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  •   The natural environment in each of these three small island developing States in Africa is fragile and threatened ACCRA Ghana December 6 2021 APO Group The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO warns that urgent and transformative measures are needed in the six small island developing States SIDS of Africa due to poverty vulnerability to variations in temperature and rainfall and the increased risk of prolonged droughts and floods caused by climate change A new FAO study Transforming Agriculture in Africa s Small Island Developing States Lessons Learned and Options for Investment in Climate Smart Agriculture in Cape Verde Guinea Bissau and Seychelles warns that these threats combined with the dependence on rainfed agriculture could reduce crop yields and countries food consumption if climate smart techniques and practices are not adopted The study conducted by the FAO Regional Office for Africa and the International Crop Research Institute for the Semi arid Tropics Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security Research Program focuses on one country from each income group within African SIDS Cape Verde middle income Guinea Bissau lowest income and Seychelles highest income But the study finds that they all face the same basic problems and need support to build system wide capacity for transformative action at scale to protect the nutrition and food supply of communities Investments Needed as Climate Change Threatens Small Island Developing States There is an urgent need to invest in renewable energy rainwater harvesting cisterns nutrition sensitive and sustainable local food and climate information systems for farmers herders and fishermen said the study co author and Natural Resources Officer of FAO Albert Nikiema African small island developing states already face so many challenges without climate change and need as many weapons in their arsenal as possible to fight it Agriculture must be climate smart or the livelihoods and health of families will suffer The study presented today at a larger FAO event examining climate smart agriculture presents statistics and analysis to form a comprehensive picture of the three selected African Small Island Developing States their location and economic challenges and options most suitable and adaptable available Guinea Bissau has an especially high malnutrition rate of 20 7 percent of its population which is one of the highest of all SIDS in the world It also has the highest number of people living below the poverty line of the three African SIDS with 69 3 percent of the population with Cape Verde with 26 6 percent of people living below the threshold poverty and Seychelles 13 6 percent They all have a limited resource base depend on ocean resources have high food imports and high energy transportation and fuel costs It is a specific and complex picture It is not a problem of his creation The natural environment in each of these three small island developing States in Africa is fragile and threatened said Nora Berrahmouni FAO Senior Forestry Officer High tides floods and storms are a concern for everyone and many people in Seychelles for example remember the storm that washed away 1000 of its endemic palm trees Floods have affected agricultural lands in all three African SIDS in the last decade frightening for the 58 percent of Guinea Bissau s population who make a living from agriculture And it is also important to note that all 58 SIDS in the world combined produce only one percent of carbon dioxide emissions This is not a problem of your making What FAO and its partners are doing Beyond raising awareness and offering science based solutions FAO has helped develop the Global Program of Action GAP on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States and is supporting Small Island Developing States through policy advice analysis and technical assistance An FAO project in the six African Small Island Developing States helps smallholders identify opportunities to access high value market niches through fair trade or organic labeling Hundreds of farmers have been trained in climate smart agriculture and promoting healthy nutrition The three selected African SIDS projects include In Guinea Bissau s Bijag s archipelago of 88 islands and islets FAO is supporting communities to build terrestrial reservoirs for rainwater harvesting and to install solar panels for pumps during the dry season to allow them to grow tomatoes lettuce cabbage and carrots elsewhere lean dry season In Cape Verde FAO has partnered with local NGOs to provide cooking schools to raise awareness of nutritious sustainable and affordable local foods that have not traditionally been integrated into meals In the Seychelles FAO supports efforts to diversify the dominant tourism industry towards agritourism and the cultivation of products locally and sustainably rather than importing large quantities of food products
    FAO urges Small Island Developing States in Africa to Urgently Accelerate the Transition to Climate-smart, Sustainable Agriculture
      The natural environment in each of these three small island developing States in Africa is fragile and threatened ACCRA Ghana December 6 2021 APO Group The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO warns that urgent and transformative measures are needed in the six small island developing States SIDS of Africa due to poverty vulnerability to variations in temperature and rainfall and the increased risk of prolonged droughts and floods caused by climate change A new FAO study Transforming Agriculture in Africa s Small Island Developing States Lessons Learned and Options for Investment in Climate Smart Agriculture in Cape Verde Guinea Bissau and Seychelles warns that these threats combined with the dependence on rainfed agriculture could reduce crop yields and countries food consumption if climate smart techniques and practices are not adopted The study conducted by the FAO Regional Office for Africa and the International Crop Research Institute for the Semi arid Tropics Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security Research Program focuses on one country from each income group within African SIDS Cape Verde middle income Guinea Bissau lowest income and Seychelles highest income But the study finds that they all face the same basic problems and need support to build system wide capacity for transformative action at scale to protect the nutrition and food supply of communities Investments Needed as Climate Change Threatens Small Island Developing States There is an urgent need to invest in renewable energy rainwater harvesting cisterns nutrition sensitive and sustainable local food and climate information systems for farmers herders and fishermen said the study co author and Natural Resources Officer of FAO Albert Nikiema African small island developing states already face so many challenges without climate change and need as many weapons in their arsenal as possible to fight it Agriculture must be climate smart or the livelihoods and health of families will suffer The study presented today at a larger FAO event examining climate smart agriculture presents statistics and analysis to form a comprehensive picture of the three selected African Small Island Developing States their location and economic challenges and options most suitable and adaptable available Guinea Bissau has an especially high malnutrition rate of 20 7 percent of its population which is one of the highest of all SIDS in the world It also has the highest number of people living below the poverty line of the three African SIDS with 69 3 percent of the population with Cape Verde with 26 6 percent of people living below the threshold poverty and Seychelles 13 6 percent They all have a limited resource base depend on ocean resources have high food imports and high energy transportation and fuel costs It is a specific and complex picture It is not a problem of his creation The natural environment in each of these three small island developing States in Africa is fragile and threatened said Nora Berrahmouni FAO Senior Forestry Officer High tides floods and storms are a concern for everyone and many people in Seychelles for example remember the storm that washed away 1000 of its endemic palm trees Floods have affected agricultural lands in all three African SIDS in the last decade frightening for the 58 percent of Guinea Bissau s population who make a living from agriculture And it is also important to note that all 58 SIDS in the world combined produce only one percent of carbon dioxide emissions This is not a problem of your making What FAO and its partners are doing Beyond raising awareness and offering science based solutions FAO has helped develop the Global Program of Action GAP on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States and is supporting Small Island Developing States through policy advice analysis and technical assistance An FAO project in the six African Small Island Developing States helps smallholders identify opportunities to access high value market niches through fair trade or organic labeling Hundreds of farmers have been trained in climate smart agriculture and promoting healthy nutrition The three selected African SIDS projects include In Guinea Bissau s Bijag s archipelago of 88 islands and islets FAO is supporting communities to build terrestrial reservoirs for rainwater harvesting and to install solar panels for pumps during the dry season to allow them to grow tomatoes lettuce cabbage and carrots elsewhere lean dry season In Cape Verde FAO has partnered with local NGOs to provide cooking schools to raise awareness of nutritious sustainable and affordable local foods that have not traditionally been integrated into meals In the Seychelles FAO supports efforts to diversify the dominant tourism industry towards agritourism and the cultivation of products locally and sustainably rather than importing large quantities of food products
    FAO urges Small Island Developing States in Africa to Urgently Accelerate the Transition to Climate-smart, Sustainable Agriculture
    Africa12 months ago

    FAO urges Small Island Developing States in Africa to Urgently Accelerate the Transition to Climate-smart, Sustainable Agriculture

    The natural environment in each of these three small island developing States in Africa is fragile and threatened

    ACCRA, Ghana, December 6, 2021 / APO Group / -

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) warns that urgent and transformative measures are needed in the six small island developing States (SIDS) of Africa due to poverty, vulnerability to variations in temperature and rainfall and the increased risk of prolonged droughts and floods. caused by climate change. A new FAO study, Transforming Agriculture in Africa's Small Island Developing States: Lessons Learned and Options for Investment in Climate-Smart Agriculture in Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau and Seychelles, warns that these threats, combined with the dependence on rainfed agriculture could reduce crop yields and countries' food consumption, if climate-smart techniques and practices are not adopted.

    The study, conducted by the FAO Regional Office for Africa and the International Crop Research Institute for the Semi-arid Tropics / Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security Research Program, focuses on one country from each income group within African SIDS: Cape Verde (middle income), Guinea-Bissau (lowest income) and Seychelles (highest income). But the study finds that they all face the same basic problems and need support to build system-wide capacity for transformative action at scale to protect the nutrition and food supply of communities.

    Investments Needed as Climate Change Threatens Small Island Developing States

    "There is an urgent need to invest in renewable energy, rainwater harvesting cisterns, nutrition-sensitive and sustainable local food, and climate information systems for farmers, herders and fishermen," said the study co-author and Natural Resources Officer of FAO, Albert Nikiema. . “African small island developing states already face so many challenges without climate change and need as many weapons in their arsenal as possible to fight it. Agriculture must be climate-smart, or the livelihoods and health of families will suffer. "

    The study, presented today at a larger FAO event examining climate-smart agriculture, presents statistics and analysis to form a comprehensive picture of the three selected African Small Island Developing States, their location and economic challenges, and options. most suitable and adaptable available. Guinea-Bissau has an especially high malnutrition rate of 20.7 percent of its population, which is one of the highest of all SIDS in the world. It also has the highest number of people living below the poverty line of the three African SIDS with 69.3 percent of the population, with Cape Verde with 26.6 percent of people living below the threshold. poverty and Seychelles 13.6 percent. They all have a limited resource base, depend on ocean resources, have high food imports, and high energy, transportation and fuel costs. It is a specific and complex picture.

    "It is not a problem of his creation"

    "The natural environment in each of these three small island developing States in Africa is fragile and threatened," said Nora Berrahmouni, FAO Senior Forestry Officer. “High tides, floods and storms are a concern for everyone and many people in Seychelles, for example, remember the storm that washed away 1000 of its endemic palm trees. Floods have affected agricultural lands in all three African SIDS in the last decade, frightening for the 58 percent of Guinea-Bissau's population who make a living from agriculture. And it is also important to note that all 58 SIDS in the world combined produce only one percent of carbon dioxide emissions. This is not a problem of your making. "

    What FAO and its partners are doing

    Beyond raising awareness and offering science-based solutions, FAO has helped develop the Global Program of Action (GAP) on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States, and is supporting Small Island Developing States through policy advice, analysis and technical assistance.

    An FAO project in the six African Small Island Developing States helps smallholders identify opportunities to access high-value market niches through fair trade or organic labeling. Hundreds of farmers have been trained in climate-smart agriculture and promoting healthy nutrition.

    The three selected African SIDS projects include:

    In Guinea-Bissau's Bijagós archipelago of 88 islands and islets, FAO is supporting communities to build terrestrial reservoirs for rainwater harvesting and to install solar panels for pumps during the dry season to allow them to grow tomatoes. , lettuce, cabbage and carrots elsewhere. lean dry season.

    In Cape Verde, FAO has partnered with local NGOs to provide cooking schools to raise awareness of nutritious, sustainable and affordable local foods that have not traditionally been integrated into meals.

    In the Seychelles, FAO supports efforts to diversify the dominant tourism industry towards agritourism and the cultivation of products locally and sustainably, rather than importing large quantities of food products.

  •   Africa Climate Talks ACT Is back The second session of the third edition of the Very Intensive Africa Climate Talks ACT Ended on May 18 2021 The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa ECA in partnership with the University of Cabo Verde hosted the elaborate two day calendar that brought together over 120 participants representing key climate voices and actors in Africa The third Africa Climate Talks ACT Is part of a series of ECA s African Climate Policy Center ACPC webinars on Climate Change and Development in Africa African Perspectives on Climate Resilient Recovery in Africa from COVID 19 This edition took place virtually Launched in 2015 the African climate talks serve as a forum for global dialogue on climate change and development This climate meeting serves as a space for dialogue for continental stakeholders to engage in open speeches aimed at catalyzing emerging African perspectives on the most pressing concerns related to climate change and development The focus of the 3rd Africa Climate Negotiations explored the convergence of COVID 19 and climate crises and what this means for vulnerable communities and global governance and climate action during and beyond the pandemic Said Jean Paul Adam director of the Technology Climate Change and Natural Resources Management Division of the Economic Commission for Africa ECA According to Adam the second session of the 3rd ACT innovated in particular for African Small Island Developing States SIDS by questioning ideas for building resilient economies through green and blue economic lanes African island countries have braved the economic downturn as their tourism sectors depressed due to travel restrictions from the pandemic Island states also face threats of ocean acidification and sea level rise The deliberations and resolutions of this very engaging forum contribute to the achievement of Africa s Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs through climate resilient development James Murombedzi who heads the African Center for Climate Policy ACPC noted that the ACT brings together African universities civil society the private sector regional institutions and development partners to stimulate a pan African discourse aimed at contributing to the consolidation of African discourse on how to better respond to climate change in the COVID era 19 and beyond The ACT 2021 congregation The forum takes place against the backdrop of the unprecedented social and economic challenges associated with the crisis of the Covid 19 pandemic According to Murombedzi the centerpiece of ACT discussions focused on the global triple storm of Covid 19 climate change and economic deceleration Solutions offering low carbon and climate resilient economies decent jobs and alternative sustainable development pathways pursuing the objective of the Paris Agreement have been ACT s strengths deliberations There are many similarities between the Covid 19 pandemic and the climate change crisis as well as some important divergences Said Murombedzi Both crises pose an existential threat to Africa and suffer from the consequences of disinformation and infodemics According to Murombedzi the third ACT tried to find out how the lessons and experiences of managing the Covid 19 pandemic can be leveraged to promote a resilient green and blue recovery He also sought to find pathways for Africa s post pandemic climate conscious reconstruction through concerted global partnerships solidarity and a strong multilateral framework This year s ACT is significant as the Atlantic Ocean island nation Cabo Verde will host the first continental climate platform the Ninth Conference on Climate Change and Development in Africa CCDA IX which will be held from August 23 to 27 2021 The organizational framework for the second session of the Third Africa Climate Talks included five focus groups to facilitate the consolidation of key messages The first group looked at what Africa should seek to benefit from COP 26 and how this can be done Africa s voice and action in global climate governance and the geopolitical landscape lessons from Africa s journey through the UNFCCC process for the COVID 19 era and beyond was the main task of the second group The third group reflected on building resilience and innovative ideas for African solutions to Africa s climate and recovery challenges The constitution of climate justice and a just recovery as well as the transition for Africa was the mandate of the fourth group The final group addressed the issue of harnessing the green and blue economy for African SIDS and coastal economies as well as the challenges and opportunities beyond COVID 19 How to achieve and secure the means for a holistic implementation of durable solutions based on the solid foundation of the UNFCCC common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capacities of countries were also the main pillars of discussion at this session of the talks Strengthening Africa s voice and action in global climate governance and the resulting geopolitical landscape in the COVID 19 era and beyond is one of the three expected outcomes of the second session of the third climate negotiations in Africa The second expected outcome is a better understanding of how to harness the links between climate change the COVID 19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis to build a green and resilient future in Africa beyond the pandemic The expected end result is the strengthening of regional strategies and global frameworks for a just transition to resilient economies and the achievement of the goals of the Paris Agreement The act Forum is a series of scholar led spaces for dialogue that aim to stimulate broad discourse informed by new common African positions on relevant issues at the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on climate change governance processes says Murombedzi
    ECA and University of Cabo Verde host Africa climate talks
      Africa Climate Talks ACT Is back The second session of the third edition of the Very Intensive Africa Climate Talks ACT Ended on May 18 2021 The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa ECA in partnership with the University of Cabo Verde hosted the elaborate two day calendar that brought together over 120 participants representing key climate voices and actors in Africa The third Africa Climate Talks ACT Is part of a series of ECA s African Climate Policy Center ACPC webinars on Climate Change and Development in Africa African Perspectives on Climate Resilient Recovery in Africa from COVID 19 This edition took place virtually Launched in 2015 the African climate talks serve as a forum for global dialogue on climate change and development This climate meeting serves as a space for dialogue for continental stakeholders to engage in open speeches aimed at catalyzing emerging African perspectives on the most pressing concerns related to climate change and development The focus of the 3rd Africa Climate Negotiations explored the convergence of COVID 19 and climate crises and what this means for vulnerable communities and global governance and climate action during and beyond the pandemic Said Jean Paul Adam director of the Technology Climate Change and Natural Resources Management Division of the Economic Commission for Africa ECA According to Adam the second session of the 3rd ACT innovated in particular for African Small Island Developing States SIDS by questioning ideas for building resilient economies through green and blue economic lanes African island countries have braved the economic downturn as their tourism sectors depressed due to travel restrictions from the pandemic Island states also face threats of ocean acidification and sea level rise The deliberations and resolutions of this very engaging forum contribute to the achievement of Africa s Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs through climate resilient development James Murombedzi who heads the African Center for Climate Policy ACPC noted that the ACT brings together African universities civil society the private sector regional institutions and development partners to stimulate a pan African discourse aimed at contributing to the consolidation of African discourse on how to better respond to climate change in the COVID era 19 and beyond The ACT 2021 congregation The forum takes place against the backdrop of the unprecedented social and economic challenges associated with the crisis of the Covid 19 pandemic According to Murombedzi the centerpiece of ACT discussions focused on the global triple storm of Covid 19 climate change and economic deceleration Solutions offering low carbon and climate resilient economies decent jobs and alternative sustainable development pathways pursuing the objective of the Paris Agreement have been ACT s strengths deliberations There are many similarities between the Covid 19 pandemic and the climate change crisis as well as some important divergences Said Murombedzi Both crises pose an existential threat to Africa and suffer from the consequences of disinformation and infodemics According to Murombedzi the third ACT tried to find out how the lessons and experiences of managing the Covid 19 pandemic can be leveraged to promote a resilient green and blue recovery He also sought to find pathways for Africa s post pandemic climate conscious reconstruction through concerted global partnerships solidarity and a strong multilateral framework This year s ACT is significant as the Atlantic Ocean island nation Cabo Verde will host the first continental climate platform the Ninth Conference on Climate Change and Development in Africa CCDA IX which will be held from August 23 to 27 2021 The organizational framework for the second session of the Third Africa Climate Talks included five focus groups to facilitate the consolidation of key messages The first group looked at what Africa should seek to benefit from COP 26 and how this can be done Africa s voice and action in global climate governance and the geopolitical landscape lessons from Africa s journey through the UNFCCC process for the COVID 19 era and beyond was the main task of the second group The third group reflected on building resilience and innovative ideas for African solutions to Africa s climate and recovery challenges The constitution of climate justice and a just recovery as well as the transition for Africa was the mandate of the fourth group The final group addressed the issue of harnessing the green and blue economy for African SIDS and coastal economies as well as the challenges and opportunities beyond COVID 19 How to achieve and secure the means for a holistic implementation of durable solutions based on the solid foundation of the UNFCCC common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capacities of countries were also the main pillars of discussion at this session of the talks Strengthening Africa s voice and action in global climate governance and the resulting geopolitical landscape in the COVID 19 era and beyond is one of the three expected outcomes of the second session of the third climate negotiations in Africa The second expected outcome is a better understanding of how to harness the links between climate change the COVID 19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis to build a green and resilient future in Africa beyond the pandemic The expected end result is the strengthening of regional strategies and global frameworks for a just transition to resilient economies and the achievement of the goals of the Paris Agreement The act Forum is a series of scholar led spaces for dialogue that aim to stimulate broad discourse informed by new common African positions on relevant issues at the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on climate change governance processes says Murombedzi
    ECA and University of Cabo Verde host Africa climate talks
    Africa2 years ago

    ECA and University of Cabo Verde host Africa climate talks

    Africa Climate Talks (ACT!) Is back. The second session of the third edition of the Very Intensive Africa Climate Talks (ACT!) Ended on May 18, 2021. The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), in partnership with the University of Cabo Verde, hosted the elaborate two-day calendar that brought together over 120 participants, representing key climate voices and actors in Africa.

    The third Africa Climate Talks (ACT!) Is part of a series of ECA's African Climate Policy Center (ACPC) webinars on “Climate Change and Development in Africa: African Perspectives on Climate Resilient Recovery in Africa. from COVID-19 ”. This edition took place virtually.

    Launched in 2015, the African climate talks serve as a forum for global dialogue on climate change and development. This climate meeting serves as a space for dialogue for continental stakeholders to engage in open speeches aimed at catalyzing emerging African perspectives on the most pressing concerns related to climate change and development.

    “The focus of the 3rd Africa Climate Negotiations explored the convergence of COVID-19 and climate crises and what this means for vulnerable communities and global governance and climate action during and beyond the pandemic . Said Jean-Paul Adam, director of the Technology, Climate Change and Natural Resources Management Division of the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA).

    According to Adam, the second session of the 3rd ACT! innovated in particular for African Small Island Developing States (SIDS) by questioning ideas for building resilient economies through green and blue economic lanes. African island countries have braved the economic downturn as their tourism sectors depressed due to travel restrictions from the pandemic. Island states also face threats of ocean acidification and sea level rise.

    The deliberations and resolutions of this very engaging forum contribute to the achievement of Africa's Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through climate resilient development.

    James Murombedzi, who heads the African Center for Climate Policy (ACPC), noted that the ACT! brings together African universities, civil society, the private sector, regional institutions and development partners to stimulate a pan-African discourse aimed at contributing to the consolidation of African discourse on how to better respond to climate change in the COVID era -19 and beyond.

    The ACT 2021 congregation! The forum takes place against the backdrop of the unprecedented social and economic challenges associated with the crisis of the Covid-19 pandemic. According to Murombedzi, the centerpiece of ACT! discussions focused on the global triple storm of Covid-19, climate change and economic deceleration. Solutions offering low-carbon and climate-resilient economies, decent jobs and alternative sustainable development pathways pursuing the objective of the Paris Agreement have been ACT's strengths! deliberations.

    "There are many similarities between the Covid-19 pandemic and the climate change crisis, as well as some important divergences." Said Murombedzi. “Both crises pose an existential threat to Africa and suffer from the consequences of disinformation and 'infodemics'.

    According to Murombedzi, the third ACT! tried to find out how the lessons and experiences of managing the Covid-19 pandemic can be leveraged to promote a resilient green and blue recovery. He also sought to find pathways for Africa's post-pandemic climate-conscious reconstruction through concerted global partnerships, solidarity and a strong multilateral framework.

    This year's ACT is significant as the Atlantic Ocean island nation Cabo Verde will host the first continental climate platform, the Ninth Conference on Climate Change and Development in Africa (CCDA-IX) which will be held from August 23 to 27, 2021.

    The organizational framework for the second session of the Third Africa Climate Talks included five focus groups to facilitate the consolidation of key messages. The first group looked at what Africa should seek to benefit from COP 26, and how this can be done. Africa's voice and action in global climate governance and the geopolitical landscape - lessons from Africa's journey through the UNFCCC process for the COVID-19 era and beyond was the main task of the second group. The third group reflected on building resilience and innovative ideas for African solutions to Africa's climate and recovery challenges. The constitution of climate justice and a just recovery as well as the transition for Africa was the mandate of the fourth group. The final group addressed the issue of harnessing the green and blue economy for African SIDS and coastal economies as well as the challenges and opportunities beyond COVID-19.

    How to achieve and secure the means for a holistic implementation of durable solutions, based on the solid foundation of the UNFCCC, common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capacities of countries were also the main pillars of discussion at this session of the talks. .

    Strengthening Africa's voice and action in global climate governance and the resulting geopolitical landscape in the COVID-19 era and beyond is one of the three expected outcomes of the second session of the third climate negotiations in Africa. The second expected outcome is a better understanding of how to harness the links between climate change, the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis to build a green and resilient future in Africa beyond the pandemic. The expected end result is the strengthening of regional strategies and global frameworks for a just transition to resilient economies and the achievement of the goals of the Paris Agreement.

    "The act! Forum is a series of scholar-led spaces for dialogue that aim to stimulate broad discourse informed by new common African positions on relevant issues at the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on climate change governance processes, says Murombedzi.

  •  Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson on Thursday announced an expansion of the UK s overseas network with the opening of nine new diplomatic posts in Commonwealth countries Johnson who made the announcement at the opening of the 25th Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting 2018 said the new posts are Lesotho Swaziland and The Bahamas Others he said are Antigua and Barbuda Grenada St Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa Tonga and Vanuatu will extend Britain s global influence Johnson said as a Commonwealth family of nations it in our shared interest to boost prosperity tackle security issues and clear up the environment These new diplomatic posts are in regions which provide huge potential and opportunity post Brexit for British businesses and will help us to deepen our relationships across the Commonwealth After we leave the EU Global Britain will remain outward facing open for business and a champion of the rules based international order He said that Britain has one of the largest diplomatic footprints in the world The foreign secretary said that the UK s overseas network is instrumental in promoting our national interest particularly post Brexit He also said that the UK will also have a greater presence in Europe and in all regions of the world An increased global footprint will also ensure that Britain and its allies are able to counter the malign influences of countries who seek to undermine the UK The UK he added will also use its world class soft power to continue to win hearts and minds for the global good Johnson also announced nine million pounds to protect the marine environment and drive economic development in Commonwealth small island states He said that Britain will use its position as a leading maritime nation to help Commonwealth Small Island Developing states SIDS drive economic development and make the most of their marine environments Our oceans are the largest living space on Earth with a delicate and complex biodiversity They are not only integral to the economy but crucial to supporting the cultures food and security of the world We must as a Commonwealth protect our marine inheritance That s why today s nine million pounds will help Commonwealth small island states sustainably develop their maritime environment to create jobs and drive growth he said The foreign secretary said through projects in the SIDS such as seabed mapping sustainable tourism and identifying marine pollution hotspots the UK will share its world renowned expertise to help SIDS tackle climate change reduce poverty and boost the blue economy Johnson called for global political momentum to ensure that this generation leaves the environment in a better state than the world found it
    UK Foreign Secretary announces 9 new Commonwealth diplomatic posts
     Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson on Thursday announced an expansion of the UK s overseas network with the opening of nine new diplomatic posts in Commonwealth countries Johnson who made the announcement at the opening of the 25th Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting 2018 said the new posts are Lesotho Swaziland and The Bahamas Others he said are Antigua and Barbuda Grenada St Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa Tonga and Vanuatu will extend Britain s global influence Johnson said as a Commonwealth family of nations it in our shared interest to boost prosperity tackle security issues and clear up the environment These new diplomatic posts are in regions which provide huge potential and opportunity post Brexit for British businesses and will help us to deepen our relationships across the Commonwealth After we leave the EU Global Britain will remain outward facing open for business and a champion of the rules based international order He said that Britain has one of the largest diplomatic footprints in the world The foreign secretary said that the UK s overseas network is instrumental in promoting our national interest particularly post Brexit He also said that the UK will also have a greater presence in Europe and in all regions of the world An increased global footprint will also ensure that Britain and its allies are able to counter the malign influences of countries who seek to undermine the UK The UK he added will also use its world class soft power to continue to win hearts and minds for the global good Johnson also announced nine million pounds to protect the marine environment and drive economic development in Commonwealth small island states He said that Britain will use its position as a leading maritime nation to help Commonwealth Small Island Developing states SIDS drive economic development and make the most of their marine environments Our oceans are the largest living space on Earth with a delicate and complex biodiversity They are not only integral to the economy but crucial to supporting the cultures food and security of the world We must as a Commonwealth protect our marine inheritance That s why today s nine million pounds will help Commonwealth small island states sustainably develop their maritime environment to create jobs and drive growth he said The foreign secretary said through projects in the SIDS such as seabed mapping sustainable tourism and identifying marine pollution hotspots the UK will share its world renowned expertise to help SIDS tackle climate change reduce poverty and boost the blue economy Johnson called for global political momentum to ensure that this generation leaves the environment in a better state than the world found it
    UK Foreign Secretary announces 9 new Commonwealth diplomatic posts
    Foreign5 years ago

    UK Foreign Secretary announces 9 new Commonwealth diplomatic posts

    Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson on Thursday announced an expansion of the UK’s overseas network with the opening of nine new diplomatic posts in Commonwealth countries.

    Johnson  who made the announcement at the opening of the 25th Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting 2018, said the new posts are Lesotho, Swaziland, and The Bahamas.

    Others he said are Antigua and Barbuda, Grenada, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Tonga and Vanuatu, will extend Britain’s global influence.

    Johnson said: “as a Commonwealth family of nations, it in our shared interest to boost prosperity, tackle security issues and clear up the environment.

    “These new diplomatic posts are in regions which provide huge potential and opportunity post-Brexit for British businesses and will help us to deepen our relationships across the Commonwealth.

    “After we leave the EU, Global Britain will remain outward facing, open for business and a champion of the rules-based international order.”

    He said that Britain has one of the largest diplomatic footprints in the world.

    The foreign secretary said that the UK’s overseas network is instrumental in promoting our national interest, particularly post-Brexit.

    He also said that the UK will also have a greater presence in Europe and in all regions of the world. An increased global footprint will also ensure that Britain and its allies are able to counter the malign influences of countries who seek to undermine the UK.

    The UK, he added, will also use its world-class soft power to continue to win hearts and minds for the global good.

    Johnson also announced nine million pounds to protect the marine environment and drive economic development in Commonwealth small island states.

    He said that Britain will use its position as a leading maritime nation to help Commonwealth Small Island Developing states (SIDS) drive economic development and make the most of their marine environments.

     

    “Our oceans are the largest living space on Earth with a delicate and complex biodiversity. They are not only integral to the economy, but crucial to supporting the cultures, food and security of the world.

    “We must as a Commonwealth protect our marine inheritance.

    “That’s why today’s nine million pounds will help Commonwealth small island states sustainably develop their maritime environment to create jobs and drive growth, he said.

    The foreign secretary said through projects in the SIDS such as seabed mapping, sustainable tourism and identifying marine pollution hotspots, the UK will share its world-renowned expertise to help SIDS tackle climate change, reduce poverty and boost the blue economy.

    Johnson called for global political momentum to ensure that this generation leaves the environment in a better state than the world found it.

  •  Experts have urged countries around the globe to adopt and implement practices that promote preservation of the environment They made the call at a session on Fight Against Climate Change in Small Island Developing States SIDS at the Crans Montana Forum held aboard a cruise ship sailing from Dakhla to Casablanca in Morocco Participants highlighted the impacts of climate change on the environment especially for SIDS noting that the states suffered most from adverse climate change Mr Teburoro Tito the Ambassador to the UN and former President of Kiribati an island republic in the Central Pacific Ocean urged countries to revive past cultural practices that are pro nature Tito told Nigeria News Agency on the sidelines of the forum that countries ought to educate the younger ones on healthy environmental practices He added that countries across the globe should try to revive the good values they had in the past which are pro nature There was so much wealth in what we were doing before the industrial revolution This may mean cultural revival in many ways and giving culture a place in the modern world because most of our cultures are supported by nature We can teach our young people in schools and in rural areas to save the environment by activities such as planting trees and taking care of animals Small island nations are reportedly among the most vulnerable to climate change impacts which will become critical if no appropriate action is taken Edited by Hadiza Mohammed Aliyu NAN
    Experts stress need for global action on environment preservation
     Experts have urged countries around the globe to adopt and implement practices that promote preservation of the environment They made the call at a session on Fight Against Climate Change in Small Island Developing States SIDS at the Crans Montana Forum held aboard a cruise ship sailing from Dakhla to Casablanca in Morocco Participants highlighted the impacts of climate change on the environment especially for SIDS noting that the states suffered most from adverse climate change Mr Teburoro Tito the Ambassador to the UN and former President of Kiribati an island republic in the Central Pacific Ocean urged countries to revive past cultural practices that are pro nature Tito told Nigeria News Agency on the sidelines of the forum that countries ought to educate the younger ones on healthy environmental practices He added that countries across the globe should try to revive the good values they had in the past which are pro nature There was so much wealth in what we were doing before the industrial revolution This may mean cultural revival in many ways and giving culture a place in the modern world because most of our cultures are supported by nature We can teach our young people in schools and in rural areas to save the environment by activities such as planting trees and taking care of animals Small island nations are reportedly among the most vulnerable to climate change impacts which will become critical if no appropriate action is taken Edited by Hadiza Mohammed Aliyu NAN
    Experts stress need for global action on environment preservation
    Foreign5 years ago

    Experts stress need for global action on environment preservation

    Experts have urged countries around the globe

    to adopt and implement practices that promote preservation of the environment.

    They made the call at a session on “Fight Against Climate Change in Small Island Developing States (SIDS) at the Crans Montana Forum held aboard a cruise ship sailing from Dakhla to Casablanca in Morocco.

    Participants highlighted the impacts of climate change on the environment, especially for SIDS, noting that the states suffered most from adverse climate change.

    Mr Teburoro Tito, the Ambassador to the UN and former President of Kiribati, an island republic in the Central Pacific Ocean, urged countries to “revive past cultural practices that are pro-nature`.”

    Tito told Nigeria News Agency on the sidelines of the forum that countries ought to educate the younger ones on healthy environmental practices.

    He added that “countries across the globe should try to revive the good values they had in the past which are pro nature.

    “There was so much wealth in what we were doing before the industrial revolution.

    “This may mean cultural revival in many ways and giving culture a place in the modern world, because most of our cultures are supported by nature.

    “We can teach our young people in schools and in rural areas to save the environment by activities such as planting trees and taking care of animals.”

    Small island nations are reportedly among the most vulnerable to climate change impacts, which will become critical if no appropriate action is taken.

    Edited by: Hadiza Mohammed-Aliyu
    (NAN)

  •  Haiti Zimbabwe and Fiji were named as the three countries which suffered most at the hands of extreme weather during 2016 in a climate report published on Thursday Worldwide some 524 000 people reportedly lost their lives between 1997 and 2016 due to around 11 000 extreme incidents Furthermore the total global financial loss was estimated at 3 16 trillion U S dollars The study compiled by German global justice organisation Germanwatch based on data from Munich Re NatCatSERVICE found that the impoverished Caribbean island state Haiti was one of the most affected nations on average between 1997 and 2016 along with Honduras and Myanmar The Global Climate Risk Index 2018 investigated directly measurable impacts such as the number of deaths and economic damage incurred by extreme events such as storms and their direct implications for example flooding landslides Germanwatch underlined the role of anthropogenic climate change in extreme weather writing that rising surface sea temperatures are thought to intensify storms In particular the authors emphasised the hardships faced by so called Small Island Developing States SIDS stating that 5 out of the 20 most affected nations in the past two decades belong to this category Both Haiti and Fiji are SIDS Germany is currently co hosting a world climate conference with the tiny pacific island state of Fiji over a two week period Both German Chancellor Angel Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron are due in Bonn next week to address the gathering which is being attended by more than 23 000 delegates Edited by Abigael Joshua Felix Ajide NAN
    Report finds 524,000 killed by extreme weather in last 20 years
     Haiti Zimbabwe and Fiji were named as the three countries which suffered most at the hands of extreme weather during 2016 in a climate report published on Thursday Worldwide some 524 000 people reportedly lost their lives between 1997 and 2016 due to around 11 000 extreme incidents Furthermore the total global financial loss was estimated at 3 16 trillion U S dollars The study compiled by German global justice organisation Germanwatch based on data from Munich Re NatCatSERVICE found that the impoverished Caribbean island state Haiti was one of the most affected nations on average between 1997 and 2016 along with Honduras and Myanmar The Global Climate Risk Index 2018 investigated directly measurable impacts such as the number of deaths and economic damage incurred by extreme events such as storms and their direct implications for example flooding landslides Germanwatch underlined the role of anthropogenic climate change in extreme weather writing that rising surface sea temperatures are thought to intensify storms In particular the authors emphasised the hardships faced by so called Small Island Developing States SIDS stating that 5 out of the 20 most affected nations in the past two decades belong to this category Both Haiti and Fiji are SIDS Germany is currently co hosting a world climate conference with the tiny pacific island state of Fiji over a two week period Both German Chancellor Angel Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron are due in Bonn next week to address the gathering which is being attended by more than 23 000 delegates Edited by Abigael Joshua Felix Ajide NAN
    Report finds 524,000 killed by extreme weather in last 20 years
    Foreign5 years ago

    Report finds 524,000 killed by extreme weather in last 20 years

    Haiti, Zimbabwe and Fiji were named as the three countries which suffered most at the hands of extreme weather during 2016 in a climate report published on Thursday.

    Worldwide, some 524,000 people reportedly lost their lives between 1997 and 2016 due to around 11,000 extreme incidents.

    Furthermore, the total global financial loss was estimated at 3.16 trillion U.S. dollars.

    The study, compiled by German global justice organisation Germanwatch based on data from Munich Re NatCatSERVICE, found that the impoverished Caribbean island state Haiti was one of the most affected nations on average between 1997 and 2016 along with Honduras and Myanmar.

    The “Global Climate Risk Index 2018’’ investigated directly measurable impacts such as the number of deaths and economic damage incurred by extreme events such as storms and their direct implications (for example, flooding, landslides).

    Germanwatch underlined the role of anthropogenic climate change in extreme weather, writing that rising surface sea temperatures are thought to intensify storms.

    In particular, the authors emphasised the hardships faced by so-called Small Island Developing States (SIDS), stating that 5 out of the 20 most affected nations in the past two decades belong to this category.

    Both Haiti and Fiji are SIDS.

    Germany is currently co-hosting a world climate conference with the tiny pacific island state of Fiji over a two-week period.

    Both German Chancellor Angel Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron are due in Bonn next week to address the gathering, which is being attended by more than 23,000 delegates.

    Edited by: Abigael Joshua/Felix Ajide
    (NAN)

     

  •  Haiti Zimbabwe and Fiji were named as the three countries which suffered most at the hands of extreme weather during 2016 in a climate report published on Thursday Worldwide some 524 000 people reportedly lost their lives between 1997 and 2016 due to around 11 000 extreme incidents Furthermore the total global financial loss was estimated at 3 16 trillion U S dollars The study compiled by German global justice organisation Germanwatch based on data from Munich Re NatCatSERVICE found that the impoverished Caribbean island state Haiti was one of the most affected nations on average between 1997 and 2016 along with Honduras and Myanmar The Global Climate Risk Index 2018 investigated directly measurable impacts such as the number of deaths and economic damage incurred by extreme events such as storms and their direct implications for example flooding landslides Germanwatch underlined the role of anthropogenic climate change in extreme weather writing that rising surface sea temperatures are thought to intensify storms In particular the authors emphasised the hardships faced by so called Small Island Developing States SIDS stating that 5 out of the 20 most affected nations in the past two decades belong to this category Both Haiti and Fiji are SIDS Germany is currently co hosting a world climate conference with the tiny pacific island state of Fiji over a two week period Both German Chancellor Angel Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron are due in Bonn next week to address the gathering which is being attended by more than 23 000 delegates Edited by Abigael Joshua Felix Ajide NAN
    Report finds 524,000 killed by extreme weather in last 20 years
     Haiti Zimbabwe and Fiji were named as the three countries which suffered most at the hands of extreme weather during 2016 in a climate report published on Thursday Worldwide some 524 000 people reportedly lost their lives between 1997 and 2016 due to around 11 000 extreme incidents Furthermore the total global financial loss was estimated at 3 16 trillion U S dollars The study compiled by German global justice organisation Germanwatch based on data from Munich Re NatCatSERVICE found that the impoverished Caribbean island state Haiti was one of the most affected nations on average between 1997 and 2016 along with Honduras and Myanmar The Global Climate Risk Index 2018 investigated directly measurable impacts such as the number of deaths and economic damage incurred by extreme events such as storms and their direct implications for example flooding landslides Germanwatch underlined the role of anthropogenic climate change in extreme weather writing that rising surface sea temperatures are thought to intensify storms In particular the authors emphasised the hardships faced by so called Small Island Developing States SIDS stating that 5 out of the 20 most affected nations in the past two decades belong to this category Both Haiti and Fiji are SIDS Germany is currently co hosting a world climate conference with the tiny pacific island state of Fiji over a two week period Both German Chancellor Angel Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron are due in Bonn next week to address the gathering which is being attended by more than 23 000 delegates Edited by Abigael Joshua Felix Ajide NAN
    Report finds 524,000 killed by extreme weather in last 20 years
    Foreign5 years ago

    Report finds 524,000 killed by extreme weather in last 20 years

    Haiti, Zimbabwe and Fiji were named as the three countries which suffered most at the hands of extreme weather during 2016 in a climate report published on Thursday.

    Worldwide, some 524,000 people reportedly lost their lives between 1997 and 2016 due to around 11,000 extreme incidents.

    Furthermore, the total global financial loss was estimated at 3.16 trillion U.S. dollars.

    The study, compiled by German global justice organisation Germanwatch based on data from Munich Re NatCatSERVICE, found that the impoverished Caribbean island state Haiti was one of the most affected nations on average between 1997 and 2016 along with Honduras and Myanmar.

    The “Global Climate Risk Index 2018’’ investigated directly measurable impacts such as the number of deaths and economic damage incurred by extreme events such as storms and their direct implications (for example, flooding, landslides).

    Germanwatch underlined the role of anthropogenic climate change in extreme weather, writing that rising surface sea temperatures are thought to intensify storms.

    In particular, the authors emphasised the hardships faced by so-called Small Island Developing States (SIDS), stating that 5 out of the 20 most affected nations in the past two decades belong to this category.

    Both Haiti and Fiji are SIDS.

    Germany is currently co-hosting a world climate conference with the tiny pacific island state of Fiji over a two-week period.

    Both German Chancellor Angel Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron are due in Bonn next week to address the gathering, which is being attended by more than 23,000 delegates.

    Edited by: Abigael Joshua/Felix Ajide
    (NAN)

     

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