Laboratory,” he said.

    He, however, said that diagnostic capacity would be scaled up to other laboratories in cities with important Points of Entry (POE) and others as might be required.

    “An effective response system is in place with the availability of control capacities (trained rapid response teams, and an effective infection prevention and control programme) to limit the risk of spread in the event of a single imported case.

    “Currently, no case of EVD has been reported in Nigeria.

    Nonetheless, the Nigerian Government, through NCDC’s multisectoral NEVHD TWG, has put several measures in place to prevent and prepare for immediate control of any outbreak of the disease in-country.

    “The NCDC Incident Coordination Centre (ICC) is now in alert mode.

    Development of an incident action plan for the first few cases of EVD has commenced.

    “POE surveillance has been heightened, using the passenger pre-boarding health declaration and screening form in the Nigeria International Travel Portal (NITP) platform.

    “Passengers arriving from Uganda and persons who transited in Uganda are being followed up for 21 days of their arrival in Nigeria on their health status.

    “Trained Rapid Response Teams are on standby to be deployed in the event of an outbreak.

    Public Health Emergency Operations Centres (PHEOCs) in states with major POE i.

    e. Lagos, Kano, Abuja, and Rivers are on standby.

    “A medical counter measures plan is available.

    ” He said amplification of risk communication and engagement with states and partners, to strengthen preparedness activities including a review of risk communication protocols, plans and messages in the event of an outbreak, had been done.

    Adetifa said the country had an active infection Prevention and Control (IPC) programme nationwide with guidelines and training packages developed for healthcare workers.

    NAN reports that Ebola virus disease is a severe, often fatal illness affecting humans.

    The strain responsible for the current outbreak was first reported in southern Sudan in June 1976. Since then, seven outbreaks caused by this strain had been reported (four in Uganda and three in Sudan) with previous outbreaks’ fatality ratio ranging from 41 to 100 per cent.

    Just like other types of Ebola virus, people infected cannot spread the disease until the development of symptoms, including fever, fatigue, muscle pain, headache, and sore throat later followed by vomiting, diarrhoea, rash, symptoms of impaired kidney and liver function.

    Symptoms may appear anywhere from two to 21 days after exposure to the virus, but the average is 8 to 10 days.

    Currently, there are no vaccines or therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of this strain of the virus.

    However, the early initiation of supportive treatment has been shown to significantly reduce deaths.

    Recovery from EVD depends on good supportive clinical care, management of co-morbidities, and the patient’s immune response.

    People who recover from Ebola virus infection develop antibodies that last for at least 10 years.

    www.

    ng
    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   Nigeria 62 X raying Nigeria s health sector performance Nigeria 62 X raying Nigeria s health sector performance By Abujah Rachael News Agency of Nigeria Good health remains one of the basic needs of individuals irrespective of status in society That is why the government as a major stakeholder in any society considers the issue of health as critical and fundamental Governments in different countries have different programmes and policies to deliver quality healthcare system to their citizenry In Nigeria the burden of delivering healthcare to the populace is shared by the three tiers of government namely the Federal State and Local Governments The Nigerian healthcare system is structured into primary secondary and tertiary levels Under this arrangement the Federal Government is in charge of tertiary health institutions such as Federal Medical Centres and Federal University Teaching Hospitals The State Governments are responsible for state general hospitals and state university teaching hospitals while the local governments handle primary health centres This system is designed to ensures that Nigeria estimated 23 640 health facilities operated optimally However this mechanism seems not to have yielded the desired results as indices on ground show that more needs to be done The three tiers of government seem to be pumping lots of money into the health sector to ensure that it delivers on its mandate In the 2022 budget for instance the Federal Government set aside the sum of N711 3b for the health sector Although the figure is not as massive as would be expected an aggregate budget from the all the tiers shows that the sector may not be as under funded as portrayed in many quarters After 62 years of independence expects say that funding should translate to measurable outcomes and impacts on access to health care by the citizenry For instance in spite of the huge budgetary allocation Nigeria is ranked 187th by the World Health Organization WHO among 195 member states on health issues Similarly Nigeria s life expectancy is not among the best in the world as it stands at 54 44 years according to statistics from the UN agency Although this represents an increase of 0 57 per cent from 2021 which stood at 55 12 years experts say this is abysmal considering that many countries even those in African have higher life expectancy figures Dr Gabriel Adakole a Public Health expert said that in spite of spirited attempts to improve the fortunes of the healthcare sector there seems to be little progress made In 2021 in a first of its kind Health System Sustainability index report Nigeria ranked 14th with a total of 41 scores out of 18 African countries South Africa ranked first with 63 scores he said Four African countries accounted for just over half of all malaria deaths worldwide Nigeria 31 9 per cent the Democratic Republic of the Congo 13 2 per cent United Republic of Tanzania 4 1 per cent and Mozambique 3 8 per cent The figures for infant and maternal mortality indices do not fare better according to UNICEF Nigeria s 40 million women of childbearing age between 15 and 49 years of age suffer a disproportionally high level of health issues surrounding birth While the country represents 2 4 per cent of the world s population it currently contributes 10 per cent of global deaths for pregnant mothers UNICEF said The scenario is not too different in other areas such as female gentile mutilation treatment and care among others In spite of the challenges many experts say the sector s performance 62 years into independence is not as bad as being projected adding that the future looks bright Prof Ibrahim Abubakar a professor of infectious disease and epidemiology said that Nigeria s health system has the potential to deliver quality healthcare at the cheapest possible cost The said this is only possible with the right investment in the health sector by all the tiers of government and the private sector A comprehensive and pragmatic roadmap will boost investment and make the best use of resources to ensure a healthy Nigeria he said Dr Abigail Banji a health economist urged the government to prioritise the disease prevention to support the long term health of Nigerians Banji said that there must be a shift from simply treating disease to creating health care awareness especially among the country s youth Experts say one of the areas the sector deserves commendation is its response to COVID 19 outbreak two years ago While many countries including developed ones were overwhelmed by the virus results in hundreds of thousands of deaths the Nigerian health sector robustly responded to the challenge This led to one of the most minimal casualties around the world Statistics from the Centre for Disease Control Nigeria showed that 3 155 lives were lost from 266 382 infections nationwide This is a commendable feat against the background of the state of the nation s health sector Another area the massive investment in the health sector has paid off is the polio eradication campaign where Nigeria has been certified polio free after decades of battle with the virus As Nigerians go to polls in 2023 former minister of heath Prof Onyebuchi Chukwu said it presents an opportunity to elect those that will not only consolidate on the successes but also break new grounds If used please credit the writer and News Agency of Nigeria NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Nigeria@62: X-raying Nigeria’s health sector performance
      Nigeria 62 X raying Nigeria s health sector performance Nigeria 62 X raying Nigeria s health sector performance By Abujah Rachael News Agency of Nigeria Good health remains one of the basic needs of individuals irrespective of status in society That is why the government as a major stakeholder in any society considers the issue of health as critical and fundamental Governments in different countries have different programmes and policies to deliver quality healthcare system to their citizenry In Nigeria the burden of delivering healthcare to the populace is shared by the three tiers of government namely the Federal State and Local Governments The Nigerian healthcare system is structured into primary secondary and tertiary levels Under this arrangement the Federal Government is in charge of tertiary health institutions such as Federal Medical Centres and Federal University Teaching Hospitals The State Governments are responsible for state general hospitals and state university teaching hospitals while the local governments handle primary health centres This system is designed to ensures that Nigeria estimated 23 640 health facilities operated optimally However this mechanism seems not to have yielded the desired results as indices on ground show that more needs to be done The three tiers of government seem to be pumping lots of money into the health sector to ensure that it delivers on its mandate In the 2022 budget for instance the Federal Government set aside the sum of N711 3b for the health sector Although the figure is not as massive as would be expected an aggregate budget from the all the tiers shows that the sector may not be as under funded as portrayed in many quarters After 62 years of independence expects say that funding should translate to measurable outcomes and impacts on access to health care by the citizenry For instance in spite of the huge budgetary allocation Nigeria is ranked 187th by the World Health Organization WHO among 195 member states on health issues Similarly Nigeria s life expectancy is not among the best in the world as it stands at 54 44 years according to statistics from the UN agency Although this represents an increase of 0 57 per cent from 2021 which stood at 55 12 years experts say this is abysmal considering that many countries even those in African have higher life expectancy figures Dr Gabriel Adakole a Public Health expert said that in spite of spirited attempts to improve the fortunes of the healthcare sector there seems to be little progress made In 2021 in a first of its kind Health System Sustainability index report Nigeria ranked 14th with a total of 41 scores out of 18 African countries South Africa ranked first with 63 scores he said Four African countries accounted for just over half of all malaria deaths worldwide Nigeria 31 9 per cent the Democratic Republic of the Congo 13 2 per cent United Republic of Tanzania 4 1 per cent and Mozambique 3 8 per cent The figures for infant and maternal mortality indices do not fare better according to UNICEF Nigeria s 40 million women of childbearing age between 15 and 49 years of age suffer a disproportionally high level of health issues surrounding birth While the country represents 2 4 per cent of the world s population it currently contributes 10 per cent of global deaths for pregnant mothers UNICEF said The scenario is not too different in other areas such as female gentile mutilation treatment and care among others In spite of the challenges many experts say the sector s performance 62 years into independence is not as bad as being projected adding that the future looks bright Prof Ibrahim Abubakar a professor of infectious disease and epidemiology said that Nigeria s health system has the potential to deliver quality healthcare at the cheapest possible cost The said this is only possible with the right investment in the health sector by all the tiers of government and the private sector A comprehensive and pragmatic roadmap will boost investment and make the best use of resources to ensure a healthy Nigeria he said Dr Abigail Banji a health economist urged the government to prioritise the disease prevention to support the long term health of Nigerians Banji said that there must be a shift from simply treating disease to creating health care awareness especially among the country s youth Experts say one of the areas the sector deserves commendation is its response to COVID 19 outbreak two years ago While many countries including developed ones were overwhelmed by the virus results in hundreds of thousands of deaths the Nigerian health sector robustly responded to the challenge This led to one of the most minimal casualties around the world Statistics from the Centre for Disease Control Nigeria showed that 3 155 lives were lost from 266 382 infections nationwide This is a commendable feat against the background of the state of the nation s health sector Another area the massive investment in the health sector has paid off is the polio eradication campaign where Nigeria has been certified polio free after decades of battle with the virus As Nigerians go to polls in 2023 former minister of heath Prof Onyebuchi Chukwu said it presents an opportunity to elect those that will not only consolidate on the successes but also break new grounds If used please credit the writer and News Agency of Nigeria NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Nigeria@62: X-raying Nigeria’s health sector performance
    Features2 months ago

    Nigeria@62: X-raying Nigeria’s health sector performance

    Nigeria@62: X-raying Nigeria’s health sector performance Nigeria@62: X-raying Nigeria’s health sector performance By Abujah Rachael, News Agency of Nigeria Good health remains one of the basic needs of individuals irrespective of status in society.

    That is why the government, as a major stakeholder in any society considers the issue of health as critical and fundamental.

    Governments in different countries have different programmes and policies to deliver quality healthcare system to their citizenry.

    In Nigeria the burden of delivering healthcare to the populace is shared by the three tiers of government, namely the Federal, State and Local Governments.

    The Nigerian healthcare system is structured into primary, secondary, and tertiary levels.

    Under this arrangement, the Federal Government is in charge of tertiary health institutions such as Federal Medical Centres and Federal University Teaching Hospitals.

    The State Governments are responsible for state general hospitals and state university teaching hospitals; while the local governments handle primary health centres.

    This system is designed to ensures that Nigeria’ estimated 23,640 health facilities operated optimally.

    However, this mechanism seems not to have yielded the desired results as indices on ground show that more needs to be done The three tiers of government seem to be pumping lots of money into the health sector to ensure that it delivers on its mandate.

    In the 2022 budget for instance, the Federal Government set aside the sum of N711.3b for the health sector.

    Although the figure is not as massive as would be expected, an aggregate budget from the all the tiers shows that the sector may not be as under-funded as portrayed in many quarters.

    After 62 years of independence, expects say that funding should translate to measurable outcomes and impacts on access to health care by the citizenry.

    For instance, in spite of the huge budgetary allocation, Nigeria is ranked 187th by the World Health Organization (WHO) among 195 member states on health issues.

    Similarly, Nigeria’s life expectancy is not among the best in the world as it stands at 54.44 years, according to statistics from the UN agency.

    Although this represents an increase of 0.57 per cent from 2021 which stood at 55.12 years, experts say this is abysmal considering that many countries even those in African have higher life expectancy figures.

    Dr Gabriel Adakole, a Public Health expert, said that in spite of spirited attempts to improve the fortunes of the healthcare sector, there seems to be little progress made.

    “In 2021, in a first-of-its-kind Health System Sustainability index report, Nigeria ranked 14th with a total of 41 scores out of 18 African countries.

    South Africa ranked first with 63 scores,” he said.

    “Four African countries accounted for just over half of all malaria deaths worldwide: Nigeria 31.9 per cent, the Democratic Republic of the Congo 13.2 per cent, United Republic of Tanzania 4.1 per cent and Mozambique 3.8 per cent.

    The figures for infant and maternal mortality indices do not fare better, according to UNICEF “Nigeria’s 40 million women of childbearing age (between 15 and 49 years of age) suffer a disproportionally high level of health issues surrounding birth.

    “While the country represents 2.4 per cent of the world’s population, it currently contributes 10 per cent of global deaths for pregnant mothers”, UNICEF said.

    The scenario is not too different in other areas such as female gentile mutilation, treatment and care, among others.

    In spite of the challenges, many experts say the sector’s performance 62 years into independence is not as bad as being projected, adding that the future looks bright.

    Prof. Ibrahim Abubakar, a professor of infectious disease and epidemiology said that Nigeria’s health system has the potential to deliver quality healthcare at the cheapest possible cost.

    The said this is only possible with the right investment in the health sector by all the tiers of government and the private sector.

    “A comprehensive and pragmatic roadmap will boost investment and make the best use of resources to ensure a healthy Nigeria,” he said.

    Dr Abigail Banji, a health economist urged the government to prioritise the disease prevention to support the long-term health of Nigerians.

    Banji said that there must be a shift from simply treating disease to creating health care awareness, especially among the country’s youth.

    Experts say one of the areas the sector deserves commendation is its response to COVID-19 outbreak two years ago.

    While many countries, including developed ones, were overwhelmed by the virus, results in hundreds of thousands of deaths, the Nigerian health sector robustly responded to the challenge.

    This led to one of the most minimal casualties around the world.

    Statistics from the Centre for Disease Control, Nigeria, showed that 3,155 lives were lost from 266,382 infections nationwide.

    This is a commendable feat against the background of the state of the nation’s health sector.

    Another area the massive investment in the health sector has paid off is the polio eradication campaign where Nigeria has been certified polio-free after decades of battle with the virus.

    As Nigerians go to polls in 2023, former minister of heath, Prof. Onyebuchi Chukwu said it presents an opportunity to elect those that will not only consolidate on the successes but also break new grounds.

    **If used please credit the writer and News Agency of Nigeria
    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   In a move to protect adolescent girls from cervical cancer the Government of Sierra Leone today introduced the human papillomavirus HPV vaccine into the routine immunization schedule and launched the start of a campaign to reach 153 991 girls with the vaccine The introduction of the HPV vaccine is one of the key strategies that the Government is implementing for the elimination of cervical cancer in the country The Ministry of Health and Sanitation MoHS with the support of Gavi the Vaccine Alliance Gavi the United Nations Children s Fund UNICEF and the World Health Organization WHO will administer vaccines against HPV nationwide through schools targeting 153 991 10 year old girls who will receive two doses each over a six month period Although the HPV vaccine provides a proven and safe tool to protect women and girls against HPV and cervical cancer risk global coverage rates among 15 year old girls remain low 15 with two doses on average The latest global immunization coverage data shows that only 12 of girls globally are receiving the crucial vaccine with immunization campaigns particularly disrupted by lockdowns and school closures The Government of Sierra Leone wholeheartedly welcomes the introduction of the HPV vaccination campaign and urges everyone to support ten year old girls to get vaccinated to prevent cervical cancer and its consequences for life his life said Dr Austin Demby Minister for Health and Sanitation Globally cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women with an estimated 266 000 deaths and 528 000 new cases each year About 85 percent of the global burden of cervical cancer occurs in low income countries According to the Sierra Leone Cancer Registry cervical cancer is the second most common cancer and number one among all cancers among women aged 14 44 with approximately 504 new cases of cervical cancer diagnosed in 2021 mortal Today s launch should be celebrated as a first step in protecting girls in Sierra Leone from cervical cancer and giving them a better chance to live longer healthier lives and reach their full potential said Thabani Maphosa Director General of Country Programs at Gavi the Vaccine Alliance Historically HPV coverage around the world but especially in low income countries where the burden of cancer is highest was already too low The pandemic and school closures have taken an additional toll Supporting countries to catch up and improve HPV coverage is a critical priority for Gavi moving forward and will require actions on both the demand and supply sides We look forward to working with our partners to achieve this goal The introduction of the HPV vaccine in Sierra Leone comes after several months of extensive planning led by the National Immunization Program of the Ministry of Health and Sanitation In 2014 a Gavi supported HPV vaccine pilot project was carried out in Bo district This pilot demonstrated the country s capacity and readiness to implement a nationwide school vaccination program However due to Ebola virus disease and COVID 19 outbreaks the MoHS had to postpone the nationwide introduction of the vaccine The introduction of the HPV vaccine is a welcome demonstration of collaborative efforts in Sierra Leone to support good health for all children Good health is a basic human right that all children in Sierra Leone should enjoy regardless of where they are in the country said UNICEF Representative Dr Suleiman Braimoh More than 55 percent of the 194 WHO member states have introduced HPV vaccination however in West and Central Africa the HPV vaccine has been introduced in only eight countries With today s launch Sierra Leone joins the group of regional pioneers introducing the HPV vaccine into routine immunization schedules as a key strategy to prevent cervical cancer mortality and morbidity We are in the era where no one should suffer or die from diseases that are preventable with the use of vaccines And as we make these life saving services accessible to safeguard the health of women and girls we are also contributing to empowering the individual the community as well as enhancing the nation s sustainable social and economic development says Dr Steven Velabo Shongwe WHO Representative in Sierra Leone We urge authorities and parents to ensure their girls are protected from the heartbreak of cervical cancer by protecting them against HPV at an early age Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Sierra Leone The introduction of the HPV vaccine is a momentous milestone in protecting girls health and reducing the risk of future disease This campaign also provides an important opportunity to expand education and outreach to promote acceptance of cervical cancer screening and treatment services by older women Together with the launch of the HPV vaccine these services are essential to eliminate one of the most preventable cancers said Nadia Rasheed representative of UNFPA To ensure effective vaccine introduction Gavi supports the procurement and installation of 463 sets of solar refrigerators to help strengthen cold chain systems and ensure vaccines are kept at optimal temperatures during shipping storage and delivery to vaccination sites In addition 1 500 health workers have been trained to administer this life saving vaccine Gavi The Vaccine Alliance has worked with MoHS and the Government of Sierra Leone since 2001 to expand equitable access to immunization services for all children This support amounting to US 101 million to date has included the acquisition of vaccine doses and cold chain equipment including for COVID 19 as well as investments in health systems and technical assistance to support immunization routine the introduction of new vaccines and supplementation Campaigns Through MoHS leadership intensive awareness raising is being carried out at the community level to help increase public awareness of and uptake of the HPV vaccine focusing on the target age group of girls members of the community and leaders so that they are empowered and informed about the tools available to prevent cervical cancer With the support of partners a wide range of materials have also been developed to inform and answer questions girls parents and caregivers may have about this new vaccine
    Sierra Leone introduces human papillomavirus vaccine to protect girls from cervical cancer
      In a move to protect adolescent girls from cervical cancer the Government of Sierra Leone today introduced the human papillomavirus HPV vaccine into the routine immunization schedule and launched the start of a campaign to reach 153 991 girls with the vaccine The introduction of the HPV vaccine is one of the key strategies that the Government is implementing for the elimination of cervical cancer in the country The Ministry of Health and Sanitation MoHS with the support of Gavi the Vaccine Alliance Gavi the United Nations Children s Fund UNICEF and the World Health Organization WHO will administer vaccines against HPV nationwide through schools targeting 153 991 10 year old girls who will receive two doses each over a six month period Although the HPV vaccine provides a proven and safe tool to protect women and girls against HPV and cervical cancer risk global coverage rates among 15 year old girls remain low 15 with two doses on average The latest global immunization coverage data shows that only 12 of girls globally are receiving the crucial vaccine with immunization campaigns particularly disrupted by lockdowns and school closures The Government of Sierra Leone wholeheartedly welcomes the introduction of the HPV vaccination campaign and urges everyone to support ten year old girls to get vaccinated to prevent cervical cancer and its consequences for life his life said Dr Austin Demby Minister for Health and Sanitation Globally cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women with an estimated 266 000 deaths and 528 000 new cases each year About 85 percent of the global burden of cervical cancer occurs in low income countries According to the Sierra Leone Cancer Registry cervical cancer is the second most common cancer and number one among all cancers among women aged 14 44 with approximately 504 new cases of cervical cancer diagnosed in 2021 mortal Today s launch should be celebrated as a first step in protecting girls in Sierra Leone from cervical cancer and giving them a better chance to live longer healthier lives and reach their full potential said Thabani Maphosa Director General of Country Programs at Gavi the Vaccine Alliance Historically HPV coverage around the world but especially in low income countries where the burden of cancer is highest was already too low The pandemic and school closures have taken an additional toll Supporting countries to catch up and improve HPV coverage is a critical priority for Gavi moving forward and will require actions on both the demand and supply sides We look forward to working with our partners to achieve this goal The introduction of the HPV vaccine in Sierra Leone comes after several months of extensive planning led by the National Immunization Program of the Ministry of Health and Sanitation In 2014 a Gavi supported HPV vaccine pilot project was carried out in Bo district This pilot demonstrated the country s capacity and readiness to implement a nationwide school vaccination program However due to Ebola virus disease and COVID 19 outbreaks the MoHS had to postpone the nationwide introduction of the vaccine The introduction of the HPV vaccine is a welcome demonstration of collaborative efforts in Sierra Leone to support good health for all children Good health is a basic human right that all children in Sierra Leone should enjoy regardless of where they are in the country said UNICEF Representative Dr Suleiman Braimoh More than 55 percent of the 194 WHO member states have introduced HPV vaccination however in West and Central Africa the HPV vaccine has been introduced in only eight countries With today s launch Sierra Leone joins the group of regional pioneers introducing the HPV vaccine into routine immunization schedules as a key strategy to prevent cervical cancer mortality and morbidity We are in the era where no one should suffer or die from diseases that are preventable with the use of vaccines And as we make these life saving services accessible to safeguard the health of women and girls we are also contributing to empowering the individual the community as well as enhancing the nation s sustainable social and economic development says Dr Steven Velabo Shongwe WHO Representative in Sierra Leone We urge authorities and parents to ensure their girls are protected from the heartbreak of cervical cancer by protecting them against HPV at an early age Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Sierra Leone The introduction of the HPV vaccine is a momentous milestone in protecting girls health and reducing the risk of future disease This campaign also provides an important opportunity to expand education and outreach to promote acceptance of cervical cancer screening and treatment services by older women Together with the launch of the HPV vaccine these services are essential to eliminate one of the most preventable cancers said Nadia Rasheed representative of UNFPA To ensure effective vaccine introduction Gavi supports the procurement and installation of 463 sets of solar refrigerators to help strengthen cold chain systems and ensure vaccines are kept at optimal temperatures during shipping storage and delivery to vaccination sites In addition 1 500 health workers have been trained to administer this life saving vaccine Gavi The Vaccine Alliance has worked with MoHS and the Government of Sierra Leone since 2001 to expand equitable access to immunization services for all children This support amounting to US 101 million to date has included the acquisition of vaccine doses and cold chain equipment including for COVID 19 as well as investments in health systems and technical assistance to support immunization routine the introduction of new vaccines and supplementation Campaigns Through MoHS leadership intensive awareness raising is being carried out at the community level to help increase public awareness of and uptake of the HPV vaccine focusing on the target age group of girls members of the community and leaders so that they are empowered and informed about the tools available to prevent cervical cancer With the support of partners a wide range of materials have also been developed to inform and answer questions girls parents and caregivers may have about this new vaccine
    Sierra Leone introduces human papillomavirus vaccine to protect girls from cervical cancer
    Africa2 months ago

    Sierra Leone introduces human papillomavirus vaccine to protect girls from cervical cancer

    In a move to protect adolescent girls from cervical cancer, the Government of Sierra Leone today introduced the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine into the routine immunization schedule and launched the start of a campaign to reach 153,991 girls with the vaccine.

    The introduction of the HPV vaccine is one of the key strategies that the Government is implementing for the elimination of cervical cancer in the country.

    The Ministry of Health and Sanitation (MoHS), with the support of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance (Gavi), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO), will administer vaccines against HPV nationwide through schools, targeting 153,991 10-year-old girls, who will receive two doses each over a six-month period.

    Although the HPV vaccine provides a proven and safe tool to protect women and girls against HPV and cervical cancer risk, global coverage rates among 15-year-old girls remain low, 15% with two doses on average.

    The latest global immunization coverage data shows that only 12% of girls globally are receiving the crucial vaccine with immunization campaigns particularly disrupted by lockdowns and school closures.

    “The Government of Sierra Leone wholeheartedly welcomes the introduction of the HPV vaccination campaign and urges everyone to support ten-year-old girls to get vaccinated to prevent cervical cancer and its consequences for life.

    his life,” said Dr. Austin Demby, Minister for Health and Sanitation.

    Globally, cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women with an estimated 266,000 deaths and 528,000 new cases each year.

    About 85 percent of the global burden of cervical cancer occurs in low-income countries.

    According to the Sierra Leone Cancer Registry, cervical cancer is the second most common cancer and number one among all cancers among women aged 14-44, with approximately 504 new cases of cervical cancer diagnosed in 2021 mortal.

    "Today's launch should be celebrated as a first step in protecting girls in Sierra Leone from cervical cancer and giving them a better chance to live longer, healthier lives and reach their full potential," said Thabani Maphosa, Director General of Country Programs at Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.

    “Historically, HPV coverage around the world, but especially in low-income countries where the burden of cancer is highest, was already too low.

    The pandemic and school closures have taken an additional toll.

    Supporting countries to catch up and improve HPV coverage is a critical priority for Gavi moving forward and will require actions on both the demand and supply sides.

    We look forward to working with our partners to achieve this goal.” The introduction of the HPV vaccine in Sierra Leone comes after several months of extensive planning led by the National Immunization Program of the Ministry of Health and Sanitation.

    In 2014, a Gavi-supported HPV vaccine pilot project was carried out in Bo district.

    This pilot demonstrated the country's capacity and readiness to implement a nationwide school vaccination program.

    However, due to Ebola virus disease and COVID-19 outbreaks, the MoHS had to postpone the nationwide introduction of the vaccine.

    “The introduction of the HPV vaccine is a welcome demonstration of collaborative efforts in Sierra Leone to support good health for all children.

    Good health is a basic human right that all children in Sierra Leone should enjoy, regardless of where they are in the country,” said UNICEF Representative Dr. Suleiman Braimoh.

    More than 55 percent of the 194 WHO member states have introduced HPV vaccination; however, in West and Central Africa, the HPV vaccine has been introduced in only eight countries.

    With today's launch, Sierra Leone joins the group of regional pioneers introducing the HPV vaccine into routine immunization schedules as a key strategy to prevent cervical cancer mortality and morbidity.

    “We are in the era where no one should suffer or die from diseases that are preventable with the use of vaccines.

    And, as we make these life-saving services accessible to safeguard the health of women and girls, we are also contributing to empowering the individual, the community, as well as enhancing the nation's sustainable social and economic development."

    says Dr. Steven Velabo Shongwe, WHO Representative in Sierra Leone.

    "We urge authorities and parents to ensure their girls are protected from the heartbreak of cervical cancer by protecting them against HPV at an early age."

    “Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Sierra Leone.

    The introduction of the HPV vaccine is a momentous milestone in protecting girls' health and reducing the risk of future disease.

    This campaign also provides an important opportunity to expand education and outreach to promote acceptance of cervical cancer screening and treatment services by older women.

    Together with the launch of the HPV vaccine, these services are essential to eliminate one of the most preventable cancers”, said Nadia Rasheed, representative of UNFPA.

    To ensure effective vaccine introduction, Gavi supports the procurement and installation of 463 sets of solar refrigerators to help strengthen cold chain systems and ensure vaccines are kept at optimal temperatures during shipping, storage and delivery.

    to vaccination sites.

    In addition, 1,500 health workers have been trained to administer this life-saving vaccine.

    Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance has worked with MoHS and the Government of Sierra Leone since 2001 to expand equitable access to immunization services for all children.

    This support, amounting to US$101 million to date, has included the acquisition of vaccine doses and cold chain equipment, including for COVID-19, as well as investments in health systems and technical assistance to support immunization.

    routine, the introduction of new vaccines and supplementation.

    Campaigns Through MoHS leadership, intensive awareness raising is being carried out at the community level to help increase public awareness of and uptake of the HPV vaccine, focusing on the target age group of girls, members of the community and leaders, so that they are empowered and informed about the tools.

    available to prevent cervical cancer.

    With the support of partners, a wide range of materials have also been developed to inform and answer questions girls, parents and caregivers may have about this new vaccine.

  •   Merck Foundation Merck Foundation com the philanthropic arm of Merck KGaA Germany in partnership with African First Ladies launched a new children s storybook Sugar Free Jude to promote a healthy lifestyle and raise awareness of screening early prevention and management of Diabetes for children and young people in Africa in English French and Portuguese Senator Dr Rasha Kelej Executive Director of the Merck Foundation said I am very happy to present to you the Merck Foundation s new children s storybook Sugar Free Jude in association with my dear sisters the first ladies Africa which is currently available on our social networks and websites and will soon be distributed in our partner countries Through our new storybook for children we want to promote a healthy lifestyle and raise awareness about early detection prevention and control of Diabetes from an early age to remind everyone that together we can fight against diabetes all every day and that health is our only wealth Sugar Free Jude is the story of a school going youth Jude whose daily life is disrupted when he is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes Jude was able to manage his health condition with the help of his family friends and teachers in school and became an advocate for the fight against diabetes in his school and community Read the Sugar Free Jude storybook here https bit ly 3PsepSf According to the World Health Organization WHO almost 70 of the African population living with diabetes are unaware of their condition and around 45 million adults have Impaired Glucose Tolerance IGT which puts them at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes Jude symbolizes the many young men and women in Africa who suffer from diabetes but are unaware of their condition Early signs and symptoms of diabetes such as frequent urination increased thirst feeling tired and hungry vision problems slow wound healing and fungal infections should not be ignored In case one experiences any of these symptoms they should see a doctor and get tested Managing diabetes is a lifestyle change those who live with this condition should eat healthy exercise regularly stop smoking and limit the consumption of alcohol sugar and salt explained Senator Dr Rasha Kelej The Merck Foundation has also released three songs in three languages called NO more Diabetes Sugar Free in English Dites non au Diab te in French and Chega de Diabete in Portuguese And recently he has released the remix of the three languages Listen to the diabetes song remix here https bit ly 3yaw77d These songs have been sung by Cwezi from Ghana for the English version Laura Beg from Mauritius for the French version and Blaze from Mozambique for the Portuguese version The songs talk about promoting a healthy lifestyle and raising awareness about early detection and prevention of Diabetes Click here to listen to the English song NO More Diabetes Sugar Free https bit ly 3vcCVQ9 Click here to listen to the French song Dites non au Diab te https bit ly 3OrOw4J Click here to listen to the Portuguese song Chega de Diabete https bit ly 3z22FzT Additionally through the Merck Foundation Diabetes Blue Dots Program in partnership with the African First Ladies Ministries of Health and Medical Societies the Merck Foundation has provided more than 720 fellowships for physicians from 45 countries for one year Postgraduate Diploma and two year Masters in Cardiovascular Preventive Medicine Endocrinology and Diabetes and Masters in Diabetes from 3 months The Merck Foundation together with the African First Ladies has also presented Awards for Media Fashion Designers Filmmakers Musicians Singers and potential new talents in these fields from African countries to promote a healthy lifestyle and raise awareness of prevention and early detection of Diabetes and Hypertension Award Details 1 Merck Foundation Media Recognition Awards 2022 Diabetes and Hypertension Media representatives are invited to showcase their work through strong and influential messages to promote a healthy lifestyle and create awareness about the prevention and early detection of diabetes and hypertension Submission Deadline October 30 2022 Click here https bit ly 3csdIun for more details 2 Merck Foundation Film Awards 2022 Diabetes and Hypertension All African filmmakers students from film training institutions or young talents from Africa are invited to create and share long or short FILMS be it drama documentary or docudrama to deliver robust and influential messages to promote a healthy lifestyle raising awareness about the prevention and early detection of Diabetes and Hypertension Submission Deadline October 30 2022 Click here https bit ly 3z55T5z for more details 3 Merck Foundation Fashion Awards 2022 Diabetes Hypertension All African students and fashion designers are invited to create and share designs to convey strong and influential messages to promote a healthy lifestyle and raise awareness of prevention and early detection of diabetes and hypertension Submission Deadline October 30 2022 Click here https bit ly 3z7C0BJ for more details 4 Merck Foundation Song Awards 2022 Diabetes Hypertension All African singers and musical artists are invited to create and share a SONG with the aim of promoting a healthy lifestyle and raising awareness about the prevention and early detection of diabetes and hypertension hypertension Submission Deadline October 30 2022 Click here https bit ly 3JaxQNZ for more details Entries for all awards should be emailed to submit merck foundation com The Merck Foundation in collaboration with the African First Ladies has also published 7 inspiring children s storybooks in three languages and over 30 songs on how to end the stigma of infertility and support girls women s education and empowerment in English French and Portuguese To listen to the Merck Foundation songs and read the Merck Foundation storybooks visit https bit ly 3PUxM7a
    Merck Foundation’s ‘Sugar Free Jude’ Aims to Promote a Healthy Lifestyle and Fight Diabetes for African Children and Youth in Three Languages
      Merck Foundation Merck Foundation com the philanthropic arm of Merck KGaA Germany in partnership with African First Ladies launched a new children s storybook Sugar Free Jude to promote a healthy lifestyle and raise awareness of screening early prevention and management of Diabetes for children and young people in Africa in English French and Portuguese Senator Dr Rasha Kelej Executive Director of the Merck Foundation said I am very happy to present to you the Merck Foundation s new children s storybook Sugar Free Jude in association with my dear sisters the first ladies Africa which is currently available on our social networks and websites and will soon be distributed in our partner countries Through our new storybook for children we want to promote a healthy lifestyle and raise awareness about early detection prevention and control of Diabetes from an early age to remind everyone that together we can fight against diabetes all every day and that health is our only wealth Sugar Free Jude is the story of a school going youth Jude whose daily life is disrupted when he is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes Jude was able to manage his health condition with the help of his family friends and teachers in school and became an advocate for the fight against diabetes in his school and community Read the Sugar Free Jude storybook here https bit ly 3PsepSf According to the World Health Organization WHO almost 70 of the African population living with diabetes are unaware of their condition and around 45 million adults have Impaired Glucose Tolerance IGT which puts them at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes Jude symbolizes the many young men and women in Africa who suffer from diabetes but are unaware of their condition Early signs and symptoms of diabetes such as frequent urination increased thirst feeling tired and hungry vision problems slow wound healing and fungal infections should not be ignored In case one experiences any of these symptoms they should see a doctor and get tested Managing diabetes is a lifestyle change those who live with this condition should eat healthy exercise regularly stop smoking and limit the consumption of alcohol sugar and salt explained Senator Dr Rasha Kelej The Merck Foundation has also released three songs in three languages called NO more Diabetes Sugar Free in English Dites non au Diab te in French and Chega de Diabete in Portuguese And recently he has released the remix of the three languages Listen to the diabetes song remix here https bit ly 3yaw77d These songs have been sung by Cwezi from Ghana for the English version Laura Beg from Mauritius for the French version and Blaze from Mozambique for the Portuguese version The songs talk about promoting a healthy lifestyle and raising awareness about early detection and prevention of Diabetes Click here to listen to the English song NO More Diabetes Sugar Free https bit ly 3vcCVQ9 Click here to listen to the French song Dites non au Diab te https bit ly 3OrOw4J Click here to listen to the Portuguese song Chega de Diabete https bit ly 3z22FzT Additionally through the Merck Foundation Diabetes Blue Dots Program in partnership with the African First Ladies Ministries of Health and Medical Societies the Merck Foundation has provided more than 720 fellowships for physicians from 45 countries for one year Postgraduate Diploma and two year Masters in Cardiovascular Preventive Medicine Endocrinology and Diabetes and Masters in Diabetes from 3 months The Merck Foundation together with the African First Ladies has also presented Awards for Media Fashion Designers Filmmakers Musicians Singers and potential new talents in these fields from African countries to promote a healthy lifestyle and raise awareness of prevention and early detection of Diabetes and Hypertension Award Details 1 Merck Foundation Media Recognition Awards 2022 Diabetes and Hypertension Media representatives are invited to showcase their work through strong and influential messages to promote a healthy lifestyle and create awareness about the prevention and early detection of diabetes and hypertension Submission Deadline October 30 2022 Click here https bit ly 3csdIun for more details 2 Merck Foundation Film Awards 2022 Diabetes and Hypertension All African filmmakers students from film training institutions or young talents from Africa are invited to create and share long or short FILMS be it drama documentary or docudrama to deliver robust and influential messages to promote a healthy lifestyle raising awareness about the prevention and early detection of Diabetes and Hypertension Submission Deadline October 30 2022 Click here https bit ly 3z55T5z for more details 3 Merck Foundation Fashion Awards 2022 Diabetes Hypertension All African students and fashion designers are invited to create and share designs to convey strong and influential messages to promote a healthy lifestyle and raise awareness of prevention and early detection of diabetes and hypertension Submission Deadline October 30 2022 Click here https bit ly 3z7C0BJ for more details 4 Merck Foundation Song Awards 2022 Diabetes Hypertension All African singers and musical artists are invited to create and share a SONG with the aim of promoting a healthy lifestyle and raising awareness about the prevention and early detection of diabetes and hypertension hypertension Submission Deadline October 30 2022 Click here https bit ly 3JaxQNZ for more details Entries for all awards should be emailed to submit merck foundation com The Merck Foundation in collaboration with the African First Ladies has also published 7 inspiring children s storybooks in three languages and over 30 songs on how to end the stigma of infertility and support girls women s education and empowerment in English French and Portuguese To listen to the Merck Foundation songs and read the Merck Foundation storybooks visit https bit ly 3PUxM7a
    Merck Foundation’s ‘Sugar Free Jude’ Aims to Promote a Healthy Lifestyle and Fight Diabetes for African Children and Youth in Three Languages
    Africa2 months ago

    Merck Foundation’s ‘Sugar Free Jude’ Aims to Promote a Healthy Lifestyle and Fight Diabetes for African Children and Youth in Three Languages

    Merck Foundation (Merck-Foundation.com), the philanthropic arm of Merck KGaA Germany in partnership with African First Ladies launched a new children's storybook: 'Sugar Free Jude' to promote a healthy lifestyle and raise awareness of screening early prevention and management.

    of Diabetes for children and young people in Africa in English, French and Portuguese.

    Senator Dr. Rasha Kelej, Executive Director of the Merck Foundation said: “I am very happy to present to you the Merck Foundation's new children's storybook: 'Sugar Free Jude' in association with my dear sisters, the first ladies Africa, which is currently available on our social networks and websites and will soon be distributed in our partner countries.

    Through our new storybook for children, we want to promote a healthy lifestyle and raise awareness about early detection, prevention and control of Diabetes, from an early age, to remind everyone that together we can fight against diabetes all.

    every day and that health is our only wealth.” 'Sugar Free Jude' is the story of a school-going youth, Jude, whose daily life is disrupted when he is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

    Jude was able to manage his health condition with the help of his family, friends, and teachers in school and became an advocate for the fight against diabetes in his school and community.” Read the 'Sugar Free Jude' storybook here: https://bit.ly/3PsepSf According to the World Health Organization (WHO), almost 70% of the African population living with diabetes are unaware of their condition and around 45 million adults have Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT) which puts them at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

    “Jude symbolizes the many young men and women in Africa who suffer from diabetes but are unaware of their condition.

    Early signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination, increased thirst, feeling tired and hungry, vision problems, slow wound healing, and fungal infections, should not be ignored.

    In case one experiences any of these symptoms, they should see a doctor and get tested.

    Managing diabetes is a lifestyle change, those who live with this condition should eat healthy, exercise regularly, stop smoking and limit the consumption of alcohol, sugar and salt”, explained Senator Dr. Rasha Kelej.

    The Merck Foundation has also released three songs in three languages ​​called 'NO more Diabetes, Sugar Free' in English, 'Dites non au Diabète' in French and 'Chega de Diabete' in Portuguese.

    And recently he has released the remix of the three languages.

    Listen to the diabetes song remix here: https://bit.ly/3yaw77d These songs have been sung by Cwezi from Ghana for the English version, Laura Beg from Mauritius for the French version and Blaze from Mozambique for the Portuguese version.

    The songs talk about promoting a healthy lifestyle and raising awareness about early detection and prevention of Diabetes.

    Click here to listen to the English song 'NO More Diabetes, Sugar Free': https://bit.ly/3vcCVQ9 Click here to listen to the French song 'Dites non au Diabète': https://bit.ly /3OrOw4J Click here to listen to the Portuguese song 'Chega de Diabete': https://bit.ly/3z22FzT Additionally, through the "Merck Foundation Diabetes Blue Dots Program" in partnership with the African First Ladies, Ministries of Health and Medical Societies, the Merck Foundation has provided more than 720 fellowships for physicians from 45 countries, for one-year Postgraduate Diploma and two-year Masters in Cardiovascular Preventive Medicine, Endocrinology and Diabetes, and Masters in Diabetes from 3 months.

    The Merck Foundation, together with the African First Ladies, has also presented Awards for Media, Fashion Designers, Filmmakers, Musicians/Singers and potential new talents in these fields from African countries to promote a healthy lifestyle and raise awareness of prevention.

    and early detection of Diabetes and Hypertension.

    Award Details: 1.

    Merck Foundation Media Recognition Awards 2022 "Diabetes and Hypertension": Media representatives are invited to showcase their work through strong and influential messages to promote a healthy lifestyle and create awareness about the prevention and early detection of diabetes and hypertension.

    Submission Deadline: October 30, 2022.

    Click here (https://bit.ly/3csdIun) for more details.

    2.

    Merck Foundation Film Awards 2022 “Diabetes and Hypertension”: All African filmmakers, students from film training institutions or young talents from Africa are invited to create and share long or short FILMS, be it drama, documentary or docudrama to deliver robust and influential messages to promote a healthy lifestyle raising awareness about the prevention and early detection of Diabetes and Hypertension.

    Submission Deadline: October 30, 2022.

    Click here (https://bit.ly/3z55T5z) for more details.

    3.

    Merck Foundation Fashion Awards 2022 "Diabetes & Hypertension": All African students and fashion designers are invited to create and share designs to convey strong and influential messages to promote a healthy lifestyle and raise awareness of prevention and early detection of diabetes and hypertension.

    Submission Deadline: October 30, 2022.

    Click here (https://bit.ly/3z7C0BJ) for more details.

    4.

    Merck Foundation Song Awards 2022 “Diabetes & Hypertension”: All African singers and musical artists are invited to create and share a SONG with the aim of promoting a healthy lifestyle and raising awareness about the prevention and early detection of diabetes and hypertension.

    hypertension.

    Submission Deadline: October 30, 2022.

    Click here (https://bit.ly/3JaxQNZ) for more details.

    Entries for all awards should be emailed to: submit@merck-foundation.com The Merck Foundation, in collaboration with the African First Ladies, has also published 7 inspiring children's storybooks in three languages ​​and over 30 songs on how to end the stigma of infertility and support girls.

    women's education and empowerment, in English, French and Portuguese.

    To listen to the Merck Foundation songs and read the Merck Foundation storybooks, visit: https://bit.ly/3PUxM7a

  •   The African Development Bank www AfDB org had several productive engagements around its strategic priorities at the recently concluded 77th United Nations General Assembly UNGA meetings in New York Highlights of the meeting included an urgent call for increased financing to mitigate the effects of climate change and food insecurity The President of the African Development Bank Group Dr Akinwumi Adesina led the bank s delegation to the meetings and played an active role in the discussions that led to an international declaration to end malnutrition and stunting The bank s commitments reflect its strategic priorities as the African countries it supports grapple with the lingering impacts of the Covid 19 pandemic as well as war related food and fuel price increases of Russia in Ukraine and climate change Climate change was a recurring theme in many of the bank s UNGA discussions especially the need for urgent financing for countries most at risk from climate change Climate change has taken on added urgency with the upcoming United Nations Climate Change Conference COP27 taking place in Sharm El Sheik Egypt in less than two months COP 27 or the African COP as it is called presents an unprecedented opportunity for a unified African voice to demand that the global community go beyond words and take concrete action on financing for climate adaptation and mitigation Speaking at the second ministerial meeting on climate and development Adesina joined US Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry and other participants in urging developed countries to keep the promises they made at COP26 in Glasgow last year and under the 2015 Paris Agreement John Kerry s words were unequivocal We are late we must act I m sick of saying the same thing too many times in the same meetings Business as usual is the collective enemy It is time to act he said at the meeting Adesina echoed this call for urgent action He warned Africa is suffering Africa is suffocating and in serious financial trouble for what it did not cause There needs to be a greater sense of urgency not in talking but in making and delivering the resources that the continent desperately needs Click here https bit ly 3Ehj9IJ to watch and listen to Adesina s remarks The African Development Bank Group has joined the Global Leadership Council on a new initiative to increase clean and reliable energy and tackle global warming The Global Leadership Council is made up of world leaders including the head of the African Development Bank the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Patricia Espinosa United Nations Development Program Administrator Achim Steiner European Investment Bank President Werner Hoyer Norwegian Prime Minister Jonas Gahr and Rockefeller Foundation President Dr Rajiv J Shah co chair of the council As a first step the Council will focus on efforts to break down barriers to just energy transitions in developing countries While developing countries are currently responsible for just 25 of global CO2 emissions this share could grow to 75 by 2050 according to analysis published by the Alliance Developing countries currently receive only a fraction of the financing to develop clean energy despite representing almost half of the world s population The General Assembly allowed the African Development Bank Group to show particular leadership in efforts to end hunger nutrition and stunting in Africa Under the Presidential Dialogue Group on Nutrition inspired by the African Union s designation of 2022 as the Year of Nutrition the head of the African Development Bank Group joined African presidents in signing a historic commitment to stop child growth retardation According to the Global Nutrition Report considered the most comprehensive report on the state of nutrition worldwide more than 30 of children in Africa are stunted The Dialogue Group is an initiative of the African Leaders for Nutrition platform of the African Development Bank the Government of Ethiopia and Big Win a philanthropic organization In addition to Ethiopia the platform counts among its members the leaders of the Democratic Republic of the Congo Madagascar Malawi Mozambique Niger Senegal Tanzania and Uganda The African Development Bank s African Emergency Food Production Fund featured prominently at the World Summit on Food Security Senegalese President Macky Sall chairman of the African Union praised the bank for quickly launching the 1 5 billion line to avert a looming food crisis The program is facilitating the production of 38 million tons of food This represents a 12 billion increase in production in just two years In support of the African Development Bank Group s Jobs for Youth in Africa program to create 25 million jobs by 2025 and related initiatives the President of the Bank participated in a high level session to discuss the Global Accelerator on Jobs and Social Protection for Just Transitions https bit ly 3SVfKTX initiative Speaking at the session UN Secretary General Ant nio Guterres urged governments around the world to invest quickly in creating quality jobs and providing social protection for the uninsured He told leaders to focus on concrete solutions to implement the initiative warning that the path of inaction leads to economic collapse and climate catastrophe widening inequalities and increasing social unrest This could leave billions trapped in vicious cycles of poverty and destitution The session was also addressed by several leaders from around the world including African Development Bank President Dr Akinwumi Adesina Malawi President Lazarus Chakwera Ugandan Vice President Jessica Alupo and the Minister of Planning and Economic Development of Egypt Hala El Said African Development Bank President Dr Akinwumi Adesina said We have to restructure our economies to be productive with education infrastructure energy and make sure we have productive sectors that can use people s skills and absorb them into the economy On the sidelines of the General Assembly Adesina also led a bank delegation to the World Health Organization WHO meetings The two organizations agreed to work together on quality healthcare infrastructure vaccines essential drugs nutrition and the African Pharmaceutical Technology Foundation WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus congratulated the African Development Bank for creating the Africa Pharmaceutical Technology Foundation which he said could help shape the market for pharmaceuticals Adesina also held bilateral meetings with the new president of Kenya William Ruto the American billionaire and philanthropist Michael Bloomberg and former US President Bill Clinton and former US Senator Hillary Clinton The president also met with Anne Beatthe Tvinnereim Norway s minister for international development who is also governor of the African Development Bank Before the Global Citizen Festival they discussed efforts to end hunger Norway is supporting the African Emergency Food Production Fund UNGA 77 brought together world leaders civil society activists private sector actors and youth from around the world for two weeks of in person dialogue in New York City under the theme A Watershed Moment Transformative Solutions to Intertwined Challenges
    The 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly highlights the key priorities of the African Development Bank: climate finance, job creation and food insecurity
      The African Development Bank www AfDB org had several productive engagements around its strategic priorities at the recently concluded 77th United Nations General Assembly UNGA meetings in New York Highlights of the meeting included an urgent call for increased financing to mitigate the effects of climate change and food insecurity The President of the African Development Bank Group Dr Akinwumi Adesina led the bank s delegation to the meetings and played an active role in the discussions that led to an international declaration to end malnutrition and stunting The bank s commitments reflect its strategic priorities as the African countries it supports grapple with the lingering impacts of the Covid 19 pandemic as well as war related food and fuel price increases of Russia in Ukraine and climate change Climate change was a recurring theme in many of the bank s UNGA discussions especially the need for urgent financing for countries most at risk from climate change Climate change has taken on added urgency with the upcoming United Nations Climate Change Conference COP27 taking place in Sharm El Sheik Egypt in less than two months COP 27 or the African COP as it is called presents an unprecedented opportunity for a unified African voice to demand that the global community go beyond words and take concrete action on financing for climate adaptation and mitigation Speaking at the second ministerial meeting on climate and development Adesina joined US Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry and other participants in urging developed countries to keep the promises they made at COP26 in Glasgow last year and under the 2015 Paris Agreement John Kerry s words were unequivocal We are late we must act I m sick of saying the same thing too many times in the same meetings Business as usual is the collective enemy It is time to act he said at the meeting Adesina echoed this call for urgent action He warned Africa is suffering Africa is suffocating and in serious financial trouble for what it did not cause There needs to be a greater sense of urgency not in talking but in making and delivering the resources that the continent desperately needs Click here https bit ly 3Ehj9IJ to watch and listen to Adesina s remarks The African Development Bank Group has joined the Global Leadership Council on a new initiative to increase clean and reliable energy and tackle global warming The Global Leadership Council is made up of world leaders including the head of the African Development Bank the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Patricia Espinosa United Nations Development Program Administrator Achim Steiner European Investment Bank President Werner Hoyer Norwegian Prime Minister Jonas Gahr and Rockefeller Foundation President Dr Rajiv J Shah co chair of the council As a first step the Council will focus on efforts to break down barriers to just energy transitions in developing countries While developing countries are currently responsible for just 25 of global CO2 emissions this share could grow to 75 by 2050 according to analysis published by the Alliance Developing countries currently receive only a fraction of the financing to develop clean energy despite representing almost half of the world s population The General Assembly allowed the African Development Bank Group to show particular leadership in efforts to end hunger nutrition and stunting in Africa Under the Presidential Dialogue Group on Nutrition inspired by the African Union s designation of 2022 as the Year of Nutrition the head of the African Development Bank Group joined African presidents in signing a historic commitment to stop child growth retardation According to the Global Nutrition Report considered the most comprehensive report on the state of nutrition worldwide more than 30 of children in Africa are stunted The Dialogue Group is an initiative of the African Leaders for Nutrition platform of the African Development Bank the Government of Ethiopia and Big Win a philanthropic organization In addition to Ethiopia the platform counts among its members the leaders of the Democratic Republic of the Congo Madagascar Malawi Mozambique Niger Senegal Tanzania and Uganda The African Development Bank s African Emergency Food Production Fund featured prominently at the World Summit on Food Security Senegalese President Macky Sall chairman of the African Union praised the bank for quickly launching the 1 5 billion line to avert a looming food crisis The program is facilitating the production of 38 million tons of food This represents a 12 billion increase in production in just two years In support of the African Development Bank Group s Jobs for Youth in Africa program to create 25 million jobs by 2025 and related initiatives the President of the Bank participated in a high level session to discuss the Global Accelerator on Jobs and Social Protection for Just Transitions https bit ly 3SVfKTX initiative Speaking at the session UN Secretary General Ant nio Guterres urged governments around the world to invest quickly in creating quality jobs and providing social protection for the uninsured He told leaders to focus on concrete solutions to implement the initiative warning that the path of inaction leads to economic collapse and climate catastrophe widening inequalities and increasing social unrest This could leave billions trapped in vicious cycles of poverty and destitution The session was also addressed by several leaders from around the world including African Development Bank President Dr Akinwumi Adesina Malawi President Lazarus Chakwera Ugandan Vice President Jessica Alupo and the Minister of Planning and Economic Development of Egypt Hala El Said African Development Bank President Dr Akinwumi Adesina said We have to restructure our economies to be productive with education infrastructure energy and make sure we have productive sectors that can use people s skills and absorb them into the economy On the sidelines of the General Assembly Adesina also led a bank delegation to the World Health Organization WHO meetings The two organizations agreed to work together on quality healthcare infrastructure vaccines essential drugs nutrition and the African Pharmaceutical Technology Foundation WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus congratulated the African Development Bank for creating the Africa Pharmaceutical Technology Foundation which he said could help shape the market for pharmaceuticals Adesina also held bilateral meetings with the new president of Kenya William Ruto the American billionaire and philanthropist Michael Bloomberg and former US President Bill Clinton and former US Senator Hillary Clinton The president also met with Anne Beatthe Tvinnereim Norway s minister for international development who is also governor of the African Development Bank Before the Global Citizen Festival they discussed efforts to end hunger Norway is supporting the African Emergency Food Production Fund UNGA 77 brought together world leaders civil society activists private sector actors and youth from around the world for two weeks of in person dialogue in New York City under the theme A Watershed Moment Transformative Solutions to Intertwined Challenges
    The 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly highlights the key priorities of the African Development Bank: climate finance, job creation and food insecurity
    Africa2 months ago

    The 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly highlights the key priorities of the African Development Bank: climate finance, job creation and food insecurity

    The African Development Bank (www.AfDB.org) had several productive engagements around its strategic priorities at the recently concluded 77th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) meetings in New York. Highlights of the meeting included an urgent call for increased financing to mitigate the effects of climate change and food insecurity.

    The President of the African Development Bank Group, Dr. Akinwumi Adesina, led the bank's delegation to the meetings and played an active role in the discussions that led to an international declaration to end malnutrition and stunting.

    The bank's commitments reflect its strategic priorities as the African countries it supports grapple with the lingering impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic, as well as war-related food and fuel price increases.

    of Russia in Ukraine and climate change.

    Climate change was a recurring theme in many of the bank's UNGA discussions, especially the need for urgent financing for countries most at risk from climate change.

    Climate change has taken on added urgency with the upcoming United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27) taking place in Sharm El-Sheik, Egypt, in less than two months.

    COP 27, or “the African COP” as it is called, presents an unprecedented opportunity for a unified African voice to demand that the global community go beyond words and take concrete action on financing for climate adaptation and mitigation.

    .

    Speaking at the second ministerial meeting on climate and development, Adesina joined US Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry and other participants in urging developed countries to keep the promises they made at COP26 in Glasgow.

    last year, and under the 2015 Paris Agreement.

    John Kerry's words were unequivocal: “We are late.

    we must act I'm sick of saying the same thing too many times in the same meetings.

    Business as usual is the collective enemy.

    It is time to act,” he said at the meeting.

    Adesina echoed this call for urgent action.

    He warned: “Africa is suffering, Africa is suffocating and in serious financial trouble for what it did not cause.

    There needs to be a greater sense of urgency, not in talking, but in making and delivering the resources that the continent desperately needs.” Click here (https://bit.ly/3Ehj9IJ) to watch and listen to Adesina's remarks.

    The African Development Bank Group has joined the Global Leadership Council on a new initiative to increase clean and reliable energy and tackle global warming.

    The Global Leadership Council is made up of world leaders, including the head of the African Development Bank, the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Patricia Espinosa; United Nations Development Program Administrator Achim Steiner; European Investment Bank. President Werner Hoyer; Norwegian Prime Minister Jonas Gahr; and Rockefeller Foundation President Dr. Rajiv J.

    Shah, co-chair of the council.

    As a first step, the Council will focus on efforts to break down barriers to just energy transitions in developing countries.

    While developing countries are currently responsible for just 25% of global CO2 emissions, this share could grow to 75% by 2050, according to analysis published by the Alliance.

    Developing countries currently receive only a fraction of the financing to develop clean energy, despite representing almost half of the world's population.

    The General Assembly allowed the African Development Bank Group to show particular leadership in efforts to end hunger, nutrition and stunting in Africa.

    Under the Presidential Dialogue Group on Nutrition, inspired by the African Union's designation of 2022 as the "Year of Nutrition," the head of the African Development Bank Group joined African presidents in signing a historic commitment to stop child growth retardation.

    According to the Global Nutrition Report, considered the most comprehensive report on the state of nutrition worldwide, more than 30% of children in Africa are stunted.

    The Dialogue Group is an initiative of the African Leaders for Nutrition platform of the African Development Bank, the Government of Ethiopia and Big Win, a philanthropic organization.

    In addition to Ethiopia, the platform counts among its members the leaders of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Niger, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda.

    The African Development Bank's African Emergency Food Production Fund featured prominently at the World Summit on Food Security.

    Senegalese President Macky Sall, chairman of the African Union, praised the bank for quickly launching the $1.5 billion line to avert a looming food crisis.

    The program is facilitating the production of 38 million tons of food.

    This represents a $12 billion increase in production in just two years.

    In support of the African Development Bank Group's Jobs for Youth in Africa program to create 25 million jobs by 2025 and related initiatives, the President of the Bank participated in a high-level session to discuss the Global Accelerator on Jobs and Social Protection for Just Transitions (https://bit.ly/3SVfKTX) initiative.

    Speaking at the session, UN Secretary-General António Guterres urged governments around the world to invest quickly in creating quality jobs and providing social protection for the uninsured.

    He told leaders to focus on concrete solutions to implement the initiative, warning that “the path of inaction leads to economic collapse and climate catastrophe, widening inequalities and increasing social unrest.

    This could leave billions trapped in vicious cycles of poverty and destitution.” The session was also addressed by several leaders from around the world, including African Development Bank President Dr. Akinwumi Adesina, Malawi President Lazarus Chakwera, Ugandan Vice President Jessica Alupo, and the Minister of Planning and Economic Development of Egypt, Hala El-Said. African Development Bank President Dr. Akinwumi Adesina said: "We have to restructure our economies to be productive with education, infrastructure, energy and make sure we have productive sectors that can use people's skills and absorb them into the economy".

    On the sidelines of the General Assembly, Adesina also led a bank delegation to the World Health Organization (WHO) meetings.

    The two organizations agreed to work together on quality healthcare infrastructure, vaccines, essential drugs, nutrition and the African Pharmaceutical Technology Foundation.

    WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus congratulated the African Development Bank for creating the Africa Pharmaceutical Technology Foundation, which he said "could help shape the market for pharmaceuticals."

    Adesina also held bilateral meetings with the new president of Kenya, William Ruto; the American billionaire and philanthropist Michael Bloomberg; and former US President Bill Clinton and former US Senator Hillary Clinton.

    The president also met with Anne Beatthe Tvinnereim, Norway's minister for international development, who is also governor of the African Development Bank. Before the Global Citizen Festival, they discussed efforts to end hunger.

    Norway is supporting the African Emergency Food Production Fund. UNGA 77 brought together world leaders, civil society activists, private sector actors and youth from around the world for two weeks of in-person dialogue in New York City under the theme "A Watershed Moment: Transformative Solutions to Intertwined Challenges" .

  •   Sitting on a wooden stool outside her home in the Dobeli community in the Yola North Local Government Area LGA Hajara Yusuf a 27 year old mother of three was coaxing her children to take the medication seasonal malaria chemoprevention SMC Usually I look forward to when they give the regular anti malarial drugs because I have seen firsthand how it keeps children from getting sick Previously I used to decline medication because I wasn t sure what it was until a community health educator explained the benefit to me Then I tried my second son Tsoho because he always got sick and he has been healthy ever since Two of my children are among the eligible group entitled to receive the medications and since then I have taken it upon myself to be vigilant whenever there is a campaign to ensure that my children receive their dose I also encourage other mothers to collect for their children Since Tsoho and his brother started receiving the SMC medicines I have spent less money on medicines and this has given me a lot of time for other things she said Ms Yusuf said that she usually gets sad when she sees that her son does not play with other children But right now I m happy that she s playing and running like the other kids And I remain committed to ensuring that they are available to receive their medications in all four cycles and will be an advocate for such benefits to other mothers as well said Ms Yusuf The young mother of three children is one of the beneficiaries of the SMC medicines distributed in the state of Adamawa to almost one million children in the 21 LGAs with the support of the World Health Organization WHO and financing from Global Funds through the National Malaria Elimination Program NMEP SMC is administered monthly for four months during periods of increased malaria transmission using sulfadoxine pyrimethamine SP and amodiaquine AQ SPAQ to children aged 3 to 59 months to reduce cases of malaria outbreaks that generally increase in the country during the rainy season A persistent threat In Nigeria malaria caused by the bite of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes is a major public health problem and poses a threat to the entire population with children and pregnant women most vulnerable to severe illness and death Ending malaria transmission by 2030 remains a top government priority as Nigeria is one of four countries that account for just over half of all malaria deaths worldwide According to the latest World Malaria Report Nigeria accounts for 27 of all malaria cases and 32 of deaths worldwide To reduce the burden of disease the WHO recommends among other interventions the SMC intervention for children aged 3 59 months living in areas of high malaria transmission to protect against malaria during the rainy season Other WHO recommended interventions to control malaria include vector control through the use of long lasting insecticidal nets indoor residual spraying all suspected malaria cases are confirmed by parasite based diagnostic tests using microscopy or a rapid diagnostic test Diagnostic tests allow health providers to quickly distinguish between malarial and non malarial fevers facilitating appropriate treatment Continued intervention Applauding the WHO for continuously supporting the state government to provide quality health services to the population Adamawa State Director of Public Health Dr Celine Laori said that the September malaria prevention campaign is the fourth and final cycle of the SMC routine for the year We appreciate the outstanding leadership and commitment of WHO throughout the four cycles They supported the state in building the capacity of health workers which pushed them to provide adequate services throughout the exercise said Dr Laori Endorsing the importance of the campaign Northeast Emergency Manager Dr Richard Lako said WHO has remained a dedicated partner in supporting Adamawa State in achieving global goals of reducing the incidence of malaria cases and mortality rate by at least 90 by 2030 The SMC campaign will complement the efforts of the Adamawa state government to provide quality health services to the people WHO will continue to provide technical support including capacity building to increase early disease detection in the state especially in hard to reach places said Dr Lako
    Mothers adopt seasonal malaria chemoprevention drugs to keep malaria at bay in Adamawa state
      Sitting on a wooden stool outside her home in the Dobeli community in the Yola North Local Government Area LGA Hajara Yusuf a 27 year old mother of three was coaxing her children to take the medication seasonal malaria chemoprevention SMC Usually I look forward to when they give the regular anti malarial drugs because I have seen firsthand how it keeps children from getting sick Previously I used to decline medication because I wasn t sure what it was until a community health educator explained the benefit to me Then I tried my second son Tsoho because he always got sick and he has been healthy ever since Two of my children are among the eligible group entitled to receive the medications and since then I have taken it upon myself to be vigilant whenever there is a campaign to ensure that my children receive their dose I also encourage other mothers to collect for their children Since Tsoho and his brother started receiving the SMC medicines I have spent less money on medicines and this has given me a lot of time for other things she said Ms Yusuf said that she usually gets sad when she sees that her son does not play with other children But right now I m happy that she s playing and running like the other kids And I remain committed to ensuring that they are available to receive their medications in all four cycles and will be an advocate for such benefits to other mothers as well said Ms Yusuf The young mother of three children is one of the beneficiaries of the SMC medicines distributed in the state of Adamawa to almost one million children in the 21 LGAs with the support of the World Health Organization WHO and financing from Global Funds through the National Malaria Elimination Program NMEP SMC is administered monthly for four months during periods of increased malaria transmission using sulfadoxine pyrimethamine SP and amodiaquine AQ SPAQ to children aged 3 to 59 months to reduce cases of malaria outbreaks that generally increase in the country during the rainy season A persistent threat In Nigeria malaria caused by the bite of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes is a major public health problem and poses a threat to the entire population with children and pregnant women most vulnerable to severe illness and death Ending malaria transmission by 2030 remains a top government priority as Nigeria is one of four countries that account for just over half of all malaria deaths worldwide According to the latest World Malaria Report Nigeria accounts for 27 of all malaria cases and 32 of deaths worldwide To reduce the burden of disease the WHO recommends among other interventions the SMC intervention for children aged 3 59 months living in areas of high malaria transmission to protect against malaria during the rainy season Other WHO recommended interventions to control malaria include vector control through the use of long lasting insecticidal nets indoor residual spraying all suspected malaria cases are confirmed by parasite based diagnostic tests using microscopy or a rapid diagnostic test Diagnostic tests allow health providers to quickly distinguish between malarial and non malarial fevers facilitating appropriate treatment Continued intervention Applauding the WHO for continuously supporting the state government to provide quality health services to the population Adamawa State Director of Public Health Dr Celine Laori said that the September malaria prevention campaign is the fourth and final cycle of the SMC routine for the year We appreciate the outstanding leadership and commitment of WHO throughout the four cycles They supported the state in building the capacity of health workers which pushed them to provide adequate services throughout the exercise said Dr Laori Endorsing the importance of the campaign Northeast Emergency Manager Dr Richard Lako said WHO has remained a dedicated partner in supporting Adamawa State in achieving global goals of reducing the incidence of malaria cases and mortality rate by at least 90 by 2030 The SMC campaign will complement the efforts of the Adamawa state government to provide quality health services to the people WHO will continue to provide technical support including capacity building to increase early disease detection in the state especially in hard to reach places said Dr Lako
    Mothers adopt seasonal malaria chemoprevention drugs to keep malaria at bay in Adamawa state
    Africa2 months ago

    Mothers adopt seasonal malaria chemoprevention drugs to keep malaria at bay in Adamawa state

    Sitting on a wooden stool outside her home in the Dobeli community in the Yola North Local Government Area (LGA), Hajara Yusuf, a 27-year-old mother of three, was coaxing her children to take the medication seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC).

    “Usually I look forward to when they give the regular anti-malarial drugs because I have seen firsthand how it keeps children from getting sick.

    Previously, I used to decline medication because I wasn't sure what it was until a community health educator explained the benefit to me.

    Then I tried my second son (Tsoho) because he always got sick and he has been healthy ever since.

    Two of my children are among the eligible group entitled to receive the medications and since then I have taken it upon myself to be vigilant whenever there is a campaign to ensure that my children receive their dose.

    I also encourage other mothers to collect for their children.

    Since Tsoho and his brother started receiving the SMC medicines, I have spent less money on medicines, and this has given me a lot of time for other things,” she said.

    Ms. Yusuf said that she usually gets sad when she sees that her son does not play with other children.

    “But right now, I'm happy that she's playing and running like the other kids.

    And I remain committed to ensuring that they are available to receive their medications in all four cycles and will be an advocate for such benefits to other mothers as well, said Ms. Yusuf.

    The young mother of three children is one of the beneficiaries of the SMC medicines distributed in the state of Adamawa to almost one million children in the 21 LGAs, with the support of the World Health Organization (WHO) and financing from Global Funds through the National Malaria Elimination Program.

    (NMEP).

    SMC is administered monthly for four months during periods of increased malaria transmission, using sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and amodiaquine (AQ) (SPAQ) to children aged 3 to 59 months to reduce cases of malaria outbreaks that generally increase in the country during the rainy season.

    A persistent threat In Nigeria, malaria caused by the bite of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes is a major public health problem and poses a threat to the entire population, with children and pregnant women most vulnerable to severe illness and death .

    Ending malaria transmission by 2030 remains a top government priority, as Nigeria is one of four countries that account for just over half of all malaria deaths worldwide.

    According to the latest World Malaria Report, Nigeria accounts for 27% of all malaria cases and 32% of deaths worldwide.

    To reduce the burden of disease, the WHO recommends, among other interventions, the SMC intervention for children aged 3-59 months living in areas of high malaria transmission to protect against malaria during the rainy season.

    Other WHO-recommended interventions to control malaria include vector control through the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets, indoor residual spraying.

    all suspected malaria cases are confirmed by parasite-based diagnostic tests (using microscopy or a rapid diagnostic test).

    Diagnostic tests allow health providers to quickly distinguish between malarial and non-malarial fevers, facilitating appropriate treatment.

    Continued intervention Applauding the WHO for continuously supporting the state government to provide quality health services to the population, Adamawa State Director of Public Health Dr. Celine Laori said that the September malaria prevention campaign is the fourth and final cycle of the SMC routine for the year.

    “We appreciate the outstanding leadership and commitment of WHO throughout the four cycles.

    They supported the state in building the capacity of health workers, which pushed them to provide adequate services throughout the exercise,” said Dr. Laori.

    Endorsing the importance of the campaign, Northeast Emergency Manager Dr. Richard Lako said WHO has remained a dedicated partner in supporting Adamawa State in achieving global goals of reducing the incidence of malaria cases and mortality rate by at least 90% by 2030.

    “The SMC campaign will complement the efforts of the Adamawa state government to provide quality health services to the people.

    WHO will continue to provide technical support, including capacity building, to increase early disease detection in the state, especially in hard-to-reach places,” said Dr. Lako.

  •  The World Health Organization WHO and the International Labour Organization ILO have called for concrete actions to address mental health concerns in the working population WHO guidelines released on Tuesday said that an estimated 12 billion workdays are lost annually due to depression and anxiety costing the global economy nearly 1 trillion dollar Two new publications which aim to address this issue were published on September 27 on WHO Guidelines on mental health at work and a derivative policy brief The WHO global guidelines on mental health at work recommend actions to tackle risks to mental health such as heavy workloads negative behaviours and other factors that create distress at work It said that for the first time WHO recommended manager training to build their capacity to prevent stressful work environments and respond to workers in distress It said that WHO s World Mental Health Report published in June 2022 showed that of one billion people living with a mental disorder in 2019 15 per cent of working age adults experienced a mental disorder Work amplifies wider societal issues that negatively affect mental health including discrimination and inequality Bullying and psychological violence also known as mobbing is a key complaint of workplace harassment that has a negative impact on mental health Yet discussing or disclosing mental health remains a taboo in work settings globally it said It said that the guidelines also recommend better ways to accommodate the needs of workers with mental health conditions It recommend interventions that support their return to work and for those with severe mental health conditions provide interventions that facilitate entry into paid employment Importantly The guidelines call for interventions aimed at the protection of health humanitarian and emergency workers Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus WHO Director General said it was time to focus on the detrimental effect work can have on our mental health The well being of the individual is reason enough to act but poor mental health can also have a debilitating impact on a person s performance and productivity These new guidelines can help prevent negative work situations and cultures and offer much needed mental health protection and support for working people Ghebreyesus said He said that a separate WHO and ILO policy brief explained the guidelines in terms of practical strategies for governments employers and workers and their organizations in the public and private sectors Ghebreyesus said that the aim was to support the prevention of mental health risks protect and promote mental health at work and support those with mental health conditions so they can participate and thrive in the world of work Investment and leadership will be critical to the implementation of the strategies he said Mr Guy Ryder ILO Director General said as people spend a large proportion of their lives in work a safe and healthy working environment was critical We need to invest to build a culture of prevention around mental health at work reshape the work environment to stop stigma and social exclusion and ensure employees with mental health conditions feel protected and supported Ryder said He said that the ILO Occupational Safety and Health Convention No 155 and Recommendation No 164 provides legal frameworks to protect the health and safety of workers Ryder said that however the WHO Mental Health Atlas found that only 35 per cent of countries reported having national programmes for work related mental health promotion and prevention He said that COVID 19 triggered a 25 per cent increase in general anxiety and depression worldwide exposing how unprepared governments were for its impact on mental health and revealing a chronic global shortage of mental health resources Ryder said in 2020 governments worldwide spent an average of just twi per cent of health budgets on mental health with lower middle income countries investing less than 1per cent NewsSourceCredit NAN
    WHO, ILO seek concrete action to tackle mental health issues in workplaces
     The World Health Organization WHO and the International Labour Organization ILO have called for concrete actions to address mental health concerns in the working population WHO guidelines released on Tuesday said that an estimated 12 billion workdays are lost annually due to depression and anxiety costing the global economy nearly 1 trillion dollar Two new publications which aim to address this issue were published on September 27 on WHO Guidelines on mental health at work and a derivative policy brief The WHO global guidelines on mental health at work recommend actions to tackle risks to mental health such as heavy workloads negative behaviours and other factors that create distress at work It said that for the first time WHO recommended manager training to build their capacity to prevent stressful work environments and respond to workers in distress It said that WHO s World Mental Health Report published in June 2022 showed that of one billion people living with a mental disorder in 2019 15 per cent of working age adults experienced a mental disorder Work amplifies wider societal issues that negatively affect mental health including discrimination and inequality Bullying and psychological violence also known as mobbing is a key complaint of workplace harassment that has a negative impact on mental health Yet discussing or disclosing mental health remains a taboo in work settings globally it said It said that the guidelines also recommend better ways to accommodate the needs of workers with mental health conditions It recommend interventions that support their return to work and for those with severe mental health conditions provide interventions that facilitate entry into paid employment Importantly The guidelines call for interventions aimed at the protection of health humanitarian and emergency workers Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus WHO Director General said it was time to focus on the detrimental effect work can have on our mental health The well being of the individual is reason enough to act but poor mental health can also have a debilitating impact on a person s performance and productivity These new guidelines can help prevent negative work situations and cultures and offer much needed mental health protection and support for working people Ghebreyesus said He said that a separate WHO and ILO policy brief explained the guidelines in terms of practical strategies for governments employers and workers and their organizations in the public and private sectors Ghebreyesus said that the aim was to support the prevention of mental health risks protect and promote mental health at work and support those with mental health conditions so they can participate and thrive in the world of work Investment and leadership will be critical to the implementation of the strategies he said Mr Guy Ryder ILO Director General said as people spend a large proportion of their lives in work a safe and healthy working environment was critical We need to invest to build a culture of prevention around mental health at work reshape the work environment to stop stigma and social exclusion and ensure employees with mental health conditions feel protected and supported Ryder said He said that the ILO Occupational Safety and Health Convention No 155 and Recommendation No 164 provides legal frameworks to protect the health and safety of workers Ryder said that however the WHO Mental Health Atlas found that only 35 per cent of countries reported having national programmes for work related mental health promotion and prevention He said that COVID 19 triggered a 25 per cent increase in general anxiety and depression worldwide exposing how unprepared governments were for its impact on mental health and revealing a chronic global shortage of mental health resources Ryder said in 2020 governments worldwide spent an average of just twi per cent of health budgets on mental health with lower middle income countries investing less than 1per cent NewsSourceCredit NAN
    WHO, ILO seek concrete action to tackle mental health issues in workplaces
    General news2 months ago

    WHO, ILO seek concrete action to tackle mental health issues in workplaces

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Labour Organization (ILO) have called for concrete actions to address mental health concerns in the working population.

    WHO  guidelines  released on Tuesday  said that an estimated 12 billion workdays are lost annually due to depression and anxiety costing the global economy nearly 1 trillion dollar.

    ” Two new publications which aim to address this issue were published on September 27 on WHO Guidelines on mental health at work and a derivative policy brief.

    The WHO global guidelines on mental health at work recommend actions to tackle risks to mental health such as heavy workloads, negative behaviours and other factors that create distress at work.

    It said that for the first time WHO recommended manager training, to build their capacity to prevent stressful work environments and respond to workers in distress.

    It said that WHO’s World Mental Health Report, published in June 2022, showed that of one billion people living with a mental disorder in 2019, 15 per cent of working-age adults experienced a mental disorder.

    “Work amplifies wider societal issues that negatively affect mental health, including discrimination and inequality.

    ” Bullying and psychological violence (also known as “mobbing”) is a key complaint of workplace harassment that has a negative impact on mental health.

    “Yet discussing or disclosing mental health remains a taboo in work settings globally,” it said.

    It said that the guidelines also recommend better ways to accommodate the needs of workers with mental health conditions.

    It recommend interventions that support their return to work and for those with severe mental health conditions, provide interventions that facilitate entry into paid employment.

    Importantly.

    The guidelines call for interventions aimed at the protection of health, humanitarian, and emergency workers.

    Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, said it was time to focus on the detrimental effect work can have on our mental health.

    “The well-being of the individual is reason enough to act, but poor mental health can also have a debilitating impact on a person’s performance and productivity.

    “These new guidelines can help prevent negative work situations and cultures and offer much-needed mental health protection and support for working people.

    ”Ghebreyesus said.

    He said that a separate WHO and ILO policy brief explained the guidelines in terms of practical strategies for governments, employers and workers, and their organizations, in the public and private sectors.

    Ghebreyesus said that the aim was to support the prevention of mental health risks, protect and promote mental health at work, and support those with mental health conditions, so they can participate and thrive in the world of work.

    ” Investment and leadership will be critical to the implementation of the strategies.

    he said.

    Mr Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General said as people spend a large proportion of their lives in work , a safe and healthy working environment was critical.

    “We need to invest to build a culture of prevention around mental health at work, reshape the work environment to stop stigma and social exclusion, and ensure employees with mental health conditions feel protected and supported,” Ryder said.

    He said that the ILO Occupational Safety and Health Convention (No. 155) and Recommendation (No. 164) provides legal frameworks to protect the health and safety of workers.

    Ryder said that however, the WHO Mental Health Atlas found that only 35 per cent of countries reported having national programmes for work-related mental health promotion and prevention.

    He said that COVID-19 triggered a 25 per cent increase in general anxiety and depression worldwide, exposing how unprepared governments were for its impact on mental health, and revealing a chronic global shortage of mental health resources.

    Ryder said in 2020, governments worldwide spent an average of just twi per cent of health budgets on mental health, with lower-middle income countries investing less than 1per cent.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   Gender based violence GBV is a sensitive issue that requires empathetic professionals working with victims and survivors The Clinical Manual on the Health Care of Survivors Subject to Intimate Partner Violence and or Sexual Violence of the World Health Organization WHO in Namibia has helped doctors social workers and nurses such as Mark Bezuidenhout registered nurse at the Epako Clinic to be more sensitive with his patients Initially the manual was intended for doctors however nurses and social workers have also found the manual beneficial to their work The manual is very useful It makes GBV clients easier to deal with because it helps us treat patients with empathy and in a way that benefits them Previously we often got stuck and didn t know what to do next or who to involve says Bezuidenhout He is also more aware of the different forms of gender based violence I am more aware of how to deal with rape survivors and those who experience other types of gender based violence says Bezuidenhout He has had to deal with patients who are physically emotionally and sexually abused Most are women of reproductive age We refer these patients to social workers for further interventions Bezuidenhout explained Justina Shoopala is a Senior Registered Nurse at Rundu State Hospital One way she has been able to tell that her patients were possibly being abused is when they refused to go home after being discharged from the hospital A lot of times they refuse to tell us why they don t want to go home but with further investigation we tell them that they are experiencing some form of abuse and then we refer them to social workers explains Shoopala In addition she points out that when the same patient is admitted to the hospital many times with no signs of serious physical symptoms they also investigate further to rule out possible abuse The training sensitized us on how to ask the customer questions without being insensitive says Shoopala Audrey Gaes a social worker for the Ministry of Health and Social Services in the Erongo region has been working with GBV patients sometimes identified by doctors or nurses Whether patients return to follow up sessions with social workers depends on their socioeconomic status It is important to establish a good relationship with patients because that determines the willingness of patients to continue We teach them independence because some of them stay in relationships due to mental psychological and emotional dependency So they have to go through this process Gaes said Causes of GBV Gender based violence has several causes health professionals point out Excessive alcohol consumption and poverty are among the factors that contribute to gender based violence You will find young girls with sugar daddies who end up abusing them adds Bezuidenhout He feels that nurses should ask questions when underage children come to the hospital for prenatal care Not all nurses or health workers are aware of child rape and that there is a penalty for not reporting it Bezuidenhout observed This is why it will be crucial to train more nurses on the clinical manual adds Bezuidenhout A lot of times nurses are only treating the patient for the illness they came in for so I think more nurses need to be trained to identify cases of GBV so they can refer clients who might be experiencing this to social workers It would also be great if there could be a unit for those cases where people can come and feel safe Bezuidenhout said Training law enforcement officers While this training has helped Bezuidenhout he believes law enforcement officers should also receive training on the clinical manual The manual is so beneficial that law enforcement officers could benefit from it Most cases of gender based violence are referred to them so they can really benefit from this training Bezuidenhout said The manual must be decentralized involving the Ministry of Gender and the gender based violence unit because for them if perhaps they have a rape case they will simply come and say that we have a rape case without being sensitive to the client Confidentiality is important So it will be good for them to get training on the brochure added Bezuidenhout Angaleni Kangayi the regional chief social worker in Rundu agrees that the training should be provided to other stakeholders This will help us understand the role that other stakeholders play in addressing gender based violence said Kangayi The impact of COVID on GBV programs The Covid 19 pandemic has had an impact on GBV services says Bezuidenhout She is the only nurse stationed at the Epako clinic who participated in the training The first training took place before the Covid 19 pandemic But when the Covid 19 arrived his attention was focused on that My work was interrupted by the Covid 19 pandemic because I have been on vaccination campaigns he says He also does not have a consultation room where he treats GBV patients Right now I m taking care of TB tuberculosis patients he said Similarly Shoopala feels that the Covid 19 pandemic has diverted her focus from gender based violence and calls on the Ministry and partners to continue to support the implementation of the Clinical Manual
    Lessons from the World Health Organization clinical manual on gender-based violence (GBV)
      Gender based violence GBV is a sensitive issue that requires empathetic professionals working with victims and survivors The Clinical Manual on the Health Care of Survivors Subject to Intimate Partner Violence and or Sexual Violence of the World Health Organization WHO in Namibia has helped doctors social workers and nurses such as Mark Bezuidenhout registered nurse at the Epako Clinic to be more sensitive with his patients Initially the manual was intended for doctors however nurses and social workers have also found the manual beneficial to their work The manual is very useful It makes GBV clients easier to deal with because it helps us treat patients with empathy and in a way that benefits them Previously we often got stuck and didn t know what to do next or who to involve says Bezuidenhout He is also more aware of the different forms of gender based violence I am more aware of how to deal with rape survivors and those who experience other types of gender based violence says Bezuidenhout He has had to deal with patients who are physically emotionally and sexually abused Most are women of reproductive age We refer these patients to social workers for further interventions Bezuidenhout explained Justina Shoopala is a Senior Registered Nurse at Rundu State Hospital One way she has been able to tell that her patients were possibly being abused is when they refused to go home after being discharged from the hospital A lot of times they refuse to tell us why they don t want to go home but with further investigation we tell them that they are experiencing some form of abuse and then we refer them to social workers explains Shoopala In addition she points out that when the same patient is admitted to the hospital many times with no signs of serious physical symptoms they also investigate further to rule out possible abuse The training sensitized us on how to ask the customer questions without being insensitive says Shoopala Audrey Gaes a social worker for the Ministry of Health and Social Services in the Erongo region has been working with GBV patients sometimes identified by doctors or nurses Whether patients return to follow up sessions with social workers depends on their socioeconomic status It is important to establish a good relationship with patients because that determines the willingness of patients to continue We teach them independence because some of them stay in relationships due to mental psychological and emotional dependency So they have to go through this process Gaes said Causes of GBV Gender based violence has several causes health professionals point out Excessive alcohol consumption and poverty are among the factors that contribute to gender based violence You will find young girls with sugar daddies who end up abusing them adds Bezuidenhout He feels that nurses should ask questions when underage children come to the hospital for prenatal care Not all nurses or health workers are aware of child rape and that there is a penalty for not reporting it Bezuidenhout observed This is why it will be crucial to train more nurses on the clinical manual adds Bezuidenhout A lot of times nurses are only treating the patient for the illness they came in for so I think more nurses need to be trained to identify cases of GBV so they can refer clients who might be experiencing this to social workers It would also be great if there could be a unit for those cases where people can come and feel safe Bezuidenhout said Training law enforcement officers While this training has helped Bezuidenhout he believes law enforcement officers should also receive training on the clinical manual The manual is so beneficial that law enforcement officers could benefit from it Most cases of gender based violence are referred to them so they can really benefit from this training Bezuidenhout said The manual must be decentralized involving the Ministry of Gender and the gender based violence unit because for them if perhaps they have a rape case they will simply come and say that we have a rape case without being sensitive to the client Confidentiality is important So it will be good for them to get training on the brochure added Bezuidenhout Angaleni Kangayi the regional chief social worker in Rundu agrees that the training should be provided to other stakeholders This will help us understand the role that other stakeholders play in addressing gender based violence said Kangayi The impact of COVID on GBV programs The Covid 19 pandemic has had an impact on GBV services says Bezuidenhout She is the only nurse stationed at the Epako clinic who participated in the training The first training took place before the Covid 19 pandemic But when the Covid 19 arrived his attention was focused on that My work was interrupted by the Covid 19 pandemic because I have been on vaccination campaigns he says He also does not have a consultation room where he treats GBV patients Right now I m taking care of TB tuberculosis patients he said Similarly Shoopala feels that the Covid 19 pandemic has diverted her focus from gender based violence and calls on the Ministry and partners to continue to support the implementation of the Clinical Manual
    Lessons from the World Health Organization clinical manual on gender-based violence (GBV)
    Africa2 months ago

    Lessons from the World Health Organization clinical manual on gender-based violence (GBV)

    Gender-based violence (GBV) is a sensitive issue that requires empathetic professionals working with victims and survivors.

    The 'Clinical Manual on the Health Care of Survivors Subject to Intimate Partner Violence and/or Sexual Violence, of the World Health Organization (WHO) in Namibia' has helped doctors, social workers and nurses such as Mark Bezuidenhout, registered nurse at the Epako Clinic, to be more sensitive with his patients.

    Initially, the manual was intended for doctors; however, nurses and social workers have also found the manual beneficial to their work.

    “The manual is very useful.

    It makes GBV clients easier to deal with because it helps us treat patients with empathy and in a way that benefits them.

    Previously, we often got stuck and didn't know what to do next or who to involve,” says Bezuidenhout.

    He is also more aware of the different forms of gender-based violence.

    “I am more aware of how to deal with rape survivors and those who experience other types of gender-based violence,” says Bezuidenhout.

    He has had to deal with patients who are physically, emotionally, and sexually abused.

    Most are women of reproductive age.

    "We refer these patients to social workers for further interventions," Bezuidenhout explained.

    Justina Shoopala is a Senior Registered Nurse at Rundu State Hospital.

    One way she has been able to tell that her patients were possibly being abused is when they refused to go home after being discharged from the hospital.

    “A lot of times they refuse to tell us why they don't want to go home, but with further investigation, we tell them that they are experiencing some form of abuse and then we refer them to social workers,” explains Shoopala.

    In addition, she points out that when the same patient is admitted to the hospital "many times with no signs of serious physical symptoms, they also investigate further to rule out possible abuse."

    “The training sensitized us on how to ask the customer questions without being insensitive,” says Shoopala.

    Audrey Gaes, a social worker for the Ministry of Health and Social Services in the Erongo region, has been working with GBV patients, sometimes identified by doctors or nurses.

    Whether patients return to follow-up sessions with social workers depends on their socioeconomic status.

    “It is important to establish a good relationship with patients because that determines the willingness of patients to continue.

    We teach them independence because some of them stay in relationships due to mental, psychological, and emotional dependency.

    So, they have to go through this process,” Gaes said.

    Causes of GBV Gender-based violence has several causes, health professionals point out.

    Excessive alcohol consumption and poverty are among the factors that contribute to gender-based violence.

    "You will find young girls with sugar daddies who end up abusing them," adds Bezuidenhout.

    He feels that nurses should ask questions when underage children come to the hospital for prenatal care.

    “Not all nurses or health workers are aware of child rape and that there is a penalty for not reporting it,” Bezuidenhout observed.

    This is why it will be crucial to train more nurses on the clinical manual, adds Bezuidenhout.

    “A lot of times nurses are only treating the patient for the illness they came in for, so I think more nurses need to be trained to identify cases of GBV so they can refer clients who might be experiencing this to social workers.

    .

    It would also be great if there could be a unit for those cases where people can come and feel safe,” Bezuidenhout said.

    Training law enforcement officers While this training has helped Bezuidenhout, he believes law enforcement officers should also receive training on the clinical manual.

    “The manual is so beneficial that law enforcement officers could benefit from it.

    Most cases of gender-based violence are referred to them so they can really benefit from this training,” Bezuidenhout said.

    “The manual must be decentralized, involving the Ministry of Gender and the gender-based violence unit because for them, if perhaps they have a rape case, they will simply come and say that we have a rape case without being sensitive to the client.

    Confidentiality is important.

    So it will be good for them to get training on the brochure,” added Bezuidenhout.

    Angaleni Kangayi, the regional chief social worker in Rundu, agrees that the training should be provided to other stakeholders.

    “This will help us understand the role that other stakeholders play in addressing gender-based violence,” said Kangayi.

    The impact of COVID on GBV programs The Covid-19 pandemic has had an impact on GBV services, says Bezuidenhout.

    She is the only nurse stationed at the Epako clinic who participated in the training.

    The first training took place before the Covid-19 pandemic.

    But, when the Covid-19 arrived, his attention was focused on that.

    “My work was interrupted by the Covid-19 pandemic because I have been on vaccination campaigns,” he says.

    He also does not have a consultation room where he treats GBV patients.

    “Right now I'm taking care of TB (tuberculosis) patients,” he said.

    Similarly, Shoopala feels that the Covid-19 pandemic has diverted her focus from gender-based violence and calls on the Ministry and partners to continue to support the implementation of the Clinical Manual.

  •   Leadership from the Ugandan Ministry of Health the World Health Organization WHO and other health partners visited the Ebola affected areas of Mubende district on September 24 to assess the health situation understand the gaps and strengthen the response to the Ebola outbreak in the country The delegation was led by the Minister of Health the Honorable Dr Jane Ruth Aceng and accompanied by the WHO Officer in Charge Dr Bayo Fatunmbi representatives of various health development organizations and implementing partners and three members of the Ugandan Parliament Starting with the National Task Force meeting at City Hall in Mubende District Health Development and implementing partners discussed the outbreak situation and engaged in their various capacities to support the response They highlighted the need to strengthen community policing and risk communication as basic elements in any response to an outbreak Ebola is real and we must eradicate this outbreak as soon as possible The cases we already have in the country are enough and we cannot afford to lose more Let us mobilize all our resources whether technical financial or operational to deal with the outbreak Hon Dr Jane Ruth Aceng Acero Ugandan Minister of Health Since the beginning of this pandemic the WHO has always supported the government to prevent its spread We have dispatched our staff and mobilized operational resources to Mubende district to strengthen the response in case management risk communication infection prevention and control community engagement and surveillance Dr Bayo Fatunmbi Leader of the WHO group for communicable and non communicable diseases Diseases In addition the team visited communities made up of community leaders village health teams and other members to raise awareness of the outbreak and encourage them to participate in the response If you know someone with Ebola or who is a contact please report it Early diagnosis is very important to reduce the risk of death I want to encourage village health teams to go door to door to identify people with signs and symptoms of Ebola added Dr Jane Ruth Health development partners also visited some potential centers in Madudu district where Ebola health centers can be set up for rapid response Since the Ebola outbreak was reported in Uganda on September 20 2022 the country has so far recorded 31 cases and 19 deaths as of September 24 2022 WHO has deployed its staff to support the response in districts affected The organization has supported the training and deployment of Rapid Response Teams RRTs and provided the Mubende Regional Referral Hospital with three Ebola kits to treat Ebola patients and save lives WHO support has also enabled the development of the National Response Plan and the activation of District Task Teams DTFs in 10 high risk districts including Mubende Sembabule Kyankwanzi Kampala Mityana Kyegegwa Gomba Kiboga Kassanda Kazo Kakumiro and Kibaale There are several candidate vaccines for the Sudan Ebola virus in development Experts will review these vaccines and see if they can be used in Uganda However other health measures such as early detection community engagement patient isolation and early supportive care have been shown to save lives in similar outbreaks People are encouraged to report all signs and symptoms of Ebola including sudden onset of fever headache severe body weakness muscle pain sore throat vomiting diarrhea or bloody urine and bleeding from an opening in the Body
    Partners for health development mobilized to end the Ebola outbreak in Uganda
      Leadership from the Ugandan Ministry of Health the World Health Organization WHO and other health partners visited the Ebola affected areas of Mubende district on September 24 to assess the health situation understand the gaps and strengthen the response to the Ebola outbreak in the country The delegation was led by the Minister of Health the Honorable Dr Jane Ruth Aceng and accompanied by the WHO Officer in Charge Dr Bayo Fatunmbi representatives of various health development organizations and implementing partners and three members of the Ugandan Parliament Starting with the National Task Force meeting at City Hall in Mubende District Health Development and implementing partners discussed the outbreak situation and engaged in their various capacities to support the response They highlighted the need to strengthen community policing and risk communication as basic elements in any response to an outbreak Ebola is real and we must eradicate this outbreak as soon as possible The cases we already have in the country are enough and we cannot afford to lose more Let us mobilize all our resources whether technical financial or operational to deal with the outbreak Hon Dr Jane Ruth Aceng Acero Ugandan Minister of Health Since the beginning of this pandemic the WHO has always supported the government to prevent its spread We have dispatched our staff and mobilized operational resources to Mubende district to strengthen the response in case management risk communication infection prevention and control community engagement and surveillance Dr Bayo Fatunmbi Leader of the WHO group for communicable and non communicable diseases Diseases In addition the team visited communities made up of community leaders village health teams and other members to raise awareness of the outbreak and encourage them to participate in the response If you know someone with Ebola or who is a contact please report it Early diagnosis is very important to reduce the risk of death I want to encourage village health teams to go door to door to identify people with signs and symptoms of Ebola added Dr Jane Ruth Health development partners also visited some potential centers in Madudu district where Ebola health centers can be set up for rapid response Since the Ebola outbreak was reported in Uganda on September 20 2022 the country has so far recorded 31 cases and 19 deaths as of September 24 2022 WHO has deployed its staff to support the response in districts affected The organization has supported the training and deployment of Rapid Response Teams RRTs and provided the Mubende Regional Referral Hospital with three Ebola kits to treat Ebola patients and save lives WHO support has also enabled the development of the National Response Plan and the activation of District Task Teams DTFs in 10 high risk districts including Mubende Sembabule Kyankwanzi Kampala Mityana Kyegegwa Gomba Kiboga Kassanda Kazo Kakumiro and Kibaale There are several candidate vaccines for the Sudan Ebola virus in development Experts will review these vaccines and see if they can be used in Uganda However other health measures such as early detection community engagement patient isolation and early supportive care have been shown to save lives in similar outbreaks People are encouraged to report all signs and symptoms of Ebola including sudden onset of fever headache severe body weakness muscle pain sore throat vomiting diarrhea or bloody urine and bleeding from an opening in the Body
    Partners for health development mobilized to end the Ebola outbreak in Uganda
    Africa2 months ago

    Partners for health development mobilized to end the Ebola outbreak in Uganda

    Leadership from the Ugandan Ministry of Health, the World Health Organization (WHO), and other health partners visited the Ebola-affected areas of Mubende district on September 24 to assess the health situation, understand the gaps, and strengthen the response to the Ebola outbreak.

    in the country.

    The delegation was led by the Minister of Health, the Honorable Dr. Jane Ruth Aceng, and accompanied by the WHO Officer-in-Charge, Dr. Bayo Fatunmbi, representatives of various health development organizations and implementing partners, and three members of the Ugandan Parliament.

    .

    Starting with the National Task Force meeting at City Hall in Mubende District, Health Development and implementing partners discussed the outbreak situation and engaged in their various capacities to support the response.

    They highlighted the need to strengthen community policing and risk communication as basic elements in any response to an outbreak.

    “Ebola is real and we must eradicate this outbreak as soon as possible.

    The cases we already have in the country are enough and we cannot afford to lose more.

    Let us mobilize all our resources, whether technical, financial or operational, to deal with the outbreak”, Hon Dr. Jane Ruth Aceng Acero, Ugandan Minister of Health.

    “Since the beginning of this pandemic, the WHO has always supported the government to prevent its spread.

    We have dispatched our staff and mobilized operational resources to Mubende district to strengthen the response in case management, risk communication, infection prevention and control, community engagement and surveillance,” Dr. Bayo Fatunmbi, Leader of the WHO group for communicable and non-communicable diseases.

    Diseases.

    In addition, the team visited communities made up of community leaders, village health teams and other members to raise awareness of the outbreak and encourage them to participate in the response.

    “If you know someone with Ebola or who is a contact, please report it.

    Early diagnosis is very important to reduce the risk of death.

    I want to encourage village health teams to go door-to-door to identify people with signs and symptoms of Ebola,” added Dr. Jane Ruth. Health development partners also visited some potential centers in Madudu district where Ebola health centers can be set up for rapid response.

    Since the Ebola outbreak was reported in Uganda on September 20, 2022, the country has so far recorded 31 cases and 19 deaths as of September 24, 2022.

    WHO has deployed its staff to support the response in districts affected.

    The organization has supported the training and deployment of Rapid Response Teams (RRTs) and provided the Mubende Regional Referral Hospital with three Ebola kits to treat Ebola patients and save lives.

    WHO support has also enabled the development of the National Response Plan and the activation of District Task Teams (DTFs) in 10 high-risk districts, including Mubende, Sembabule, Kyankwanzi, Kampala, Mityana, Kyegegwa, Gomba, Kiboga , Kassanda, Kazo, Kakumiro and Kibaale.

    There are several candidate vaccines for the Sudan Ebola virus in development.

    Experts will review these vaccines and see if they can be used in Uganda.

    However, other health measures, such as early detection, community engagement, patient isolation, and early supportive care, have been shown to save lives in similar outbreaks.

    People are encouraged to report all signs and symptoms of Ebola, including sudden onset of fever, headache, severe body weakness, muscle pain, sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody urine, and bleeding from an opening in the Body.

  •   In 2018 the World Health Organization WHO in collaboration with the health authorities of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and other health partners established a program to monitor the health of Ebola survivors and support them in their recovery Dr Raymond Pallawo WHO epidemiologist and program coordinator explains why it is critical to support those who have recovered from the highly infectious viral disease and ongoing efforts to understand and prevent a potential resurgence of the virus among survivors What challenges do Ebola survivors face Of the last seven Ebola outbreaks in the country we have recorded 1 269 people who have recovered from the disease But they face difficulties including stigma job loss or difficulty finding work Some have been denied treatment in health centers when their status is known They also face medical problems An assessment conducted in July 2022 among the survivors found that some suffered from persistent mental health eye or joint problems To increase our understanding of these challenges we suggest that the Ministry of Health in collaboration with UNICEF and associations of Ebola survivors conduct an additional survey among those who have recovered from the disease The survey which will begin soon will also include survivors thoughts on the program to help them What kind of assistance do survivors receive The monitoring program is essentially a public health program Provides medical care during the first 18 months after discharge from treatment and monitors the possible persistence of the virus in body fluids This involves looking for signs that suggest a relapse while mitigating the risk of recurrence through early detection and care In practical terms they receive a monthly medical and psychological examination If we detect signs that indicate a possible relapse further investigations are carried out and medical attention is provided Cases of relapse have been managed and the risk of resurgence has been avoided Some people who recovered from Ebola developed meningitis and encephalitis swelling of the brain but did not infect others Staff at Ebola survivor clinics have been trained to care for survivors and observe infection prevention and control measures and protocols As such someone who has recovered from Ebola and is suspected of having relapsed is monitored in such a way that they do not transmit the virus to others In addition in our clinics a person who has recovered from Ebola and suffers from another disease such as malaria or mental illness is treated with all covered expenses Pregnant women who have been cured of Ebola are also monitored during antenatal consultations until delivery Most of these women have given birth without problems and their children are doing very well At the time of delivery we take samples from the mother and the baby So far we have not seen any mother to child transmission of the virus What challenges does the monitoring program face There is no follow up of Ebola survivors beyond 18 months which is problematic because we have realized that the virus can resurface among survivors even years later These are often people with meningeal symptoms who test positive for Ebola in blood or cerebrospinal fluid even though they have previously recovered from Ebola This can happen months or years later This is why we want to deepen the research to understand this topic as well as the factors of relapse and how to anticipate them in order to reduce the risks through appropriate public health actions What is being done to detect the virus and stop the possible resurgence of Ebola First of all it is important to break down the stigma towards people who have recovered from Ebola The proportion of survivors in whom the virus persists is negligible and not all cases with persistent virus result in a resurgence For example of the 1 269 survivors monitored only two continue to test positive for the virus Therefore monitoring those who have recovered from the virus helps us spot the warning signs of a relapse and take appropriate action Thanks to clinical monitoring and the promotion of safe sex such as abstinence or the use of condoms we have not observed any sexual transmission Surveillance systems and compliance with infection prevention and control measures must be strengthened Since 2020 we have trained surveillance agents at all levels provincial health zones health areas and more than 18 000 community health workers We have also established rapid response teams in North Kivu South Kivu and Ituri provinces
    Curbing the risk of Ebola resurgence among survivors in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
      In 2018 the World Health Organization WHO in collaboration with the health authorities of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and other health partners established a program to monitor the health of Ebola survivors and support them in their recovery Dr Raymond Pallawo WHO epidemiologist and program coordinator explains why it is critical to support those who have recovered from the highly infectious viral disease and ongoing efforts to understand and prevent a potential resurgence of the virus among survivors What challenges do Ebola survivors face Of the last seven Ebola outbreaks in the country we have recorded 1 269 people who have recovered from the disease But they face difficulties including stigma job loss or difficulty finding work Some have been denied treatment in health centers when their status is known They also face medical problems An assessment conducted in July 2022 among the survivors found that some suffered from persistent mental health eye or joint problems To increase our understanding of these challenges we suggest that the Ministry of Health in collaboration with UNICEF and associations of Ebola survivors conduct an additional survey among those who have recovered from the disease The survey which will begin soon will also include survivors thoughts on the program to help them What kind of assistance do survivors receive The monitoring program is essentially a public health program Provides medical care during the first 18 months after discharge from treatment and monitors the possible persistence of the virus in body fluids This involves looking for signs that suggest a relapse while mitigating the risk of recurrence through early detection and care In practical terms they receive a monthly medical and psychological examination If we detect signs that indicate a possible relapse further investigations are carried out and medical attention is provided Cases of relapse have been managed and the risk of resurgence has been avoided Some people who recovered from Ebola developed meningitis and encephalitis swelling of the brain but did not infect others Staff at Ebola survivor clinics have been trained to care for survivors and observe infection prevention and control measures and protocols As such someone who has recovered from Ebola and is suspected of having relapsed is monitored in such a way that they do not transmit the virus to others In addition in our clinics a person who has recovered from Ebola and suffers from another disease such as malaria or mental illness is treated with all covered expenses Pregnant women who have been cured of Ebola are also monitored during antenatal consultations until delivery Most of these women have given birth without problems and their children are doing very well At the time of delivery we take samples from the mother and the baby So far we have not seen any mother to child transmission of the virus What challenges does the monitoring program face There is no follow up of Ebola survivors beyond 18 months which is problematic because we have realized that the virus can resurface among survivors even years later These are often people with meningeal symptoms who test positive for Ebola in blood or cerebrospinal fluid even though they have previously recovered from Ebola This can happen months or years later This is why we want to deepen the research to understand this topic as well as the factors of relapse and how to anticipate them in order to reduce the risks through appropriate public health actions What is being done to detect the virus and stop the possible resurgence of Ebola First of all it is important to break down the stigma towards people who have recovered from Ebola The proportion of survivors in whom the virus persists is negligible and not all cases with persistent virus result in a resurgence For example of the 1 269 survivors monitored only two continue to test positive for the virus Therefore monitoring those who have recovered from the virus helps us spot the warning signs of a relapse and take appropriate action Thanks to clinical monitoring and the promotion of safe sex such as abstinence or the use of condoms we have not observed any sexual transmission Surveillance systems and compliance with infection prevention and control measures must be strengthened Since 2020 we have trained surveillance agents at all levels provincial health zones health areas and more than 18 000 community health workers We have also established rapid response teams in North Kivu South Kivu and Ituri provinces
    Curbing the risk of Ebola resurgence among survivors in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
    Africa2 months ago

    Curbing the risk of Ebola resurgence among survivors in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    In 2018, the World Health Organization (WHO), in collaboration with the health authorities of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and other health partners, established a program to monitor the health of Ebola survivors and support them in their recovery.

    Dr. Raymond Pallawo, WHO epidemiologist and program coordinator, explains why it is critical to support those who have recovered from the highly infectious viral disease and ongoing efforts to understand and prevent a potential resurgence of the virus among survivors.

    What challenges do Ebola survivors face?

    Of the last seven Ebola outbreaks in the country, we have recorded 1,269 people who have recovered from the disease.

    But they face difficulties including stigma, job loss, or difficulty finding work.

    Some have been denied treatment in health centers when their status is known.

    They also face medical problems.

    An assessment conducted in July 2022 among the survivors found that some suffered from persistent mental health, eye or joint problems.

    To increase our understanding of these challenges, we suggest that the Ministry of Health, in collaboration with UNICEF and associations of Ebola survivors, conduct an additional survey among those who have recovered from the disease.

    The survey, which will begin soon, will also include survivors' thoughts on the program to help them.

    What kind of assistance do survivors receive?

    The monitoring program is essentially a public health program.

    Provides medical care during the first 18 months after discharge from treatment and monitors the possible persistence of the virus in body fluids.

    This involves looking for signs that suggest a relapse while mitigating the risk of recurrence through early detection and care.

    In practical terms, they receive a monthly medical and psychological examination.

    If we detect signs that indicate a possible relapse, further investigations are carried out and medical attention is provided.

    Cases of relapse have been managed and the risk of resurgence has been avoided.

    Some people who recovered from Ebola developed meningitis and encephalitis (swelling of the brain) but did not infect others.

    Staff at Ebola survivor clinics have been trained to care for survivors and observe infection prevention and control measures and protocols.

    As such, someone who has recovered from Ebola and is suspected of having relapsed is monitored in such a way that they do not transmit the virus to others.

    In addition, in our clinics, a person who has recovered from Ebola and suffers from another disease such as malaria or mental illness is treated with all covered expenses.

    Pregnant women who have been cured of Ebola are also monitored during antenatal consultations until delivery.

    Most of these women have given birth without problems and their children are doing very well.

    At the time of delivery, we take samples from the mother and the baby.

    So far, we have not seen any mother-to-child transmission of the virus.

    What challenges does the monitoring program face?

    There is no follow-up of Ebola survivors beyond 18 months, which is problematic because we have realized that the virus can resurface among survivors even years later.

    These are often people with meningeal symptoms who test positive for Ebola in blood or cerebrospinal fluid even though they have previously recovered from Ebola.

    This can happen months or years later.

    This is why we want to deepen the research to understand this topic, as well as the factors of relapse and how to anticipate them in order to reduce the risks through appropriate public health actions.

    What is being done to detect the virus and stop the possible resurgence of Ebola?

    First of all, it is important to break down the stigma towards people who have recovered from Ebola.

    The proportion of survivors in whom the virus persists is negligible, and not all cases with persistent virus result in a resurgence.

    For example, of the 1,269 survivors monitored, only two continue to test positive for the virus.

    Therefore, monitoring those who have recovered from the virus helps us spot the warning signs of a relapse and take appropriate action.

    Thanks to clinical monitoring and the promotion of safe sex such as abstinence or the use of condoms, we have not observed any sexual transmission.

    Surveillance systems and compliance with infection prevention and control measures must be strengthened.

    Since 2020, we have trained surveillance agents at all levels—provincial, health zones, health areas—and more than 18,000 community health workers.

    We have also established rapid response teams in North Kivu, South Kivu and Ituri provinces.

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