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  •   UN Secretary General Ant nio Guterres described the World Meteorological Organization WMO report as a chronicle of climate chaos detailing the catastrophic speed of climate change which is devastating lives and livelihoods on every continent The WMO in its latest Global Climate Forecast for 2022 in 2022 released on Sunday stated that extreme heat waves drought and devastating floods have also affected millions and cost billions this year The UN has said the past eight years have been the warmest on record fueling gas concentrations and accumulated heat Faced with the inevitability of ongoing climate crises and extreme weather around the world Guterres will launch an action plan at COP27 to achieve Early Warnings for All in the next five years The UN chief explained that early warning systems are necessary to protect people and communities everywhere We must respond to the planet s distress signal with action ambitious and credible climate action he argued COP27 must be the place and now must be the time he said in a statement The report outlines increasingly dramatic signs of the climate emergency including a doubling of the rate of sea level rise since 1993 to a new record this year and indications of unprecedented glacial melting in the European Alps The full 2022 report will be published in the spring of 2023 but the interim study was presented ahead of COP27 the UN climate conference raising awareness of the enormous scale of the problems that world leaders must address if they want to have any hope of controlling the climate crisis The greater the warming the worse the impacts said WMO chief Petter Taalas launching the report at an event in Sharm El Sheikh Egypt We have such high levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere now that the lower 1 5 degrees of the Paris Agreement is barely within reach It is already too late for many glaciers and melting will continue for hundreds if not thousands of years with major implications for water security The study details the effects of both droughts and excessive rainfall Kenya Somalia and Ethiopia face crop failures and food insecurity due to another below average rainy season while more than a third of Pakistan was flooded in July and August as a result of record rains displacing nearly eight million of people The southern African region was battered by cyclones for two months earlier in the year hitting Madagascar hardest with torrential rains and devastating floods and in September Hurricane Ian caused extensive damage and loss of life in Cuba and the south west from Florida In addition the World Health Organization WHO issued a reminder that the climate crisis was still making people sick and called for health to be at the center of the COP27 climate negotiations The UN health agency announced a program of high level events scheduled throughout the conference focused on the health threat posed and the enormous health benefits that would accrue from stronger climate action in the world center of discussions The WHO has warned that between 2030 and 2050 climate change is expected to cause an estimated 250 000 additional deaths per year from malnutrition malaria diarrhea and heat stress Direct health costs are estimated to increase by 4 billion per year in this decade The agency notes however that investing in clean energy will deliver health benefits that will offset those investments twice over Enforcing higher standards for vehicle emissions for example has been calculated to save an estimated 2 4 million of lives per year www anews ng edited Source Credit NAN
    UN weather report ‘a chronicle of climate chaos’ – Guterres
      UN Secretary General Ant nio Guterres described the World Meteorological Organization WMO report as a chronicle of climate chaos detailing the catastrophic speed of climate change which is devastating lives and livelihoods on every continent The WMO in its latest Global Climate Forecast for 2022 in 2022 released on Sunday stated that extreme heat waves drought and devastating floods have also affected millions and cost billions this year The UN has said the past eight years have been the warmest on record fueling gas concentrations and accumulated heat Faced with the inevitability of ongoing climate crises and extreme weather around the world Guterres will launch an action plan at COP27 to achieve Early Warnings for All in the next five years The UN chief explained that early warning systems are necessary to protect people and communities everywhere We must respond to the planet s distress signal with action ambitious and credible climate action he argued COP27 must be the place and now must be the time he said in a statement The report outlines increasingly dramatic signs of the climate emergency including a doubling of the rate of sea level rise since 1993 to a new record this year and indications of unprecedented glacial melting in the European Alps The full 2022 report will be published in the spring of 2023 but the interim study was presented ahead of COP27 the UN climate conference raising awareness of the enormous scale of the problems that world leaders must address if they want to have any hope of controlling the climate crisis The greater the warming the worse the impacts said WMO chief Petter Taalas launching the report at an event in Sharm El Sheikh Egypt We have such high levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere now that the lower 1 5 degrees of the Paris Agreement is barely within reach It is already too late for many glaciers and melting will continue for hundreds if not thousands of years with major implications for water security The study details the effects of both droughts and excessive rainfall Kenya Somalia and Ethiopia face crop failures and food insecurity due to another below average rainy season while more than a third of Pakistan was flooded in July and August as a result of record rains displacing nearly eight million of people The southern African region was battered by cyclones for two months earlier in the year hitting Madagascar hardest with torrential rains and devastating floods and in September Hurricane Ian caused extensive damage and loss of life in Cuba and the south west from Florida In addition the World Health Organization WHO issued a reminder that the climate crisis was still making people sick and called for health to be at the center of the COP27 climate negotiations The UN health agency announced a program of high level events scheduled throughout the conference focused on the health threat posed and the enormous health benefits that would accrue from stronger climate action in the world center of discussions The WHO has warned that between 2030 and 2050 climate change is expected to cause an estimated 250 000 additional deaths per year from malnutrition malaria diarrhea and heat stress Direct health costs are estimated to increase by 4 billion per year in this decade The agency notes however that investing in clean energy will deliver health benefits that will offset those investments twice over Enforcing higher standards for vehicle emissions for example has been calculated to save an estimated 2 4 million of lives per year www anews ng edited Source Credit NAN
    UN weather report ‘a chronicle of climate chaos’ – Guterres
    Environment3 weeks ago

    UN weather report ‘a chronicle of climate chaos’ – Guterres

    UN Secretary-General António Guterres described the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) report as a "chronicle of climate chaos" detailing the catastrophic speed of climate change, which is devastating lives and livelihoods on every continent. .

    The WMO, in its latest Global Climate Forecast for 2022 in 2022, released on Sunday, stated that extreme heat waves, drought and devastating floods have also affected millions and cost billions this year.

    The UN has said the past eight years have been the warmest on record, fueling gas concentrations and accumulated heat.

    Faced with the inevitability of ongoing climate crises and extreme weather around the world, Guterres will launch an action plan at COP27 to achieve Early Warnings for All in the next five years.

    The UN chief explained that early warning systems are necessary to protect people and communities everywhere.

    "We must respond to the planet's distress signal with action, ambitious and credible climate action," he argued.

    "COP27 must be the place, and now must be the time," he said in a statement.

    The report outlines increasingly dramatic signs of the climate emergency, including a doubling of the rate of sea level rise since 1993, to a new record this year; and indications of unprecedented glacial melting in the European Alps.

    The full 2022 report will be published in the spring of 2023, but the interim study was presented ahead of COP27, the UN climate conference, raising awareness of the enormous scale of the problems that world leaders must address, if they want to have any hope of controlling the climate crisis.

    "The greater the warming, the worse the impacts," said WMO chief Petter Taalas, launching the report at an event in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt.

    “We have such high levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere now that the lower 1.5 degrees of the Paris Agreement is barely within reach.

    “It is already too late for many glaciers and melting will continue for hundreds, if not thousands of years, with major implications for water security.”

    The study details the effects of both droughts and excessive rainfall.

    Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia face crop failures and food insecurity due to another below-average rainy season, while more than a third of Pakistan was flooded in July and August as a result of record rains, displacing nearly eight million. of people.

    The southern African region was battered by cyclones for two months earlier in the year, hitting Madagascar hardest with torrential rains and devastating floods, and in September, Hurricane Ian caused extensive damage and loss of life in Cuba and the south-west. from Florida.

    In addition, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a reminder that the climate crisis was still making people sick and called for health to be at the center of the COP27 climate negotiations.

    The UN health agency announced a program of high-level events, scheduled throughout the conference, focused on the health threat posed and the enormous health benefits that would accrue from stronger climate action in the world. center of discussions.

    The WHO has warned that, between 2030 and 2050, climate change is expected to cause an estimated 250,000 additional deaths per year from malnutrition, malaria, diarrhea and heat stress; Direct health costs are estimated to increase by $4 billion per year in this decade.

    The agency notes, however, that investing in clean energy will deliver health benefits that will offset those investments twice over: Enforcing higher standards for vehicle emissions, for example, has been calculated to save an estimated 2.4 million of lives per year. (www.anews.ng)

    edited

    Source Credit: NAN

  •  A team of M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Borders MSF has conducted 32 surgeries for noma patients in another round of surgical intervention at the Noma Hospital in Sokoto from 23 October to 4 November 2022 Since the start of the activities in 2014 a total of 1249 major surgeries have been conducted for the noma patients MSF is supporting the Noma Hospital in Sokoto through inpatient care reconstructive surgeries outreach activities nutrition and mental health support Noma is preventable and treatable but people still die from it because of the limited knowledge about the disease and on how to detect it Up to 90 per cent of people affected by noma die in the first two weeks if they don t receive treatment in time That is why early detection is important says MSF project coordinator in Sokoto Dr Sham un Abubakar Early case detection and reporting through Nigeria Centre for Disease Control NCDC can be achieved through increased surveillance activities like training of Disease Surveillance and Notification Officers DSNOs Health Care Workers HCW Traditional Healers Alternative Medicine Practitioners Community Religious and Traditional Rulers and Women and Youth Groups Noma is a disease that shouldn t exist anymore Noma is an infectious and non contagious bacterial disease that starts as an inflammation of the gums similar to a small mouth ulcer In just two weeks the infection starts to destroy bones and tissues potentially affecting the jaw lips cheeks nose or eyes leaving survivors with physical consequences including pain breathing complications and difficulties in eating Malnourished children and members of isolated communities with limited access to healthcare and vaccination are more vulnerable People who survive noma either have to live sequels of the disease or manage to undergo extensive reconstructive surgery to improve quality of life On top of that they deal with the social stigma caused by the disfigurement In collaboration with the health authorities and other stakeholders MSF is commemorating the noma day 5th November in order to raise awareness about the disease address stigmata attached to it and highlight specialized activities on the disease so the patients can access the services Besides over 1000 surgeries since the beginning of the activities in Sokoto MSF teams have held 16857 mental health counselling and 2185 health promotion sessions furthermore admitted 1349 patients for both medical and surgical management of noma In addition a total of 103 survivors were admitted to the Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Centre ITFC and 35 were enrolled in the Ambulatory Therapeutic Feeding Centre ATFC MSF launched an international campaign in 2020 to raise awareness about noma and accelerate the research and advocacy agenda a crucial step being to see the disease included in the World Health Organization WHO list of Neglected Tropical Diseases NTDs The inclusion would shine a spotlight on the disease facilitating the integration of noma prevention and treatment activities into existing public health programmes and the allocation of much needed resources for its eradication Nigeria with the support of MSF and other noma stakeholders has taken the lead as a member state to get noma on the WHO s NTDs list Noma is a neglected disease but it s still not included in the WHO list of Neglected Tropical Diseases although it fits all the criteria We are supporting the Government of Nigeria s GoN call for the World Health Organization to recognize noma as a Neglected Tropical Disease so more attention and more resources will be allocated to eradicate it Dr Sham un added M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Borders MSF is an international independent medical humanitarian organisation that delivers emergency aid to people affected by armed conflict epidemics natural disasters and exclusion from healthcare MSF has worked continuously in Nigeria since 1996 and currently provides medical care free of charge in 11 states across the country Contact Field Communication Officer Abdulkareem Yakubu Email msf nigeria press geneva msf org Phone 234 810 606 6159
    32 major surgeries conducted in Noma Hospital by MSF in two weeks
     A team of M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Borders MSF has conducted 32 surgeries for noma patients in another round of surgical intervention at the Noma Hospital in Sokoto from 23 October to 4 November 2022 Since the start of the activities in 2014 a total of 1249 major surgeries have been conducted for the noma patients MSF is supporting the Noma Hospital in Sokoto through inpatient care reconstructive surgeries outreach activities nutrition and mental health support Noma is preventable and treatable but people still die from it because of the limited knowledge about the disease and on how to detect it Up to 90 per cent of people affected by noma die in the first two weeks if they don t receive treatment in time That is why early detection is important says MSF project coordinator in Sokoto Dr Sham un Abubakar Early case detection and reporting through Nigeria Centre for Disease Control NCDC can be achieved through increased surveillance activities like training of Disease Surveillance and Notification Officers DSNOs Health Care Workers HCW Traditional Healers Alternative Medicine Practitioners Community Religious and Traditional Rulers and Women and Youth Groups Noma is a disease that shouldn t exist anymore Noma is an infectious and non contagious bacterial disease that starts as an inflammation of the gums similar to a small mouth ulcer In just two weeks the infection starts to destroy bones and tissues potentially affecting the jaw lips cheeks nose or eyes leaving survivors with physical consequences including pain breathing complications and difficulties in eating Malnourished children and members of isolated communities with limited access to healthcare and vaccination are more vulnerable People who survive noma either have to live sequels of the disease or manage to undergo extensive reconstructive surgery to improve quality of life On top of that they deal with the social stigma caused by the disfigurement In collaboration with the health authorities and other stakeholders MSF is commemorating the noma day 5th November in order to raise awareness about the disease address stigmata attached to it and highlight specialized activities on the disease so the patients can access the services Besides over 1000 surgeries since the beginning of the activities in Sokoto MSF teams have held 16857 mental health counselling and 2185 health promotion sessions furthermore admitted 1349 patients for both medical and surgical management of noma In addition a total of 103 survivors were admitted to the Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Centre ITFC and 35 were enrolled in the Ambulatory Therapeutic Feeding Centre ATFC MSF launched an international campaign in 2020 to raise awareness about noma and accelerate the research and advocacy agenda a crucial step being to see the disease included in the World Health Organization WHO list of Neglected Tropical Diseases NTDs The inclusion would shine a spotlight on the disease facilitating the integration of noma prevention and treatment activities into existing public health programmes and the allocation of much needed resources for its eradication Nigeria with the support of MSF and other noma stakeholders has taken the lead as a member state to get noma on the WHO s NTDs list Noma is a neglected disease but it s still not included in the WHO list of Neglected Tropical Diseases although it fits all the criteria We are supporting the Government of Nigeria s GoN call for the World Health Organization to recognize noma as a Neglected Tropical Disease so more attention and more resources will be allocated to eradicate it Dr Sham un added M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Borders MSF is an international independent medical humanitarian organisation that delivers emergency aid to people affected by armed conflict epidemics natural disasters and exclusion from healthcare MSF has worked continuously in Nigeria since 1996 and currently provides medical care free of charge in 11 states across the country Contact Field Communication Officer Abdulkareem Yakubu Email msf nigeria press geneva msf org Phone 234 810 606 6159
    32 major surgeries conducted in Noma Hospital by MSF in two weeks
    Health3 weeks ago

    32 major surgeries conducted in Noma Hospital by MSF in two weeks

    A team of Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders (MSF) has conducted 32 surgeries for noma patients in another round of surgical intervention at the Noma Hospital in Sokoto from 23 October to 4 November 2022. Since the start of the activities in 2014, a total of 1249 major surgeries have been conducted for the noma patients.MSF is supporting the Noma Hospital in Sokoto through inpatient care, reconstructive surgeries, outreach activities, nutrition and mental health support.“Noma is preventable and treatable, but people still die from it because of the limited knowledge about the disease and on how to detect it. Up to 90 per cent of people affected by noma die in the first two weeks if they don’t receive treatment in time. That is why early detection is important,” says MSF project coordinator in Sokoto, Dr Sham`un Abubakar.“Early case detection and reporting through Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) can be achieved through increased surveillance activities like training of Disease Surveillance and Notification Officers (DSNOs), Health Care Workers (HCW), Traditional Healers, Alternative Medicine Practitioners, Community, Religious and Traditional Rulers and Women and Youth Groups. Noma is a disease that shouldn’t exist anymore.”Noma is an infectious and non-contagious bacterial disease that starts as an inflammation of the gums, similar to a small mouth ulcer. In just two weeks the infection starts to destroy bones and tissues, potentially affecting the jaw, lips, cheeks, nose or eyes, leaving survivors with physical consequences including pain, breathing complications and difficulties in eating. Malnourished children and members of isolated communities with limited access to healthcare and vaccination are more vulnerable. People who survive noma either have to live sequels of the disease or manage to undergo extensive reconstructive surgery to improve quality of life. On top of that, they deal with the social stigma caused by the disfigurement.In collaboration with the health authorities and other stakeholders, MSF is commemorating the noma day (5th November), in order to raise awareness about the disease, address stigmata attached to it and highlight specialized activities on the disease, so the patients can access the services. Besides over 1000 surgeries since the beginning of the activities in Sokoto, MSF teams have held 16857 mental health counselling and 2185 health promotion sessions; furthermore, admitted 1349 patients for both medical and surgical management of noma. In addition, a total of 103 survivors were admitted to the Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Centre (ITFC), and 35 were enrolled in the Ambulatory Therapeutic Feeding Centre (ATFC).MSF launched an international campaign in 2020 to raise awareness about noma and accelerate the research and advocacy agenda - a crucial step being to see the disease included in the World Health Organization (WHO) list of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs). The inclusion would shine a spotlight on the disease, facilitating the integration of noma prevention and treatment activities into existing public health programmes and the allocation of much-needed resources for its eradication. Nigeria with the support of MSF and other noma stakeholders has taken the lead as a member state to get noma on the WHO’s NTDs list.“Noma is a neglected disease, but it’s still not included in the WHO list of Neglected Tropical Diseases although it fits all the criteria. We are supporting the Government of Nigeria’s (GoN) call for the World Health Organization to recognize noma as a Neglected Tropical Disease so more attention and more resources will be allocated to eradicate it,” Dr Sham’un added.Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is an international, independent, medical humanitarian organisation that delivers emergency aid to people affected by armed conflict, epidemics, natural disasters and exclusion from healthcare. MSF has worked continuously in Nigeria since 1996, and currently provides medical care, free of charge, in 11 states across the country.Contact: Field Communication Officer, Abdulkareem Yakubu Email: msf-nigeria-press@geneva.msf.org Phone: +234 810 606 6159

  •   Abdisalan Muktar Ali is a World Health Organization WHO disease surveillance officer based in Dollo Zone in the Somali region of Ethiopia He is one of nine surveillance officers in the region who support the regional health office in rumor investigation active case finding and sample processing validation and classification of suspected acute flaccid paralysis In January 2022 he received a case report of acute flaccid paralysis AFP in a one year old boy from a low income herding family in Dollo area Somali region The young boy Mohammed Abdulaziz Aden developed a sudden onset of weakness in his left arm and leg which progressively worsened When attempts to cure him with holy water were unsuccessful Mohammed s mother decided to take him to a health center and made the 15 km long walk to Qorof Kebele in Galadi Woreda district where he stayed with a relative who planned to go to the health center the next day Before he could go to the health center a health extension worker Farhiya Ukash found out about his situation and visited the family Observing signs of acute flaccid paralysis AFP Ella Farhiya immediately reported the case to the Galadi Health Office Initial investigation Upon learning of the case from AFP WHO Surveillance Officer Abdisalan Muktar Ali immediately traveled to Galadi Woreda to support verification investigation and transport of samples for laboratory confirmation Abdisalan went to Qorof Kebele in Galadi Woreda for AFP investigation and verification of the suspected case Upon consulting the health extension worker who treated the family he was informed that the family had moved to an area about 90 km from Qorof Undeterred by this development Abdisalan sought the help of the kebele leader to find the best way to reach the family He was advised to talk to a group of herdsmen who come to the kebele every day at noon to sell milk He quickly followed this lead and eventually found someone who gave him a more specific description of the family s current location along with an important clue the nickname of the boy s grandfather He also found out that the family has moved to Jiracle Kebele in another district to graze Equipped with this information he traveled to Jiracle Kebele the next day to search for the family After inquiring at the health post and among the communities he was able to identify the grandmother who confirmed that Mohammed was ill and accompanied Abdisalan to visit the family in their new settlement 28 km from Jiracle Kebele They hitchhiked for the first 24 km and walked the remaining 4 km to reach the settlement Upon investigation Mohammed s condition fully met the case definition of suspected AFP so Abdisalan collected stool samples and sent them to the National Polio Laboratory at the Ethiopian Public Health Institute in Addis Ababa for confirmation During the visit to the family Abdisalan advised the mother to take her children to the nearest health post for routine immunization against vaccine preventable diseases and encouraged her to be ready for the next oral polio vaccination campaign nOPV scheduled for February 2022 Disease surveillance is not a responsibility to be taken lightly As I do my job I fully understand that the well being of my community rests squarely on my shoulders says Abdisalan I am aware that the alertness accuracy and diligence with which I conduct disease surveillance can have an impact on preventing and mitigating a potential outbreak Follow up visit In early March 2022 Abdisalan returned to the family to follow up on the child s condition and inform them of the negative laboratory result He was in good spirits as he made the long walk to the family s settlement because he knew he had good news little Mohammed was polio free The only thing left was validation of his physical condition In fact he found Mohammed playing and fully mobile and after a physical examination he validated that he had fully recovered Happy endings like this are the spice of our work which often involves confirming the presence of disease in homes and communities I am happy to play this vital role in protecting my people from a possible outbreak of disease like polio says Abdisalan with a smile WHO provides technical logistical and financial support to the Somali region to accelerate the march towards a polio free world Support ranges from establishing and implementing sensitive disease surveillance to detect and report cases to sample collection transport and testing at the WHO accredited National Polio Laboratory in Addis Ababa for confirmation as well as in the successful implementation of oral polio vaccination OPV campaigns
    No suspected polio case is too difficult to locate for investigation and follow-up in Ethiopia
      Abdisalan Muktar Ali is a World Health Organization WHO disease surveillance officer based in Dollo Zone in the Somali region of Ethiopia He is one of nine surveillance officers in the region who support the regional health office in rumor investigation active case finding and sample processing validation and classification of suspected acute flaccid paralysis In January 2022 he received a case report of acute flaccid paralysis AFP in a one year old boy from a low income herding family in Dollo area Somali region The young boy Mohammed Abdulaziz Aden developed a sudden onset of weakness in his left arm and leg which progressively worsened When attempts to cure him with holy water were unsuccessful Mohammed s mother decided to take him to a health center and made the 15 km long walk to Qorof Kebele in Galadi Woreda district where he stayed with a relative who planned to go to the health center the next day Before he could go to the health center a health extension worker Farhiya Ukash found out about his situation and visited the family Observing signs of acute flaccid paralysis AFP Ella Farhiya immediately reported the case to the Galadi Health Office Initial investigation Upon learning of the case from AFP WHO Surveillance Officer Abdisalan Muktar Ali immediately traveled to Galadi Woreda to support verification investigation and transport of samples for laboratory confirmation Abdisalan went to Qorof Kebele in Galadi Woreda for AFP investigation and verification of the suspected case Upon consulting the health extension worker who treated the family he was informed that the family had moved to an area about 90 km from Qorof Undeterred by this development Abdisalan sought the help of the kebele leader to find the best way to reach the family He was advised to talk to a group of herdsmen who come to the kebele every day at noon to sell milk He quickly followed this lead and eventually found someone who gave him a more specific description of the family s current location along with an important clue the nickname of the boy s grandfather He also found out that the family has moved to Jiracle Kebele in another district to graze Equipped with this information he traveled to Jiracle Kebele the next day to search for the family After inquiring at the health post and among the communities he was able to identify the grandmother who confirmed that Mohammed was ill and accompanied Abdisalan to visit the family in their new settlement 28 km from Jiracle Kebele They hitchhiked for the first 24 km and walked the remaining 4 km to reach the settlement Upon investigation Mohammed s condition fully met the case definition of suspected AFP so Abdisalan collected stool samples and sent them to the National Polio Laboratory at the Ethiopian Public Health Institute in Addis Ababa for confirmation During the visit to the family Abdisalan advised the mother to take her children to the nearest health post for routine immunization against vaccine preventable diseases and encouraged her to be ready for the next oral polio vaccination campaign nOPV scheduled for February 2022 Disease surveillance is not a responsibility to be taken lightly As I do my job I fully understand that the well being of my community rests squarely on my shoulders says Abdisalan I am aware that the alertness accuracy and diligence with which I conduct disease surveillance can have an impact on preventing and mitigating a potential outbreak Follow up visit In early March 2022 Abdisalan returned to the family to follow up on the child s condition and inform them of the negative laboratory result He was in good spirits as he made the long walk to the family s settlement because he knew he had good news little Mohammed was polio free The only thing left was validation of his physical condition In fact he found Mohammed playing and fully mobile and after a physical examination he validated that he had fully recovered Happy endings like this are the spice of our work which often involves confirming the presence of disease in homes and communities I am happy to play this vital role in protecting my people from a possible outbreak of disease like polio says Abdisalan with a smile WHO provides technical logistical and financial support to the Somali region to accelerate the march towards a polio free world Support ranges from establishing and implementing sensitive disease surveillance to detect and report cases to sample collection transport and testing at the WHO accredited National Polio Laboratory in Addis Ababa for confirmation as well as in the successful implementation of oral polio vaccination OPV campaigns
    No suspected polio case is too difficult to locate for investigation and follow-up in Ethiopia
    Africa4 weeks ago

    No suspected polio case is too difficult to locate for investigation and follow-up in Ethiopia

    Abdisalan Muktar Ali is a World Health Organization (WHO) disease surveillance officer based in Dollo Zone in the Somali region of Ethiopia.

    He is one of nine surveillance officers in the region who support the regional health office in rumor investigation, active case finding and sample processing, validation and classification of suspected acute flaccid paralysis.

    In January 2022, he received a case report of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in a one-year-old boy from a low-income herding family in Dollo area, Somali region.

    The young boy, Mohammed Abdulaziz Aden, developed a sudden onset of weakness in his left arm and leg, which progressively worsened.

    When attempts to cure him with holy water were unsuccessful, Mohammed's mother decided to take him to a health center and made the 15 km long walk to Qorof Kebele in Galadi Woreda (district), where he stayed with a relative.

    who planned to go.

    to the health center the next day.

    Before he could go to the health center, a health extension worker, Farhiya Ukash, found out about his situation and visited the family.

    Observing signs of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), Ella Farhiya immediately reported the case to the Galadi Health Office.

    Initial investigation Upon learning of the case from AFP, WHO Surveillance Officer Abdisalan Muktar Ali immediately traveled to Galadi Woreda to support verification, investigation and transport of samples for laboratory confirmation.

    Abdisalan went to Qorof Kebele in Galadi Woreda for AFP investigation and verification of the suspected case.

    Upon consulting the health extension worker who treated the family, he was informed that the family had moved to an area about 90 km from Qorof.

    Undeterred by this development, Abdisalan sought the help of the kebele leader to find the best way to reach the family.

    He was advised to talk to a group of herdsmen who come to the kebele every day at noon to sell milk.

    He quickly followed this lead and eventually found someone who gave him a more specific description of the family's current location along with an important clue: the nickname of the boy's grandfather.

    He also found out that the family has moved to Jiracle Kebele in another district to graze.

    Equipped with this information, he traveled to Jiracle Kebele the next day to search for the family.

    After inquiring at the health post and among the communities, he was able to identify the grandmother, who confirmed that Mohammed was ill and accompanied Abdisalan to visit the family in their new settlement, 28 km from Jiracle Kebele.

    They hitchhiked for the first 24 km and walked the remaining 4 km to reach the settlement.

    Upon investigation, Mohammed's condition fully met the case definition of suspected AFP, so Abdisalan collected stool samples and sent them to the National Polio Laboratory at the Ethiopian Public Health Institute in Addis Ababa for confirmation.

    During the visit to the family, Abdisalan advised the mother to take her children to the nearest health post for routine immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases and encouraged her to be ready for the next oral polio vaccination campaign ( nOPV) scheduled for February 2022.” Disease surveillance is not a responsibility to be taken lightly.

    As I do my job, I fully understand that the well-being of my community rests squarely on my shoulders,” says Abdisalan.

    "I am aware that the alertness, accuracy and diligence with which I conduct disease surveillance can have an impact on preventing and mitigating a potential outbreak."

    Follow-up visit In early March 2022, Abdisalan returned to the family to follow up on the child's condition and inform them of the negative laboratory result.

    He was in good spirits as he made the long walk to the family's settlement because he knew he had good news: little Mohammed was polio-free!

    The only thing left was validation of his physical condition.

    In fact, he found Mohammed playing and fully mobile, and after a physical examination, he validated that he had fully recovered.

    “Happy endings like this are the spice of our work, which often involves confirming the presence of disease in homes and communities.

    I am happy to play this vital role in protecting my people from a possible outbreak of disease like polio,” says Abdisalan, with a smile.

    WHO provides technical, logistical and financial support to the Somali region to accelerate the march towards a polio-free world.

    Support ranges from establishing and implementing sensitive disease surveillance to detect and report cases to sample collection, transport and testing at the WHO-accredited National Polio Laboratory in Addis Ababa for confirmation, as well as in the successful implementation of oral polio vaccination (OPV) campaigns.

    .

  •   When Mrs Olawale Damilola a 40 year old teacher heard that her local health center was offering screening for early signs of cervical cancer her mind flashed back to stories of women she had heard who had died from cervical cancer the illness She immediately made a reservation to get a screening test at the health center one of ten primary health care centers PHCs that offer cervical cancer secondary prevention program services in Ondo state in southwestern Nigeria I had gone to the Comprehensive Health Center in Ilara Mokin Ondo State for a family planning service when the nurse told me about the evaluation and immediately knew that she had to check my condition I jumped at the chance because I had always wanted to check my status but the price of a Pap smear is high 25 000 N Once she was lying on the examination table in the examination room the nurse explained the simple process to her Visual inspection with acetic acid VIA which consisted of applying diluted acetic acid a component of common vinegar to the cervix and observed by the health worker with the naked eye The health care provider then looks for abnormalities in the cervix which will turn white when exposed to the vinegar Before the test the nurse counseled her about cervical cancer and told her that it could be prevented if caught early Even though my result was negative I started raising awareness about screening in my community because I heard health workers complain about the low participation of women So far five women from my office have come forward for evaluation she said A global strategy Cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women globally with an estimated 604 000 new cases and 342 000 deaths in 2020 In 2020 the World Health Assembly adopted the Global Strategy to Eliminate Cancer cervical cancer Achieving that goal rests on three key pillars and corresponding targets Immunization 90 of girls are fully vaccinated with the HPV vaccine by the age of 15 Screening 70 of women had a high throughput screening before age 35 and again at age 45 Treatment 90 of women with precancerous lesions treated and 90 of women with invasive cancer managed To achieve the goal the World Health Organization WHO with funding from the Susan Thompson Buffet Foundation is providing catalytic support to Ondo Kebbi Niger Ekiti and Ondo states for breast cancer screening and treatment cervix The goal is to screen at least 5 000 women in the first phase of the program The disease can be prevented through regular screening with VIA Pap smears and human papillomavirus HPV tests to find pre cancers and treat them The disease can also be prevented with vaccinations In Ondo State the state government in collaboration with the WHO and the Clinton Health Access Initiative CHAI has been raising cancer awareness among the population by implementing a secondary cancer prevention program cervical screening to increase cancer prevention detection and treatment and the need to support cancer patients The screening service is being implemented in 10 PHC centers in the state of Ondo It began on July 22 and as of September 30 2 239 women have been screened for cervical cancer and 9 received treatment High participation Ms Ilemobayo Wuraola a health worker at the Arakale health center one of the PHCs where the service is offered said that the center has been seeing a high participation of women due to the awareness campaigns of the health workers In September we screened 182 women using the VIA procedure and 36 had suspected cases of cervical cancer and were referred to Akure University of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospital UNIMEDTH for further consultation The whole process is free I usually take advantage of the family planning program and prenatal and postnatal days to raise awareness about cervical cancer screening she said On the road to elimination Meanwhile Ondo State Health Commissioner Dr Banji Ajaka said The campaign against cervical cancer is a deliberate effort to ensure that our people especially vulnerable women and girls know about the disease undergo detection tests and those that are positive are treated The figures registered in the last three months are encouraging We are optimistic that the state will replace the 5 000 women screened for cervical cancer within six months July through December he said Emphasizing the importance of intervention WHO s Dr Kelias Msyamboza noted that intervention is crucial to reducing the burden of cervical cancer in the country Nigeria records an estimated 12 075 cases of cervical cancer and 7 968 deaths per year WHO has supported the Ondo state government with equipment and supplies tools for monitoring and evaluation and training of 100 health workers to implement the programme The trained health workers include eight educators from LGA Health and 92 community mobilizers trained in creating demand for cervical cancer screening she said To raise awareness of the program WHO is supporting the broadcast of radio jungles on cervical cancer screening in media outlets across the state WHO is also providing technical support for data validation as well as supervisory assistance to the state to monitor and evaluate screening activities at the 10 healthcare facilities
    Screening Invention Strengthens Fight Against Cervical Cancer in Ondo State
      When Mrs Olawale Damilola a 40 year old teacher heard that her local health center was offering screening for early signs of cervical cancer her mind flashed back to stories of women she had heard who had died from cervical cancer the illness She immediately made a reservation to get a screening test at the health center one of ten primary health care centers PHCs that offer cervical cancer secondary prevention program services in Ondo state in southwestern Nigeria I had gone to the Comprehensive Health Center in Ilara Mokin Ondo State for a family planning service when the nurse told me about the evaluation and immediately knew that she had to check my condition I jumped at the chance because I had always wanted to check my status but the price of a Pap smear is high 25 000 N Once she was lying on the examination table in the examination room the nurse explained the simple process to her Visual inspection with acetic acid VIA which consisted of applying diluted acetic acid a component of common vinegar to the cervix and observed by the health worker with the naked eye The health care provider then looks for abnormalities in the cervix which will turn white when exposed to the vinegar Before the test the nurse counseled her about cervical cancer and told her that it could be prevented if caught early Even though my result was negative I started raising awareness about screening in my community because I heard health workers complain about the low participation of women So far five women from my office have come forward for evaluation she said A global strategy Cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women globally with an estimated 604 000 new cases and 342 000 deaths in 2020 In 2020 the World Health Assembly adopted the Global Strategy to Eliminate Cancer cervical cancer Achieving that goal rests on three key pillars and corresponding targets Immunization 90 of girls are fully vaccinated with the HPV vaccine by the age of 15 Screening 70 of women had a high throughput screening before age 35 and again at age 45 Treatment 90 of women with precancerous lesions treated and 90 of women with invasive cancer managed To achieve the goal the World Health Organization WHO with funding from the Susan Thompson Buffet Foundation is providing catalytic support to Ondo Kebbi Niger Ekiti and Ondo states for breast cancer screening and treatment cervix The goal is to screen at least 5 000 women in the first phase of the program The disease can be prevented through regular screening with VIA Pap smears and human papillomavirus HPV tests to find pre cancers and treat them The disease can also be prevented with vaccinations In Ondo State the state government in collaboration with the WHO and the Clinton Health Access Initiative CHAI has been raising cancer awareness among the population by implementing a secondary cancer prevention program cervical screening to increase cancer prevention detection and treatment and the need to support cancer patients The screening service is being implemented in 10 PHC centers in the state of Ondo It began on July 22 and as of September 30 2 239 women have been screened for cervical cancer and 9 received treatment High participation Ms Ilemobayo Wuraola a health worker at the Arakale health center one of the PHCs where the service is offered said that the center has been seeing a high participation of women due to the awareness campaigns of the health workers In September we screened 182 women using the VIA procedure and 36 had suspected cases of cervical cancer and were referred to Akure University of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospital UNIMEDTH for further consultation The whole process is free I usually take advantage of the family planning program and prenatal and postnatal days to raise awareness about cervical cancer screening she said On the road to elimination Meanwhile Ondo State Health Commissioner Dr Banji Ajaka said The campaign against cervical cancer is a deliberate effort to ensure that our people especially vulnerable women and girls know about the disease undergo detection tests and those that are positive are treated The figures registered in the last three months are encouraging We are optimistic that the state will replace the 5 000 women screened for cervical cancer within six months July through December he said Emphasizing the importance of intervention WHO s Dr Kelias Msyamboza noted that intervention is crucial to reducing the burden of cervical cancer in the country Nigeria records an estimated 12 075 cases of cervical cancer and 7 968 deaths per year WHO has supported the Ondo state government with equipment and supplies tools for monitoring and evaluation and training of 100 health workers to implement the programme The trained health workers include eight educators from LGA Health and 92 community mobilizers trained in creating demand for cervical cancer screening she said To raise awareness of the program WHO is supporting the broadcast of radio jungles on cervical cancer screening in media outlets across the state WHO is also providing technical support for data validation as well as supervisory assistance to the state to monitor and evaluate screening activities at the 10 healthcare facilities
    Screening Invention Strengthens Fight Against Cervical Cancer in Ondo State
    Africa4 weeks ago

    Screening Invention Strengthens Fight Against Cervical Cancer in Ondo State

    When Mrs. Olawale Damilola, a 40-year-old teacher, heard that her local health center was offering screening for early signs of cervical cancer, her mind flashed back to stories of women she had heard who had died from cervical cancer.

    the illness.

    She immediately made a reservation to get a screening test at the health center, one of ten primary health care centers (PHCs) that offer cervical cancer secondary prevention program services in Ondo state in southwestern Nigeria.

    “I had gone to the Comprehensive Health Center in Ilara-Mokin, Ondo State, for a family planning service when the nurse told me about the evaluation and immediately knew that she had to check my condition.

    I jumped at the chance because I had always wanted to check my status, but the price of a Pap smear is high, 25,000 N.

    Once she was lying on the examination table in the examination room, the nurse explained the simple process to her.

    : Visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) - which consisted of applying diluted acetic acid - a component of common vinegar - to the cervix and observed by the health worker with the naked eye.

    The health care provider then looks for abnormalities in the cervix, which will turn white when exposed to the vinegar.

    Before the test, the nurse counseled her about cervical cancer and told her that it could be prevented if caught early.

    “Even though my result was negative, I started raising awareness about screening in my community because I heard health workers complain about the low participation of women.” So far, five women from my office have come forward for evaluation, she said.

    A global strategy Cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women globally, with an estimated 604,000 new cases and 342,000 deaths in 2020.

    In 2020, the World Health Assembly adopted the Global Strategy to Eliminate Cancer.

    cervical cancer.

    Achieving that goal rests on three key pillars and corresponding targets: Immunization: 90% of girls are fully vaccinated with the HPV vaccine by the age of 15; Screening: 70% of women had a high-throughput screening before age 35 and again at age 45; Treatment: 90% of women with precancerous lesions treated and 90% of women with invasive cancer managed.

    To achieve the goal, the World Health Organization (WHO), with funding from the Susan Thompson Buffet Foundation, is providing catalytic support to Ondo, Kebbi, Niger, Ekiti and Ondo states for breast cancer screening and treatment.

    cervix.

    The goal is to screen at least 5,000 women in the first phase of the program.

    The disease can be prevented through regular screening with VIA, Pap smears, and human papillomavirus (HPV) tests to find pre-cancers and treat them.

    The disease can also be prevented with vaccinations.

    In Ondo State, the state government, in collaboration with the WHO and the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI), has been raising cancer awareness among the population by implementing a secondary cancer prevention program cervical screening to increase cancer prevention, detection and treatment and the need to support cancer.

    patients The screening service is being implemented in 10 PHC centers in the state of Ondo. It began on July 22 and as of September 30, 2,239 women have been screened for cervical cancer and 9% received treatment.

    High participation Ms. Ilemobayo Wuraola, a health worker at the Arakale health center, one of the PHCs where the service is offered, said that the center has been seeing a high participation of women due to the awareness campaigns of the health workers.

    “In September, we screened 182 women using the VIA procedure, and 36 had suspected cases of cervical cancer and were referred to Akure University of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospital (UNIMEDTH) for further consultation.

    The whole process is free.

    I usually take advantage of the family planning program and prenatal and postnatal days to raise awareness about cervical cancer screening,” she said.

    On the road to elimination Meanwhile, Ondo State Health Commissioner Dr. Banji Ajaka said: “The campaign against cervical cancer is a deliberate effort to ensure that our people (especially vulnerable women and girls) know about the disease, undergo detection tests and those that are positive are treated The figures registered in the last three months are encouraging.

    We are optimistic that the state will replace the 5,000 women screened for cervical cancer within six months (July through December), he said.

    Emphasizing the importance of intervention, WHO's Dr. Kelias Msyamboza noted that intervention is crucial to reducing the burden of cervical cancer in the country.

    Nigeria records an estimated 12,075 cases of cervical cancer and 7,968 deaths per year.

    WHO has supported the Ondo state government with equipment and supplies, tools for monitoring and evaluation, and training of 100 health workers to implement the programme.

    The trained health workers include eight educators from LGA Health and 92 community mobilizers trained in creating demand for cervical cancer screening, she said.

    To raise awareness of the program, WHO is supporting the broadcast of radio jungles on cervical cancer screening in media outlets across the state.

    WHO is also providing technical support for data validation as well as supervisory assistance to the state to monitor and evaluate screening activities at the 10 healthcare facilities.

  •   Since an Ebola outbreak was declared in Uganda on September 20 Health Aide Nyangoma Kirrungi has been on the front lines of the country s response day in and day out working as a contact tracer in Madudu sub county one of the areas affected by the outbreak With the support of the World Health Organization WHO and its partners the Ugandan Ministry of Health has trained and deployed around 300 contact tracers like Kirrungi who are playing a critical role as the country seeks to slow the spread of the virus illness As part of the surveillance team Kirrungi follows up on an average of 40 contacts a day I work very closely with the investigation unit he explains Once a confirmed case of Ebola is recorded my team and I go into the field to follow up on the patient s contacts to make sure they are symptom free and then stay on alert to identify and report symptoms in case they develop come forward According to Dr Bernard Logouomo leader of the Ministry of Health surveillance team in Mubende district another Ebola affected area of the country contact tracing is key to ending the outbreak community cooperates in the response and contacts are identified it becomes easier to contain the disease he says Contact tracers follow a questionnaire designed to assess whether a contact has symptoms of Ebola Each contact tracer works with a maximum of 10 villagers health workers who are volunteers trained in disease surveillance Recruited by communities village health teams help generate trust and overcome fears among respondents In addition to the deployment of contact tracers two hotlines have been created for communities to report suspected cases Investigators follow a list of questions designed to assess the need to dispatch an ambulance or clinical officer Once a case is confirmed a case investigation team establishes a list of contacts depending on where the patient was likely to have been infected and who they may have known After contacts have been traced and tested village health teams take it upon themselves to monitor them for any symptoms for 21 days Ebol an incubation period Beyond this important support role these teams also provide invaluable assistance in raising awareness of the disease within their communities Since the beginning of the epidemic the Ministry of Health has trained more than 1 200 members of the village health team also with the support of WHO and partners With only 25 of contacts followed up every day in the early days of the outbreak contact tracing quickly improved As of mid October almost 94 of the 552 contacts were seen and monitored daily for 21 days Lydia Nasamba a market trader and Madudu resident has been a member of a local village health team for over eight years Every day at 3 pm I go to the sub county community radio station where I raise awareness about Ebola its symptoms preventive measures and how to report cases she says After that I visit identified contacts in my community to check their health status While the contribution of people like Kirrungi and Nasamba is a crucial component of Uganda s Ebola response they face numerous daily challenges including a lack of personal protective equipment and reliable transportation Contact tracers are often faced with community members fear of being stigmatized or isolated in a health facility putting people s livelihoods at risk Contacts may also not be home when contact tracers visit them making it difficult to follow up on a daily basis With support from the United States Agency for International Development and the Norwegian government WHO provided four Ebola kits to Mubende Regional Hospital and redeployed 108 technical staff to assist with case management communication of risks community participation and laboratory tests Back in Madudu nothing will deter Kirrungi from the task at hand Since I have been involved in the Ebola response I feel like I am saving lives I have learned that if all contacts are identified and treated the disease will go away she says That s what motivates me every day
    Contact tracers and village health teams take on Ebola in Uganda
      Since an Ebola outbreak was declared in Uganda on September 20 Health Aide Nyangoma Kirrungi has been on the front lines of the country s response day in and day out working as a contact tracer in Madudu sub county one of the areas affected by the outbreak With the support of the World Health Organization WHO and its partners the Ugandan Ministry of Health has trained and deployed around 300 contact tracers like Kirrungi who are playing a critical role as the country seeks to slow the spread of the virus illness As part of the surveillance team Kirrungi follows up on an average of 40 contacts a day I work very closely with the investigation unit he explains Once a confirmed case of Ebola is recorded my team and I go into the field to follow up on the patient s contacts to make sure they are symptom free and then stay on alert to identify and report symptoms in case they develop come forward According to Dr Bernard Logouomo leader of the Ministry of Health surveillance team in Mubende district another Ebola affected area of the country contact tracing is key to ending the outbreak community cooperates in the response and contacts are identified it becomes easier to contain the disease he says Contact tracers follow a questionnaire designed to assess whether a contact has symptoms of Ebola Each contact tracer works with a maximum of 10 villagers health workers who are volunteers trained in disease surveillance Recruited by communities village health teams help generate trust and overcome fears among respondents In addition to the deployment of contact tracers two hotlines have been created for communities to report suspected cases Investigators follow a list of questions designed to assess the need to dispatch an ambulance or clinical officer Once a case is confirmed a case investigation team establishes a list of contacts depending on where the patient was likely to have been infected and who they may have known After contacts have been traced and tested village health teams take it upon themselves to monitor them for any symptoms for 21 days Ebol an incubation period Beyond this important support role these teams also provide invaluable assistance in raising awareness of the disease within their communities Since the beginning of the epidemic the Ministry of Health has trained more than 1 200 members of the village health team also with the support of WHO and partners With only 25 of contacts followed up every day in the early days of the outbreak contact tracing quickly improved As of mid October almost 94 of the 552 contacts were seen and monitored daily for 21 days Lydia Nasamba a market trader and Madudu resident has been a member of a local village health team for over eight years Every day at 3 pm I go to the sub county community radio station where I raise awareness about Ebola its symptoms preventive measures and how to report cases she says After that I visit identified contacts in my community to check their health status While the contribution of people like Kirrungi and Nasamba is a crucial component of Uganda s Ebola response they face numerous daily challenges including a lack of personal protective equipment and reliable transportation Contact tracers are often faced with community members fear of being stigmatized or isolated in a health facility putting people s livelihoods at risk Contacts may also not be home when contact tracers visit them making it difficult to follow up on a daily basis With support from the United States Agency for International Development and the Norwegian government WHO provided four Ebola kits to Mubende Regional Hospital and redeployed 108 technical staff to assist with case management communication of risks community participation and laboratory tests Back in Madudu nothing will deter Kirrungi from the task at hand Since I have been involved in the Ebola response I feel like I am saving lives I have learned that if all contacts are identified and treated the disease will go away she says That s what motivates me every day
    Contact tracers and village health teams take on Ebola in Uganda
    Africa1 month ago

    Contact tracers and village health teams take on Ebola in Uganda

    Since an Ebola outbreak was declared in Uganda on September 20, Health Aide Nyangoma Kirrungi has been on the front lines of the country's response day in and day out, working as a contact tracer in Madudu sub-county, one of the areas affected by the outbreak.

    .

    With the support of the World Health Organization (WHO) and its partners, the Ugandan Ministry of Health has trained and deployed around 300 contact tracers like Kirrungi, who are playing a critical role as the country seeks to slow the spread of the virus.

    illness.

    As part of the surveillance team, Kirrungi follows up on an average of 40 contacts a day.

    “I work very closely with the investigation unit,” he explains.

    “Once a confirmed case of Ebola is recorded, my team and I go into the field to follow up on the patient's contacts to make sure they are symptom-free and then stay on alert to identify and report symptoms in case they develop.

    come forward.” According to Dr. Bernard Logouomo, leader of the Ministry of Health surveillance team in Mubende district, another Ebola-affected area of ​​the country, contact tracing is key to ending the outbreak.

    community cooperates in the response and contacts are identified, it becomes easier to contain the disease," he says.

    Contact tracers follow a questionnaire designed to assess whether a contact has symptoms of Ebola.

    Each contact tracer works with a maximum of 10 villagers health workers, who are volunteers trained in disease surveillance Recruited by communities, village health teams help generate trust and overcome fears among respondents.

    In addition to the deployment of contact tracers, two hotlines have been created for communities to report suspected cases.

    Investigators follow a list of questions designed to assess the need to dispatch an ambulance or clinical officer Once a case is confirmed, a case investigation team establishes a list of contacts, depending on where the patient was likely to have been infected and who they may have known After contacts have been traced and tested, village health teams take it upon themselves to monitor them for any symptoms for 21 days – Ebol an incubation period.

    Beyond this important support role, these teams also provide invaluable assistance in raising awareness of the disease within their communities.

    Since the beginning of the epidemic, the Ministry of Health has trained more than 1,200 members of the village health team, also with the support of WHO and partners.

    With only 25% of contacts followed up every day in the early days of the outbreak, contact tracing quickly improved.

    As of mid-October, almost 94% of the 552 contacts were seen and monitored daily for 21 days.

    Lydia Nasamba, a market trader and Madudu resident, has been a member of a local village health team for over eight years.

    “Every day at 3 pm, I go to the sub-county community radio station, where I raise awareness about Ebola: its symptoms, preventive measures, and how to report cases,” she says.

    "After that, I visit identified contacts in my community to check their health status."

    While the contribution of people like Kirrungi and Nasamba is a crucial component of Uganda's Ebola response, they face numerous daily challenges, including a lack of personal protective equipment and reliable transportation.

    Contact tracers are often faced with community members' fear of being stigmatized or isolated in a health facility, putting people's livelihoods at risk.

    Contacts may also not be home when contact tracers visit them, making it difficult to follow up on a daily basis.

    With support from the United States Agency for International Development and the Norwegian government, WHO provided four Ebola kits to Mubende Regional Hospital and redeployed 108 technical staff to assist with case management, communication of risks, community participation and laboratory tests.

    Back in Madudu, nothing will deter Kirrungi from the task at hand.

    “Since I have been involved in the Ebola response, I feel like I am saving lives.

    I have learned that if all contacts are identified and treated, the disease will go away,” she says.

    "That's what motivates me every day."

  •  The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control amp Prevention NCDC and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations CEPI are hosting a workshop in the country for scientists from across the West Africa sub region The workshop will discuss the progress of research known as the Enable Lassa Research Programme the largest ever Lassa fever study size from the sub region Dr Ifedayo Adetifa Director General NCDC said this in an interview with News Agency of Nigeria on Saturday in Abuja Adetifa said that the 3 day workshop brought together experts from Nigeria Benin Guinea Liberia and Sierra Leone all countries affected by Lassa fever to share progress challenges and insights from their works He said this was set up and funded by CEPI Enable programme aims to provide a more detailed description of the epidemiology of Lassa fever in the region Adetifa said that the agency was leading the Nigerian component of the study while the project was also being conducted in Benin Guinea Liberia and Sierra Leone Lassa fever is typically spread to humans by infected rodents with severe cases potentially resulting in a hemorrhagic fever associated with a high risk of death It is recognised by the World Health Organization WHO as a disease with epidemic potential There are no vaccines for Lassa fever currently approved for human use he explained NAN recalls that the research was launched in 2020 while Enable aims to provide a better understanding of the true Lassa disease burden across West Africa There are regular outbreaks of the disease in the sub region and the programme guides the development of vaccines against the epidemic threat The Enable programme has been set up and funded by CEPI which is established as one of the largest global funders of Lassa fever research First identified over fifty years ago Lassa fever is typically spread when a person comes into contact with the body fluids of the infected rodent species Mastomys natalensis otherwise known as the Natal multimammate mouse or rat Same disease can also be contacted through food and other materials contaminated by its urine faeces and saliva NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Researchers brainstorm on progress on Lassa fever
     The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control amp Prevention NCDC and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations CEPI are hosting a workshop in the country for scientists from across the West Africa sub region The workshop will discuss the progress of research known as the Enable Lassa Research Programme the largest ever Lassa fever study size from the sub region Dr Ifedayo Adetifa Director General NCDC said this in an interview with News Agency of Nigeria on Saturday in Abuja Adetifa said that the 3 day workshop brought together experts from Nigeria Benin Guinea Liberia and Sierra Leone all countries affected by Lassa fever to share progress challenges and insights from their works He said this was set up and funded by CEPI Enable programme aims to provide a more detailed description of the epidemiology of Lassa fever in the region Adetifa said that the agency was leading the Nigerian component of the study while the project was also being conducted in Benin Guinea Liberia and Sierra Leone Lassa fever is typically spread to humans by infected rodents with severe cases potentially resulting in a hemorrhagic fever associated with a high risk of death It is recognised by the World Health Organization WHO as a disease with epidemic potential There are no vaccines for Lassa fever currently approved for human use he explained NAN recalls that the research was launched in 2020 while Enable aims to provide a better understanding of the true Lassa disease burden across West Africa There are regular outbreaks of the disease in the sub region and the programme guides the development of vaccines against the epidemic threat The Enable programme has been set up and funded by CEPI which is established as one of the largest global funders of Lassa fever research First identified over fifty years ago Lassa fever is typically spread when a person comes into contact with the body fluids of the infected rodent species Mastomys natalensis otherwise known as the Natal multimammate mouse or rat Same disease can also be contacted through food and other materials contaminated by its urine faeces and saliva NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Researchers brainstorm on progress on Lassa fever
    General news1 month ago

    Researchers brainstorm on progress on Lassa fever

    The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control & Prevention (NCDC) and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), are hosting a workshop in the country for scientists from across the West Africa sub-region.The workshop will discuss the progress of research known as “the Enable Lassa Research Programme”, the largest ever Lassa fever study size from the sub-region.Dr Ifedayo Adetifa, Director-General, NCDC, said this in an interview with News Agency of Nigeria, on Saturday in Abuja.Adetifa said that the 3-day workshop brought together experts from Nigeria, Benin, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, all countries affected by Lassa fever to share progress, challenges and insights from their works.He said, ”this was set up and funded by CEPI.Enable programme aims to provide a more detailed description of the epidemiology of Lassa fever in the region.” Adetifa said that the agency was leading the Nigerian component of the study, while the project was also being conducted in Benin, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone.“Lassa fever is typically spread to humans by infected rodents, with severe cases potentially resulting in a hemorrhagic fever associated with a high risk of death.“It is recognised by the World Health Organization (WHO), as a disease with epidemic potential.“There are no vaccines for Lassa fever currently approved for human use, “ he explained.NAN recalls that the research was launched in 2020, while Enable aims to provide a better understanding of the true Lassa disease burden across West Africa.There are regular outbreaks of the disease in the sub-region and the programme guides the development of vaccines against the epidemic threat.The Enable programme has been set up and funded by CEPI, which is established as one of the largest global funders of Lassa fever research.First identified over fifty years ago, Lassa fever is typically spread when a person comes into contact with the body fluids of the infected rodent species, Mastomys natalensis, otherwise known as the Natal multimammate mouse or rat.Same disease can also be contacted through food and other materials contaminated by its urine, faeces and saliva.NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   Mental neurological and substance use disorders account for more than 10 of the global burden of disease Lost productivity resulting from depression and anxiety two of the most common mental disorders cost the global economy US 1 trillion each year In low and middle income countries more than 75 of people with mental disorders do not receive any treatment for their disorder In Ghana the government has made efforts to improve mental health services at all levels However significant gaps remained with only about 2 of Ghana s 2 3 million people living with mental health problems receiving psychiatric treatment and support from health facilities according to the WHO To help countries like Ghana address mental health gaps the World Health Organization WHO established the Director General s Special Initiative on Mental Health DG SIMH with a vision of ensuring that everyone in the target population in selected countries achieve the highest level of mental health and well being The five year initiative supported by the Government of Norway aims to give an additional 100 million people access to quality affordable mental health in 12 countries around the world Prior to implementation in Ghana WHO has assisted Ghana in developing a national implementation plan and is currently assisting the country s six new regions in developing their regional plans for effective implementation We recognize the important role of stakeholders in the implementation of this initiative said Dr Joana Ansong WHO Noncommunicable Diseases and Risk Factors Officer in Ghana at the kickoff meeting of the initiative in the region north western Ghana That is why we want the regions to design their implementation strategies so that they can take ownership of the process and strengthen alliances to achieve universal mental health coverage Ghana launched the initiative in July 2022 and implementation is expected to begin in the third quarter of 2022 and last for five years with the aim of improving access to quality integrated person centered mental health care for another 5 2 million Ghanaians The WHO Special Initiative for Mental Health will advance mental health policy advocacy and human rights and scale up quality interventions and services for people with mental health conditions including substance use and mental health disorders neurological For the Ghanaian health authorities this initiative is a great opportunity to strengthen the mental health system while mobilizing communities to create an environment free of stigma and abuse against people with mental health problems We need to create an environment that is conducive enough for people with mental disorders to go out and seek help at any level of the health system said Western North Regional Director of Health Dr Marion Okoh Owusu This special initiative is an opportunity for us to redefine mental health care in Ghana Indeed Nana Elluo panyin III while expressing deep gratitude for the WHO Special Initiative on Mental Health Kyidomhene of Sefwi Wiawso Traditional Area underscored the critical role that traditional leaders can play in helping to improve service delivery mental health in Ghana We need to deepen collaboration between health authorities and traditional leaders to strengthen protection mechanisms for people with mental health problems added Nana Elluo panyin III The WHO Special Initiative on Mental Health will build on the successes of other mental health interventions such as the QualityRights Initiative which is helping to improve the quality of care and promote the human rights of people living with poor health mental
    Redefining mental health care in Ghana
      Mental neurological and substance use disorders account for more than 10 of the global burden of disease Lost productivity resulting from depression and anxiety two of the most common mental disorders cost the global economy US 1 trillion each year In low and middle income countries more than 75 of people with mental disorders do not receive any treatment for their disorder In Ghana the government has made efforts to improve mental health services at all levels However significant gaps remained with only about 2 of Ghana s 2 3 million people living with mental health problems receiving psychiatric treatment and support from health facilities according to the WHO To help countries like Ghana address mental health gaps the World Health Organization WHO established the Director General s Special Initiative on Mental Health DG SIMH with a vision of ensuring that everyone in the target population in selected countries achieve the highest level of mental health and well being The five year initiative supported by the Government of Norway aims to give an additional 100 million people access to quality affordable mental health in 12 countries around the world Prior to implementation in Ghana WHO has assisted Ghana in developing a national implementation plan and is currently assisting the country s six new regions in developing their regional plans for effective implementation We recognize the important role of stakeholders in the implementation of this initiative said Dr Joana Ansong WHO Noncommunicable Diseases and Risk Factors Officer in Ghana at the kickoff meeting of the initiative in the region north western Ghana That is why we want the regions to design their implementation strategies so that they can take ownership of the process and strengthen alliances to achieve universal mental health coverage Ghana launched the initiative in July 2022 and implementation is expected to begin in the third quarter of 2022 and last for five years with the aim of improving access to quality integrated person centered mental health care for another 5 2 million Ghanaians The WHO Special Initiative for Mental Health will advance mental health policy advocacy and human rights and scale up quality interventions and services for people with mental health conditions including substance use and mental health disorders neurological For the Ghanaian health authorities this initiative is a great opportunity to strengthen the mental health system while mobilizing communities to create an environment free of stigma and abuse against people with mental health problems We need to create an environment that is conducive enough for people with mental disorders to go out and seek help at any level of the health system said Western North Regional Director of Health Dr Marion Okoh Owusu This special initiative is an opportunity for us to redefine mental health care in Ghana Indeed Nana Elluo panyin III while expressing deep gratitude for the WHO Special Initiative on Mental Health Kyidomhene of Sefwi Wiawso Traditional Area underscored the critical role that traditional leaders can play in helping to improve service delivery mental health in Ghana We need to deepen collaboration between health authorities and traditional leaders to strengthen protection mechanisms for people with mental health problems added Nana Elluo panyin III The WHO Special Initiative on Mental Health will build on the successes of other mental health interventions such as the QualityRights Initiative which is helping to improve the quality of care and promote the human rights of people living with poor health mental
    Redefining mental health care in Ghana
    Africa1 month ago

    Redefining mental health care in Ghana

    Mental, neurological and substance use disorders account for more than 10% of the global burden of disease.

    Lost productivity resulting from depression and anxiety, two of the most common mental disorders, cost the global economy US$1 trillion each year.

    In low- and middle-income countries, more than 75% of people with mental disorders do not receive any treatment for their disorder.

    In Ghana, the government has made efforts to improve mental health services at all levels.

    However, significant gaps remained, with only about 2% of Ghana's 2.3 million people living with mental health problems receiving psychiatric treatment and support from health facilities according to the WHO.

    To help countries like Ghana address mental health gaps, the World Health Organization (WHO) established the Director-General's Special Initiative on Mental Health (DG-SIMH) with a vision of ensuring that everyone in the target population in selected countries achieve the highest level of mental health and well-being.

    The five-year initiative supported by the Government of Norway aims to give an additional 100 million people access to quality, affordable mental health in 12 countries around the world.

    Prior to implementation in Ghana, WHO has assisted Ghana in developing a national implementation plan and is currently assisting the country's six new regions in developing their regional plans for effective implementation.

    “We recognize the important role of stakeholders in the implementation of this initiative,” said Dr. Joana Ansong, WHO Noncommunicable Diseases and Risk Factors Officer in Ghana, at the kickoff meeting of the initiative in the region.

    north western Ghana.

    “That is why we want the regions to design their implementation strategies so that they can take ownership of the process and strengthen alliances to achieve universal mental health coverage.” Ghana launched the initiative in July 2022 and implementation is expected to begin in the third quarter of 2022 and last for five years, with the aim of improving access to quality integrated person-centered mental health care for another 5 .2 million Ghanaians.

    The WHO Special Initiative for Mental Health will advance mental health policy, advocacy and human rights, and scale up quality interventions and services for people with mental health conditions, including substance use and mental health disorders.

    neurological For the Ghanaian health authorities, this initiative is a great opportunity to strengthen the mental health system while mobilizing communities to create an environment free of stigma and abuse against people with mental health problems.

    “We need to create an environment that is conducive enough for people with mental disorders to go out and seek help at any level of the health system,” said Western North Regional Director of Health Dr. Marion Okoh-Owusu.

    "This special initiative is an opportunity for us to redefine mental health care in Ghana."

    Indeed, Nana Elluo panyin III, while expressing deep gratitude for the WHO Special Initiative on Mental Health, Kyidomhene of Sefwi Wiawso Traditional Area, underscored the critical role that traditional leaders can play in helping to improve service delivery.

    mental health in Ghana.

    "We need to deepen collaboration between health authorities and traditional leaders to strengthen protection mechanisms for people with mental health problems," added Nana Elluo panyin III.

    The WHO Special Initiative on Mental Health will build on the successes of other mental health interventions, such as the QualityRights Initiative, which is helping to improve the quality of care and promote the human rights of people living with poor health.

    mental.

  •   The director of the World Health Organization WHO on Wednesday urged the international community and the media to pay the crisis in Ethiopia the attention it deserves Stressing that there is no other situation globally where six million have been besieged for almost two years Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned that there is a very narrow window to prevent the genocide in Tigray Yes I am from Tigray and yes this affects me personally I don t pretend not to Most of my relatives are in the most affected areas more than 90 percent of them he acknowledged during his usual press conference in Geneva But my job is to bring to the world s attention the crises that threaten the health of people wherever they are This is a health crisis for six million people and the world is not paying enough attention he stressed Hostilities must end The WHO chief echoed the words used by the UN secretary general earlier this week in which he said the situation in Ethiopia is out of control Hostilities in Tigray must end now including the immediate withdrawal and separation of the Eritrean armed forces from Ethiopia he said Tedros highlighted that banking fuel food electricity and medical care are used as weapons of war while media coverage is also not allowed and the destruction of civilians is carried out in the dark There are no services for tuberculosis HIV diabetes hypertension and more Those diseases which can be treated elsewhere are now a death sentence in Tigray he warned adding that even people who have money are starving because they can t not access it COVID 19 remains an emergency Tedros also touched on more global health issues during his regular briefing including COVID 19 which remains a public health emergency of international concern While the global situation has obviously improved since the pandemic began the virus continues to change and many risks and uncertainties remain he explained warning that the pandemic had surprised us before and could very well do so again The WHO chief said it was crucial to strengthen surveillance and expand access to tests treatments and vaccines for those most at risk and for all countries to update their national preparedness and response plans Ebola outbreak in Uganda Regarding the current Ebola outbreak in Uganda the expert reported that there are currently 60 confirmed cases and 20 probable cases Meanwhile 44 people have died and 25 have recovered We remain concerned that there may be more chains of transmission and more contacts than we are aware of in the affected communities he stressed The Ministry of Health is investigating the eight most recent cases as initial reports indicate that they were not among the known contacts Additionally two confirmed cases from Mubende district sought care in the capital Kampala increasing transmission risks in that city Tedros reported that the WHO and its partners continue to support the Government of Uganda to contain the outbreak and prevent it from spreading to more regions and countries Is monkeypox still an emergency The WHO chief said the WHO Emergency Committee will meet on Thursday to discuss the Monkeypox outbreak and make recommendations The number of reported cases globally has been declining for eight weeks in a row but as with COVID 19 risks and uncertainties remain with some countries still seeing increased transmission he warned
    Tigray conflict is a health crisis for 6 million people and ‘the world is not paying attention’: Tedros
      The director of the World Health Organization WHO on Wednesday urged the international community and the media to pay the crisis in Ethiopia the attention it deserves Stressing that there is no other situation globally where six million have been besieged for almost two years Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned that there is a very narrow window to prevent the genocide in Tigray Yes I am from Tigray and yes this affects me personally I don t pretend not to Most of my relatives are in the most affected areas more than 90 percent of them he acknowledged during his usual press conference in Geneva But my job is to bring to the world s attention the crises that threaten the health of people wherever they are This is a health crisis for six million people and the world is not paying enough attention he stressed Hostilities must end The WHO chief echoed the words used by the UN secretary general earlier this week in which he said the situation in Ethiopia is out of control Hostilities in Tigray must end now including the immediate withdrawal and separation of the Eritrean armed forces from Ethiopia he said Tedros highlighted that banking fuel food electricity and medical care are used as weapons of war while media coverage is also not allowed and the destruction of civilians is carried out in the dark There are no services for tuberculosis HIV diabetes hypertension and more Those diseases which can be treated elsewhere are now a death sentence in Tigray he warned adding that even people who have money are starving because they can t not access it COVID 19 remains an emergency Tedros also touched on more global health issues during his regular briefing including COVID 19 which remains a public health emergency of international concern While the global situation has obviously improved since the pandemic began the virus continues to change and many risks and uncertainties remain he explained warning that the pandemic had surprised us before and could very well do so again The WHO chief said it was crucial to strengthen surveillance and expand access to tests treatments and vaccines for those most at risk and for all countries to update their national preparedness and response plans Ebola outbreak in Uganda Regarding the current Ebola outbreak in Uganda the expert reported that there are currently 60 confirmed cases and 20 probable cases Meanwhile 44 people have died and 25 have recovered We remain concerned that there may be more chains of transmission and more contacts than we are aware of in the affected communities he stressed The Ministry of Health is investigating the eight most recent cases as initial reports indicate that they were not among the known contacts Additionally two confirmed cases from Mubende district sought care in the capital Kampala increasing transmission risks in that city Tedros reported that the WHO and its partners continue to support the Government of Uganda to contain the outbreak and prevent it from spreading to more regions and countries Is monkeypox still an emergency The WHO chief said the WHO Emergency Committee will meet on Thursday to discuss the Monkeypox outbreak and make recommendations The number of reported cases globally has been declining for eight weeks in a row but as with COVID 19 risks and uncertainties remain with some countries still seeing increased transmission he warned
    Tigray conflict is a health crisis for 6 million people and ‘the world is not paying attention’: Tedros
    Africa1 month ago

    Tigray conflict is a health crisis for 6 million people and ‘the world is not paying attention’: Tedros

    The director of the World Health Organization (WHO) on Wednesday urged the international community and the media to pay the crisis in Ethiopia "the attention it deserves."

    Stressing that there is no other situation globally where six million have been besieged for almost two years, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned that there is a very narrow window to prevent the genocide in Tigray.

    “Yes, I am from Tigray, and yes, this affects me personally.

    I don't pretend not to.

    Most of my relatives are in the most affected areas, more than 90 percent of them, ”he acknowledged during his usual press conference in Geneva.

    “But my job is to bring to the world's attention the crises that threaten the health of people wherever they are.

    This is a health crisis for six million people, and the world is not paying enough attention”, he stressed.

    Hostilities must end The WHO chief echoed the words used by the UN secretary-general earlier this week, in which he said the situation in Ethiopia is "out of control".

    "Hostilities in Tigray must end now, including the immediate withdrawal and separation of the Eritrean armed forces from Ethiopia," he said.

    Tedros highlighted that banking, fuel, food, electricity and medical care are used as weapons of war, while media coverage is also not allowed and the "destruction of civilians" is carried out in the dark.

    “There are no services for tuberculosis, HIV, diabetes, hypertension and more.

    Those diseases, which can be treated elsewhere, are now a death sentence in Tigray,” he warned, adding that even people who have money are starving because they can't.

    not access it.

    COVID-19 remains an emergency Tedros also touched on more global health issues during his regular briefing, including COVID-19, which remains a public health emergency of international concern.

    "While the global situation has obviously improved since the pandemic began, the virus continues to change and many risks and uncertainties remain," he explained, warning that the pandemic had surprised us before and "could very well do so again."

    The WHO chief said it was crucial to strengthen surveillance and expand access to tests, treatments and vaccines for those most at risk, and for all countries to update their national preparedness and response plans.

    Ebola outbreak in Uganda Regarding the current Ebola outbreak in Uganda, the expert reported that there are currently 60 confirmed cases and 20 probable cases.

    Meanwhile, 44 people have died and 25 have recovered.

    “We remain concerned that there may be more chains of transmission and more contacts than we are aware of in the affected communities,” he stressed.

    The Ministry of Health is investigating the eight most recent cases, as initial reports indicate that they were not among the known contacts.

    Additionally, two confirmed cases from Mubende district sought care in the capital Kampala, increasing transmission risks in that city.

    Tedros reported that the WHO and its partners continue to support the Government of Uganda to contain the outbreak and prevent it from spreading to more regions and countries.

    Is monkeypox still an emergency?

    The WHO chief said the WHO Emergency Committee will meet on Thursday to discuss the Monkeypox outbreak and make recommendations.

    “The number of reported cases globally has been declining for eight weeks in a row, but as with COVID-19, risks and uncertainties remain, with some countries still seeing increased transmission,” he warned.

    .

  •   Anifa Tsani a 20 year old mother of one is happy to be able to make informed decisions about her sexual and reproductive health at the Internally Displaced Persons IDP camp in Damagaza Abuja She started living in the camp at a very young age and got married in the same environment where she barely had enough food to eat Every time I take my son to the health center for vaccinations the health workers encourage us caregivers to space our children through family planning I decided to use the injection because I want a good life for my son and I would like to keep my sex life private The injection gave me the opportunity to protect myself without fear of criticism from my co wives and has protected me from negative cultural perceptions about sexual and reproductive health she said Anifa Tsani s story is repeated in the stories of many other women who want to have a choice in her sexual and reproductive health Reducing stigma and barriers to care In Nigeria there is still low uptake of family planning FP services as the 2021 Nigeria Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey MICS indicates that demand for family planning FP services PF among married or cohabiting women is only satisfied in 4 out of 10 women To rectify the concerns the World Health Organization WHO has been working with the Federal Ministry of Health FMOH using the patient centered care approach to provide sexual and reproductive health services in the country This is achieved by introducing self care interventions at the community level through pharmacies and proprietary drug stores and conventional health facilities to reduce the burden of care on health workers Speaking about the essence of the approach WHO technical officer Dr Olumuyiwa Ojo said that the initiative is crucial for the country to achieve universal health coverage He said that the WHO works in a critical area of supporting policy changes to create an enabling environment for the provision of self care services in the country Following the publication of the WHO self care guideline in 2019 the Nigerian government with the support of the WHO adapted and began implementing the guideline It is expected to close the gap in unmet need for contraceptives and other selected sexual and reproductive health services Support includes coordinated implementation of the costed self care implementation plan lead advocacy demand generation and creating the enabling policy environment for implementation Similarly WHO through funding from the Swedish International Development Agency SIDA and the Children s Investment Fund Foundation CIFF is supporting the government to build the capacity of health workers to providing self management interventions in Nigerian health care services The WHO and other development partners provided guidance on self care to health workers and administrators in more than 18 states in Nigeria he said Salome Vincent Aya a health worker and beneficiary of capacity building training in Nasarawa state said that the introduction of self care services in her local health system has increased women s willingness to receive self care services Family planning Many women now opt for self care services such as injectable contraceptives It allows those who live far from the health center or who want confidentiality about their reproductive health to have supplies when they need them It has reduced the cost of transportation especially for those who live in places far from health facilities Initially the implementation of the initiative raised several concerns for health workers but with proper education they also appreciated it as it reduced the time spent on FP services she said According to the WHO self care interventions are tools that support the ability of individuals families and communities to promote health prevent illness maintain health and cope with illness and disability with or without the support of a healthcare provider health worker Self care includes self monitoring such as administering a long acting injectable contraceptive or self sampling for human papillomavirus or home oral HIV testing It can include self awareness such as accessing health information from a trusted partner or app Scaling up self care services To scale up the implementation of self care services in the country FMOH in collaboration with WHO and more than 70 partners including government officials in all programs at the national and state levels donors partners for the development and private sector actors recently revised and planned for the next level of implementation of the national self care guideline for sexual reproductive and maternal health At the meeting the Director Head of the Department of Family Health FMOH Dr Salma Ibrahim Anas Kolo said that the self care initiative is necessary due to the rapid increase in the country s population and the lessons learned from the interruption services caused by lockdown measures in response to the COVID 19 pandemic Dr Anas Kolo said the initiative will help reduce pressure on health facilities to provide quality care as communities and families People are supported to take charge of their own health She pointed out that self care in Nigeria is not the same as self medication but self care is limited to some services that have been pointed out that people can use with or without the support of health workers The implementation of self care services in the country is a backdrop to the earlier launch of the national guideline on self care along with the Family Planning 2030 commitment and various other SRH policy documents in March 2022 by the Hon ble Minister of Health
    Self-care empowers women to manage their sexual and reproductive health
      Anifa Tsani a 20 year old mother of one is happy to be able to make informed decisions about her sexual and reproductive health at the Internally Displaced Persons IDP camp in Damagaza Abuja She started living in the camp at a very young age and got married in the same environment where she barely had enough food to eat Every time I take my son to the health center for vaccinations the health workers encourage us caregivers to space our children through family planning I decided to use the injection because I want a good life for my son and I would like to keep my sex life private The injection gave me the opportunity to protect myself without fear of criticism from my co wives and has protected me from negative cultural perceptions about sexual and reproductive health she said Anifa Tsani s story is repeated in the stories of many other women who want to have a choice in her sexual and reproductive health Reducing stigma and barriers to care In Nigeria there is still low uptake of family planning FP services as the 2021 Nigeria Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey MICS indicates that demand for family planning FP services PF among married or cohabiting women is only satisfied in 4 out of 10 women To rectify the concerns the World Health Organization WHO has been working with the Federal Ministry of Health FMOH using the patient centered care approach to provide sexual and reproductive health services in the country This is achieved by introducing self care interventions at the community level through pharmacies and proprietary drug stores and conventional health facilities to reduce the burden of care on health workers Speaking about the essence of the approach WHO technical officer Dr Olumuyiwa Ojo said that the initiative is crucial for the country to achieve universal health coverage He said that the WHO works in a critical area of supporting policy changes to create an enabling environment for the provision of self care services in the country Following the publication of the WHO self care guideline in 2019 the Nigerian government with the support of the WHO adapted and began implementing the guideline It is expected to close the gap in unmet need for contraceptives and other selected sexual and reproductive health services Support includes coordinated implementation of the costed self care implementation plan lead advocacy demand generation and creating the enabling policy environment for implementation Similarly WHO through funding from the Swedish International Development Agency SIDA and the Children s Investment Fund Foundation CIFF is supporting the government to build the capacity of health workers to providing self management interventions in Nigerian health care services The WHO and other development partners provided guidance on self care to health workers and administrators in more than 18 states in Nigeria he said Salome Vincent Aya a health worker and beneficiary of capacity building training in Nasarawa state said that the introduction of self care services in her local health system has increased women s willingness to receive self care services Family planning Many women now opt for self care services such as injectable contraceptives It allows those who live far from the health center or who want confidentiality about their reproductive health to have supplies when they need them It has reduced the cost of transportation especially for those who live in places far from health facilities Initially the implementation of the initiative raised several concerns for health workers but with proper education they also appreciated it as it reduced the time spent on FP services she said According to the WHO self care interventions are tools that support the ability of individuals families and communities to promote health prevent illness maintain health and cope with illness and disability with or without the support of a healthcare provider health worker Self care includes self monitoring such as administering a long acting injectable contraceptive or self sampling for human papillomavirus or home oral HIV testing It can include self awareness such as accessing health information from a trusted partner or app Scaling up self care services To scale up the implementation of self care services in the country FMOH in collaboration with WHO and more than 70 partners including government officials in all programs at the national and state levels donors partners for the development and private sector actors recently revised and planned for the next level of implementation of the national self care guideline for sexual reproductive and maternal health At the meeting the Director Head of the Department of Family Health FMOH Dr Salma Ibrahim Anas Kolo said that the self care initiative is necessary due to the rapid increase in the country s population and the lessons learned from the interruption services caused by lockdown measures in response to the COVID 19 pandemic Dr Anas Kolo said the initiative will help reduce pressure on health facilities to provide quality care as communities and families People are supported to take charge of their own health She pointed out that self care in Nigeria is not the same as self medication but self care is limited to some services that have been pointed out that people can use with or without the support of health workers The implementation of self care services in the country is a backdrop to the earlier launch of the national guideline on self care along with the Family Planning 2030 commitment and various other SRH policy documents in March 2022 by the Hon ble Minister of Health
    Self-care empowers women to manage their sexual and reproductive health
    Africa1 month ago

    Self-care empowers women to manage their sexual and reproductive health

    Anifa Tsani, a 20-year-old mother of one, is happy to be able to make informed decisions about her sexual and reproductive health at the Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camp in Damagaza, Abuja.

    She started living in the camp at a very young age and got married in the same environment where she barely had enough food to eat.

    “Every time I take my son to the health center for vaccinations, the health workers encourage us (caregivers) to space our children through family planning.

    I decided to use the injection because I want a good life for my son and I would like to keep my sex life private.

    The injection gave me the opportunity to protect myself without fear of criticism from my co-wives and has protected me from negative cultural perceptions about sexual and reproductive health,” she said.

    Anifa Tsani's story is repeated in the stories of many other women who want to have a choice in her sexual and reproductive health.

    Reducing stigma and barriers to care In Nigeria, there is still low uptake of family planning (FP) services, as the 2021 Nigeria Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) indicates that demand for family planning (FP) services PF among married or cohabiting women is only satisfied in 4 out of 10 women.

    To rectify the concerns, the World Health Organization (WHO) has been working with the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH), using the patient-centered care approach, to provide sexual and reproductive health services in the country.

    This is achieved by introducing self-care interventions at the community level through pharmacies and proprietary drug stores and conventional health facilities to reduce the burden of care on health workers.

    Speaking about the essence of the approach, WHO technical officer Dr. Olumuyiwa Ojo said that the initiative is crucial for the country to achieve universal health coverage.

    He said that the WHO works in a critical area of ​​supporting policy changes to create an enabling environment for the provision of self-care services in the country.

    “Following the publication of the WHO self-care guideline in 2019, the Nigerian government, with the support of the WHO, adapted and began implementing the guideline.

    It is expected to close the gap in unmet need for contraceptives and other selected sexual and reproductive health services.

    Support includes coordinated implementation of the costed self-care implementation plan, lead advocacy, demand generation, and creating the enabling policy environment for implementation.

    Similarly, WHO, through funding from the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA) and the Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF), is supporting the government to build the capacity of health workers to providing self-management interventions in Nigerian health care services.

    The WHO and other development partners provided guidance on self-care to health workers and administrators in more than 18 states in Nigeria, he said.

    Salome Vincent Aya, a health worker and beneficiary of capacity-building training in Nasarawa state, said that the introduction of self-care services in her local health system has increased women's willingness to receive self-care services.

    Family planning.

    “Many women now opt for self-care services such as injectable contraceptives.

    It allows those who live far from the health center or who want confidentiality about their reproductive health to have supplies when they need them.

    It has reduced the cost of transportation, especially for those who live in places far from health facilities.

    Initially, the implementation of the initiative raised several concerns for health workers, but with proper education, they also appreciated it, as it reduced the time spent on FP services,” she said.

    According to the WHO, self-care interventions are tools that support the ability of individuals, families, and communities to promote health, prevent illness, maintain health, and cope with illness and disability with or without the support of a healthcare provider.

    health worker.

    Self-care includes self-monitoring, such as administering a long-acting injectable contraceptive or self-sampling for human papillomavirus, or home oral HIV testing.

    It can include self-awareness, such as accessing health information from a trusted partner or app.

    Scaling up self-care services To scale up the implementation of self-care services in the country, FMOH, in collaboration with WHO and more than 70 partners (including government officials in all programs at the national and state levels, donors, partners for the development and private sector actors) recently revised and planned for the next level of implementation of the national self-care guideline for sexual, reproductive and maternal health.

    At the meeting, the Director/Head of the Department of Family Health, FMOH, Dr. Salma Ibrahim Anas-Kolo, said that the self-care initiative is necessary due to the rapid increase in the country's population and the lessons learned from the interruption services caused by lockdown measures in response to the COVID 19 pandemic Dr. Anas-Kolo said the initiative will help reduce pressure on health facilities to provide quality care, as communities and families People are supported to take charge of their own health.

    She pointed out that self-care in Nigeria is not the same as self-medication, but self-care is limited to some services that have been pointed out that people can use with or without the support of health workers.

    The implementation of self-care services in the country is a backdrop to the earlier launch of the national guideline on self-care along with the Family Planning 2030 commitment and various other SRH policy documents in March 2022 by the Hon'ble Minister of Health.

    .

  •   The World Health Organization WHO and UNICEF today welcomed funding agreements for the King Salman Humanitarian Relief and Aid Center KSrelief valued at US 10 million to further strengthen polio and measles programs in eight countries The agreement was signed on the sidelines of the World Health Summit in Berlin The new funding will provide UNICEF and WHO with 5 million each in response to an emergency call for action by WHO and UNICEF to prevent major epidemics of polio and measles WHO and UNICEF have urged countries to prioritize vaccination of children as they rebuild their immunization systems following major global immunization disruptions caused by COVID 19 The pandemic has left millions of vulnerable children at increased risk of preventable childhood illnesses With this generous contribution from KSrelief WHO will support polio and measles programs in Somalia Iraq and Sudan by purchasing laboratory equipment improve surveillance digitization of PPE strengthening of the cold chain and training for field vaccinators UNICEF will support the five high risk countries of Afghanistan Central African Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Guinea and Pakistan with the procurement and in country distribution of polio and measles vaccines and supplies such as cold chain equipment and syringes hiring and training of vaccinators and sustainable strengthening of immunization systems COVID 19 has had a devastating effect on immunization services globally said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus WHO Director General KSrelief s generous support will help WHO save children s lives benefiting an estimated 50 million people and preventing major outbreaks of vaccine preventable diseases such as polio and measles in Somalia Iraq and Sudan We cannot allow COVID 19 to spark new epidemics of childhood illnesses said UNICEF Executive Director Catherine Russell The pandemic disrupted routine immunization services around the world leaving millions of vulnerable children at increased risk of polio measles and other preventable childhood illnesses This new agreement will result in lives saved and stronger immunization systems than will benefit millions of children Dr Abdullah Al Rabeeah General Supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Relief and Relief Center KSrelief stated This cooperation agreement will strengthen global action to protect vulnerable children at higher risk of preventable childhood diseases it also affirms the dedication of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to save lives and safeguard the future The agreement is the result of the Kingdom s commitment to work with WHO and UNICEF to jointly address global health challenges
    The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) welcome the funding of the King Salman Humanitarian Relief and Aid Center (KSrelief) for the prevention of the measles and polio epidemics
      The World Health Organization WHO and UNICEF today welcomed funding agreements for the King Salman Humanitarian Relief and Aid Center KSrelief valued at US 10 million to further strengthen polio and measles programs in eight countries The agreement was signed on the sidelines of the World Health Summit in Berlin The new funding will provide UNICEF and WHO with 5 million each in response to an emergency call for action by WHO and UNICEF to prevent major epidemics of polio and measles WHO and UNICEF have urged countries to prioritize vaccination of children as they rebuild their immunization systems following major global immunization disruptions caused by COVID 19 The pandemic has left millions of vulnerable children at increased risk of preventable childhood illnesses With this generous contribution from KSrelief WHO will support polio and measles programs in Somalia Iraq and Sudan by purchasing laboratory equipment improve surveillance digitization of PPE strengthening of the cold chain and training for field vaccinators UNICEF will support the five high risk countries of Afghanistan Central African Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Guinea and Pakistan with the procurement and in country distribution of polio and measles vaccines and supplies such as cold chain equipment and syringes hiring and training of vaccinators and sustainable strengthening of immunization systems COVID 19 has had a devastating effect on immunization services globally said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus WHO Director General KSrelief s generous support will help WHO save children s lives benefiting an estimated 50 million people and preventing major outbreaks of vaccine preventable diseases such as polio and measles in Somalia Iraq and Sudan We cannot allow COVID 19 to spark new epidemics of childhood illnesses said UNICEF Executive Director Catherine Russell The pandemic disrupted routine immunization services around the world leaving millions of vulnerable children at increased risk of polio measles and other preventable childhood illnesses This new agreement will result in lives saved and stronger immunization systems than will benefit millions of children Dr Abdullah Al Rabeeah General Supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Relief and Relief Center KSrelief stated This cooperation agreement will strengthen global action to protect vulnerable children at higher risk of preventable childhood diseases it also affirms the dedication of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to save lives and safeguard the future The agreement is the result of the Kingdom s commitment to work with WHO and UNICEF to jointly address global health challenges
    The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) welcome the funding of the King Salman Humanitarian Relief and Aid Center (KSrelief) for the prevention of the measles and polio epidemics
    Africa1 month ago

    The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) welcome the funding of the King Salman Humanitarian Relief and Aid Center (KSrelief) for the prevention of the measles and polio epidemics

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF today welcomed funding agreements for the King Salman Humanitarian Relief and Aid Center (KSrelief) valued at US$10 million to further strengthen polio and measles programs in eight countries.

    The agreement was signed on the sidelines of the World Health Summit in Berlin.

    The new funding will provide UNICEF and WHO with $5 million each in response to an emergency call for action by WHO and UNICEF to prevent major epidemics of polio and measles.

    WHO and UNICEF have urged countries to prioritize vaccination of children as they rebuild their immunization systems following major global immunization disruptions caused by COVID-19.

    The pandemic has left millions of vulnerable children at increased risk of preventable childhood illnesses.

    With this generous contribution from KSrelief, WHO will support polio and measles programs in Somalia, Iraq and Sudan by purchasing laboratory equipment; improve surveillance; digitization of PPE; strengthening of the cold chain; and training for field vaccinators.

    UNICEF will support the five high-risk countries of Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea and Pakistan with the procurement and in-country distribution of polio and measles vaccines and supplies such as cold chain equipment and syringes; hiring and training of vaccinators; and sustainable strengthening of immunization systems.

    "COVID-19 has had a devastating effect on immunization services globally," said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General.

    "KSrelief's generous support will help WHO save children's lives, benefiting an estimated 50 million people and preventing major outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases such as polio and measles in Somalia, Iraq and Sudan."

    "We cannot allow COVID-19 to spark new epidemics of childhood illnesses," said UNICEF Executive Director Catherine Russell.

    "The pandemic disrupted routine immunization services around the world, leaving millions of vulnerable children at increased risk of polio, measles and other preventable childhood illnesses.

    This new agreement will result in lives saved and stronger immunization systems than will benefit millions of children.

    Dr. Abdullah Al Rabeeah, General Supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Relief and Relief Center (KSrelief) stated: "This cooperation agreement will strengthen global action to protect vulnerable children at higher risk of preventable childhood diseases; it also affirms the dedication of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to save lives and safeguard the future.

    The agreement is the result of the Kingdom's commitment to work with WHO and UNICEF to jointly address global health challenges."

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