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  •   Ethiopia is commemorating the 2022 World Antimicrobial Awareness Week WAAW through a series of events that are aimed at raising the awareness of health professionals and the community in general on Antimicrobial Resistance AMR its hazards containment and prevention The country has also launched Sector Specific Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance prevention and containment which is the first of its kind in the World Health Organization African Region In her keynote address during the launch of the commemoration event WHO Deputy Representative Dr Nonhlanhla Rose Dlamini said The global and regional burden of AMR is alarming and sub Saharan African countries are bearing the heaviest burden of resistant bacterial infections With 99 deaths per 100 000 population Sub Saharan Africa as compared to other regions has the highest AMR associated deaths which is far exceeding the previous global projections of 700 000 annual deaths from AMR Compounding the challenge is that more than half of all deaths recorded in the WHO African Region are caused by communicable diseases that are managed with antimicrobial medicines Dr Dlamini said adding that AMR puts at risk decades of advances towards the control of diseases such as malaria HIV AIDS tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections She also stressed the importance of water sanitation and hygiene WaSH vaccines and waste management as an essential component in addressing AMR The Government of Ethiopia is working with development partners to implement the third edition of National Antimicrobial Containment and Prevention Strategic Plan the One Health Approach 2021 2025 in line with global and regional action plans WHO is honored to be part of the process where Ethiopia is the first country in the WHO African region to launch sector specific plan on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control Dr Nonhlanhla Rose Dlamini said Ethiopia has faced its huge share of multifaceted problems that are associated with AMR Deputy Director General of Ethiopian Environmental Protection Authority Mrs Frenesh Mekuria said and expressed hope that the sector specific AMR Prevention and Containment Action Plan would help alleviate the various problems AMR is causing to human animal and environmental health Expressing the determination of the various ministerial and sector offices working on AMR the Deputy Director General called upon all national and international partners and stakeholders to enhance their collaboration and coordination in controlling the impacts of AMR in Ethiopia and beyond The commemoration and launching ceremony was attended by representatives from the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health Ministry of Agriculture the Environmental Protection Authority and international partners WAAW 2022 is being observed from November 18th to 24th 2022 across the globe with the theme Preventing Antimicrobial Resistance Together with the aim of raising awareness on the risks posed by overuse and misuse of antimicrobials including antibiotics and to encourage their more responsible use WAAW also aims at calling for urgent multisectoral collaboration and action to preserve the efficacy of this fundamental component of modern medicine through a One Health approach Antimicrobial resistance known more commonly as drug resistance occurs when disease causing germs become resistant to traditional medication making infections harder to treat and increasing the risk of disease spread severe illness and death Lack of effective antimicrobials will also negatively impact treatment of diseases in animals with potentially dire consequences for food security and overall economic growth Other than misuse and overuse of antimicrobials in human and animal health other drivers include limited availability and uptake of vaccines limited diagnostic capacity to support appropriate treatment lack of access to clean water sanitation and hygiene poor infection prevention and control practices poor disposal practices and the presence of antimicrobials in the environment and water bodies Guided by the Global Action Plan on AMR and in line with WHO s 13th General Programme of Work GPW WHO in the African Region continues to support regional and national interventions to combat AMR WHO collaborated with Food and Agriculture Organization FAO the World Organisation for Animal Health WHOA the UN Environment Programme UNEP USAID the African Centres for Disease Control and the African Union Inter African Bureau for Animal Resources in high level advocacy and a continental appeal for increased high level political advocacy to highlight the depth of the AMR threat The partners also enabled the country to mobilize significant amounts of funds from MPTF AMR project 2021 2023 and Kingdom of Saudia Arabia to support implementation of the National AMR strategic and containment plan 2021 2025 at national and sub national level In 2019 more than 4 9 million deaths were globally attributed to drug resistant bacterial infections with over 1 2 million of them directly related to AMR which is more than HIV AIDS and malaria combined Various reports also suggest that the management of COVID 19 patients with antibiotics has fueled the global AMR threat
    Ethiopia commemorates World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, launches Sector-Specific Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Containment
      Ethiopia is commemorating the 2022 World Antimicrobial Awareness Week WAAW through a series of events that are aimed at raising the awareness of health professionals and the community in general on Antimicrobial Resistance AMR its hazards containment and prevention The country has also launched Sector Specific Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance prevention and containment which is the first of its kind in the World Health Organization African Region In her keynote address during the launch of the commemoration event WHO Deputy Representative Dr Nonhlanhla Rose Dlamini said The global and regional burden of AMR is alarming and sub Saharan African countries are bearing the heaviest burden of resistant bacterial infections With 99 deaths per 100 000 population Sub Saharan Africa as compared to other regions has the highest AMR associated deaths which is far exceeding the previous global projections of 700 000 annual deaths from AMR Compounding the challenge is that more than half of all deaths recorded in the WHO African Region are caused by communicable diseases that are managed with antimicrobial medicines Dr Dlamini said adding that AMR puts at risk decades of advances towards the control of diseases such as malaria HIV AIDS tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections She also stressed the importance of water sanitation and hygiene WaSH vaccines and waste management as an essential component in addressing AMR The Government of Ethiopia is working with development partners to implement the third edition of National Antimicrobial Containment and Prevention Strategic Plan the One Health Approach 2021 2025 in line with global and regional action plans WHO is honored to be part of the process where Ethiopia is the first country in the WHO African region to launch sector specific plan on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control Dr Nonhlanhla Rose Dlamini said Ethiopia has faced its huge share of multifaceted problems that are associated with AMR Deputy Director General of Ethiopian Environmental Protection Authority Mrs Frenesh Mekuria said and expressed hope that the sector specific AMR Prevention and Containment Action Plan would help alleviate the various problems AMR is causing to human animal and environmental health Expressing the determination of the various ministerial and sector offices working on AMR the Deputy Director General called upon all national and international partners and stakeholders to enhance their collaboration and coordination in controlling the impacts of AMR in Ethiopia and beyond The commemoration and launching ceremony was attended by representatives from the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health Ministry of Agriculture the Environmental Protection Authority and international partners WAAW 2022 is being observed from November 18th to 24th 2022 across the globe with the theme Preventing Antimicrobial Resistance Together with the aim of raising awareness on the risks posed by overuse and misuse of antimicrobials including antibiotics and to encourage their more responsible use WAAW also aims at calling for urgent multisectoral collaboration and action to preserve the efficacy of this fundamental component of modern medicine through a One Health approach Antimicrobial resistance known more commonly as drug resistance occurs when disease causing germs become resistant to traditional medication making infections harder to treat and increasing the risk of disease spread severe illness and death Lack of effective antimicrobials will also negatively impact treatment of diseases in animals with potentially dire consequences for food security and overall economic growth Other than misuse and overuse of antimicrobials in human and animal health other drivers include limited availability and uptake of vaccines limited diagnostic capacity to support appropriate treatment lack of access to clean water sanitation and hygiene poor infection prevention and control practices poor disposal practices and the presence of antimicrobials in the environment and water bodies Guided by the Global Action Plan on AMR and in line with WHO s 13th General Programme of Work GPW WHO in the African Region continues to support regional and national interventions to combat AMR WHO collaborated with Food and Agriculture Organization FAO the World Organisation for Animal Health WHOA the UN Environment Programme UNEP USAID the African Centres for Disease Control and the African Union Inter African Bureau for Animal Resources in high level advocacy and a continental appeal for increased high level political advocacy to highlight the depth of the AMR threat The partners also enabled the country to mobilize significant amounts of funds from MPTF AMR project 2021 2023 and Kingdom of Saudia Arabia to support implementation of the National AMR strategic and containment plan 2021 2025 at national and sub national level In 2019 more than 4 9 million deaths were globally attributed to drug resistant bacterial infections with over 1 2 million of them directly related to AMR which is more than HIV AIDS and malaria combined Various reports also suggest that the management of COVID 19 patients with antibiotics has fueled the global AMR threat
    Ethiopia commemorates World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, launches Sector-Specific Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Containment
    Africa2 months ago

    Ethiopia commemorates World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, launches Sector-Specific Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Containment

    Ethiopia is commemorating the 2022 World Antimicrobial Awareness Week (WAAW) through a series of events that are aimed at raising the awareness of health professionals and the community in general on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR), its hazards, containment and prevention.

    The country has also launched Sector Specific Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance prevention and containment which is the first of its kind in the World Health Organization African Region.

    In her keynote address during the launch of the commemoration event, WHO Deputy Representative Dr. Nonhlanhla Rose Dlamini said, “The global and regional burden of AMR is alarming, and sub-Saharan African countries are bearing the heaviest burden of resistant bacterial infections.” With 99 deaths per 100 000 population, Sub-Saharan Africa, as compared to other regions, has the highest AMR associated deaths, which is far exceeding the previous global projections of 700 000 annual deaths from AMR.

    “Compounding the challenge is that more than half of all deaths recorded in the WHO African Region are caused by communicable diseases that are managed with antimicrobial medicines,” Dr Dlamini said, adding that AMR puts at risk decades of advances towards the control of diseases such as malaria, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and sexually-transmitted infections.

    She also stressed the importance of water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH), vaccines and waste management as an essential component in addressing AMR. 

    The Government of Ethiopia is working with development partners to implement the third edition of National Antimicrobial Containment and Prevention Strategic Plan: the One Health Approach 2021-2025 in line with global and regional action plans.

    “WHO is honored to be part of the process, where Ethiopia is the first country in the WHO African region to launch sector-specific plan on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control,” Dr. Nonhlanhla Rose Dlamini said.

    “Ethiopia has faced its huge share of multifaceted problems that are associated with AMR” Deputy Director General of Ethiopian Environmental Protection Authority Mrs. Frenesh Mekuria said and expressed hope that the sector-specific AMR Prevention and Containment Action Plan would help alleviate the various problems AMR is causing to human, animal and environmental health.

    Expressing the determination of the various ministerial and sector offices working on AMR, the Deputy Director General called upon all national and international partners and stakeholders to enhance their collaboration and coordination in controlling the impacts of AMR in Ethiopia and beyond.

    The commemoration and launching ceremony was attended by representatives from the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health, Ministry of Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Authority and international partners.

    WAAW 2022 is being observed from November 18th to 24th 2022 across the globe with the theme “Preventing Antimicrobial Resistance Together” with the aim of raising awareness on the risks posed by overuse and misuse of antimicrobials, including antibiotics, and to encourage their more responsible use.

    WAAW also aims at calling for urgent multisectoral collaboration and action to preserve the efficacy of this fundamental component of modern medicine through a One-Health approach.

    Antimicrobial resistance, known more commonly as “drug resistance”, occurs when disease-causing germs become resistant to traditional medication, making infections harder to treat, and increasing the risk of disease spread, severe illness and death.

    Lack of effective antimicrobials will also negatively impact treatment of diseases in animals, with potentially dire consequences for food security, and overall economic growth.

    Other than misuse and overuse of antimicrobials in human and animal health, other drivers include limited availability and uptake of vaccines; limited diagnostic capacity to support appropriate treatment; lack of access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene; poor infection prevention and control practices; poor disposal practices; and the presence of antimicrobials in the environment and water bodies. 

    Guided by the Global Action Plan on AMR, and in line with WHO’s 13th General Programme of Work (GPW), WHO in the African Region continues to support regional and national interventions to combat AMR.

    WHO collaborated with Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (WHOA), the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), USAID, the African Centres for Disease Control and the African Union Inter-African Bureau for Animal Resources, in high level advocacy and a continental appeal for increased high-level political advocacy to highlight the depth of the AMR threat. 

    The partners also enabled the country to mobilize significant amounts of funds from MPTF AMR project 2021-2023 and Kingdom of Saudia Arabia to support implementation of the National AMR strategic and containment plan 2021-2025 at national and sub-national level.

    In 2019, more than 4.9 million deaths were globally attributed to drug-resistant bacterial infections, with over 1.2 million of them directly related to AMR, which is more than HIV/AIDS and malaria combined.

    Various reports also suggest that the management of COVID-19 patients with antibiotics has fueled the global AMR threat.

  •   This World AIDS Day the international community is focusing on how to end the HIV AIDS epidemic by 2030 Experts believe it can be done by overcoming barriers to HIV care and treatment through focusing on priority populations and supporting them through lifelong treatment The focus must be on identifying the remaining last mile barriers and focusing on the unique needs of the vulnerable populations including the most affected population of all teenage girls One of the first things we can do to overcome barriers to HIV care is to move away from the tyranny of the aggregate said Nkosi Tshabalala co host of a webinar http bit ly 3V1RAsr with top African HIV experts and BroadReach Health Development s Acting District Director of Gert Sibande in Mpumalanga South Africa one of the health districts where BroadReach http bit ly 3U50l3B delivers public healthcare in partnership with USAID and the Department of Health That means instead of just looking at general HIV numbers and adopting a one size fits all approach to prevention and care we must focus on the specific communities that have the highest HIV prevalence We must determine what we can do for them in a human centric caring way to address their specific health needs so that they can reach viral suppression This is the key to stopping further transmission of HIV in society by 2030 Reaching adolescent women the most at risk population group for HIV in Africa Today the face of HIV in Africa is a young girl with a baby on her back who when faced with the difficult choice of self care versus child care will always sacrifice her own health for her child said panelist Thanduxolo Doro People Living with HIV PLHIV Civil Society Leader and Project Management Specialist for USAID http bit ly 3GHFMqE South Africa Doro s vivid assessment is backed by data According to the recent UNAIDS In Danger report http bit ly 3B4czTx women and girls accounted for 63 of all new HIV infections in sub Saharan Africa Six out of seven new infections among 15 19 year olds in the region were among girls In Uganda for example adolescent girls were four to five times more likely to be HIV positive than the rest of the population said Dr Andrew Kambugu Executive Director of the Uganda Infectious Disease Institute IDI http bit ly 3OwGFUS who oversees a large scale PEPFAR funded HIV programmes in the country IDI is a capacity building organisation in the infectious diseases space based at Makerere University and is also a CDC funded HIV implementing partner Dr Veni Naidu HIV Community Services Lead with BroadReach Health Development who oversees their DREAMS programme for young women said adolescent girls and young women are disproportionately vulnerable to HIV infection due to their socio economic circumstances DREAMS is a USAID initiative across Africa to support and mentor at risk adolescent girls and young women Girls are at greater HIV risk if they engage in sex at a very young age when they don t have the power to negotiate condom use when they have multiple sexual partners if they are repressed by patriarchal culture and gender based violence GBV and if they have transactional relationships with sexual partners All symptoms of the current economic environment Orphanhood is also a risk factor because of a lack of guidance and higher risk of GBV said Naidu Girls are often reluctant to get tested or treated for HIV as they fear judgment from their parents caregivers peers and health workers Annah Sango Advocacy Officer with Global Network of People Living with HIV http bit ly 3ECDyWY in Zimbabwe said it is very important to provide a choice to young women so that they can find the preventions or treatments that will work best for their personal situation This includes pills injections vaginal rings or access to male and female condoms Choice means agency which means more protection We need to solve issues of accessibility availability affordability convenience and community buy in around HIV prevention and care for our most vulnerable populations Taking care of the needs of priority HIV AIDS communities For society to achieve epidemic control priority must be given to key populations including men who avoid seeking medical help vulnerable young girls commercial sex workers and members of the LGTBQI communities for whom it was difficult or even risky to seek help One often overlooked and blamed group is adult men for whom it was often practically challenging or embarrassing to come to clinics for HIV testing treatment and care In South Africa adult men make up 37 http bit ly 3VrWsH3 of adults living with HIV Often breadwinners who cannot afford to spend the day in a clinic men form part of the statistic that one in five Ugandans is HIV positive without knowing it Stigma shame criminalisation and economic challenges are the greatest barriers to HIV prevention and care said Kambugu Doro who leads USAID s Mina Men in isiZulu initiative focused on men and their health and wellbeing said cultural context was also important to consider African men often feel pressure to be virile strong respected providers and protectors and clinics can be stressful spaces They may feel stripped of their power patronised by one directional counselling with terminology they don t understand such as viral load transmissibility or prophylaxis We have to work from a point of empathy and inclusivity A crucial message for World AIDS Day 2022 is U U Undetectable Untransmittable highlighting the important message of hope that people who achieve viral suppression through adherence to their HIV AIDS medications can live long and healthy lives This is because viral suppression results in an undetectable viral load meaning that HIV people can live freely without the fear of transmitting HIV to others I am living proof of this message of hope said Doro who champions the MINA campaign http bit ly 3V5r9lo to reach men at risk I ve lived with HIV for 33 years not only surviving but thriving with a happy virally suppressed life with my HIV negative family It is possible Other key communities who need to hear this message include sex workers and their clients men who have sex with men people who inject drugs and transgender people and their sexual partners Combined they accounted for 70 of HIV infections globally and 51 of new infections in sub Saharan Africa according to UNAIDS These priority populations face barriers to access ranging from stigma and education to language barriers social injustice criminalisation especially in countries where homosexuality is illegal and economic and transport issues that make it hard for people to get to clinics To overcome these challenges the healthcare community needed to be innovative We must think outside the box to reach key populations for example through moonlight or drop in clinics says Kambugu For instance we successfully reached the remote fishing communities on Lake Victoria through drone powered drug deliveries Real hope of overcoming HIV AIDS in our lifetime Kambugu said the data proved that it was truly possible to reach epidemic control in our lifetime 75 of all people living with HIV in Uganda have already reached viral suppression it is possible in other countries too For context globally according to a UNAIDS report 59 living with HIV have reached viral suppression while South Africa as a whole has reach 89 according to Health Minister Joe Phaahla To reach 100 Kambugu believes Uganda needs to stop criminalising transactional and homosexual sex so that these population groups can freely access HIV prevention and care We must adopt the spirit of Ubuntu and build empathy into our policymaking For hope to translate into results Naidu believes better communication more individualised models of care and public private collaborations must become the standard for all HIV prevention and care in Africa Adding to this Sangoh believes all governments in Africa should include sex education in the school curricula We need to work tirelessly against inequality and lack of knowledge on all fronts she said
    Africa can overcome HIV by 2030 if we prioritise most vulnerable groups, experts agree ahead of World AIDS Day 2022
      This World AIDS Day the international community is focusing on how to end the HIV AIDS epidemic by 2030 Experts believe it can be done by overcoming barriers to HIV care and treatment through focusing on priority populations and supporting them through lifelong treatment The focus must be on identifying the remaining last mile barriers and focusing on the unique needs of the vulnerable populations including the most affected population of all teenage girls One of the first things we can do to overcome barriers to HIV care is to move away from the tyranny of the aggregate said Nkosi Tshabalala co host of a webinar http bit ly 3V1RAsr with top African HIV experts and BroadReach Health Development s Acting District Director of Gert Sibande in Mpumalanga South Africa one of the health districts where BroadReach http bit ly 3U50l3B delivers public healthcare in partnership with USAID and the Department of Health That means instead of just looking at general HIV numbers and adopting a one size fits all approach to prevention and care we must focus on the specific communities that have the highest HIV prevalence We must determine what we can do for them in a human centric caring way to address their specific health needs so that they can reach viral suppression This is the key to stopping further transmission of HIV in society by 2030 Reaching adolescent women the most at risk population group for HIV in Africa Today the face of HIV in Africa is a young girl with a baby on her back who when faced with the difficult choice of self care versus child care will always sacrifice her own health for her child said panelist Thanduxolo Doro People Living with HIV PLHIV Civil Society Leader and Project Management Specialist for USAID http bit ly 3GHFMqE South Africa Doro s vivid assessment is backed by data According to the recent UNAIDS In Danger report http bit ly 3B4czTx women and girls accounted for 63 of all new HIV infections in sub Saharan Africa Six out of seven new infections among 15 19 year olds in the region were among girls In Uganda for example adolescent girls were four to five times more likely to be HIV positive than the rest of the population said Dr Andrew Kambugu Executive Director of the Uganda Infectious Disease Institute IDI http bit ly 3OwGFUS who oversees a large scale PEPFAR funded HIV programmes in the country IDI is a capacity building organisation in the infectious diseases space based at Makerere University and is also a CDC funded HIV implementing partner Dr Veni Naidu HIV Community Services Lead with BroadReach Health Development who oversees their DREAMS programme for young women said adolescent girls and young women are disproportionately vulnerable to HIV infection due to their socio economic circumstances DREAMS is a USAID initiative across Africa to support and mentor at risk adolescent girls and young women Girls are at greater HIV risk if they engage in sex at a very young age when they don t have the power to negotiate condom use when they have multiple sexual partners if they are repressed by patriarchal culture and gender based violence GBV and if they have transactional relationships with sexual partners All symptoms of the current economic environment Orphanhood is also a risk factor because of a lack of guidance and higher risk of GBV said Naidu Girls are often reluctant to get tested or treated for HIV as they fear judgment from their parents caregivers peers and health workers Annah Sango Advocacy Officer with Global Network of People Living with HIV http bit ly 3ECDyWY in Zimbabwe said it is very important to provide a choice to young women so that they can find the preventions or treatments that will work best for their personal situation This includes pills injections vaginal rings or access to male and female condoms Choice means agency which means more protection We need to solve issues of accessibility availability affordability convenience and community buy in around HIV prevention and care for our most vulnerable populations Taking care of the needs of priority HIV AIDS communities For society to achieve epidemic control priority must be given to key populations including men who avoid seeking medical help vulnerable young girls commercial sex workers and members of the LGTBQI communities for whom it was difficult or even risky to seek help One often overlooked and blamed group is adult men for whom it was often practically challenging or embarrassing to come to clinics for HIV testing treatment and care In South Africa adult men make up 37 http bit ly 3VrWsH3 of adults living with HIV Often breadwinners who cannot afford to spend the day in a clinic men form part of the statistic that one in five Ugandans is HIV positive without knowing it Stigma shame criminalisation and economic challenges are the greatest barriers to HIV prevention and care said Kambugu Doro who leads USAID s Mina Men in isiZulu initiative focused on men and their health and wellbeing said cultural context was also important to consider African men often feel pressure to be virile strong respected providers and protectors and clinics can be stressful spaces They may feel stripped of their power patronised by one directional counselling with terminology they don t understand such as viral load transmissibility or prophylaxis We have to work from a point of empathy and inclusivity A crucial message for World AIDS Day 2022 is U U Undetectable Untransmittable highlighting the important message of hope that people who achieve viral suppression through adherence to their HIV AIDS medications can live long and healthy lives This is because viral suppression results in an undetectable viral load meaning that HIV people can live freely without the fear of transmitting HIV to others I am living proof of this message of hope said Doro who champions the MINA campaign http bit ly 3V5r9lo to reach men at risk I ve lived with HIV for 33 years not only surviving but thriving with a happy virally suppressed life with my HIV negative family It is possible Other key communities who need to hear this message include sex workers and their clients men who have sex with men people who inject drugs and transgender people and their sexual partners Combined they accounted for 70 of HIV infections globally and 51 of new infections in sub Saharan Africa according to UNAIDS These priority populations face barriers to access ranging from stigma and education to language barriers social injustice criminalisation especially in countries where homosexuality is illegal and economic and transport issues that make it hard for people to get to clinics To overcome these challenges the healthcare community needed to be innovative We must think outside the box to reach key populations for example through moonlight or drop in clinics says Kambugu For instance we successfully reached the remote fishing communities on Lake Victoria through drone powered drug deliveries Real hope of overcoming HIV AIDS in our lifetime Kambugu said the data proved that it was truly possible to reach epidemic control in our lifetime 75 of all people living with HIV in Uganda have already reached viral suppression it is possible in other countries too For context globally according to a UNAIDS report 59 living with HIV have reached viral suppression while South Africa as a whole has reach 89 according to Health Minister Joe Phaahla To reach 100 Kambugu believes Uganda needs to stop criminalising transactional and homosexual sex so that these population groups can freely access HIV prevention and care We must adopt the spirit of Ubuntu and build empathy into our policymaking For hope to translate into results Naidu believes better communication more individualised models of care and public private collaborations must become the standard for all HIV prevention and care in Africa Adding to this Sangoh believes all governments in Africa should include sex education in the school curricula We need to work tirelessly against inequality and lack of knowledge on all fronts she said
    Africa can overcome HIV by 2030 if we prioritise most vulnerable groups, experts agree ahead of World AIDS Day 2022
    Africa2 months ago

    Africa can overcome HIV by 2030 if we prioritise most vulnerable groups, experts agree ahead of World AIDS Day 2022

    This World AIDS Day, the international community is focusing on how to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic by 2030.

    Experts believe it can be done by overcoming barriers to HIV care and treatment through focusing on priority populations and supporting them through lifelong treatment.

    The focus must be on identifying the remaining “last mile” barriers and focusing on the unique needs of the vulnerable populations, including the most affected population of all, teenage girls. 

    “One of the first things we can do to overcome barriers to HIV care is to move away from the ‘tyranny of the aggregate’,” said Nkosi Tshabalala, co-host of a webinar (http://bit.ly/3V1RAsr) with top African HIV experts and BroadReach Health Development’s Acting District Director of Gert Sibande in Mpumalanga, South Africa - one of the health districts where BroadReach (http://bit.ly/3U50l3B) delivers public healthcare in partnership with USAID and the Department of Health.

      “That means instead of just looking at general HIV numbers and adopting a one-size-fits-all approach to prevention and care, we must focus on the specific communities that have the highest HIV prevalence.

    We must determine what we can do for them in a human-centric, caring way to address their specific health needs so that they can reach viral suppression.

    This is the key to stopping further transmission of HIV in society by 2030.”   Reaching adolescent women, the most at-risk population group for HIV in Africa  “Today, the face of HIV in Africa is a young girl with a baby on her back, who, when faced with the difficult choice of self-care versus child-care, will always sacrifice her own health for her child,” said panelist Thanduxolo Doro, People Living with HIV (PLHIV) Civil Society Leader and Project Management Specialist for USAID (http://bit.ly/3GHFMqE) South Africa.

      Doro’s vivid assessment is backed by data.

    According to the recent UNAIDS “In Danger” report (http://bit.ly/3B4czTx), women and girls accounted for 63% of all new HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Six out of seven new infections among 15–19-year-olds in the region were among girls.

    In Uganda for example, adolescent girls were four to five times more likely to be HIV positive than the rest of the population, said Dr Andrew Kambugu, Executive Director of the Uganda Infectious Disease Institute (IDI) (http://bit.ly/3OwGFUS) , who oversees a large-scale PEPFAR-funded HIV programmes in the country. 

    IDI is a capacity-building organisation in the infectious diseases space, based at Makerere University, and is also a CDC-funded HIV implementing partner.

    Dr Veni Naidu, HIV Community Services Lead with BroadReach Health Development who oversees their DREAMS programme for young women, said adolescent girls and young women are disproportionately vulnerable to HIV infection due to their socio-economic circumstances.

    DREAMS is a USAID initiative across Africa to support and mentor at risk adolescent girls and young women. 

    Girls are at greater HIV risk if they engage in sex at a very young age; when they don’t have the power to negotiate condom-use; when they have multiple sexual partners; if they are repressed by patriarchal culture and gender-based violence (GBV); and if they have transactional relationships with sexual partners.

    All symptoms of the current economic environment.

      “Orphanhood is also a risk factor, because of a lack of guidance and higher risk of GBV,” said Naidu.

    “Girls are often reluctant to get tested or treated for HIV as they fear judgment from their parents, caregivers, peers and health workers”.

    Annah Sango, Advocacy Officer with Global Network of People Living with HIV (http://bit.ly/3ECDyWY) in Zimbabwe, said it is very important to provide a choice to young women so that they can find the preventions or  treatments that will work best for their personal situation.

    This includes pills, injections, vaginal rings, or access to male and female condoms.

    “Choice means agency, which means more protection.

    We need to solve issues of accessibility, availability, affordability, convenience, and community buy-in around HIV prevention and care for our most vulnerable populations.”  Taking care of the needs of priority HIV/AIDS communities  For society to achieve epidemic control, priority must be given to key populations including men who avoid seeking medical help, vulnerable young girls, commercial sex workers, and members of the LGTBQI+ communities for whom it was difficult or even risky to seek help.

      One often overlooked and blamed group is adult men, for whom it was often practically challenging or embarrassing to come to clinics for HIV testing, treatment and care.

    In South Africa, adult men make up 37% (http://bit.ly/3VrWsH3) of adults living with HIV.

      Often breadwinners who cannot afford to spend the day in a clinic, men form part of the statistic that one in five Ugandans is HIV positive without knowing it.

    “Stigma, shame, criminalisation, and economic challenges are the greatest barriers to HIV prevention and care,” said Kambugu.

      Doro who leads USAID’s Mina (“Men” in isiZulu) initiative focused on men and their health and wellbeing, said cultural context was also important to consider.

    “African men often feel pressure to be virile, strong, respected providers and protectors, and clinics can be stressful spaces.

    They may feel stripped of their power, patronised by one-directional counselling with terminology they don’t understand, such as ‘viral load’, ‘transmissibility’ or ‘prophylaxis’.

    We have to work from a point of empathy and inclusivity.”  A crucial message for World AIDS Day 2022 is U=U (Undetectable = Untransmittable), highlighting the important message of hope that people who achieve viral suppression through adherence to their HIV/AIDS medications can live long and healthy lives.

    This is because viral suppression results in an undetectable viral load, meaning that HIV+ people can live freely, without the fear of transmitting HIV to others.

      “I am living proof of this message of hope,” said Doro, who champions the MINA campaign (http://bit.ly/3V5r9lo) to reach men at risk.

    “I’ve lived with HIV for 33 years, not only surviving but thriving, with a happy, virally suppressed life with my HIV-negative family.

    It is possible.”   Other key communities who need to hear this message include sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with men, people who inject drugs, and transgender people and their sexual partners.

    Combined, they accounted for 70% of HIV infections globally and 51% of new infections in sub-Saharan Africa, according to UNAIDS.

    These priority populations face barriers to access, ranging from stigma and education to language barriers, social injustice, criminalisation (especially in countries where homosexuality is illegal), and economic and transport issues that make it hard for people to get to clinics. 

    To overcome these challenges, the healthcare community needed to be innovative.

    “We must think outside the box to reach key populations, for example through moonlight or drop-in clinics” says Kambugu.

    “For instance, we successfully reached the remote fishing communities on Lake Victoria through drone-powered drug deliveries.”   Real hope of overcoming HIV/AIDS in our lifetime  Kambugu said the data proved that it was truly possible to reach epidemic control in our lifetime.

    “75% of all people living with HIV in Uganda have already reached viral suppression, it is possible in other countries too.” For context globally, according to a UNAIDS report 59% living with HIV have reached viral suppression, while South Africa as a whole has reach 89%, according to Health Minister Joe Phaahla.

      To reach 100%, Kambugu believes Uganda needs to stop criminalising transactional and homosexual sex, so that these population groups can freely access HIV prevention and care.

    “We must adopt the spirit of Ubuntu, and build empathy into our policymaking.”  For hope to translate into results, Naidu believes better communication, more individualised models of care, and public-private collaborations must become the standard for all HIV prevention and care in Africa.

    Adding to this, Sangoh believes all governments in Africa should include sex education in the school curricula.

    “We need to work tirelessly against inequality and lack of knowledge on all fronts,” she said.

     

  •   On November 22 U S Consul General Will Stevens and the Lagos State Governor Babajide Sanwo Olu held a handover ceremony to celebrate the completion of the Lagos State Integrated Resource Plan to bolster the overall energy security for residents Access to a stable and sustainable energy supply is critical for the long term sustainable development of more than 15 million residents of Lagos State As the most populous in Nigeria Lagos State has a predicted increase in peak electricity demand by as much as 400 percent by 2040 The Integrated Resource Plan serves as a roadmap and blueprint to improve sector planning and coordination while providing guidance on Lagos State energy development requirements to stakeholders including federal and state agencies regulators power generators electricity transmitters and distributors investors and consumers The Integrated Resource Plan will improve sector planning and coordination to provide stable and sustainable energy to all citizens and businesses The Plan will outline resource development plans for the next 20 years to meet the long term electricity needs of the State s residents businesses industries and public government premises such as hospitals and health clinics The U S Agency for International Development USAID Power Africa Nigeria Power Sector Program in partnership with the Government of Lagos State developed the plan The U S government is committed to expanding and supporting the modernization of Lagos s energy sector building a foundation for broad and inclusive economic and social development This Integrated Resource Plan is a concrete testament to the partnership between the United States and Lagos State as we both work together to create a sustainable and equitable future explained U S Consul General to Lagos Will Stevens The U S government USAID and Power Africa will continue to collaborate with Lagos State to implement the plan to further support power sector planning and coordination and provide guidance to stakeholders on Lagos State power system development requirements
    Lagos And United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner to Bolster Energy for Residents of the State
      On November 22 U S Consul General Will Stevens and the Lagos State Governor Babajide Sanwo Olu held a handover ceremony to celebrate the completion of the Lagos State Integrated Resource Plan to bolster the overall energy security for residents Access to a stable and sustainable energy supply is critical for the long term sustainable development of more than 15 million residents of Lagos State As the most populous in Nigeria Lagos State has a predicted increase in peak electricity demand by as much as 400 percent by 2040 The Integrated Resource Plan serves as a roadmap and blueprint to improve sector planning and coordination while providing guidance on Lagos State energy development requirements to stakeholders including federal and state agencies regulators power generators electricity transmitters and distributors investors and consumers The Integrated Resource Plan will improve sector planning and coordination to provide stable and sustainable energy to all citizens and businesses The Plan will outline resource development plans for the next 20 years to meet the long term electricity needs of the State s residents businesses industries and public government premises such as hospitals and health clinics The U S Agency for International Development USAID Power Africa Nigeria Power Sector Program in partnership with the Government of Lagos State developed the plan The U S government is committed to expanding and supporting the modernization of Lagos s energy sector building a foundation for broad and inclusive economic and social development This Integrated Resource Plan is a concrete testament to the partnership between the United States and Lagos State as we both work together to create a sustainable and equitable future explained U S Consul General to Lagos Will Stevens The U S government USAID and Power Africa will continue to collaborate with Lagos State to implement the plan to further support power sector planning and coordination and provide guidance to stakeholders on Lagos State power system development requirements
    Lagos And United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner to Bolster Energy for Residents of the State
    Africa2 months ago

    Lagos And United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner to Bolster Energy for Residents of the State

    On November 22, U.S. Consul General Will Stevens and the Lagos State Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu held a handover ceremony to celebrate the completion of the Lagos State Integrated Resource Plan to bolster the overall energy security for residents. 

    Access to a stable and sustainable energy supply is critical for the long-term, sustainable development of more than 15 million residents of Lagos State. 

    As the most populous in Nigeria, Lagos State has a predicted increase in peak electricity demand by as much as 400 percent by 2040. 

    The Integrated Resource Plan serves as a roadmap and blueprint to improve sector planning and coordination while providing guidance on Lagos State energy development requirements to stakeholders, including federal and state agencies, regulators, power generators, electricity transmitters and distributors, investors, and consumers. 

    The Integrated Resource Plan will improve sector planning and coordination to provide stable and sustainable energy to all citizens and businesses. 

    The Plan will outline resource development plans for the next 20 years to meet the long-term electricity needs of the State’s residents, businesses, industries, and public/government premises such as hospitals and health clinics. 

    The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Power Africa Nigeria Power Sector Program, in partnership with the Government of Lagos State developed the plan. 

    “The U.S. government is committed to expanding and supporting the modernization of Lagos’s energy sector, building a foundation for broad and inclusive economic and social development. 

    This Integrated Resource Plan is a concrete testament to the partnership between the United States and Lagos State as we both work together to create a sustainable and equitable future,” explained U.S. Consul General to Lagos, Will Stevens. 

    The U.S. government, USAID and Power Africa will continue to collaborate with Lagos State to implement the plan to further support power sector planning and coordination and provide guidance to stakeholders on Lagos State power system development requirements.

  •   On November 22 Zambian Minister of Finance Situmbeko Musokotwane and U S Ambassador to Zambia Michael Gonzales launched two critical economic development projects funded by the U S government the U S Agency for International Development USAID Business Enabling Project and USAID TradeBoost These projects will improve business opportunities create jobs and increase incomes for Zambians working in the agriculture clean energy trade and ecotourism sectors The USAID Business Enabling Project is a 14 million almost 233 million kwacha project that will bring inclusive private sector investment and trade to Zambia with a focus on supporting greater opportunities for women in the economy By strengthening communication between government industry and civil society this project will improve policies and business processes to create and expand economically viable enterprises USAID TradeBoost is a 30 million almost 500 million kwacha investment project in Zambia through Prosper Africa s flagship Africa Trade and Investment program Its overarching goal is to increase trade and investment nationally regionally and internationally that generates inclusive economic growth particularly for women and youth through climate friendly economic approaches Both projects will counter the rising food insecurity caused by multiple shocks including COVID 19 changing weather patterns and Russia s war against Ukraine During the launch event U S Ambassador Michael Gonzales noted By making it easier to do business and connect with trading partners these projects will help Zambian businesses to produce more create jobs and provide a broader variety of healthy food options in markets Adding value within Zambia to agricultural commodities and reaching new export markets means more money will reach Zambian workers pockets At the same time increasing food production and exports will vastly improve food security both locally and across the continent It will also help to prevent malnutrition by providing a more nutritious and diversified menu of foods to Zambians and our brothers and sisters throughout the continent The USAID Business Enabling Project and USAID TradeBoost will work side by side with other existing U S government funded economic development projects to create an environment that addresses trade agriculture clean energy and eco tourism challenges while providing women and youth greater access to finance and capital The programs will incentivize climate friendly growth and build value chains linking rural areas to larger markets
    United States (U.S.) Government Launches Two Projects to Boost Business and Trade
      On November 22 Zambian Minister of Finance Situmbeko Musokotwane and U S Ambassador to Zambia Michael Gonzales launched two critical economic development projects funded by the U S government the U S Agency for International Development USAID Business Enabling Project and USAID TradeBoost These projects will improve business opportunities create jobs and increase incomes for Zambians working in the agriculture clean energy trade and ecotourism sectors The USAID Business Enabling Project is a 14 million almost 233 million kwacha project that will bring inclusive private sector investment and trade to Zambia with a focus on supporting greater opportunities for women in the economy By strengthening communication between government industry and civil society this project will improve policies and business processes to create and expand economically viable enterprises USAID TradeBoost is a 30 million almost 500 million kwacha investment project in Zambia through Prosper Africa s flagship Africa Trade and Investment program Its overarching goal is to increase trade and investment nationally regionally and internationally that generates inclusive economic growth particularly for women and youth through climate friendly economic approaches Both projects will counter the rising food insecurity caused by multiple shocks including COVID 19 changing weather patterns and Russia s war against Ukraine During the launch event U S Ambassador Michael Gonzales noted By making it easier to do business and connect with trading partners these projects will help Zambian businesses to produce more create jobs and provide a broader variety of healthy food options in markets Adding value within Zambia to agricultural commodities and reaching new export markets means more money will reach Zambian workers pockets At the same time increasing food production and exports will vastly improve food security both locally and across the continent It will also help to prevent malnutrition by providing a more nutritious and diversified menu of foods to Zambians and our brothers and sisters throughout the continent The USAID Business Enabling Project and USAID TradeBoost will work side by side with other existing U S government funded economic development projects to create an environment that addresses trade agriculture clean energy and eco tourism challenges while providing women and youth greater access to finance and capital The programs will incentivize climate friendly growth and build value chains linking rural areas to larger markets
    United States (U.S.) Government Launches Two Projects to Boost Business and Trade
    Africa2 months ago

    United States (U.S.) Government Launches Two Projects to Boost Business and Trade

    On November 22, Zambian Minister of Finance Situmbeko Musokotwane and U.S. Ambassador to Zambia Michael Gonzales launched two critical economic development projects funded by the U.S. government – the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Business Enabling Project and USAID TradeBoost. 

    These projects will improve business opportunities, create jobs, and increase incomes for Zambians working in the agriculture, clean energy, trade, and ecotourism sectors.

    The USAID Business Enabling Project is a $14 million (almost 233 million kwacha) project that will bring inclusive private sector investment and trade to Zambia with a focus on supporting greater opportunities for women in the economy. 

    By strengthening communication between government, industry, and civil society this project will improve policies and business processes to create and expand economically-viable enterprises.

    USAID TradeBoost is a $30 million (almost 500 million kwacha) investment project in Zambia through Prosper Africa’s flagship Africa Trade and Investment program. 

    Its overarching goal is to increase trade and investment nationally, regionally, and internationally that generates inclusive economic growth, particularly for women and youth, through climate-friendly economic approaches. 

    Both projects will counter the rising food insecurity caused by multiple shocks including COVID-19, changing weather patterns, and Russia’s war against Ukraine.

    During the launch event, U.S. Ambassador Michael Gonzales noted, “By making it easier to do business and connect with trading partners, these projects will help Zambian businesses to produce more, create jobs, and provide a broader variety of healthy food options in markets.

    Adding value within Zambia to agricultural commodities and reaching new export markets means more money will reach Zambian workers’ pockets. 

    At the same time, increasing food production and exports will vastly improve food security both locally and across the continent. 

    It will also help to prevent malnutrition by providing a more nutritious and diversified menu of foods to Zambians and our brothers and sisters throughout the continent.” The USAID Business Enabling Project and USAID TradeBoost will work side-by-side with other existing U.S. government-funded economic development projects to create an environment that addresses trade, agriculture, clean energy, and eco-tourism challenges while providing women and youth greater access to finance and capital. 

    The programs will incentivize climate-friendly growth and build value chains linking rural areas to larger markets.

  •   Lagos State Governor Babajide Sanwo Olu has urged the House of Representatives to allow state governments have input into the Electricity Bill 2022 by allowing them to generate electricity and develop at their pace Sanwo Olu stated this yesterday during the handover ceremony of the Lagos State Integrated Energy Resource Plan IRP which was done by the Lagos State Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources in collaboration with America through the USAID and Power Africa Nigeria Power Sector Programme PA NPSP He said This is about power partnership which started eight years ago by the Barack Obama administration Lagos State needs to increase its electricity generation capacity to help develop small businesses and grow the GDP of the state and Nigeria I also call on the Speaker of the House of Representatives Femi Gbajabiamila to join us to resolve all the issues in the electricity bill In his remarks the state s Commissioner for Energy and Mineral Resources Mr Olalere Odusote said the initiative was a 20 year partnership that would also involve the two electricity distribution companies in Lagos Ikeja and Eko Discos adding that it would transform the power deficiencies in Africa Odusote further noted that the plan was aimed at identifying infrastructure requirements and bridging gaps as well as bringing needed investments in the electricity sector The Consul General of American Consulate in Lagos Williams Stevens described electricity as the basis of economic growth trade and investments and expressed the American government s excitement at partnering with the state He said This is the main dream of former President Barack Obama for Africa s development which started in 2014 and I am glad that eight years after it has come to full circle
    Sanwo-Olu tasks Reps on allowing states to generate electricity
      Lagos State Governor Babajide Sanwo Olu has urged the House of Representatives to allow state governments have input into the Electricity Bill 2022 by allowing them to generate electricity and develop at their pace Sanwo Olu stated this yesterday during the handover ceremony of the Lagos State Integrated Energy Resource Plan IRP which was done by the Lagos State Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources in collaboration with America through the USAID and Power Africa Nigeria Power Sector Programme PA NPSP He said This is about power partnership which started eight years ago by the Barack Obama administration Lagos State needs to increase its electricity generation capacity to help develop small businesses and grow the GDP of the state and Nigeria I also call on the Speaker of the House of Representatives Femi Gbajabiamila to join us to resolve all the issues in the electricity bill In his remarks the state s Commissioner for Energy and Mineral Resources Mr Olalere Odusote said the initiative was a 20 year partnership that would also involve the two electricity distribution companies in Lagos Ikeja and Eko Discos adding that it would transform the power deficiencies in Africa Odusote further noted that the plan was aimed at identifying infrastructure requirements and bridging gaps as well as bringing needed investments in the electricity sector The Consul General of American Consulate in Lagos Williams Stevens described electricity as the basis of economic growth trade and investments and expressed the American government s excitement at partnering with the state He said This is the main dream of former President Barack Obama for Africa s development which started in 2014 and I am glad that eight years after it has come to full circle
    Sanwo-Olu tasks Reps on allowing states to generate electricity
    Foreign2 months ago

    Sanwo-Olu tasks Reps on allowing states to generate electricity

    Lagos State Governor, Babajide Sanwo-Olu, has urged the House of Representatives to allow state governments have input into the Electricity Bill 2022 by allowing them to generate electricity and develop at their pace.   

    Sanwo-Olu stated this, yesterday, during the handover ceremony of the Lagos State Integrated Energy Resource Plan (IRP), which was done by the Lagos State Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, in collaboration with America through the USAID and Power Africa Nigeria Power Sector Programme (PA-NPSP).   

    He said: “This is about power partnership, which started eight years ago by the Barack Obama administration.

    “Lagos State needs to increase its electricity generation capacity to help develop small businesses and grow the GDP of the state and Nigeria.

    “I also call on the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Femi Gbajabiamila, to join us to resolve all the issues in the electricity bill.

    ” In his remarks, the state’s Commissioner for Energy and Mineral Resources, Mr. Olalere Odusote, said the initiative was a 20-year partnership that would also involve the two electricity distribution companies in Lagos, Ikeja and Eko Discos, adding that it would transform the power deficiencies in Africa.

    Odusote further noted that the plan was aimed at identifying infrastructure requirements and bridging gaps, as well as bringing needed investments in the electricity sector.   

    The Consul-General of, American Consulate in Lagos, Williams Stevens, described electricity as the basis of economic growth, trade and investments and expressed the American government’s excitement at partnering with the state.

    He said: “This is the main dream of former President Barack Obama for Africa’s development, which started in 2014 and I am glad that eight years after, it has come to full circle.

  •   The U S Government through the United States Agency for International Development USAID became a formal partner in the Mozambique Education Support Fund Fundo de Apoio ao Sector da Educa o FASE to further support the Ministry of Education and Human Development MINEDH carry out its 10 year Education Sector Strategic Plan This comes three months after Minister of Education Carmelita Namashulua and USAID Mission Director Helen Pataki signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on education FASE is co funded by 12 donors Finland Canada Italy Ireland Portugal France Germany the EU the World Bank UNICEF and the Global Partnership for Education and now the United States The Fund focuses on a number of issues jointly identified by the Government of Mozambique and donors including access to and quality of education and improving the institutional capacity of Mozambique s education sector at the central provincial district and school levels among other priorities With the United States membership in FASE USAID is contributing 700 000 to the Fund annually USAID continues to directly implement programs in bilingual education girls education the inclusion of students with disabilities support and development of teacher training and reducing teacher absenteeism as well as vocational education and training skills Those programs are implemented in Nampula and Zambezia and include USAID Improved Learning Outcomes in Primary Education SABER USAID Advancing Girls Education AGE USAID Apoiar A Ler USAID Community Engagement for Improved Bilingual Education USAID Mission Director Pataki said Being a FASE partner enhances the U S government s ability to collaborate and align priorities with other donors with a single objective to give children and youth access to a good quality education particularly girls and children with disabilities Improving the education sector is a critical component of the broader U S Government assistance in Mozambique In close collaboration with the Government of the Republic of Mozambique the U S Government provides more than 500 million in annual assistance to improve the quality of education and healthcare promote economic prosperity and support the overall development of the nation
    The United States Joins the Mozambique Education Support Fund
      The U S Government through the United States Agency for International Development USAID became a formal partner in the Mozambique Education Support Fund Fundo de Apoio ao Sector da Educa o FASE to further support the Ministry of Education and Human Development MINEDH carry out its 10 year Education Sector Strategic Plan This comes three months after Minister of Education Carmelita Namashulua and USAID Mission Director Helen Pataki signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on education FASE is co funded by 12 donors Finland Canada Italy Ireland Portugal France Germany the EU the World Bank UNICEF and the Global Partnership for Education and now the United States The Fund focuses on a number of issues jointly identified by the Government of Mozambique and donors including access to and quality of education and improving the institutional capacity of Mozambique s education sector at the central provincial district and school levels among other priorities With the United States membership in FASE USAID is contributing 700 000 to the Fund annually USAID continues to directly implement programs in bilingual education girls education the inclusion of students with disabilities support and development of teacher training and reducing teacher absenteeism as well as vocational education and training skills Those programs are implemented in Nampula and Zambezia and include USAID Improved Learning Outcomes in Primary Education SABER USAID Advancing Girls Education AGE USAID Apoiar A Ler USAID Community Engagement for Improved Bilingual Education USAID Mission Director Pataki said Being a FASE partner enhances the U S government s ability to collaborate and align priorities with other donors with a single objective to give children and youth access to a good quality education particularly girls and children with disabilities Improving the education sector is a critical component of the broader U S Government assistance in Mozambique In close collaboration with the Government of the Republic of Mozambique the U S Government provides more than 500 million in annual assistance to improve the quality of education and healthcare promote economic prosperity and support the overall development of the nation
    The United States Joins the Mozambique Education Support Fund
    Africa2 months ago

    The United States Joins the Mozambique Education Support Fund

    The U.S. Government, through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), became a formal partner in the Mozambique Education Support Fund (Fundo de Apoio ao Sector da Educação, FASE) to further support the Ministry of Education and Human Development (MINEDH) carry out its 10-year Education Sector Strategic Plan.  This comes three months after Minister of Education Carmelita Namashulua and USAID Mission Director Helen Pataki signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on education.

    FASE is co-funded by 12 donors: Finland, Canada, Italy, Ireland, Portugal, France, Germany, the EU, the World Bank, UNICEF and the Global Partnership for Education, and now the United States.

    The Fund focuses on a number of issues jointly identified by the Government of Mozambique and donors, including access to and quality of education, and improving the institutional capacity of Mozambique’s education sector at the central, provincial, district, and school levels, among other priorities.

    With the United States’ membership in FASE, USAID is contributing $700,000 to the Fund annually.

    USAID continues to directly implement programs in bilingual education, girls education, the inclusion of students with disabilities, support and development of teacher training and reducing teacher absenteeism, as well as vocational education and training skills.

    Those programs are implemented in Nampula and Zambezia and include: USAID Improved Learning Outcomes in Primary Education (SABER) USAID Advancing Girls Education (AGE) USAID Apoiar A Ler USAID Community Engagement for Improved Bilingual Education USAID Mission Director Pataki said, “Being a FASE partner enhances the U.S. government’s ability to collaborate and align priorities with other donors with a single objective: to give children and youth access to a good quality education, particularly girls and children with disabilities.” Improving the education sector is a critical component of the broader U.S. Government assistance in Mozambique. 

    In close collaboration with the Government of the Republic of Mozambique, the U.S. Government provides more than $500 million in annual assistance to improve the quality of education and healthcare, promote economic prosperity, and support the overall development of the nation.

  •   Environmental justice efforts are critically important to save Madagascar s unique biodiversity from irreversible destruction On November 17 the U S government through the U S Agency for International Development USAID convened a roundtable workshop to address environmental injustices and promote the wise and sustainable use of the country s precious natural resources Environmental justice ensures efficient enforcement of environmental laws effective sanctions in response to environment related misconduct and equitable sharing of benefits from environmental resources Forests and natural habitats are disappearing fauna and flora are threatened with extinction and communities suffer injustice that leads them to break the law to survive Agathe Sector USAID s Environment Office Director said in remarks at the workshop Despite commendable efforts to reverse this trend impunity corruption and lack of enforcement stand in the way Legal frameworks exist but their application is insufficient The need for rigorous fair and equitable natural resource management is a critical aspect of good governance in Madagascar today During the workshop representatives of the public sector CSOs and conservation NGOs joined together to evaluate the effectiveness of Madagascar s environmental legal framework call for revisions to national policy identify necessary strategies and highlight the need for more effective implementation of existing programs Participants also endorsed several environmental justice resolutions and developed a clear action plan for organizations engaged in this essential work Stakeholders like the Tafo Mihavo network of natural resources managers and the Study and Research Group on Primates of Madagascar Solidarity of Land Stakeholders urged representatives from the ministries of the Environment and Sustainable Development Justice Land Management and Land Services to address critical issues such as the transfer of natural resources management to local communities and the relevance of existing laws and regulations They also underscored the important link between land tenure and environmental justice and how natural resource management practices such as protection of drinking water sources affect human health Specifically the recommendations called for decentralization of law enforcement and empowerment of communities through the dina and adoption of new land use legislation Through its Hay Tao environmental governance project USAID supports Madagascar s public institutions to develop policies and enforce environmental and land laws to improve the legal framework for natural resource governance The United States stands side by side with Madagascar like mpirahalahy mianala to help safeguard the country s unique biodiversity Since 2013 USAID has committed more than 60 million to promote sustainability improve livelihoods for communities bolster governance of natural resources stop wildlife trafficking and protect forests from illegal exploitation
    United States (U.S.) Advances Environmental Justice for Madagascar
      Environmental justice efforts are critically important to save Madagascar s unique biodiversity from irreversible destruction On November 17 the U S government through the U S Agency for International Development USAID convened a roundtable workshop to address environmental injustices and promote the wise and sustainable use of the country s precious natural resources Environmental justice ensures efficient enforcement of environmental laws effective sanctions in response to environment related misconduct and equitable sharing of benefits from environmental resources Forests and natural habitats are disappearing fauna and flora are threatened with extinction and communities suffer injustice that leads them to break the law to survive Agathe Sector USAID s Environment Office Director said in remarks at the workshop Despite commendable efforts to reverse this trend impunity corruption and lack of enforcement stand in the way Legal frameworks exist but their application is insufficient The need for rigorous fair and equitable natural resource management is a critical aspect of good governance in Madagascar today During the workshop representatives of the public sector CSOs and conservation NGOs joined together to evaluate the effectiveness of Madagascar s environmental legal framework call for revisions to national policy identify necessary strategies and highlight the need for more effective implementation of existing programs Participants also endorsed several environmental justice resolutions and developed a clear action plan for organizations engaged in this essential work Stakeholders like the Tafo Mihavo network of natural resources managers and the Study and Research Group on Primates of Madagascar Solidarity of Land Stakeholders urged representatives from the ministries of the Environment and Sustainable Development Justice Land Management and Land Services to address critical issues such as the transfer of natural resources management to local communities and the relevance of existing laws and regulations They also underscored the important link between land tenure and environmental justice and how natural resource management practices such as protection of drinking water sources affect human health Specifically the recommendations called for decentralization of law enforcement and empowerment of communities through the dina and adoption of new land use legislation Through its Hay Tao environmental governance project USAID supports Madagascar s public institutions to develop policies and enforce environmental and land laws to improve the legal framework for natural resource governance The United States stands side by side with Madagascar like mpirahalahy mianala to help safeguard the country s unique biodiversity Since 2013 USAID has committed more than 60 million to promote sustainability improve livelihoods for communities bolster governance of natural resources stop wildlife trafficking and protect forests from illegal exploitation
    United States (U.S.) Advances Environmental Justice for Madagascar
    Africa2 months ago

    United States (U.S.) Advances Environmental Justice for Madagascar

    Environmental justice efforts are critically important to save Madagascar’s unique biodiversity from irreversible destruction.

    On November 17, the U.S. government, through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) convened a roundtable workshop to address environmental injustices and promote the wise and sustainable use of the country’s precious natural resources.

    Environmental justice ensures efficient enforcement of environmental laws, effective sanctions in response to environment-related misconduct, and equitable sharing of benefits from environmental resources.

    “Forests and natural habitats are disappearing, fauna and flora are threatened with extinction, and communities suffer injustice that leads them to break the law to survive,” Agathe Sector, USAID’s Environment Office Director, said in remarks at the workshop. 

    “Despite commendable efforts to reverse this trend, impunity, corruption, and lack of enforcement stand in the way. 

    Legal frameworks exist, but their application is insufficient. 

    The need for rigorous, fair, and equitable natural resource management is a critical aspect of good governance in Madagascar today.” During the workshop, representatives of the public sector, CSOs, and conservation NGOs joined together to evaluate the effectiveness of Madagascar’s environmental legal framework, call for revisions to national policy, identify necessary strategies, and highlight the need for more effective implementation of existing programs. 

    Participants also endorsed several environmental justice resolutions and developed a clear action plan for organizations engaged in this essential work.

    Stakeholders like the Tafo Mihavo  network of natural resources managers and the Study and Research Group on Primates of Madagascar, Solidarity of Land Stakeholders urged representatives from the ministries of the Environment and Sustainable Development, Justice, Land Management and Land Services to address critical issues such as the transfer of natural resources management to local communities and the relevance of existing laws and regulations.

    They also underscored the important link between land tenure and environmental justice, and how natural resource management practices, such as protection of drinking water sources, affect human health. 

    Specifically, the recommendations called for decentralization of law enforcement and empowerment of communities through the dina , and adoption of new land use legislation.

    Through its Hay Tao environmental governance project, USAID supports Madagascar’s public institutions to develop policies and enforce environmental and land laws to improve the legal framework for natural resource governance.

    The United States stands side by side with Madagascar like “mpirahalahy mianala” to help safeguard the country’s unique biodiversity. 

    Since 2013, USAID has committed more than $60 million to promote sustainability, improve livelihoods for communities, bolster governance of natural resources, stop wildlife trafficking, and protect forests from illegal exploitation.

  •   Ambassador Tracey Ann Jacobson Charg d Affaires of the U S Embassy in Addis Ababa United States Agency for International Development s USAID Deputy Assistant Administrator DAA for Africa Tyler Beckelman and USAID Ethiopia Mission Director Sean Jones visited Jigjiga and Kebre Biyeh in Somali region The delegation met with Somali Regional President H E Mustafe Omer as well as with humanitarian and development organizations and with people of the Somali region During the meeting with regional President H E Mustafe Omer the delegation discussed USAID s ongoing response to the catastrophic drought including life saving food and other assistance They also discussed USAID s historical support in Somali region the urgent needs facing the drought stricken region now and the continued U S support and collaboration towards peace and stability Ambassador Jacobson and the USAID team also noted the region s commitment to climate adaptation and development The delegation visited humanitarian and development programs responding to the drought to see the effects of American aid firsthand They began with a stop at the Kebri Beyah Hart Sheikh Health Center which provides emergency stabilization and treatment for children suffering from severe and moderate acute malnutrition and receives funding and life saving medicines from USAID The delegation spoke with a livestock trader who has received USAID support to encourage the sale of livestock destocking during the drought thus reducing pressure on the parched grazing lands and providing much needed cash to households The delegation also met with Ethiopian pastoralists who receive American funded vouchers for livestock feed and veterinary care These valuable vouchers are allowing residents of Somali region to maintain the milk production of their herds Finally they visited a USAID funded World Food Programme WFP warehouse to observe the life saving food and nutrition assistance provided to households experiencing the impacts of the historic drought With USAID s funding WFP is reaching 2 4 million people for emergency food assistance in 89 woredas in Somali alone USAID has provided over 672 million in drought response in 2022 and is devoted to the health welfare and prosperous future of the people of Ethiopia This is another example of the strong partnership between the American and Ethiopian people
    Ambassador Jacobson and United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Delegation Strengthen Partnership in Drought Response During Official Visit to Somali Region
      Ambassador Tracey Ann Jacobson Charg d Affaires of the U S Embassy in Addis Ababa United States Agency for International Development s USAID Deputy Assistant Administrator DAA for Africa Tyler Beckelman and USAID Ethiopia Mission Director Sean Jones visited Jigjiga and Kebre Biyeh in Somali region The delegation met with Somali Regional President H E Mustafe Omer as well as with humanitarian and development organizations and with people of the Somali region During the meeting with regional President H E Mustafe Omer the delegation discussed USAID s ongoing response to the catastrophic drought including life saving food and other assistance They also discussed USAID s historical support in Somali region the urgent needs facing the drought stricken region now and the continued U S support and collaboration towards peace and stability Ambassador Jacobson and the USAID team also noted the region s commitment to climate adaptation and development The delegation visited humanitarian and development programs responding to the drought to see the effects of American aid firsthand They began with a stop at the Kebri Beyah Hart Sheikh Health Center which provides emergency stabilization and treatment for children suffering from severe and moderate acute malnutrition and receives funding and life saving medicines from USAID The delegation spoke with a livestock trader who has received USAID support to encourage the sale of livestock destocking during the drought thus reducing pressure on the parched grazing lands and providing much needed cash to households The delegation also met with Ethiopian pastoralists who receive American funded vouchers for livestock feed and veterinary care These valuable vouchers are allowing residents of Somali region to maintain the milk production of their herds Finally they visited a USAID funded World Food Programme WFP warehouse to observe the life saving food and nutrition assistance provided to households experiencing the impacts of the historic drought With USAID s funding WFP is reaching 2 4 million people for emergency food assistance in 89 woredas in Somali alone USAID has provided over 672 million in drought response in 2022 and is devoted to the health welfare and prosperous future of the people of Ethiopia This is another example of the strong partnership between the American and Ethiopian people
    Ambassador Jacobson and United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Delegation Strengthen Partnership in Drought Response During Official Visit to Somali Region
    Africa2 months ago

    Ambassador Jacobson and United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Delegation Strengthen Partnership in Drought Response During Official Visit to Somali Region

    Ambassador Tracey Ann Jacobson, Chargé d’Affaires of the U.S. Embassy in Addis Ababa, United States Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Deputy Assistant Administrator (DAA) for Africa, Tyler Beckelman, and USAID/Ethiopia Mission Director Sean Jones visited Jigjiga and Kebre Biyeh in Somali region. 

    The delegation met with Somali Regional President H.E. Mustafe Omer as well as with humanitarian and development organizations and with people of the Somali region.

    During the meeting with regional President H.E. Mustafe Omer, the delegation discussed USAID’s ongoing response to the catastrophic drought, including life-saving food and other assistance. 

    They also discussed USAID’s historical support in Somali region, the urgent needs facing the drought-stricken region now, and the continued U.S. support and collaboration towards peace and stability. 

    Ambassador Jacobson and the USAID team also noted the region’s commitment to climate adaptation and development.

    The delegation visited humanitarian and development programs responding to the drought to see the effects of American aid firsthand. 

    They began with a stop at the Kebri Beyah Hart-Sheikh Health Center, which provides emergency stabilization and treatment for children suffering from severe and moderate acute malnutrition and receives funding and life-saving medicines from USAID.

    The delegation spoke with a livestock trader, who has received USAID support to encourage the sale of livestock (“destocking”) during the drought, thus reducing pressure on the parched grazing lands and providing much needed cash to households. 

    The delegation also met with Ethiopian pastoralists, who receive American-funded vouchers for livestock feed and veterinary care. 

    These valuable vouchers are allowing residents of Somali region to maintain the milk production of their herds.

    Finally, they visited a USAID-funded World Food Programme (WFP) warehouse to observe the life-saving food and nutrition assistance provided to households experiencing the impacts of the historic drought. 

    With USAID’s funding, WFP is reaching 2.4 million people for emergency food assistance in 89 woredas in Somali alone.

    USAID has provided over $672 million in drought response in 2022 and is devoted to the health, welfare, and prosperous future of the people of Ethiopia. 

    This is another example of the strong partnership between the American and Ethiopian people.

  •   The U S Embassy in Egypt is commemorating International Education Week from November 14 18 by celebrating Egypt and the United States expanding ties in the field of education On November 14 the U S Department of State in collaboration with the Institute of International Education released the Open Doors Report which showed that during the past academic year 2021 2022 3 967 Egyptians studied at American colleges and universities the highest number ever recorded an 8 percent increase over the prior academic year and a more than 70 percent increase from ten years prior These Egyptian students join the roughly one million students from abroad who studied in the United States during the past academic year as the United States and Egypt work to increase student access to globalized education a key goal of Egypt s Vision 2030 In highlighting the strength of the U S Egypt partnership in education Charg d Affaires a i Ambassador Daniel Rubinstein noted We are thrilled to see more Egyptian students take advantage of the unique educational opportunities available in the United States The roughly 4 000 accredited colleges and universities in the United States provide a world class education in a diverse and welcoming environment And I can tell you from personal experience that students who study abroad bring a unique set of skills perspectives and experiences that will benefit them in any career and life pursuit During International Education Week the U S Embassy in Egypt and EducationUSA advisors are conducting in person and online events for students and academics interested in exchanges or long term study in the United States The U S Embassy provides a wide range of exchange programs which enable hundreds of Egyptians to benefit from educational and professional exchanges in the United States each year The U S Government through USAID also offers scholarships to graduate undergraduate and public and private sector professionals to study in the United States For example the newly announced USAID Egyptian Pioneers program will provide 700 scholarships and more than 600 exchange or training opportunities to mid career professionals including Egyptian government officials Through EducationUSA Egyptian students can access resources and guidance on study in the United States For more information on EducationUSA visit https www amideast org egypt study in the usa lt https www amideast org egypt study in the usa gt
    United States (U.S.) Embassy in Egypt Commemorates International Education Week
      The U S Embassy in Egypt is commemorating International Education Week from November 14 18 by celebrating Egypt and the United States expanding ties in the field of education On November 14 the U S Department of State in collaboration with the Institute of International Education released the Open Doors Report which showed that during the past academic year 2021 2022 3 967 Egyptians studied at American colleges and universities the highest number ever recorded an 8 percent increase over the prior academic year and a more than 70 percent increase from ten years prior These Egyptian students join the roughly one million students from abroad who studied in the United States during the past academic year as the United States and Egypt work to increase student access to globalized education a key goal of Egypt s Vision 2030 In highlighting the strength of the U S Egypt partnership in education Charg d Affaires a i Ambassador Daniel Rubinstein noted We are thrilled to see more Egyptian students take advantage of the unique educational opportunities available in the United States The roughly 4 000 accredited colleges and universities in the United States provide a world class education in a diverse and welcoming environment And I can tell you from personal experience that students who study abroad bring a unique set of skills perspectives and experiences that will benefit them in any career and life pursuit During International Education Week the U S Embassy in Egypt and EducationUSA advisors are conducting in person and online events for students and academics interested in exchanges or long term study in the United States The U S Embassy provides a wide range of exchange programs which enable hundreds of Egyptians to benefit from educational and professional exchanges in the United States each year The U S Government through USAID also offers scholarships to graduate undergraduate and public and private sector professionals to study in the United States For example the newly announced USAID Egyptian Pioneers program will provide 700 scholarships and more than 600 exchange or training opportunities to mid career professionals including Egyptian government officials Through EducationUSA Egyptian students can access resources and guidance on study in the United States For more information on EducationUSA visit https www amideast org egypt study in the usa lt https www amideast org egypt study in the usa gt
    United States (U.S.) Embassy in Egypt Commemorates International Education Week
    Africa2 months ago

    United States (U.S.) Embassy in Egypt Commemorates International Education Week

    The U.S. Embassy in Egypt is commemorating International Education Week from November 14-18 by celebrating Egypt and the United States’ expanding ties in the field of education.

    On November 14, the U.S. Department of State, in collaboration with the Institute of International Education, released the Open Doors Report, which showed that during the past academic year (2021-2022) 3,967 Egyptians studied at American colleges and universities—the highest number ever recorded, an 8 percent increase over the prior academic year, and a more than 70 percent increase from ten years prior.

    These Egyptian students join the roughly one million students from abroad who studied in the United States during the past academic year, as the United States and Egypt work to increase student access to globalized education, a key goal of Egypt’s Vision 2030.

    In highlighting the strength of the U.S.-Egypt partnership in education, Chargé d'Affaires, a.i., Ambassador Daniel Rubinstein noted, “We are thrilled to see more Egyptian students take advantage of the unique educational opportunities available in the United States.

    The roughly 4,000 accredited colleges and universities in the United States provide a world-class education in a diverse and welcoming environment.

    And I can tell you from personal experience that students who study abroad bring a unique set of skills, perspectives, and experiences that will benefit them in any career and life pursuit."

    During International Education Week, the U.S. Embassy in Egypt and EducationUSA advisors are conducting in-person and online events for students and academics interested in exchanges or long-term study in the United States.

    The U.S. Embassy provides a wide range of exchange programs, which enable hundreds of Egyptians to benefit from educational and professional exchanges in the United States each year.

    The U.S. Government, through USAID, also offers scholarships to graduate, undergraduate, and public and private sector professionals to study in the United States.

    For example, the newly announced USAID Egyptian Pioneers program will provide 700 scholarships and more than 600 exchange or training opportunities to mid-career professionals, including Egyptian government officials.

    Through EducationUSA, Egyptian students can access resources and guidance on study in the United States.

    For more information on EducationUSA, visit: https://www.amideast.org/egypt/study-in-the-usa <https://www.amideast.org/egypt/study-in-the-usa> 

  •   At COP27 the U S Agency for International Development USAID announced a suite of programs to advance gender responsive climate action New announcements include Advancing Gender Responsive Climate Action USAID announced 21 8 million dedicated to gender responsive climate action from the Gender Equity and Equality Action GEEA Fund surpassing its 14 million COP26 commitment This includes funding for organizations working in over 37 countries to address gender based violence connected to climate support to national governments to increase gender equality in their national climate commitments and programs that advance green jobs for women and gender smart climate information services Through USAID s Climate Finance Development Accelerator mechanism CFDA USAID announced the launch of its new Climate Gender Equity Fund which will leverage private sector funding to scale climate finance that advances gender equitable climate action USAID and online retailer Amazon Inc announced a new five year partnership with initial seed funding of 6 million to establish the Climate Gender Equity Fund This new initiative will increase access to climate finance for women led climate organizations as well as businesses that advance gender equitable climate solutions in the least developed countries around the world As part of its commitment to gender equality and climate change Amazon is also announcing a new commitment to allocate 50 million from its Climate Pledge Fund to invest in women founded and women led climate tech companies Amazon will collaborate with USAID and the Climate Gender Equity Fund to source new investment opportunities and broaden its pipeline of female applicants USAID and Amazon will work together to secure at least 60 million in additional funding and invite others to join us in advancing this critical issue Investing in Climate Leadership for Egyptian Women USAID has made a 23 million initial investment in a new nine year program Egyptian Pioneers that aims to build a more inclusive and capable Egyptian workforce while contributing to climate goals The investment will support leadership and professional training undergraduate and postgraduate scholarships and study abroad programs in the United States for more than 500 Egyptian women Together these deliverables will accelerate climate action by scaling gender equitable approaches that leverage women and girls unique knowledge priorities and experiences all through impactful partnerships with the private sector other U S government agencies bilateral and multilateral donors and philanthropies Following last year s announcement at COP26 and as outlined in USAID s Climate Strategy USAID is committed to increasing participation and leadership for Indigenous Peoples local communities women and youth in all their diversity in climate action in at least 40 partner countries by 2030
    United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Advances Global Climate Action and Gender Equality
      At COP27 the U S Agency for International Development USAID announced a suite of programs to advance gender responsive climate action New announcements include Advancing Gender Responsive Climate Action USAID announced 21 8 million dedicated to gender responsive climate action from the Gender Equity and Equality Action GEEA Fund surpassing its 14 million COP26 commitment This includes funding for organizations working in over 37 countries to address gender based violence connected to climate support to national governments to increase gender equality in their national climate commitments and programs that advance green jobs for women and gender smart climate information services Through USAID s Climate Finance Development Accelerator mechanism CFDA USAID announced the launch of its new Climate Gender Equity Fund which will leverage private sector funding to scale climate finance that advances gender equitable climate action USAID and online retailer Amazon Inc announced a new five year partnership with initial seed funding of 6 million to establish the Climate Gender Equity Fund This new initiative will increase access to climate finance for women led climate organizations as well as businesses that advance gender equitable climate solutions in the least developed countries around the world As part of its commitment to gender equality and climate change Amazon is also announcing a new commitment to allocate 50 million from its Climate Pledge Fund to invest in women founded and women led climate tech companies Amazon will collaborate with USAID and the Climate Gender Equity Fund to source new investment opportunities and broaden its pipeline of female applicants USAID and Amazon will work together to secure at least 60 million in additional funding and invite others to join us in advancing this critical issue Investing in Climate Leadership for Egyptian Women USAID has made a 23 million initial investment in a new nine year program Egyptian Pioneers that aims to build a more inclusive and capable Egyptian workforce while contributing to climate goals The investment will support leadership and professional training undergraduate and postgraduate scholarships and study abroad programs in the United States for more than 500 Egyptian women Together these deliverables will accelerate climate action by scaling gender equitable approaches that leverage women and girls unique knowledge priorities and experiences all through impactful partnerships with the private sector other U S government agencies bilateral and multilateral donors and philanthropies Following last year s announcement at COP26 and as outlined in USAID s Climate Strategy USAID is committed to increasing participation and leadership for Indigenous Peoples local communities women and youth in all their diversity in climate action in at least 40 partner countries by 2030
    United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Advances Global Climate Action and Gender Equality
    Africa3 months ago

    United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Advances Global Climate Action and Gender Equality

    At COP27, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) announced a suite of programs to advance gender-responsive climate action.

    New announcements include: Advancing Gender-Responsive Climate Action USAID announced $21.8 million dedicated to gender-responsive climate action from the Gender Equity and Equality Action (GEEA) Fund, surpassing its $14 million COP26 commitment.

    This includes funding for organizations working in over 37 countries to address gender-based violence connected to climate, support to national governments to increase gender equality in their national climate commitments, and programs that advance green jobs for women and gender-smart climate information services.

    Through USAID’s Climate Finance Development Accelerator mechanism (CFDA), USAID announced the launch of its new Climate Gender Equity Fund, which will leverage private sector funding to scale climate finance that advances gender-equitable climate action.

    USAID and online retailer Amazon, Inc., announced a new five-year partnership, with initial seed funding of $6 million to establish the Climate Gender Equity Fund. This new initiative will increase access to climate finance for women-led climate organizations, as well as businesses that advance gender-equitable climate solutions in the least developed countries around the world.

    As part of its commitment to gender equality and climate change, Amazon is also announcing a new commitment to allocate $50 million from its Climate Pledge Fund to invest in women-founded and women-led climate tech companies.

    Amazon will collaborate with USAID and the Climate Gender Equity Fund to source new investment opportunities and broaden its pipeline of female applicants.

    USAID and Amazon will work together to secure at least $60 million in additional funding and invite others to join us in advancing this critical issue.

    Investing in Climate Leadership for Egyptian Women USAID has made a $23 million initial investment in a new, nine-year program, Egyptian Pioneers, that aims to build a more inclusive and capable Egyptian workforce, while contributing to climate goals.

    The investment will support leadership and professional training, undergraduate and postgraduate scholarships, and study abroad programs in the United States for more than 500 Egyptian women.

    Together, these deliverables will accelerate climate action by scaling gender-equitable approaches that leverage women and girls’ unique knowledge, priorities, and experiences – all through impactful partnerships with the private sector, other U.S. government agencies, bilateral and multilateral donors, and philanthropies.

    Following last year’s announcement at COP26 and as outlined in USAID’s Climate Strategy, USAID is committed to increasing participation and leadership for Indigenous Peoples, local communities, women, and youth in all their diversity in climate action in at least 40 partner countries by 2030.

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