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  •  The Kaduna State Primary Health Care Board SPHCB on Wednesday urged journalists in the state to promote salient issues on Maternal Infant and Young Child Nutrition MIYCN in the state The Assistant Nutrition Officer of the state Mr Adams Ango made the appeal at a media roundtable in Kaduna on promoting issues around MIYCN The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the media roundtable engagement was done in collaboration with Alive and Thrive project He said that according to Global Multi Dimensional Poverty Index Report 2015 the poverty rate in Kaduna state stood at 56 5 while about 1 6 million children risk malnutrition and Over 800 000 children 48 were stunted He noted that public funding of nutrition was still inadequate and fragmented across sectors leading to delay in implementation of nutrition interventions with consequent unacceptable indices Ango however said that the state had deployed strategies and interventions in curtailing malnutrition and its consequences in the state He said the World Bank Accelerating Nutrition Results in Nigeria ANRiN project provided funding for improving nutrition through MIYCN counselling services It also provided Basic Nutrition Package services across communities in the 23 local governments He added that the state was implementing Community Management of Acute Malnutrition CMAM in 87 health facilities in 17 LGAs across the state with Ready to Use Therapeutic food RUTF Ango stressed that the media if equipped with the knowledge on key issues in MIYCN including code for marketing of breast milk substitute would enhance reportage of the issues for public good He said the objective of this was to discuss the role of the radio and television producers and newspapers editors in promoting MIYCN Also Serah Kwasu A amp T Programmes Manager in Kaduna said maternal and newborn health and nutrition inextricably connected She said globally 295 000 women died due to pregnancy related causes and 2 5 million newborns died within the first month of life Nigeria accounts for over 34 per cent of global maternal deaths Risk of dying during pregnancy childbirth post partum or after an abortion for a Nigerian woman is one in 22 compared to one in 49 000 in developed countries He said 95 per cent of these deaths were preventable nut Nigeria loses about 2 313 children daily translating to 844 321 under five children deaths annually She added that mothers nutrition status and health both before and during pregnancy had significant effects on the outcome of her child A baby s birth weight rate of postnatal growth and chances of survival are all influenced by the mother s health and dietary intake Good nutritional status before during and after pregnancy optimises maternal health and reduces the risk of pregnancy complications birth defects and chronic disease in her children in later adulthood she said Noting nutrition as a fundamental human right she said good maternal nutrition status reduced the risk of anaemia and pregnancy complications among other effects She said Lasting progress in global health and development was achievable through improving nutrition during the critical 1 000 days beginning with adequate maternal nutrition Also Rahila Maishanu the Breast Milk Substitute Desk Officer of the National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control NAFDAC in Kaduna said the World Health Assembly WHA 1981 adopted the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes BMS She explained that the WHA adopted the code as a weapon to protect breastfeeding from the negative impact that aggressive advertising and marketing techniques by Infant Food Manufacturers IFM were having on breastfeeding rates and duration Maishanu further said that NAFDAC was empowered by law to regulate and control the manufacture importation exportation distribution advertisement sale and use of foods drugs cosmetics medical devices and others By the law NAFDAC became the home of the code and the Agency mandated to implement monitor and enforce the provisions of the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes she said She noted that the media needed to be familiar with laws and regulations on marketing breast milk substitutes in Nigeria by training staff to identify and report violations of the code or related National Regulations The media must reject any advertisements promoting breast milk substitute products NAFDAC does not issue advertisement permits for breast milk substitutes Maishanu said She called on media houses to endorse programs which promoted optimal feeding practices for infants and young children She also called for establishment of cr ches in media houses for breastfeeding mothers The role of the media cannot be overemphasised in the promotion and protection of breastfeeding Every consequence of note starts and ends with information and education and the media is believed to be the best medium to both educate and inform the public she said NAN reports that various media houses in Kaduna who attended the media roundtable engagement made commitments on various ways and strategies in promoting MIYCN programmes Idris Abdulrahman NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Kaduna Govt. urges media to promote salient issues on maternal, infant nutrition
     The Kaduna State Primary Health Care Board SPHCB on Wednesday urged journalists in the state to promote salient issues on Maternal Infant and Young Child Nutrition MIYCN in the state The Assistant Nutrition Officer of the state Mr Adams Ango made the appeal at a media roundtable in Kaduna on promoting issues around MIYCN The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the media roundtable engagement was done in collaboration with Alive and Thrive project He said that according to Global Multi Dimensional Poverty Index Report 2015 the poverty rate in Kaduna state stood at 56 5 while about 1 6 million children risk malnutrition and Over 800 000 children 48 were stunted He noted that public funding of nutrition was still inadequate and fragmented across sectors leading to delay in implementation of nutrition interventions with consequent unacceptable indices Ango however said that the state had deployed strategies and interventions in curtailing malnutrition and its consequences in the state He said the World Bank Accelerating Nutrition Results in Nigeria ANRiN project provided funding for improving nutrition through MIYCN counselling services It also provided Basic Nutrition Package services across communities in the 23 local governments He added that the state was implementing Community Management of Acute Malnutrition CMAM in 87 health facilities in 17 LGAs across the state with Ready to Use Therapeutic food RUTF Ango stressed that the media if equipped with the knowledge on key issues in MIYCN including code for marketing of breast milk substitute would enhance reportage of the issues for public good He said the objective of this was to discuss the role of the radio and television producers and newspapers editors in promoting MIYCN Also Serah Kwasu A amp T Programmes Manager in Kaduna said maternal and newborn health and nutrition inextricably connected She said globally 295 000 women died due to pregnancy related causes and 2 5 million newborns died within the first month of life Nigeria accounts for over 34 per cent of global maternal deaths Risk of dying during pregnancy childbirth post partum or after an abortion for a Nigerian woman is one in 22 compared to one in 49 000 in developed countries He said 95 per cent of these deaths were preventable nut Nigeria loses about 2 313 children daily translating to 844 321 under five children deaths annually She added that mothers nutrition status and health both before and during pregnancy had significant effects on the outcome of her child A baby s birth weight rate of postnatal growth and chances of survival are all influenced by the mother s health and dietary intake Good nutritional status before during and after pregnancy optimises maternal health and reduces the risk of pregnancy complications birth defects and chronic disease in her children in later adulthood she said Noting nutrition as a fundamental human right she said good maternal nutrition status reduced the risk of anaemia and pregnancy complications among other effects She said Lasting progress in global health and development was achievable through improving nutrition during the critical 1 000 days beginning with adequate maternal nutrition Also Rahila Maishanu the Breast Milk Substitute Desk Officer of the National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control NAFDAC in Kaduna said the World Health Assembly WHA 1981 adopted the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes BMS She explained that the WHA adopted the code as a weapon to protect breastfeeding from the negative impact that aggressive advertising and marketing techniques by Infant Food Manufacturers IFM were having on breastfeeding rates and duration Maishanu further said that NAFDAC was empowered by law to regulate and control the manufacture importation exportation distribution advertisement sale and use of foods drugs cosmetics medical devices and others By the law NAFDAC became the home of the code and the Agency mandated to implement monitor and enforce the provisions of the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes she said She noted that the media needed to be familiar with laws and regulations on marketing breast milk substitutes in Nigeria by training staff to identify and report violations of the code or related National Regulations The media must reject any advertisements promoting breast milk substitute products NAFDAC does not issue advertisement permits for breast milk substitutes Maishanu said She called on media houses to endorse programs which promoted optimal feeding practices for infants and young children She also called for establishment of cr ches in media houses for breastfeeding mothers The role of the media cannot be overemphasised in the promotion and protection of breastfeeding Every consequence of note starts and ends with information and education and the media is believed to be the best medium to both educate and inform the public she said NAN reports that various media houses in Kaduna who attended the media roundtable engagement made commitments on various ways and strategies in promoting MIYCN programmes Idris Abdulrahman NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Kaduna Govt. urges media to promote salient issues on maternal, infant nutrition
    General news1 week ago

    Kaduna Govt. urges media to promote salient issues on maternal, infant nutrition

    The Kaduna State Primary Health Care Board (SPHCB) on Wednesday urged journalists in the state to promote salient issues on Maternal, Infant and Young Child Nutrition (MIYCN) in the state.

    The Assistant Nutrition Officer of the state, Mr. Adams Ango, made the appeal at a media roundtable in Kaduna on promoting issues around MIYCN.

    The News Agency of Nigeria , reports that the media roundtable engagement was done in collaboration with Alive and Thrive project.

    He said that according to Global Multi-Dimensional Poverty Index Report (2015), the poverty rate in Kaduna state stood at 56.5%, while about 1.6 million children risk malnutrition and Over 800,000 children (48%) were stunted.

    He noted that public funding of nutrition was still inadequate and fragmented across sectors leading to delay in implementation of nutrition interventions, with consequent unacceptable indices.

    Ango however said that the state had deployed strategies and interventions in curtailing malnutrition and its consequences in the state.

    He said the World Bank Accelerating Nutrition Results in Nigeria (ANRiN) project, provided funding for improving nutrition through MIYCN counselling services.

    It also provided Basic Nutrition Package services across communities in the 23 local governments.

    He added that the state was implementing Community Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) in 87 health facilities in 17 LGAs across the state with Ready-to-Use Therapeutic food (RUTF).

    Ango stressed that the media, if equipped with the knowledge on key issues in MIYCN, including code for marketing of breast milk substitute, would enhance reportage of the issues for public good.

    He said the objective of this was to discuss the role of the radio and television producers and newspapers editors in promoting MIYCN.

    Also, Serah Kwasu, A&T Programmes Manager in Kaduna, said maternal and newborn health and nutrition inextricably connected.

    She said globally, 295,000 women died due to pregnancy-related causes and 2.5 million newborns died within the first month of life.

    “Nigeria accounts for over 34 per cent of global maternal deaths.

    Risk of dying during pregnancy, childbirth, post partum, or after an abortion for a Nigerian woman is one in 22, compared to one in 49,000 in developed countries.  

    He said “95 per cent of these deaths were preventable nut Nigeria loses about 2,313 children daily translating to 844,321 under-five children deaths annually.  

    She added that mothers nutrition status and health, both before and during pregnancy, had significant effects on the outcome of her child.

    “A baby’s birth weight, rate of postnatal growth and chances of survival are all influenced by the mother’s health and dietary intake.

    “Good nutritional status before, during and after pregnancy optimises maternal health and reduces the risk of pregnancy complications, birth defects and chronic disease in her children in later adulthood,” she said.

    Noting nutrition as a fundamental human right, she said good maternal nutrition status reduced the risk of anaemia and pregnancy complications, among other effects.

    She said Lasting progress in global health and development was achievable through improving nutrition during the critical 1,000 days beginning with adequate maternal nutrition.

    Also, Rahila Maishanu, the Breast Milk Substitute Desk Officer of the National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC) in Kaduna, said the World Health Assembly (WHA), 1981 adopted the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes (BMS).  

    She explained that the WHA adopted the code as a weapon to protect breastfeeding from the negative impact that aggressive advertising and marketing techniques by Infant Food Manufacturers (IFM) were having on breastfeeding rates and duration.

    Maishanu further said that NAFDAC was empowered by law to regulate and control the manufacture, importation, exportation, distribution, advertisement, sale and use of foods, drugs, cosmetics, medical devices and others.

    “By the law, NAFDAC became the home of the code and the Agency mandated to implement, monitor and enforce the provisions of the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes,”she said.

    She noted that the media needed to be familiar with laws and regulations on marketing breast milk substitutes in Nigeria by training staff to identify and report violations of the code or related National Regulations.

    “The media must reject any advertisements promoting breast milk substitute products, NAFDAC does not issue advertisement permits for breast milk substitutes,”Maishanu said.

    She called on media houses to endorse programs which promoted optimal feeding practices for infants and young children.

    She also called for establishment of crèches in media houses for breastfeeding mothers.

    “The role of the media cannot be overemphasised in the promotion and protection of breastfeeding.

    “Every consequence of note starts and ends with information and education and the media is believed to be the best medium to both educate and inform the public,” she said.

    NAN reports that various media houses in Kaduna, who attended the media roundtable engagement, made commitments on various ways and strategies in promoting MIYCN programmes.

    Idris Abdulrahman
    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   The Kingdom of Eswatini has once again hosted delegates from the Eastern Central and Southern African College of Nursing ECSACON for the 15th Biennial Scientific Conference and 7th Quadrennial General Assembly The conference kicked off on a high note in Manzini on September 13 2022 with delegates from 16 countries across East Central and Southern Africa including Uganda South Africa Tanzania Rwanda Zimbabwe Namibia Seychelles and the hosts Eswatini Botswana and Lesotho The last conference was held in the Kingdom in August 1998 under the theme Improving Adolescent Health Nurses and Midwives Working in Partnership with Communities and was officiated by Her Majesty King Mswati III This was one of the most memorable events where the country witnessed nursing and midwifery science experts sharing scientific knowledge and best practices aimed at improving the health of our people The conference was officially opened by the Director General of the World Health Organization WHO Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus Broadcasting a recorded message he began by applauding all the nurses and midwives in South East and Central Africa for their steadfast commitment and courage during the COVID 19 pandemic He also pointed out that there is a shortage of nurses and midwives around the world adding that there is a notable shortage in the African region He mentioned that at the World Health Assembly WHA countries committed to strengthening support and safeguarding nurses midwives and other members of the health care workforce Dr Ghebreyesus highlighted that WHO has developed tools to help countries meet this commitment including the Global Strategy for Nursing and Midwifery He noted that there are encouraging signs of progress in this regard WHO remains committed to helping all countries strengthen their health workforce especially in Africa and we remain committed to supporting all nurses and midwives to ensure they receive quality education a living wage a safe and supportive environment and the respect they deserve he said During the official opening His Excellency the Honorable Acting Prime Minister of Eswatini Themba Masuku recognized the tremendous progress that African countries have made in addressing the health problems of adolescents who due to HIV AIDS suffered a setback in the early 2000s until the discovery of antiretroviral drugs drugs that became a solution to the burden of HIV Masuku reiterated that the extraordinary commitment selflessness passion impartiality and dedication cannot be overstated demonstrated by nurses and midwives to address the health challenges facing communities and meet regional and global goals She added that the Kingdom of Eswatini like other countries in the ECSA region is committed to achieving Universal Health Coverage UHC and that nurses and midwives are essential to achieving UHC through Primary Health Care C you are the first healthcare personnel to interact with patients and sometimes the only healthcare professional a patient will see It provides care support and treatment to the sick injured dying and supports their families and communities he said Masuku noted that the changing burden of disease and new emerging diseases such as COVID 19 have highlighted the need to strengthen the way healthcare is delivered in the ECSA region and the world at large He further stated that this also challenges the nursing and midwifery professions to embrace science and innovation while constantly seeking solutions to the new and complex challenges they face in nurse and midwife production education leadership and management research and practice clinic The acting prime minister also noted that the sub Saharan African region has grown economically over the past two decades with an impressive growth of more than 300 in total GDP since 2000 This growth he noted has been accompanied by increases in health spending and significant gains in health outcomes with improvements in health care and health outcomes directly supported by economic growth in the region Despite the progress Masuku added the region still struggles with the highest disease burden in the world including an emerging double burden of communicable and non communicable diseases This requires investing in the Nursing and Midwifery professions if we want to achieve Universal Health Coverage as well as the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs Similarly the COVID 19 pandemic has profoundly affected nursing education and practice This pandemic has exposed gaps and vulnerabilities in health systems and has presented important lessons for future preparedness he said adding that the conference therefore comes at an opportune time to share lessons learned and learn from each other to contribute to achieving universal health coverage and sustainable development goals We cannot succeed without each other and we must engage with respect and dignity while seeking guidance from standards and principles that have evolved through time experience and collective wisdom The conference was attended by over 400 nurses who took the time to observe a moment of silence for all the nurses and midwives who have lost their lives due to COVID 19 Delegates also recommitted to faithfully practicing the profession and upholding and upholding the standard of the nursing profession ECSACON has contributed for the past 32 years to capacity building in nursing education regulation and practice She has contributed to several studies including the State of the World Nursing report and the World Midwifery report to name a few
    Eswatini hosts the 15th Biennial Conference of the Eastern, Central and Southern Africa College of Nursing
      The Kingdom of Eswatini has once again hosted delegates from the Eastern Central and Southern African College of Nursing ECSACON for the 15th Biennial Scientific Conference and 7th Quadrennial General Assembly The conference kicked off on a high note in Manzini on September 13 2022 with delegates from 16 countries across East Central and Southern Africa including Uganda South Africa Tanzania Rwanda Zimbabwe Namibia Seychelles and the hosts Eswatini Botswana and Lesotho The last conference was held in the Kingdom in August 1998 under the theme Improving Adolescent Health Nurses and Midwives Working in Partnership with Communities and was officiated by Her Majesty King Mswati III This was one of the most memorable events where the country witnessed nursing and midwifery science experts sharing scientific knowledge and best practices aimed at improving the health of our people The conference was officially opened by the Director General of the World Health Organization WHO Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus Broadcasting a recorded message he began by applauding all the nurses and midwives in South East and Central Africa for their steadfast commitment and courage during the COVID 19 pandemic He also pointed out that there is a shortage of nurses and midwives around the world adding that there is a notable shortage in the African region He mentioned that at the World Health Assembly WHA countries committed to strengthening support and safeguarding nurses midwives and other members of the health care workforce Dr Ghebreyesus highlighted that WHO has developed tools to help countries meet this commitment including the Global Strategy for Nursing and Midwifery He noted that there are encouraging signs of progress in this regard WHO remains committed to helping all countries strengthen their health workforce especially in Africa and we remain committed to supporting all nurses and midwives to ensure they receive quality education a living wage a safe and supportive environment and the respect they deserve he said During the official opening His Excellency the Honorable Acting Prime Minister of Eswatini Themba Masuku recognized the tremendous progress that African countries have made in addressing the health problems of adolescents who due to HIV AIDS suffered a setback in the early 2000s until the discovery of antiretroviral drugs drugs that became a solution to the burden of HIV Masuku reiterated that the extraordinary commitment selflessness passion impartiality and dedication cannot be overstated demonstrated by nurses and midwives to address the health challenges facing communities and meet regional and global goals She added that the Kingdom of Eswatini like other countries in the ECSA region is committed to achieving Universal Health Coverage UHC and that nurses and midwives are essential to achieving UHC through Primary Health Care C you are the first healthcare personnel to interact with patients and sometimes the only healthcare professional a patient will see It provides care support and treatment to the sick injured dying and supports their families and communities he said Masuku noted that the changing burden of disease and new emerging diseases such as COVID 19 have highlighted the need to strengthen the way healthcare is delivered in the ECSA region and the world at large He further stated that this also challenges the nursing and midwifery professions to embrace science and innovation while constantly seeking solutions to the new and complex challenges they face in nurse and midwife production education leadership and management research and practice clinic The acting prime minister also noted that the sub Saharan African region has grown economically over the past two decades with an impressive growth of more than 300 in total GDP since 2000 This growth he noted has been accompanied by increases in health spending and significant gains in health outcomes with improvements in health care and health outcomes directly supported by economic growth in the region Despite the progress Masuku added the region still struggles with the highest disease burden in the world including an emerging double burden of communicable and non communicable diseases This requires investing in the Nursing and Midwifery professions if we want to achieve Universal Health Coverage as well as the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs Similarly the COVID 19 pandemic has profoundly affected nursing education and practice This pandemic has exposed gaps and vulnerabilities in health systems and has presented important lessons for future preparedness he said adding that the conference therefore comes at an opportune time to share lessons learned and learn from each other to contribute to achieving universal health coverage and sustainable development goals We cannot succeed without each other and we must engage with respect and dignity while seeking guidance from standards and principles that have evolved through time experience and collective wisdom The conference was attended by over 400 nurses who took the time to observe a moment of silence for all the nurses and midwives who have lost their lives due to COVID 19 Delegates also recommitted to faithfully practicing the profession and upholding and upholding the standard of the nursing profession ECSACON has contributed for the past 32 years to capacity building in nursing education regulation and practice She has contributed to several studies including the State of the World Nursing report and the World Midwifery report to name a few
    Eswatini hosts the 15th Biennial Conference of the Eastern, Central and Southern Africa College of Nursing
    Africa2 weeks ago

    Eswatini hosts the 15th Biennial Conference of the Eastern, Central and Southern Africa College of Nursing

    The Kingdom of Eswatini has once again hosted delegates from the Eastern, Central and Southern African College of Nursing (ECSACON) for the 15th Biennial Scientific Conference and 7th Quadrennial General Assembly.

    The conference kicked off on a high note in Manzini on September 13, 2022, with delegates from 16 countries across East, Central and Southern Africa, including Uganda, South Africa, Tanzania, Rwanda, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Seychelles, and the hosts Eswatini, Botswana and Lesotho.

    The last conference was held in the Kingdom in August 1998, under the theme: 'Improving Adolescent Health: Nurses and Midwives Working in Partnership with Communities' and was officiated by Her Majesty King Mswati III.

    This was one of the most memorable events where the country witnessed nursing and midwifery science experts sharing scientific knowledge and best practices aimed at improving the health of our people.

    The conference was officially opened by the Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO), Dr. Tedros Ghebreyesus.

    Broadcasting a recorded message, he began by applauding all the nurses and midwives in South, East and Central Africa for their steadfast commitment and courage during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    He also pointed out that there is a shortage of nurses and midwives around the world, adding that there is a notable shortage in the African region.

    He mentioned that at the World Health Assembly (WHA), countries committed to strengthening support and safeguarding nurses, midwives and other members of the health care workforce.

    Dr. Ghebreyesus highlighted that WHO has developed tools to help countries meet this commitment, including the Global Strategy for Nursing and Midwifery.

    He noted that there are encouraging signs of progress in this regard.

    “WHO remains committed to helping all countries strengthen their health workforce, especially in Africa, and we remain committed to supporting all nurses and midwives to ensure they receive quality education, a living wage, a safe and supportive environment, and the respect they deserve.

    " he said.

    During the official opening, His Excellency the Honorable Acting Prime Minister of Eswatini Themba Masuku recognized the tremendous progress that African countries have made in addressing the health problems of adolescents who, due to HIV/AIDS, suffered a setback in the early 2000s until the discovery of antiretroviral drugs drugs that became a solution to the burden of HIV Masuku reiterated that the extraordinary commitment, selflessness, passion, impartiality and dedication cannot be overstated demonstrated by nurses and midwives to address the health challenges facing communities and meet regional and global goals She added that the Kingdom of Eswatini, like other countries in the ECSA region, is committed to achieving Universal Health Coverage (UHC) and that nurses and midwives are essential to achieving (UHC) through Primary Health Care. C, you are the first healthcare personnel to interact with patients and sometimes the only healthcare professional a patient will see.

    It provides care, support and treatment to the sick, injured, dying and supports their families and communities,” he said.

    Masuku noted that the changing burden of disease and new emerging diseases such as COVID-19 have highlighted the need to strengthen the way healthcare is delivered in the ECSA region and the world at large.

    He further stated that this also challenges the nursing and midwifery professions to embrace science and innovation while constantly seeking solutions to the new and complex challenges they face in nurse and midwife production (education), leadership and management, research and practice.

    clinic.

    The acting prime minister also noted that the sub-Saharan African region has grown economically over the past two decades with an impressive growth of more than 300% in total GDP since 2000.

    This growth, he noted, has been accompanied by increases in health spending.

    and significant gains in health outcomes with improvements in health care and health outcomes directly supported by economic growth in the region.

    Despite the progress, Masuku added, the region still struggles with the highest disease burden in the world, including an emerging double burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases.

    “This requires investing in the Nursing and Midwifery professions if we want to achieve Universal Health Coverage, as well as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

    “Similarly, the COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly affected nursing education and practice.

    This pandemic has exposed gaps and vulnerabilities in health systems and has presented important lessons for future preparedness,” he said, adding that the conference therefore comes at an opportune time to share lessons learned and learn from each other to contribute to achieving universal health.

    coverage and sustainable development goals.

    "We cannot succeed without each other, and we must engage with respect and dignity while seeking guidance from standards and principles that have evolved through time, experience and collective wisdom."

    The conference was attended by over 400 nurses who took the time to observe a moment of silence for all the nurses and midwives who have lost their lives due to COVID-19.

    Delegates also recommitted to faithfully practicing the profession and upholding and upholding the standard of the nursing profession.

    ECSACON has contributed for the past 32 years to capacity building in nursing education, regulation and practice.

    She has contributed to several studies, including the State of the World Nursing report and the World Midwifery report, to name a few.

  •  Aisha Musa a Pediatrician at Minna General Hospital has stressed the importance of first breast milk that comes out of a mother after giving birth saying it is the best part of breast milk She said this at a symposium to commemorate the 2022 World Breastfeeding Week WBW which is annually marked from Aug 1 to Aug 7 around the world The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the WBW which has Step Up Breastfeeding Educate and Support as its theme for 2022 is a global campaign to raise awareness and galvanise action on themes related to breastfeeding NAN also reports that WBW started in 1992 with annual themes including healthcare systems women and work education and human rights among others Since 2016 WBW is aligned with the UN Sustainable Development Goals SDGs and in 2018 a World Health Assembly WHA resolution endorsed the week as an important breastfeeding promotion strategy The pediatrician therefore said during the event organised by the Niger State Primary Health Care Development Agency in collaboration with UNICEF that nursing mothers should not deny babies the first breast milk immediately after delivery Musa explained that the first breast milk known as colostrum yellowish in colour should be fed to a baby as it has nutrients concentration a child needs She said mothers should also breastfeed their babies after the first breast milk to enable the child access foremilk and hindmilk Foremilk is the milk a baby takes at the beginning of feeding and hindmilk follows it Typically foremilk is mostly water combined with other nutrients and hindmilk is highly fatty Both contain lactose that your baby needs to develop properly Colostrum is the first yellow milk that comes out from a woman s breast immediately after giving birth colostrum contains antibodies a child needs it is the first immunisation a child gets in life Any child that is not given the colostrum is easily exposed to disease therefore the habit of throwing away the first breastmilk should be stopped in communities she said Musa also stressed the importance of exclusive breastfeeding for the child s survival and development adding that the practice is to protect the child from sickness and improve bonding In her remarks Mrs Chinwe Ezeife the Nutrition Specialist UNICEF Kaduna Field Office pledged the agency s continuous collaboration with Niger Government to protect promote and support breastfeeding and other activities in the state She said we have trained community volunteers who have been going from house to house to educate women on the need to embrace exclusive breastfeeding Ezeife disclosed that UNICEF in collaboration with the National Orientation Agency and the State Primary Health Care Development Agency would engage traditional and religious leaders to support women in their domains to breastfeed She added that the organisation would also help in improving capacity of health workers on how they could support mothers to embrace breastfeeding Asmau Abubakar Nutrition Officer in the state said the government partnered various organisations such as Accelerating Nutrition Results Result in Nigeria project to improve nutrition among women NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Pediatrician stresses importance of first breast milk for babies
     Aisha Musa a Pediatrician at Minna General Hospital has stressed the importance of first breast milk that comes out of a mother after giving birth saying it is the best part of breast milk She said this at a symposium to commemorate the 2022 World Breastfeeding Week WBW which is annually marked from Aug 1 to Aug 7 around the world The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the WBW which has Step Up Breastfeeding Educate and Support as its theme for 2022 is a global campaign to raise awareness and galvanise action on themes related to breastfeeding NAN also reports that WBW started in 1992 with annual themes including healthcare systems women and work education and human rights among others Since 2016 WBW is aligned with the UN Sustainable Development Goals SDGs and in 2018 a World Health Assembly WHA resolution endorsed the week as an important breastfeeding promotion strategy The pediatrician therefore said during the event organised by the Niger State Primary Health Care Development Agency in collaboration with UNICEF that nursing mothers should not deny babies the first breast milk immediately after delivery Musa explained that the first breast milk known as colostrum yellowish in colour should be fed to a baby as it has nutrients concentration a child needs She said mothers should also breastfeed their babies after the first breast milk to enable the child access foremilk and hindmilk Foremilk is the milk a baby takes at the beginning of feeding and hindmilk follows it Typically foremilk is mostly water combined with other nutrients and hindmilk is highly fatty Both contain lactose that your baby needs to develop properly Colostrum is the first yellow milk that comes out from a woman s breast immediately after giving birth colostrum contains antibodies a child needs it is the first immunisation a child gets in life Any child that is not given the colostrum is easily exposed to disease therefore the habit of throwing away the first breastmilk should be stopped in communities she said Musa also stressed the importance of exclusive breastfeeding for the child s survival and development adding that the practice is to protect the child from sickness and improve bonding In her remarks Mrs Chinwe Ezeife the Nutrition Specialist UNICEF Kaduna Field Office pledged the agency s continuous collaboration with Niger Government to protect promote and support breastfeeding and other activities in the state She said we have trained community volunteers who have been going from house to house to educate women on the need to embrace exclusive breastfeeding Ezeife disclosed that UNICEF in collaboration with the National Orientation Agency and the State Primary Health Care Development Agency would engage traditional and religious leaders to support women in their domains to breastfeed She added that the organisation would also help in improving capacity of health workers on how they could support mothers to embrace breastfeeding Asmau Abubakar Nutrition Officer in the state said the government partnered various organisations such as Accelerating Nutrition Results Result in Nigeria project to improve nutrition among women NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Pediatrician stresses importance of first breast milk for babies
    General news2 months ago

    Pediatrician stresses importance of first breast milk for babies

    Aisha Musa, a Pediatrician at Minna General Hospital, has stressed the importance of first breast milk that comes out of a mother after giving birth, saying it is the best part of breast milk.

    She said this at a symposium to commemorate the 2022 World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) which is annually marked from Aug. 1 to Aug. 7 around the world.

    The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the WBW, which has “Step Up Breastfeeding, Educate and Support” as its theme for 2022 is a global campaign to raise awareness and galvanise action on themes related to breastfeeding.

    NAN also reports that WBW started in 1992, with annual themes including healthcare systems, women and work, education and human rights, among others.

    Since 2016, WBW is aligned with the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and in 2018, a World Health Assembly (WHA) resolution endorsed the week as an important breastfeeding promotion strategy.

    The pediatrician, therefore, said during the event, organised by the Niger State Primary Health Care Development Agency in collaboration with UNICEF, that nursing mothers should not deny babies the first breast milk immediately after delivery.

    Musa explained that the first breast milk known as “colostrum”, yellowish in colour should be fed to a baby as it has nutrients’ concentration a child needs.

    She said mothers should also breastfeed their babies after the first breast milk to enable the child access foremilk and hindmilk.

    “Foremilk is the milk a baby takes at the beginning of feeding and hindmilk follows it.

    ‌‌Typically, foremilk is mostly water combined with other nutrients, and hindmilk is highly fatty.

    Both contain lactose that your baby needs to develop properly.

    “Colostrum is the first yellow milk that comes out from a woman’s breast immediately after giving birth; colostrum contains antibodies a child needs; it is the first immunisation a child gets in life.

    “Any child that is not given the colostrum is easily exposed to disease, therefore, the habit of throwing away the first breastmilk should be stopped in communities,” she said.

    Musa also stressed the importance of exclusive breastfeeding for the child’s survival and development, adding that the practice is to protect the child from sickness and improve bonding.

    In her remarks, Mrs Chinwe Ezeife, the Nutrition Specialist, UNICEF Kaduna Field Office, pledged the agency’s continuous collaboration with Niger Government to protect, promote and support breastfeeding and other activities in the state.

    She said “we have trained community volunteers who have been going from house to house to educate women on the need to embrace exclusive breastfeeding.

    ” Ezeife disclosed that UNICEF, in collaboration with the National Orientation Agency and the State Primary Health Care Development Agency would engage traditional and religious leaders to support women in their domains to breastfeed.

    She added that the organisation would also help in improving capacity of health workers on how they could support mothers to embrace breastfeeding.

    Asmau Abubakar, Nutrition Officer in the state, said the government partnered various organisations such as Accelerating Nutrition Results Result in Nigeria project to improve nutrition among women.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  A Nutritionist Dr Olugbenga Bankole has advised working mothers to express their breasts milk through breast pumps to breast feed their babies Bankole who is the Programme Manager Nutrition Department Kwara State Primary Healthcare Development Agency gave the advice on Thursday in Ilorin while speaking with journalists on the sidelines of the commemoration of World Breastfeeding Month 2022 The breastfeeding month slated yearly in August is dedicated to advancing advocacy protection and promotion of breastfeeding to ensure that all families have the opportunity to breastfeed The theme for the 2022 week Step Up for Breastfeeding Educate and Support is meant to encourage organisations and nations to create safeguards for breastfeeding Bankole who also advised that mothers should breastfeed their children for six months after birth said that antibodies in breast milk aide the infant s defense against germs and viruses He said that working mothers had no excuse not to breastfeed their babies because expressed milk squeezing milk from a nursing mother s breasts could last up to four days without deteriorating Milk that has been expressed can last for four days in the refrigerator and last six months while in the freezer he said According to him the advent of COVID 19 in 2020 saw a significant rise of about 70 per cent of women in Kwara that were breastfeeding their babies He however said that there was a decline to about 55 per cent in 202 adding that the State Committee on Nutrition ensured that strategic places were designated across the Ministries Department and Agencies for working mothers to breastfeed their babies He said that there was need for mothers to breastfeed their babies for about eight times daily and for every three hours because it was important that babies were breastfed frequently rather than only on demand Bankole said that Nigeria signed the International Code of Marketing of Breast milk Substitutes an international health policy framework for breastfeeding promotion adopted by the World Health Assembly WHA He explained that the Code was developed as a global public health strategy and recommended restrictions on the marketing of breast milk substitutes such as infant formula to encourage to breastfeed and that substitutes were used safely if needed He said that the Code also covered ethical considerations and regulations for the marketing of feeding bottles and teats adding that breast milk substitute could be used only in special circumstances such as for orphans He said that services of Wet nurses a woman employed to suckle another woman s child could be utilised if possible even though the practice is subject to the socio cultural tradition of a place Bankole added that the issue of breastfeeding was multi faceted requiring the support of the father Obstetricians Gynaecologists midwives and even the community at large He said Warm Chain campaign places the mother baby father and other stakeholders as part of the chain to effective breastfeeding It strives to link different actors across the health community and workplace sectors to provide a continuum of care during the first six months of the baby life he said NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Nutritionist advises working mothers on breastfeeding
     A Nutritionist Dr Olugbenga Bankole has advised working mothers to express their breasts milk through breast pumps to breast feed their babies Bankole who is the Programme Manager Nutrition Department Kwara State Primary Healthcare Development Agency gave the advice on Thursday in Ilorin while speaking with journalists on the sidelines of the commemoration of World Breastfeeding Month 2022 The breastfeeding month slated yearly in August is dedicated to advancing advocacy protection and promotion of breastfeeding to ensure that all families have the opportunity to breastfeed The theme for the 2022 week Step Up for Breastfeeding Educate and Support is meant to encourage organisations and nations to create safeguards for breastfeeding Bankole who also advised that mothers should breastfeed their children for six months after birth said that antibodies in breast milk aide the infant s defense against germs and viruses He said that working mothers had no excuse not to breastfeed their babies because expressed milk squeezing milk from a nursing mother s breasts could last up to four days without deteriorating Milk that has been expressed can last for four days in the refrigerator and last six months while in the freezer he said According to him the advent of COVID 19 in 2020 saw a significant rise of about 70 per cent of women in Kwara that were breastfeeding their babies He however said that there was a decline to about 55 per cent in 202 adding that the State Committee on Nutrition ensured that strategic places were designated across the Ministries Department and Agencies for working mothers to breastfeed their babies He said that there was need for mothers to breastfeed their babies for about eight times daily and for every three hours because it was important that babies were breastfed frequently rather than only on demand Bankole said that Nigeria signed the International Code of Marketing of Breast milk Substitutes an international health policy framework for breastfeeding promotion adopted by the World Health Assembly WHA He explained that the Code was developed as a global public health strategy and recommended restrictions on the marketing of breast milk substitutes such as infant formula to encourage to breastfeed and that substitutes were used safely if needed He said that the Code also covered ethical considerations and regulations for the marketing of feeding bottles and teats adding that breast milk substitute could be used only in special circumstances such as for orphans He said that services of Wet nurses a woman employed to suckle another woman s child could be utilised if possible even though the practice is subject to the socio cultural tradition of a place Bankole added that the issue of breastfeeding was multi faceted requiring the support of the father Obstetricians Gynaecologists midwives and even the community at large He said Warm Chain campaign places the mother baby father and other stakeholders as part of the chain to effective breastfeeding It strives to link different actors across the health community and workplace sectors to provide a continuum of care during the first six months of the baby life he said NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Nutritionist advises working mothers on breastfeeding
    General news2 months ago

    Nutritionist advises working mothers on breastfeeding

    A Nutritionist, Dr Olugbenga Bankole, has advised working mothers to express their breasts milk through breast pumps to breast feed their babies.

    Bankole, who is the Programme Manager, Nutrition Department, Kwara State Primary Healthcare Development Agency, gave the advice on Thursday in Ilorin while speaking with journalists on the sidelines of the commemoration of World Breastfeeding Month 2022. The breastfeeding month, slated yearly in August, is dedicated to advancing advocacy, protection and promotion of breastfeeding to ensure that all families have the opportunity to breastfeed.

    The theme for the 2022 week, “Step Up for Breastfeeding: Educate and Support”, is meant to encourage organisations and nations to create safeguards for breastfeeding.

    Bankole, who also advised that mothers should breastfeed their children for six months after birth, said that antibodies in breast milk aide the infant’s defense against germs and viruses.

    He said that working mothers had no excuse not to breastfeed their babies because expressed milk (squeezing milk from a nursing mother’s breasts) could last up to four days without deteriorating.

    “Milk that has been expressed can last for four days in the refrigerator and last six months while in the freezer,” he said.

    According to him, the advent of COVID-19 in 2020 saw a significant rise of about 70 per cent of women in Kwara that were breastfeeding their babies.

    He, however, said that there was a decline to about 55 per cent in 202, adding that the State Committee on Nutrition ensured that strategic places were designated across the Ministries, Department and Agencies for working mothers to breastfeed their babies.

    He said that there was need for mothers to breastfeed their babies for about eight times daily and for every three hours because it was important that babies were breastfed frequently rather than only on demand.

    Bankole said that Nigeria signed the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes, an international health policy framework for breastfeeding promotion adopted by the World Health Assembly (WHA).

    He explained that the Code was developed as a global public health strategy and recommended restrictions on the marketing of breast milk substitutes, such as infant formula, to encourage to breastfeed and that substitutes were used safely, if needed.

    He said that the Code also covered ethical considerations and regulations for the marketing of feeding bottles and teats, adding that breast milk substitute could be used only in special circumstances such as for orphans.

    He said that services of Wet-nurses (a woman employed to suckle another woman’s child) could be utilised if possible “even though the practice is subject to the socio-cultural tradition of a place”.

    Bankole added that the issue of breastfeeding was multi-faceted requiring the support of the father, Obstetricians, Gynaecologists, midwives and even the community at large.

    He said:  “Warm Chain campaign” places the mother-baby, father and other stakeholders as part of the chain to effective breastfeeding.

    “It strives to link different actors across the health, community and workplace sectors to provide a continuum of care during the first six months of the baby life,” he said.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   FG begins implementation of 5 year NSOANP in National HoThe Federal Government is set to begin the implementation of the National Surgical Obstetrics Anesthesia and Nursing Plan NSOANP 2019 2023 Dr Obiajulu Ugbo the Head Coordinating Unit Department of Hospital Services Ministry of Health disclosed this on Thursday while presenting the NSOANP working document to Dr Aisha Umar the acting Chief Medical Director CMD National Hospital Abuja Ugbo said that the plan was developed in line with a World Health Assembly WHA Resolution of 2015 that states that surgical obstetric anesthesia and nursing care are important components of Universal Health Coverage UHC According to her this means that UHC is complete when surgeries are fully integrated into healthcare services She added that the five year plan which was inaugurated in May 2019 could not kick off due to the COVID 19 pandemic restrictions The coordinating unit head said the aim of the plan is to strengthen existing infrastructure and equipment achieve access to surgical care of both adults and children by the year 2023 and increase middle level workforce She said this policy aims to increase the density of surgeons anesthetics obstetricians and plan training of middle level workforce Also a very key point is that the policy aims to achieve financial risk protection by health insurance for 50 per cent of the population by 2023 This policy also aims to strengthen healthcare governance and leadership The plan relies on realistic baseline findings surgical disease burden surgical situation analysis and reveals gaps and challenges with information and data for planning She said it was expected that the hospital would embrace and support the plan by designating a desk officer for continuous liaison with the ministry and also come up with a budget for the plan in the next budget cycle We are just disseminating the plan at this stage and it is at the level of the implementation it will be reviewed and then we can give you our success stories Ugbo said She added that the policy was being disseminated to all federal tertiary hospitals and the state ministries of health which are expected to trickle it down to the primary healthcare level Responding the acting CMD applauded the Federal Government for coming up with such plan She said that the time of implementation should be extended to give room for time lost due to the COVID 19 pandemic On its implementation she said that the hospital would get a desk officer to work with the team of nurses and surgeons and document what they do and report to the ministry She assured that the hospital would do its best to implement the plan and expressed the hope that financing would be provided by health insurance for Nigerians who would be taken to the hospital but cannot afford its services Umar said that migration of medical personnel was a huge problem and that something should be done to retain available manpower She added that we know that the healthcare resource in Africa is moving because of migration I hope that the committee will note this and do something to retain the manpower that we have struggled to train in Nigeria Recently the National Hospital management presented to the board this problem graphically where we lost 34 consultants in one year It is a big problem we know the impact and sometimes we try to let people know that new recruits cannot replace experienced clinicians A doctor that worked for 22 years cannot be replaced by someone that graduated yesterday it is not a simple matter of employment We will do what we can do to drive the message that migration is a big problem and it is affecting healthcare delivery in our institutions NewsSourceCredit NAN
    FG begins implementation of 5-year NSOANP in National Hospital, others
      FG begins implementation of 5 year NSOANP in National HoThe Federal Government is set to begin the implementation of the National Surgical Obstetrics Anesthesia and Nursing Plan NSOANP 2019 2023 Dr Obiajulu Ugbo the Head Coordinating Unit Department of Hospital Services Ministry of Health disclosed this on Thursday while presenting the NSOANP working document to Dr Aisha Umar the acting Chief Medical Director CMD National Hospital Abuja Ugbo said that the plan was developed in line with a World Health Assembly WHA Resolution of 2015 that states that surgical obstetric anesthesia and nursing care are important components of Universal Health Coverage UHC According to her this means that UHC is complete when surgeries are fully integrated into healthcare services She added that the five year plan which was inaugurated in May 2019 could not kick off due to the COVID 19 pandemic restrictions The coordinating unit head said the aim of the plan is to strengthen existing infrastructure and equipment achieve access to surgical care of both adults and children by the year 2023 and increase middle level workforce She said this policy aims to increase the density of surgeons anesthetics obstetricians and plan training of middle level workforce Also a very key point is that the policy aims to achieve financial risk protection by health insurance for 50 per cent of the population by 2023 This policy also aims to strengthen healthcare governance and leadership The plan relies on realistic baseline findings surgical disease burden surgical situation analysis and reveals gaps and challenges with information and data for planning She said it was expected that the hospital would embrace and support the plan by designating a desk officer for continuous liaison with the ministry and also come up with a budget for the plan in the next budget cycle We are just disseminating the plan at this stage and it is at the level of the implementation it will be reviewed and then we can give you our success stories Ugbo said She added that the policy was being disseminated to all federal tertiary hospitals and the state ministries of health which are expected to trickle it down to the primary healthcare level Responding the acting CMD applauded the Federal Government for coming up with such plan She said that the time of implementation should be extended to give room for time lost due to the COVID 19 pandemic On its implementation she said that the hospital would get a desk officer to work with the team of nurses and surgeons and document what they do and report to the ministry She assured that the hospital would do its best to implement the plan and expressed the hope that financing would be provided by health insurance for Nigerians who would be taken to the hospital but cannot afford its services Umar said that migration of medical personnel was a huge problem and that something should be done to retain available manpower She added that we know that the healthcare resource in Africa is moving because of migration I hope that the committee will note this and do something to retain the manpower that we have struggled to train in Nigeria Recently the National Hospital management presented to the board this problem graphically where we lost 34 consultants in one year It is a big problem we know the impact and sometimes we try to let people know that new recruits cannot replace experienced clinicians A doctor that worked for 22 years cannot be replaced by someone that graduated yesterday it is not a simple matter of employment We will do what we can do to drive the message that migration is a big problem and it is affecting healthcare delivery in our institutions NewsSourceCredit NAN
    FG begins implementation of 5-year NSOANP in National Hospital, others
    General news2 months ago

    FG begins implementation of 5-year NSOANP in National Hospital, others

    FG begins implementation of 5-year NSOANP in National HoThe Federal Government is set to begin the implementation of the National Surgical, Obstetrics, Anesthesia and Nursing Plan (NSOANP) 2019-2023.

    Dr Obiajulu Ugbo, the Head, Coordinating Unit, Department of Hospital Services, Ministry of Health, disclosed this on Thursday while presenting the NSOANP working document to Dr Aisha Umar, the acting Chief Medical Director (CMD), National Hospital, Abuja.

    Ugbo said that the plan was developed in line with a World Health Assembly (WHA) Resolution of 2015 that states that surgical, obstetric, anesthesia and nursing care are important components of Universal Health Coverage (UHC).

    According to her, this means that UHC is complete when surgeries are fully integrated into healthcare services.

    She added that the five-year plan which was inaugurated in May 2019 could not kick off due to the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions.

    The coordinating unit head said the aim of the plan is to strengthen existing infrastructure and equipment, achieve access to surgical care of both adults and children by the year 2023 and increase middle level workforce.

    She said “this policy aims to increase the density of surgeons, anesthetics, obstetricians and plan training of middle level workforce.

    “Also a very key point is that the policy aims to achieve financial risk protection by health insurance for 50 per cent of the population by 2023.

    “This policy also aims to strengthen healthcare governance and leadership.

    “The plan relies on realistic baseline findings, surgical disease burden, surgical situation analysis and reveals gaps and challenges with information and data for planning.” She said it was expected that the hospital would embrace and support the plan by designating a desk officer for continuous liaison with the ministry and also come up with a budget for the plan in the next budget cycle.

    “We are just disseminating the plan at this stage and it is at the level of the implementation it will be reviewed and then we can give you our success stories,” Ugbo said.

    She added that the policy was being disseminated to all federal tertiary hospitals and the state ministries of health which are expected to trickle it down to the primary healthcare level.

    Responding, the acting CMD applauded the Federal Government for coming up with such plan.

    She said that the time of implementation should be extended to give room for time lost due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    On its implementation, she said that the hospital would get a desk officer to work with the team of nurses and surgeons and document what they do and report to the ministry.

    She assured that the hospital would do its best to implement the plan, and expressed the hope that financing would be provided by health insurance for Nigerians who would be taken to the hospital but cannot afford its services.

    Umar said that migration of medical personnel was a huge problem and that something should be done to retain available manpower.

    She added that “we know that the healthcare resource in Africa is moving because of migration.

    I hope that the committee will note this and do something to retain the manpower that we have struggled to train in Nigeria.

    “Recently, the National Hospital management presented to the board this problem graphically, where we lost 34 consultants in one year.

    “It is a big problem; we know the impact and sometimes we try to let people know that new recruits cannot replace experienced clinicians.

    “A doctor that worked for 22 years cannot be replaced by someone that graduated yesterday; it is not a simple matter of employment.

    “We will do what we can do to drive the message that migration is a big problem and it is affecting healthcare delivery in our institutions.” (

    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   The World Health Organization WHO says that cases of the new Omicron variant have been reported in at least 23 countries in five of the six WHO regions WHO Director General Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus unveiled in Geneva on Wednesday saying the number of cases is expected to rise WHO takes this development extremely seriously and all countries should too he told reporters listening to the agency s regular virtual briefing on COVID 19 But it shouldn t surprise us That is what viruses do And this is what this virus will continue to do as long as we allow it to continue spreading he said Preliminary evidence suggests that Omicron may have a potential immune escape and or possibly increased transmissibility compared to previous variants of concern according to the latest WHO weekly epidemiological update on COVID 19 also released Wednesday He said experts were learning more about the variant but there is still more to learn about its effect on transmission the severity of the disease and the effectiveness of tests therapeutics and vaccines The WHO chief urged countries to take rational and proportionate risk reduction measures including those aimed at delaying or reducing the spread such as screening passengers or implementing quarantines for international travelers However he stressed that blanket travel bans would not prevent the international spread of Omicron and place a heavy burden on lives and livelihoods Ghebreyesus stressed the need to continue public health measures against the spread of the coronavirus and ensure that vulnerable and high risk people are fully vaccinated He cautioned that the current toxic mix of low vaccine coverage and very low evidence is a recipe for variant breeding and amplification We need to use the tools we already have to prevent transmission and save Delta s lives And if we do that we will also prevent transmission and save Omicron s lives But if countries and people don t do what they need to do to stop Delta s broadcast they won t stop Omicron either he said As of Tuesday there were more than 261 million confirmed COVID 19 cases worldwide and 5 2 million deaths and the Delta variant continued to dominate Meanwhile the director general said that the agreement of countries to launch a process to develop a new global agreement on preventing and responding to a pandemic is cause for hope Ghebreyesus welcomed the consensus decision reached during a special session of the World Health Assembly WHA the UN agency s highest decision making body which was attended by representatives of its 194 member states The three day meeting began on Monday with the sole objective of considering the benefits of creating a new international agreement on preparedness for pandemic prevention and how best to avoid the pitfalls that have clouded an effective response to COVID 19 This was only the second time that the assembly met in a special session since the WHO was founded in 1948 The adoption of this decision is cause for celebration and reason for hope which we will need he said in his closing remarks although he noted that the road ahead is long There are still differences of opinion about what a new agreement could or should contain But you have shown each other and the world that differences can be overcome and common ground can be found The decision will establish an Intergovernmental Negotiating Body INB that will negotiate and draft any convention agreement or other international instruments A first meeting will take place no later than March 1 2022 and public hearings will also be held to inform the deliberations INB will deliver a progress report to the World Health Assembly in 2023 and present its results for consideration the following year YAYA
    COVID-19: Omicron variant now in 23 countries – WHO
      The World Health Organization WHO says that cases of the new Omicron variant have been reported in at least 23 countries in five of the six WHO regions WHO Director General Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus unveiled in Geneva on Wednesday saying the number of cases is expected to rise WHO takes this development extremely seriously and all countries should too he told reporters listening to the agency s regular virtual briefing on COVID 19 But it shouldn t surprise us That is what viruses do And this is what this virus will continue to do as long as we allow it to continue spreading he said Preliminary evidence suggests that Omicron may have a potential immune escape and or possibly increased transmissibility compared to previous variants of concern according to the latest WHO weekly epidemiological update on COVID 19 also released Wednesday He said experts were learning more about the variant but there is still more to learn about its effect on transmission the severity of the disease and the effectiveness of tests therapeutics and vaccines The WHO chief urged countries to take rational and proportionate risk reduction measures including those aimed at delaying or reducing the spread such as screening passengers or implementing quarantines for international travelers However he stressed that blanket travel bans would not prevent the international spread of Omicron and place a heavy burden on lives and livelihoods Ghebreyesus stressed the need to continue public health measures against the spread of the coronavirus and ensure that vulnerable and high risk people are fully vaccinated He cautioned that the current toxic mix of low vaccine coverage and very low evidence is a recipe for variant breeding and amplification We need to use the tools we already have to prevent transmission and save Delta s lives And if we do that we will also prevent transmission and save Omicron s lives But if countries and people don t do what they need to do to stop Delta s broadcast they won t stop Omicron either he said As of Tuesday there were more than 261 million confirmed COVID 19 cases worldwide and 5 2 million deaths and the Delta variant continued to dominate Meanwhile the director general said that the agreement of countries to launch a process to develop a new global agreement on preventing and responding to a pandemic is cause for hope Ghebreyesus welcomed the consensus decision reached during a special session of the World Health Assembly WHA the UN agency s highest decision making body which was attended by representatives of its 194 member states The three day meeting began on Monday with the sole objective of considering the benefits of creating a new international agreement on preparedness for pandemic prevention and how best to avoid the pitfalls that have clouded an effective response to COVID 19 This was only the second time that the assembly met in a special session since the WHO was founded in 1948 The adoption of this decision is cause for celebration and reason for hope which we will need he said in his closing remarks although he noted that the road ahead is long There are still differences of opinion about what a new agreement could or should contain But you have shown each other and the world that differences can be overcome and common ground can be found The decision will establish an Intergovernmental Negotiating Body INB that will negotiate and draft any convention agreement or other international instruments A first meeting will take place no later than March 1 2022 and public hearings will also be held to inform the deliberations INB will deliver a progress report to the World Health Assembly in 2023 and present its results for consideration the following year YAYA
    COVID-19: Omicron variant now in 23 countries – WHO
    Headlines10 months ago

    COVID-19: Omicron variant now in 23 countries – WHO

    The World Health Organization, WHO, says that cases of the new Omicron variant have been reported in at least 23 countries in five of the six WHO regions.

    WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus unveiled in Geneva on Wednesday, saying the number of cases is expected to rise.

    "WHO takes this development extremely seriously, and all countries should too," he told reporters listening to the agency's regular virtual briefing on COVID-19.

    But it shouldn't surprise us. That is what viruses do. And this is what this virus will continue to do, as long as we allow it to continue spreading, "he said.

    Preliminary evidence suggests that Omicron may have a "potential immune escape" and, or possibly, increased transmissibility, compared to previous variants of concern, according to the latest WHO weekly epidemiological update on COVID-19, also released Wednesday.

    He said experts were learning more about the variant, "but there is still more to learn about its effect on transmission, the severity of the disease and the effectiveness of tests, therapeutics and vaccines."

    The WHO chief urged countries to take "rational and proportionate risk reduction measures", including those aimed at delaying or reducing the spread, such as screening passengers or implementing quarantines for international travelers.

    However, he stressed that "blanket travel bans would not prevent the international spread of Omicron and place a heavy burden on lives and livelihoods."

    Ghebreyesus stressed the need to continue public health measures against the spread of the coronavirus and ensure that vulnerable and high-risk people are fully vaccinated.

    He cautioned that the current "toxic mix" of low vaccine coverage and very low evidence is a recipe for variant breeding and amplification.

    “We need to use the tools we already have to prevent transmission and save Delta's lives.

    “And if we do that, we will also prevent transmission and save Omicron's lives. But if countries and people don't do what they need to do to stop Delta's broadcast, they won't stop Omicron either, ”he said.

    As of Tuesday, there were more than 261 million confirmed COVID-19 cases worldwide and 5.2 million deaths, and the Delta variant continued to dominate.

    Meanwhile, the director general said that the agreement of countries to launch a process to develop a new global agreement on preventing and responding to a pandemic is cause for hope.

    Ghebreyesus welcomed the consensus decision reached during a special session of the World Health Assembly (WHA), the UN agency's highest decision-making body, which was attended by representatives of its 194 member states.

    The three-day meeting began on Monday with the sole objective of considering the benefits of creating a new international agreement on preparedness for pandemic prevention and how best to avoid the pitfalls that have clouded an effective response to COVID-19.

    This was only the second time that the assembly met in a special session since the WHO was founded in 1948.

    "The adoption of this decision is cause for celebration and reason for hope, which we will need," he said in his closing remarks, although he noted that the road ahead is long.

    “There are still differences of opinion about what a new agreement could or should contain. But you have shown each other and the world that differences can be overcome and common ground can be found. "

    The decision will establish an Intergovernmental Negotiating Body (INB) that will negotiate and draft any convention, agreement or other international instruments.

    A first meeting will take place no later than March 1, 2022 and public hearings will also be held to inform the deliberations.

    INB will deliver a progress report to the World Health Assembly in 2023 and present its results for consideration the following year.

    YAYA

  •   By Cecilia Ologunagba The Director General of the World Health Organization WHO Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus has requested support from G7 health ministers to meet immunization targets by the end of the year In his remarks at the G7 health ministers meeting in Oxford Ghebreyesus called on ministers to show leadership to strengthen the WHO on sustainable financing First we ask for your support in reaching our immunization goals for September and year end dose sharing with COVAX is now essential to achieve these goals We need 250 million doses by September and we need 100 million doses just in June and July As a G7 country you are in a unique position to pool doses and make it happen second we ask for your leadership in strengthening WHO including through sustainable and predictable funding Thirdly we ask for your support for an international treaty or agreement aimed at improving sharing and mutual accountability in order to meet the challenges we face now he said The Director General ensured WHO s continued commitment to work with ministers and all nations to achieve the vision of a healthier more secure more just and more sustainable future He said addressing the mismatch between WHO s expectations and resources and getting the job done was a key issue The challenges we face are deeper just like the solutions we design must be That is why the recommendation that I think will contribute the most to strengthening both WHO and global health security is the recommendation for a treaty on pandemic preparedness and response As you know member states at the World Health Assembly WHA passed a resolution last week agreeing to hold a special session of the Assembly in November AMS adopted a resolution providing for a session in November to consider the development of a WHO convention agreement or other international instrument on pandemic preparedness and response a he declared He said holding a WHO convention on pandemic preparedness and response was an idea whose time had come We need generational engagement that survives budget cycles election cycles and media cycles A commitment that creates a global framework for governance funding systems and tools needed to build a safer world based on a One Health approach through close collaboration with tripartite plus partners A treaty would promote improved sharing trust and accountability and provide a solid foundation on which to build other mechanisms for global health security He therefore thanked the G7 countries which expressed their support for the idea of a treaty The G7 countries are a group of the seven largest advanced economies in the world namely United Kingdom Germany Italy Canada France Japan and the United States NAA NAN
    WHO seeks G7 support to meet immunization targets
      By Cecilia Ologunagba The Director General of the World Health Organization WHO Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus has requested support from G7 health ministers to meet immunization targets by the end of the year In his remarks at the G7 health ministers meeting in Oxford Ghebreyesus called on ministers to show leadership to strengthen the WHO on sustainable financing First we ask for your support in reaching our immunization goals for September and year end dose sharing with COVAX is now essential to achieve these goals We need 250 million doses by September and we need 100 million doses just in June and July As a G7 country you are in a unique position to pool doses and make it happen second we ask for your leadership in strengthening WHO including through sustainable and predictable funding Thirdly we ask for your support for an international treaty or agreement aimed at improving sharing and mutual accountability in order to meet the challenges we face now he said The Director General ensured WHO s continued commitment to work with ministers and all nations to achieve the vision of a healthier more secure more just and more sustainable future He said addressing the mismatch between WHO s expectations and resources and getting the job done was a key issue The challenges we face are deeper just like the solutions we design must be That is why the recommendation that I think will contribute the most to strengthening both WHO and global health security is the recommendation for a treaty on pandemic preparedness and response As you know member states at the World Health Assembly WHA passed a resolution last week agreeing to hold a special session of the Assembly in November AMS adopted a resolution providing for a session in November to consider the development of a WHO convention agreement or other international instrument on pandemic preparedness and response a he declared He said holding a WHO convention on pandemic preparedness and response was an idea whose time had come We need generational engagement that survives budget cycles election cycles and media cycles A commitment that creates a global framework for governance funding systems and tools needed to build a safer world based on a One Health approach through close collaboration with tripartite plus partners A treaty would promote improved sharing trust and accountability and provide a solid foundation on which to build other mechanisms for global health security He therefore thanked the G7 countries which expressed their support for the idea of a treaty The G7 countries are a group of the seven largest advanced economies in the world namely United Kingdom Germany Italy Canada France Japan and the United States NAA NAN
    WHO seeks G7 support to meet immunization targets
    General news1 year ago

    WHO seeks G7 support to meet immunization targets

    By Cecilia Ologunagba

    The Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus, has requested support from G7 health ministers to meet immunization targets by the end of the year.

    In his remarks at the G7 health ministers meeting in Oxford, Ghebreyesus called on ministers to show leadership to strengthen the WHO on sustainable financing.

    “First, we ask for your support in reaching our immunization goals for September and year-end; dose sharing with COVAX is now essential to achieve these goals.

    “We need 250 million doses by September and we need 100 million doses just in June and July.

    “As a G7 country, you are in a unique position to pool doses and make it happen; second, we ask for your leadership in strengthening WHO, including through sustainable and predictable funding;

    “Thirdly, we ask for your support for an international treaty or agreement aimed at improving sharing and mutual accountability in order to meet the challenges we face now,” he said.

    The Director General ensured WHO's continued commitment to work with ministers and all nations to achieve the vision of a healthier, more secure, more just and more sustainable future.

    He said addressing the mismatch between WHO's expectations and resources and getting the job done was a key issue.

    “The challenges we face are deeper, just like the solutions we design must be.

    “That is why the recommendation that I think will contribute the most to strengthening both WHO and global health security is the recommendation for a treaty on pandemic preparedness and response.

    “As you know, member states at the World Health Assembly (WHA) passed a resolution last week agreeing to hold a special session of the Assembly in November.

    "AMS adopted a resolution providing for a session in November to consider the development of a WHO convention, agreement or other international instrument on pandemic preparedness and response," a- he declared.

    He said holding a WHO convention on pandemic preparedness and response was an idea whose time had come.

    “We need generational engagement that survives budget cycles, election cycles and media cycles.

    “A commitment that creates a global framework for governance, funding. systems and tools, needed to build a safer world, based on a One Health approach, through close collaboration with tripartite-plus partners.

    “A treaty would promote improved sharing, trust and accountability, and provide a solid foundation on which to build other mechanisms for global health security.

    He therefore thanked the G7 countries which expressed their support for the idea of ​​a treaty.

    The G7 countries are a group of the seven largest advanced economies in the world, namely: United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, Canada, France, Japan and the United States. (NAA)

    (NAN)

  •   By Cecilia Ologunagba The World Health Organisation WHO says the 74th session of the World Health Assembly WHA will stress the urgent need to end the current pandemic and prevent the next one by building a healthier safer and fairer world WHO in a statement said that WHA which would be held virtually would run from May 24 to 1 June 2021 The Health Assembly is WHO s highest decision making body and is attended by delegations from all around the world It will also be opened to Associate Members Observers invited representatives of the UN and other participating inter governmental organisations and non State actors According to the UN health agency over the past year cases of COVID 19 rose 40 fold to 162 million globally while the number of deaths has increased 11 times to more than 3 3 million The pandemic has hit all countries hard but its impact has been harshest on those communities which were already vulnerable Those countries vulnerable who are more exposed to the disease less likely to have access to quality health care services and more likely to experience adverse consequences such as loss of income as a result of measures implemented to contain the pandemic The statement quoted WHO Director General Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus saying A crisis often brings out the best in people and organisations From the WHO Strategic Preparedness and Response Plan to our technical guidance the Solidarity Trial the UN Supply Chain Task Force and the OpenWHO org learning platform have been helping prevent infections and save lives Also other initiatives like the Access to COVID 19 Tools Accelerator including its COVAX partnership and the Solidarity Response Fund WHO has given countries effective and evidence informed tools to prevent infections save lives and maintain essential health services I am especially proud of the incredible work that WHO staff have done all over the world in the past 17 months to support countries to put these tools to work The UN health agency said that the pandemic was far from over and that the global response was at a critical phase It stated that stark contrasts still undermined progress with vaccine inequity being one of the most urgent issues posing a threat to ending the pandemic and to global recovery Over 75 per cent of all vaccine doses have been administered in only 10 countries the lowest income countries have administered less than half a per cent of global doses The statement further quoted Ghebreyesus as saying This year s WHA will play a vital role in shaping the global health architecture of the future and in strengthening WHO to fulfil its mission and mandate The Assembly s agenda will focus on the health related Sustainable Development Goals It will also focus on WHO s Triple Billion targets of one billion more people benefitting from universal health coverage one billion more better protected from health emergencies and one billion more enjoying better health and well being NAN NAN
    World Health Assembly will focus on ending COVID-19 pandemic – WHO
      By Cecilia Ologunagba The World Health Organisation WHO says the 74th session of the World Health Assembly WHA will stress the urgent need to end the current pandemic and prevent the next one by building a healthier safer and fairer world WHO in a statement said that WHA which would be held virtually would run from May 24 to 1 June 2021 The Health Assembly is WHO s highest decision making body and is attended by delegations from all around the world It will also be opened to Associate Members Observers invited representatives of the UN and other participating inter governmental organisations and non State actors According to the UN health agency over the past year cases of COVID 19 rose 40 fold to 162 million globally while the number of deaths has increased 11 times to more than 3 3 million The pandemic has hit all countries hard but its impact has been harshest on those communities which were already vulnerable Those countries vulnerable who are more exposed to the disease less likely to have access to quality health care services and more likely to experience adverse consequences such as loss of income as a result of measures implemented to contain the pandemic The statement quoted WHO Director General Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus saying A crisis often brings out the best in people and organisations From the WHO Strategic Preparedness and Response Plan to our technical guidance the Solidarity Trial the UN Supply Chain Task Force and the OpenWHO org learning platform have been helping prevent infections and save lives Also other initiatives like the Access to COVID 19 Tools Accelerator including its COVAX partnership and the Solidarity Response Fund WHO has given countries effective and evidence informed tools to prevent infections save lives and maintain essential health services I am especially proud of the incredible work that WHO staff have done all over the world in the past 17 months to support countries to put these tools to work The UN health agency said that the pandemic was far from over and that the global response was at a critical phase It stated that stark contrasts still undermined progress with vaccine inequity being one of the most urgent issues posing a threat to ending the pandemic and to global recovery Over 75 per cent of all vaccine doses have been administered in only 10 countries the lowest income countries have administered less than half a per cent of global doses The statement further quoted Ghebreyesus as saying This year s WHA will play a vital role in shaping the global health architecture of the future and in strengthening WHO to fulfil its mission and mandate The Assembly s agenda will focus on the health related Sustainable Development Goals It will also focus on WHO s Triple Billion targets of one billion more people benefitting from universal health coverage one billion more better protected from health emergencies and one billion more enjoying better health and well being NAN NAN
    World Health Assembly will focus on ending COVID-19 pandemic – WHO
    Foreign1 year ago

    World Health Assembly will focus on ending COVID-19 pandemic – WHO

    By Cecilia Ologunagba

    The World  Health Organisation (WHO) says the 74th session of the World Health Assembly (WHA) will stress the urgent need to end the current pandemic and prevent the next one by building a healthier, safer, and fairer world.

    WHO, in a statement said that WHA, which would be held virtually, would run from May 24 to 1 June, 2021.

    The Health Assembly is WHO’s highest decision-making body and is attended by delegations from all around the world.

    It will also be opened to Associate Members, Observers, invited representatives of the UN and other participating inter-governmental organisations, and non-State actors.

    According to the UN health agency, over the past year, cases of COVID-19 rose 40-fold to 162 million globally, while the number of deaths has increased 11 times, to more than 3.3 million.

    “The pandemic has hit all countries hard, but its impact has been harshest on those communities which were already vulnerable.

    “Those countries vulnerable, who are more exposed to the disease, less likely to have access to quality health care services and more likely to experience adverse consequences (such as loss of income) as a result of measures implemented to contain the pandemic.’’

    The statement quoted WHO Director-General, Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus, saying, “A crisis often brings out the best in people and organisations.

    “From the WHO Strategic Preparedness and Response Plan to our technical guidance, the Solidarity Trial, the UN Supply Chain Task Force and the OpenWHO.org learning platform  have been helping prevent infections and save lives.

    “Also, other initiatives like the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator, including its COVAX partnership, and the Solidarity Response Fund, WHO has given countries effective and evidence-informed tools to prevent infections, save lives and maintain essential health services.

    “I am especially proud of the incredible work that WHO staff have done all over the world in the past 17 months to support countries to put these tools to work.”

    The UN health agency said that the pandemic was far from over and that the global response was at a critical phase.

    It stated that stark contrasts still undermined progress, with vaccine inequity being one of the most urgent issues, posing a threat to ending the pandemic and to global recovery.

    “Over 75 per cent of all vaccine doses have been administered in only 10 countries; the lowest income countries have administered less than half a per cent of global doses.’’

    The statement further quoted Ghebreyesus, as saying, “This year’s WHA will play a vital role in shaping the global health architecture of the future, and in strengthening WHO to fulfil its mission and mandate.”

    The Assembly’s agenda will focus on the health-related Sustainable Development Goals.

    It will also focus on WHO’s Triple Billion targets of one billion more people benefitting from universal health coverage; one billion more better protected from health emergencies, and  one billion more enjoying better health and well-being. (NAN)

    (NAN)

  •   Director General of World Health Organisation WHO Tedros Ghebreyesus says the COVID 19 pandemic has demonstrated the consequences of chronic under investment in public health Ghebreyesus said this in his closing remarks at the 73rd World Health Assembly WHA held virtually in Geneva The WHA is the decision making body of the WHO attended by delegations from all member states Ghebreyesus said during the assembly that the pandemic had also ignited a socio economic crisis that impacted billions of lives and livelihoods and undermined global stability and solidarity He added that returning to the status quo is not an option We don t just need more investment in public health We must also rethink how we value health The time has come for a new narrative that sees health not as a cost but an investment that should form the foundation of productive resilient and stable economies To start building that narrative I am proud to announce that we are establishing a new Council on the Economics of Health for All The council will focus on the links between health and sustainable inclusive and innovation led economic growth According to him the pandemic has also shown that there is an urgent need for a globally agreed system for sharing pathogen materials and clinical samples to facilitate the rapid development of medical countermeasures as global public goods It can t be based on bilateral agreements and it can t take years to negotiate We are proposing a new approach that will include a repository for materials housed by WHO in a secure Swiss facility An agreement that sharing materials into this repository is voluntary that WHO can facilitate the transfer and use of the materials and a set of criteria under which WHO will distribute them The director general thanked member states for their flexibility goodwill and pragmatism in adapting to the constraints of dealing with a large agenda virtually across multiple time zones He said in spite of the challenges this Assembly has been very productive as you will agree with me You have approved a comprehensive resolution on emergency preparedness a new roadmap to defeat meningitis by 2030 a new roadmap for neglected tropical diseases a resolution on scaled up action on epilepsy and other neurological disorders You declared 2021 as the International Year of Health and Care Workers through a written silence procedure you have also adopted the Immunisation Agenda 2030 Also you approved the Global Strategy to Accelerate the Elimination of Cervical Cancer as a public health problem as well as the Global Strategy for TB Research and Innovation In addition you approved resolution on the Decade of Healthy Ageing the Global Strategy and Plan of Action on Public Health Innovation and Intellectual Property as well as resolutions on eye care and food safety According to him each of these represents an urgent health priority that affects the lives of millions of people and which increases the demands and expectations of WHO We look forward to working with all Member States in the coming weeks and months to build a WHO with increased capabilities and the resources to meet these demands and expectations he added The main functions of the WHA are to determine the policies of the organisation appoint the Director General supervise financial policies as well as review and approve the proposed programme budget The WHA usually takes place in May but this year given the COVID 19 pandemic a reduced de minimis WHA took place on May 18 and May 19 The resumed WHA73 which started on Nov 9 ended on Friday Edited By Hadiza Mohammed Aliyu Source NAN
    COVID-19 has demonstrated chronic under-investment in public health – WHO
      Director General of World Health Organisation WHO Tedros Ghebreyesus says the COVID 19 pandemic has demonstrated the consequences of chronic under investment in public health Ghebreyesus said this in his closing remarks at the 73rd World Health Assembly WHA held virtually in Geneva The WHA is the decision making body of the WHO attended by delegations from all member states Ghebreyesus said during the assembly that the pandemic had also ignited a socio economic crisis that impacted billions of lives and livelihoods and undermined global stability and solidarity He added that returning to the status quo is not an option We don t just need more investment in public health We must also rethink how we value health The time has come for a new narrative that sees health not as a cost but an investment that should form the foundation of productive resilient and stable economies To start building that narrative I am proud to announce that we are establishing a new Council on the Economics of Health for All The council will focus on the links between health and sustainable inclusive and innovation led economic growth According to him the pandemic has also shown that there is an urgent need for a globally agreed system for sharing pathogen materials and clinical samples to facilitate the rapid development of medical countermeasures as global public goods It can t be based on bilateral agreements and it can t take years to negotiate We are proposing a new approach that will include a repository for materials housed by WHO in a secure Swiss facility An agreement that sharing materials into this repository is voluntary that WHO can facilitate the transfer and use of the materials and a set of criteria under which WHO will distribute them The director general thanked member states for their flexibility goodwill and pragmatism in adapting to the constraints of dealing with a large agenda virtually across multiple time zones He said in spite of the challenges this Assembly has been very productive as you will agree with me You have approved a comprehensive resolution on emergency preparedness a new roadmap to defeat meningitis by 2030 a new roadmap for neglected tropical diseases a resolution on scaled up action on epilepsy and other neurological disorders You declared 2021 as the International Year of Health and Care Workers through a written silence procedure you have also adopted the Immunisation Agenda 2030 Also you approved the Global Strategy to Accelerate the Elimination of Cervical Cancer as a public health problem as well as the Global Strategy for TB Research and Innovation In addition you approved resolution on the Decade of Healthy Ageing the Global Strategy and Plan of Action on Public Health Innovation and Intellectual Property as well as resolutions on eye care and food safety According to him each of these represents an urgent health priority that affects the lives of millions of people and which increases the demands and expectations of WHO We look forward to working with all Member States in the coming weeks and months to build a WHO with increased capabilities and the resources to meet these demands and expectations he added The main functions of the WHA are to determine the policies of the organisation appoint the Director General supervise financial policies as well as review and approve the proposed programme budget The WHA usually takes place in May but this year given the COVID 19 pandemic a reduced de minimis WHA took place on May 18 and May 19 The resumed WHA73 which started on Nov 9 ended on Friday Edited By Hadiza Mohammed Aliyu Source NAN
    COVID-19 has demonstrated chronic under-investment in public health – WHO
    COVID-192 years ago

    COVID-19 has demonstrated chronic under-investment in public health – WHO

    Director-General of World Health Organisation (WHO), Tedros Ghebreyesus, says the COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated the consequences of chronic under-investment in public health.

    Ghebreyesus said this in his closing remarks at the 73rd World Health Assembly (WHA) held virtually in Geneva.

    The WHA is the decision-making body of the WHO, attended by delegations from all member states.

    Ghebreyesus said during the assembly that the pandemic had also ignited a socio-economic crisis that impacted billions of lives and livelihoods and undermined global stability and solidarity.

    He added that “returning to the status quo is not an option. We don’t just need more investment in public health. We must also rethink how we value health.

    “The time has come for a new narrative that sees health not as a cost, but an investment that should form the foundation of productive, resilient and stable economies.

    “To start building that narrative, I am proud to announce that we are establishing a new Council on the Economics of Health for All.

    “The council will focus on the links between health and sustainable, inclusive and innovation-led economic growth.”

    According to him, the pandemic has also shown that there is an urgent need for a globally agreed system for sharing pathogen materials and clinical samples, to facilitate the rapid development of medical countermeasures as global public goods.

    “It can’t be based on bilateral agreements, and it can’t take years to negotiate.

    “We are proposing a new approach that will include a repository for materials, housed by WHO in a secure Swiss facility.

    “An agreement that sharing materials into this repository is voluntary; that WHO can facilitate the transfer and use of the materials; and a set of criteria under which WHO will distribute them.’’

    The director general thanked member states for their flexibility, goodwill and pragmatism in adapting to the constraints of dealing with a large agenda virtually, across multiple time zones.

    He said “in spite of the challenges, this Assembly has been very productive, as you will agree with me.

    “You have approved a comprehensive resolution on emergency preparedness; a new roadmap to defeat meningitis by 2030; a new roadmap for neglected tropical diseases; a resolution on scaled-up action on epilepsy and other neurological disorders.

    “You declared 2021 as the International Year of Health and Care Workers; through a written silence procedure, you have also adopted the Immunisation Agenda 2030.

    “Also, you approved the Global Strategy to Accelerate the Elimination of Cervical Cancer as a public health problem, as well as the Global Strategy for TB Research and Innovation.

    “In addition, you approved resolution on the Decade of Healthy Ageing; the Global Strategy and Plan of Action on Public Health, Innovation and Intellectual Property, as well as resolutions on eye care and food safety.”

    According to him, each of these represents an urgent health priority that affects the lives of millions of people, and which increases the demands and expectations of WHO.

    “We look forward to working with all Member States in the coming weeks and months to build a WHO with increased capabilities and the resources to meet these demands and expectations,” he added.

    The main functions of the WHA are to determine the policies of the organisation, appoint the Director-General, supervise financial policies, as well as review and approve the proposed programme budget.

    The WHA usually takes place in May, but this year, given the COVID-19 pandemic, a reduced (de minimis) WHA took place on May 18 and May 19.

    The resumed WHA73, which started on Nov. 9, ended on Friday.


    Edited By: Hadiza Mohammed-Aliyu
    Source: NAN

  •   The World Health Organisation WHO says delegates attending the virtual session of the 73rd World Health Assembly WHA have adopted two resolutions on meningitis and epilepsy control The organisation disclosed this in a statement posted on its website on FridayThe WHA is the decision making body of the WHO and it is being attended by delegations from all member states The world body stated that member states recommended the adoption of the two resolutions on meningitis control and epilepsy at the 73rd World Health Assembly It added that Committee A which focuses on programme and budget matters decided to recommend the adoption of the first ever resolution on meningitis which will approve a global roadmap to defeat meningitis by 2030 Meningitis is a disease that kills 300 000 people annually and leaves one in five of those affected with devastating long term consequences The Committee also recommended the adoption of a resolution calling for scaled up and integrated action on epilepsy and other neurological disorders such as stroke migraine and dementia Neurological disorders are the leading cause of disability and the second leading cause of death worldwide In addition the statement stated the Committee further decided to recommend the adoption of a decision endorsing the new roadmap for Neglected Tropical Diseases NTDs The roadmap which targets year 2030 aims to reduce the number of people requiring treatment for NTDs by 90 per cent It also hopes to eliminate at least one NTD in 100 countries eradicate two diseases dracunculiasis and yaws and reduce by 75 per cent the Disability Adjusted Life Years DALYs related to NTDs The WHO statement noted that the Committee A noted the Operational Framework for Primary Health Care which aligned with the Declaration of Astana and resolution WHA72 2 2019 It noted that WHO established a Special Programme on Primary Health Care to roll out the Operational Framework supporting Member States to build people centred resilient and sustainable primary health care based health systems It pointed out that Committee B which deals predominantly with administrative financial and legal matters reviewed the Director General s report on Health Conditions in Occupied Palestinian Territory including East Jerusalem and in the occupied Syrian Golan The Committee also decided by vote to recommend the adoption of a decision requesting the Director General among others to report on progress in the implementation of its recommendations to the next World Health Assembly All resolutions and decisions recommended by the Committees for adoption by the 73rd World Health Assembly will be included in the Committees reports to be considered by the Assembly it added The main functions of the WHA are to determine the policies of the organisation appoint the Director General supervise financial policies as well as review and approve proposed programme budget The WHA usually takes place in May but this year given the COVID 19 pandemic a reduced de minimis WHA took place on May 18 and May 19 The resumed WHA73 which started on Nov 9 ended on Friday Edited By Hadiza Mohammed Aliyu Source NAN
    World Health Assembly endorse resolutions on meningitis, epilepsy control
      The World Health Organisation WHO says delegates attending the virtual session of the 73rd World Health Assembly WHA have adopted two resolutions on meningitis and epilepsy control The organisation disclosed this in a statement posted on its website on FridayThe WHA is the decision making body of the WHO and it is being attended by delegations from all member states The world body stated that member states recommended the adoption of the two resolutions on meningitis control and epilepsy at the 73rd World Health Assembly It added that Committee A which focuses on programme and budget matters decided to recommend the adoption of the first ever resolution on meningitis which will approve a global roadmap to defeat meningitis by 2030 Meningitis is a disease that kills 300 000 people annually and leaves one in five of those affected with devastating long term consequences The Committee also recommended the adoption of a resolution calling for scaled up and integrated action on epilepsy and other neurological disorders such as stroke migraine and dementia Neurological disorders are the leading cause of disability and the second leading cause of death worldwide In addition the statement stated the Committee further decided to recommend the adoption of a decision endorsing the new roadmap for Neglected Tropical Diseases NTDs The roadmap which targets year 2030 aims to reduce the number of people requiring treatment for NTDs by 90 per cent It also hopes to eliminate at least one NTD in 100 countries eradicate two diseases dracunculiasis and yaws and reduce by 75 per cent the Disability Adjusted Life Years DALYs related to NTDs The WHO statement noted that the Committee A noted the Operational Framework for Primary Health Care which aligned with the Declaration of Astana and resolution WHA72 2 2019 It noted that WHO established a Special Programme on Primary Health Care to roll out the Operational Framework supporting Member States to build people centred resilient and sustainable primary health care based health systems It pointed out that Committee B which deals predominantly with administrative financial and legal matters reviewed the Director General s report on Health Conditions in Occupied Palestinian Territory including East Jerusalem and in the occupied Syrian Golan The Committee also decided by vote to recommend the adoption of a decision requesting the Director General among others to report on progress in the implementation of its recommendations to the next World Health Assembly All resolutions and decisions recommended by the Committees for adoption by the 73rd World Health Assembly will be included in the Committees reports to be considered by the Assembly it added The main functions of the WHA are to determine the policies of the organisation appoint the Director General supervise financial policies as well as review and approve proposed programme budget The WHA usually takes place in May but this year given the COVID 19 pandemic a reduced de minimis WHA took place on May 18 and May 19 The resumed WHA73 which started on Nov 9 ended on Friday Edited By Hadiza Mohammed Aliyu Source NAN
    World Health Assembly endorse resolutions on meningitis, epilepsy control
    Health2 years ago

    World Health Assembly endorse resolutions on meningitis, epilepsy control

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) says delegates attending the virtual session of the 73rd World Health Assembly (WHA) have adopted two resolutions on meningitis and epilepsy control.

    The organisation disclosed this in a statement posted on its website on Friday

    The WHA is the decision-making body of the WHO, and it is being attended by delegations from all member states.

    The world body stated that member states recommended the adoption of the two resolutions on meningitis control and epilepsy at the 73rd World Health Assembly.

    It added that “Committee A, which focuses on programme and budget matters, decided to recommend the adoption of the first-ever resolution on meningitis, which will approve a global roadmap to defeat meningitis by 2030.

    “Meningitis is a disease that kills 300,000 people annually and leaves one in five of those affected with devastating long-term consequences.

    “The Committee also recommended the adoption of a resolution calling for scaled-up and integrated action on epilepsy and other neurological disorders such as stroke, migraine and dementia.

    “Neurological disorders are the leading cause of disability and the second leading cause of death worldwide.”

    In addition, the statement stated, the Committee further decided to recommend the adoption of a decision endorsing the new roadmap for Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs).

    “The roadmap, which targets year 2030, aims to reduce the number of people requiring treatment for NTDs by 90 per cent.

    “It also hopes to eliminate at least one NTD in 100 countries, eradicate two diseases (dracunculiasis and yaws), and reduce by 75 per cent, the Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) related to NTDs.”

    The WHO statement noted that the Committee A noted the Operational Framework for Primary Health Care, which aligned with the Declaration of Astana and resolution WHA72.2 (2019).

    It noted that WHO established a Special Programme on Primary Health Care to roll out the Operational Framework – supporting Member States to build people-centred, resilient and sustainable primary health care-based health systems.

    It pointed out that Committee B – which deals predominantly with administrative, financial and legal matters – reviewed the Director-General’s report on “Health Conditions in Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and in the occupied Syrian Golan.

    The Committee also decided, by vote, to recommend the adoption of a decision requesting the Director-General, among others, to report on progress in the implementation of its recommendations to the next World Health Assembly.

    “All resolutions and decisions recommended by the Committees for adoption by the 73rd World Health Assembly will be included in the Committees’ reports to be considered by the Assembly,’’ it added.

    The main functions of the WHA are to determine the policies of the organisation, appoint the Director-General, supervise financial policies, as well as review and approve proposed programme budget.

    The WHA usually takes place in May, but this year, given the COVID-19 pandemic, a reduced (de minimis) WHA took place on May 18 and May 19.

    The resumed WHA73, which started on Nov. 9, ended on Friday.


    Edited By: Hadiza Mohammed-Aliyu
    Source: NAN