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  •   On the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly of Heads of State and Government President Ramkalawan who is currently leading the Seychelles delegation in New York also participated in several strategic side events for Seychelles Bilateral discussions have been crucial networking platforms and important discussions with key partners and Seychellois stakeholders The President participated as one of the panelists at the African Heads of Government Climate Finance Dialogue organized by Africa Investors Ai and the UN Special Adviser for Africa OSAA At their invitation President Ramkalawan was the keynote speaker at the panel discussion under the guided theme Partnerships and opportunities to implement the investable NDCs Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs President Ramkalawan spoke together with three other African Heads of State which included the President of the Federal Republic of Somalia HE Hassan Sheikh Mohamud and the President of the Republic of Gambia HE Adama Barrow President Ramkalawan also attended Blue Leaders 30X30 Catalytic Action for a Global Network of Fully and Highly Protected Marine Areas and a Strong New High Seas Treaty event held at the Plaza Hotel in New York The event which was organized by the Government of Belgium and Nigeria where President Ramkalawan was one of the Blue Leaders Heads of State who addressed the audience The Prime Minister of Cura ao Gilmar Pisas also made a presentation while the Prime Minister of Belgium made a virtual video statement The main event was opened by the CEO of Blomberg Philanthropies Patricia E Harris and the panel discussions were moderated by the Deputy Prime Minister of Belgium Following the Blue Leaders event the President also held discussions with Mission Blue The Sylvia Earle Alliance President and President legendary oceanographer Her Deepness Dr Sylvia Earle Dr Earle is an Explorer in Residence for the National Geographic Society and is called Her Deepness by the New Yorker and the New York Times a Living Legend of the Library of Congress and Time magazine s first Hero for the Planet Familiar with Seychelles the meeting with the Head of State was an opportunity for Dr Earle to brief President Ramkalawan on her previous expeditions and work in Seychelles as well as to engage in fruitful discussions on how Mission Blue can further support Seychelles Seychelles in its environmental conservation efforts She will soon be in Seychelles for a mission in Aldabra accompanying Prince Albert of Monaco In his capacity as Vice President of the SIDS DOCK Initiative President Ramkalawan also delivered a virtual statement at the 7th session of the SIDS DOCK Assembly SIDS DOCK is an initiative among the member countries of the Alliance of Small Island States AOSIS created to help SIDS transform their energy sectors and address adaptation to climate change in line with the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs of the UN Other side meetings included discussions with the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States Ms Rabab Fatima While at the 77th United Nations General Assembly in New York the president also had the opportunity to engage with a number of world leaders during a closed door high level meeting of the Association of Small Island States AOSIS limited to Heads of State or Government focused on two main issues objective discussion namely progress towards the Adoption of a Multidimensional Vulnerability Index MVI at the UN and the Establishment of a Financing Agreement to Address Loss and Damage at COP27 President Ramkalawan was assisted by Ambassador Ian Madeleine and other Foreign Ministry officials
    President Ramkalawan Participates in Key Side Events and Bilateral Meetings on the Sidelines of the 77th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA)
      On the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly of Heads of State and Government President Ramkalawan who is currently leading the Seychelles delegation in New York also participated in several strategic side events for Seychelles Bilateral discussions have been crucial networking platforms and important discussions with key partners and Seychellois stakeholders The President participated as one of the panelists at the African Heads of Government Climate Finance Dialogue organized by Africa Investors Ai and the UN Special Adviser for Africa OSAA At their invitation President Ramkalawan was the keynote speaker at the panel discussion under the guided theme Partnerships and opportunities to implement the investable NDCs Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs President Ramkalawan spoke together with three other African Heads of State which included the President of the Federal Republic of Somalia HE Hassan Sheikh Mohamud and the President of the Republic of Gambia HE Adama Barrow President Ramkalawan also attended Blue Leaders 30X30 Catalytic Action for a Global Network of Fully and Highly Protected Marine Areas and a Strong New High Seas Treaty event held at the Plaza Hotel in New York The event which was organized by the Government of Belgium and Nigeria where President Ramkalawan was one of the Blue Leaders Heads of State who addressed the audience The Prime Minister of Cura ao Gilmar Pisas also made a presentation while the Prime Minister of Belgium made a virtual video statement The main event was opened by the CEO of Blomberg Philanthropies Patricia E Harris and the panel discussions were moderated by the Deputy Prime Minister of Belgium Following the Blue Leaders event the President also held discussions with Mission Blue The Sylvia Earle Alliance President and President legendary oceanographer Her Deepness Dr Sylvia Earle Dr Earle is an Explorer in Residence for the National Geographic Society and is called Her Deepness by the New Yorker and the New York Times a Living Legend of the Library of Congress and Time magazine s first Hero for the Planet Familiar with Seychelles the meeting with the Head of State was an opportunity for Dr Earle to brief President Ramkalawan on her previous expeditions and work in Seychelles as well as to engage in fruitful discussions on how Mission Blue can further support Seychelles Seychelles in its environmental conservation efforts She will soon be in Seychelles for a mission in Aldabra accompanying Prince Albert of Monaco In his capacity as Vice President of the SIDS DOCK Initiative President Ramkalawan also delivered a virtual statement at the 7th session of the SIDS DOCK Assembly SIDS DOCK is an initiative among the member countries of the Alliance of Small Island States AOSIS created to help SIDS transform their energy sectors and address adaptation to climate change in line with the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs of the UN Other side meetings included discussions with the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States Ms Rabab Fatima While at the 77th United Nations General Assembly in New York the president also had the opportunity to engage with a number of world leaders during a closed door high level meeting of the Association of Small Island States AOSIS limited to Heads of State or Government focused on two main issues objective discussion namely progress towards the Adoption of a Multidimensional Vulnerability Index MVI at the UN and the Establishment of a Financing Agreement to Address Loss and Damage at COP27 President Ramkalawan was assisted by Ambassador Ian Madeleine and other Foreign Ministry officials
    President Ramkalawan Participates in Key Side Events and Bilateral Meetings on the Sidelines of the 77th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA)
    Africa2 weeks ago

    President Ramkalawan Participates in Key Side Events and Bilateral Meetings on the Sidelines of the 77th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA)

    On the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly of Heads of State and Government, President Ramkalawan, who is currently leading the Seychelles delegation in New York, also participated in several strategic side events for Seychelles.

    Bilateral discussions have been crucial networking platforms and important discussions with key partners and Seychellois stakeholders.

    The President participated as one of the panelists at the African Heads of Government Climate Finance Dialogue organized by Africa Investors (Ai) and the UN Special Adviser for Africa (OSAA).

    At their invitation, President Ramkalawan was the keynote speaker at the panel discussion under the guided theme "Partnerships and opportunities to implement the investable NDCs, Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)".

    President Ramkalawan spoke together with three other African Heads of State; which included the President of the Federal Republic of Somalia, HE Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, and the President of the Republic of Gambia, HE Adama Barrow.

    President Ramkalawan also attended Blue Leaders 30X30: Catalytic Action for a Global Network of Fully and Highly Protected Marine Areas and a Strong New High Seas Treaty event held at the Plaza Hotel in New York. The event, which was organized by the Government of Belgium and Nigeria, where President Ramkalawan was one of the Blue Leaders Heads of State who addressed the audience.

    The Prime Minister of Curaçao, Gilmar Pisas, also made a presentation, while the Prime Minister of Belgium made a virtual video statement.

    The main event was opened by the CEO of Blomberg Philanthropies, Patricia E.

    Harris, and the panel discussions were moderated by the Deputy Prime Minister of Belgium.

    Following the Blue Leaders event, the President also held discussions with Mission Blue/The Sylvia Earle Alliance President and President, legendary oceanographer, Her Deepness Dr. Sylvia Earle.

    Dr. Earle is an Explorer-in-Residence for the National Geographic Society, and is called Her Deepness by the New Yorker and the New York Times, a Living Legend of the Library of Congress, and Time magazine's first Hero for the Planet.

    Familiar with Seychelles, the meeting with the Head of State was an opportunity for Dr. Earle to brief President Ramkalawan on her previous expeditions and work in Seychelles, as well as to engage in fruitful discussions on how Mission Blue can further support Seychelles.

    Seychelles in its environmental conservation efforts.

    .

    She will soon be in Seychelles for a mission in Aldabra accompanying Prince Albert of Monaco.

    In his capacity as Vice President of the SIDS DOCK Initiative, President Ramkalawan also delivered a virtual statement at the 7th session of the SIDS DOCK Assembly.

    SIDS DOCK is an initiative among the member countries of the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS) created to help SIDS transform their energy sectors and address adaptation to climate change in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the UN.

    Other side meetings included discussions with the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States, Ms. Rabab Fatima.

    While at the 77th United Nations General Assembly in New York, the president also had the opportunity to engage with a number of world leaders during a closed-door, high-level meeting of the Association of Small Island States (AOSIS), limited to Heads of State or Government focused on two main issues: objective discussion namely; progress towards the Adoption of a Multidimensional Vulnerability Index (MVI) at the UN and the Establishment of a Financing Agreement to Address Loss and Damage at COP27.

    President Ramkalawan was assisted by Ambassador Ian Madeleine and other Foreign Ministry officials.

  •  The new President of the Economic and Social Council ECOSOC Amb Lachezara Stoeva has pledged to focus on bridging great finance divide that has sharply curtailed the ability of many developing nations to recover from COVID 19 The UN correspondent of the News Agency of Nigeria reports that Stoeva Bulgaria s UN Ambassador banged the gavel as President of the UN organ on Monday She vowed to build on the solid foundation left by the outgoing head and his bureau to transform the world into a better place for the people of today and tomorrow Stoeva said in her opening statement that she was honoured and humbled to have been elected to lead one of the principal organs of the UN while noting that the upcoming session would be especially challenging for the world In addition to COVID 19 recovery she highlighted the ongoing war in Ukraine which has triggered massive food insecurity energy shortages and financial crises The new ECOSOC chief elaborated on initiatives to assist in overcoming the crises that have engulfed our societies Stoeva s said her second priority would be to ensure that the Council and the High Level Political Forum HLPF which is the climax of its work each year provides solid evidence based innovative and actionable policy guidance to curb and address the pandemic s impacts on the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs Her third priority is to ensure preparations advance for the SDG Summit taking place in September 2023 by building momentum and reviving the passion that characterised the elaboration and implementation of the SDGs which were agreed in 2015 Fourth she aims to build on the success of this year s Humanitarian Affairs Segment to support and reinforce the UN and its humanitarian partners in addressing profound humanitarian challenges worldwide Fifth Stoeva aims to follow up on the recommendations made to ECOSOC in the Secretary General s Our Common Agenda blueprint for action while her sixth priority will be to provide better access to youth civil society and others Her final priority she said would be to implement the recommendations adopted by the General Assembly in June 2021 for reforming the work of ECOSOC and the HLPF Stoeva assumed her duties as Bulgaria s Permanent Representative to the UN in February 2021 and has served as ECOSOC Vice President responsible for the Management Segment where she successfully led the Council s review of the Functional Commissions and Expert Bodies In a heartfelt speech outgoing President Collen Kelapile said that he was deeply honoured and elated to have served in the top job for the past year Reminding that it was the first time that Botswana had occupied the seat he described it as a momentous occasion for both my country and I personally Before handing over the reins Mr Kelapile looked back at the main theme of both ECOSOC and the HLPF in July highlighting the eight broad priorities of his term which included vaccine equity inequalities post conflict recovery and youth engagement He also highlighted the Council s new Coordination Segment and a revitalised Partnership Forum to guide its subsidiary bodies reminding that it has dealt with conflict post conflict and humanitarian emergencies including in Haiti South Sudan and the Sahel region The outgoing president also drew attention to meetings during his tenure surrounding the climate crisis implementing the New Urban Agenda and supporting the advance of the SDGs during the recent months of crises on multiple fronts I am pleased that the Council adopted a Resolution on Friday to ensure implementation of the outcomes of the Operational Activities for Development Segment he said As president he reminded that ECOSOC continued to advocate for Least Developed Countries LDCs Landlocked Developing Countries LLDCs and Small Island Developing States SIDS as well as a special push on behalf of African countries providing them a platform to share their experiences and development challenges The council has been actively involved in preparations for the Fifth UN Conference on LDCs next year and in 2024 the Third Conference on LLDCs and the Fourth Conference on SIDS he said Kelapile has called for strengthened international cooperation global solidarity and partnerships to overcome their development challenges and lent support for inclusive and sustainable recovery in these countries In passing the gavel to Stoeva he wished her all the best in leading ECOSOC s work on COVID 19 recovery and implementing the 2030 Agenda during the Decade of Action He thanked all who supported him and asked that they extend the same support and cooperation to her Kelapile also stressed the need to work together harder and coordinate further With less than eight years to 2030 it is clear that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals must remain our guiding framework he said NewsSourceCredit NAN
    New ECOSOC President to focus on bridging “finance divide’’ in developing nations
     The new President of the Economic and Social Council ECOSOC Amb Lachezara Stoeva has pledged to focus on bridging great finance divide that has sharply curtailed the ability of many developing nations to recover from COVID 19 The UN correspondent of the News Agency of Nigeria reports that Stoeva Bulgaria s UN Ambassador banged the gavel as President of the UN organ on Monday She vowed to build on the solid foundation left by the outgoing head and his bureau to transform the world into a better place for the people of today and tomorrow Stoeva said in her opening statement that she was honoured and humbled to have been elected to lead one of the principal organs of the UN while noting that the upcoming session would be especially challenging for the world In addition to COVID 19 recovery she highlighted the ongoing war in Ukraine which has triggered massive food insecurity energy shortages and financial crises The new ECOSOC chief elaborated on initiatives to assist in overcoming the crises that have engulfed our societies Stoeva s said her second priority would be to ensure that the Council and the High Level Political Forum HLPF which is the climax of its work each year provides solid evidence based innovative and actionable policy guidance to curb and address the pandemic s impacts on the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs Her third priority is to ensure preparations advance for the SDG Summit taking place in September 2023 by building momentum and reviving the passion that characterised the elaboration and implementation of the SDGs which were agreed in 2015 Fourth she aims to build on the success of this year s Humanitarian Affairs Segment to support and reinforce the UN and its humanitarian partners in addressing profound humanitarian challenges worldwide Fifth Stoeva aims to follow up on the recommendations made to ECOSOC in the Secretary General s Our Common Agenda blueprint for action while her sixth priority will be to provide better access to youth civil society and others Her final priority she said would be to implement the recommendations adopted by the General Assembly in June 2021 for reforming the work of ECOSOC and the HLPF Stoeva assumed her duties as Bulgaria s Permanent Representative to the UN in February 2021 and has served as ECOSOC Vice President responsible for the Management Segment where she successfully led the Council s review of the Functional Commissions and Expert Bodies In a heartfelt speech outgoing President Collen Kelapile said that he was deeply honoured and elated to have served in the top job for the past year Reminding that it was the first time that Botswana had occupied the seat he described it as a momentous occasion for both my country and I personally Before handing over the reins Mr Kelapile looked back at the main theme of both ECOSOC and the HLPF in July highlighting the eight broad priorities of his term which included vaccine equity inequalities post conflict recovery and youth engagement He also highlighted the Council s new Coordination Segment and a revitalised Partnership Forum to guide its subsidiary bodies reminding that it has dealt with conflict post conflict and humanitarian emergencies including in Haiti South Sudan and the Sahel region The outgoing president also drew attention to meetings during his tenure surrounding the climate crisis implementing the New Urban Agenda and supporting the advance of the SDGs during the recent months of crises on multiple fronts I am pleased that the Council adopted a Resolution on Friday to ensure implementation of the outcomes of the Operational Activities for Development Segment he said As president he reminded that ECOSOC continued to advocate for Least Developed Countries LDCs Landlocked Developing Countries LLDCs and Small Island Developing States SIDS as well as a special push on behalf of African countries providing them a platform to share their experiences and development challenges The council has been actively involved in preparations for the Fifth UN Conference on LDCs next year and in 2024 the Third Conference on LLDCs and the Fourth Conference on SIDS he said Kelapile has called for strengthened international cooperation global solidarity and partnerships to overcome their development challenges and lent support for inclusive and sustainable recovery in these countries In passing the gavel to Stoeva he wished her all the best in leading ECOSOC s work on COVID 19 recovery and implementing the 2030 Agenda during the Decade of Action He thanked all who supported him and asked that they extend the same support and cooperation to her Kelapile also stressed the need to work together harder and coordinate further With less than eight years to 2030 it is clear that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals must remain our guiding framework he said NewsSourceCredit NAN
    New ECOSOC President to focus on bridging “finance divide’’ in developing nations
    Foreign2 months ago

    New ECOSOC President to focus on bridging “finance divide’’ in developing nations

    The new President of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), Amb. Lachezara Stoeva, has pledged to focus on bridging “great finance divide” that has sharply curtailed the ability of many developing nations to recover from COVID-19.

    The UN correspondent of the News Agency of Nigeria reports that Stoeva, Bulgaria’s UN Ambassador, banged the gavel as President of the UN organ on Monday.

    She vowed to build on the “solid foundation” left by the outgoing head and his bureau to transform the world into “a better place for the people of today and tomorrow”.

    Stoeva said in her opening statement that she was “honoured and humbled” to have been elected to lead one of the principal organs of the UN, while noting that the upcoming session would be “especially challenging for the world”.

    In addition to COVID-19 recovery, she highlighted the ongoing war in Ukraine, which has “triggered massive food insecurity, energy shortages and financial crises”.

    The new ECOSOC chief elaborated on initiatives to assist in overcoming “the crises that have engulfed our societies”.

    Stoeva’s said her second priority would be to ensure that the Council and the High Level Political Forum (HLPF) which is the climax of its work each year, provides “solid, evidence-based, innovative and actionable policy guidance” to curb and address the pandemic’s impacts on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

    Her third priority is to ensure preparations advance for the SDG Summit taking place in September 2023, by building momentum and reviving “the passion that characterised the elaboration and implementation of the SDGs”, which were agreed in 2015.

    Fourth, she aims to build on the success of this year’s Humanitarian Affairs Segment to “support and reinforce” the UN and its humanitarian partners in addressing “profound humanitarian challenges” worldwide.

    Fifth, Stoeva aims to follow-up on the recommendations made to ECOSOC in the Secretary-General’s Our Common Agenda blueprint for action, while her sixth priority will be to provide better access to youth, civil society and others.

    Her final priority, she said, would be to implement the recommendations adopted by the General Assembly in June 2021 for reforming the work of ECOSOC and the HLPF.

    Stoeva assumed her duties as Bulgaria’s Permanent Representative to the UN in February 2021 and has served as ECOSOC Vice-President responsible for the Management Segment, where she successfully led the Council’s review of the Functional Commissions and Expert Bodies.

    In a heartfelt speech, outgoing President Collen Kelapile said that he was “deeply honoured and elated” to have served in the top job for the past year.

    Reminding that it was the first time that Botswana had occupied the seat, he described it as “a momentous occasion for both my country and I personally”.

    Before handing over the reins, Mr Kelapile looked back at the main theme of both ECOSOC and the HLPF in July, highlighting the “eight broad priorities”, of his term, which included vaccine equity, inequalities, post-conflict recovery, and youth engagement.

    He also highlighted the Council’s new Coordination Segment and a revitalised Partnership Forum to guide its subsidiary bodies, reminding that it has dealt with conflict, post-conflict and humanitarian emergencies, including in Haiti, South Sudan and the Sahel region.

    The outgoing president also drew attention to meetings during his tenure surrounding the climate crisis, implementing the New Urban Agenda, and supporting the advance of the SDGs during the recent months of crises on multiple fronts.

    “I am pleased that the Council adopted a Resolution on Friday to ensure implementation of the outcomes of the Operational Activities for Development Segment,” he said.

    As president, he reminded that ECOSOC continued to advocate for Least Developed Countries (LDCs), Landlocked Developing Countries (LLDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS), as well as a special push on behalf of African countries, “providing them a platform to share their experiences and development challenges”.

    The council has been actively involved in preparations for the Fifth UN Conference on LDCs next year, and in 2024, the Third Conference on LLDCs and the Fourth Conference on SIDS, he said.

    Kelapile has called for strengthened international cooperation, global solidarity and partnerships to overcome their development challenges and lent support for inclusive and sustainable recovery in these countries.

    In passing the gavel to Stoeva, he wished her “all the best” in leading ECOSOC’s work on COVID-19 recovery and implementing the 2030 Agenda during the Decade of Action.

    He thanked all who supported him and asked that they extend the same support and cooperation to her.

    Kelapile also stressed the need to work together “harder” and coordinate further.

    “With less than eight years to 2030, it is clear that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals must remain our guiding framework,” he said.

    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   Bulgaria s Ambassador to the UN slammed the gavel as President of the Economic and Social Council ECOSOC for the first time on Monday with a promise to build on the solid foundations left by the outgoing chief and his office to transform the world into a better world place for the people of today and tomorrow Ambassador Lachezara Stoeva said in her opening speech that she was honored and honored to have been chosen to head one of the UN s main bodies noting that the upcoming session will be particularly challenging for the world In addition to the COVID recovery he highlighted the ongoing war in Ukraine which has triggered massive food insecurity energy shortages and financial crises The new head of ECOSOC referred to initiatives to help overcome the crises that have engulfed our societies Setting your schedule As chair of ECOSOC Ms Stoeva said her first priority was to ensure that the Council and the High Level Political Forum HLPF which is the highlight of her work each year provide sound evidence based policy guidance innovative and actionable to curb and address the impacts of the pandemic on the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs Second its goal is to help close the great financing gap that has dramatically reduced the resilience of many developing nations His third priority is to ensure that preparations move forward for the SDG Summit to take place in September 2023 building momentum and reviving the passion that characterized the crafting and implementation of the SDGs which were agreed upon in 2015 Fourth it seeks to build on the success of this year s Humanitarian Affairs Segment to support and strengthen the United Nations and its humanitarian partners in addressing profound humanitarian challenges around the world Fifth Ambassador Stoeva aims to follow up on the recommendations made to ECOSOC in the Secretary General s Our Common Agenda action plan while her sixth priority will be to provide better access to youth civil society and other He said that his final priority would be to implement the recommendations adopted by the General Assembly in June 2021 to reform the work of ECOSOC and the HLPF Ambassador Stoeva took up her duties as Permanent Representative of Bulgaria to the UN in February last year and served as ECOSOC Vice President responsible for the Management Segment where she successfully led the Council s review of Functional Commissions and Expert Bodies fond farewell In a heartfelt speech outgoing chairman Collen Kelapile said he was deeply honored and elated to have held the top job for the past year Recalling that it was the first time Botswana had held the seat he described it as a momentous occasion both for my country and for me personally Before handing over the reins Mr Kelapile reviewed the main theme of both ECOSOC and the HLPF this month highlighting the eight broad priorities of his mandate which included vaccine equity inequalities post conflict recovery and youth commitment He also highlighted the Council s new Coordination Segment and a revitalized Partnership Forum to guide its subsidiary bodies recalling that it has dealt with conflict post conflict and humanitarian emergencies including in Haiti South Sudan and the Sahel region The outgoing president also drew attention to the meetings during his tenure around the climate crisis the implementation of the New Urban Agenda and support for the advancement of the SDGs during the last months of crisis on multiple fronts I am pleased that the Council adopted a Resolution last Friday to ensure the implementation of the results of the Operational Activities for Development Segment he said Defend the vulnerable As Chair he recalled that ECOSOC continued to advocate for Least Developed Countries LDCs Landlocked Developing Countries LLDCs and Small Island Developing States SIDS as well as a special push on behalf of African countries providing them with a platform to share their experiences and development challenges The Council has been actively involved in the preparations for the Fifth United Nations Conference on LDCs next year and in 2024 the Third Conference on LLDCs and the Fourth Conference on SIDS he said Ambassador Kelapile has called for strengthened international cooperation global solidarity and partnerships to overcome their development challenges and has provided support for an inclusive and sustainable recovery in these countries Looking to the future Passing the gavel to Ambassador Stoeva she wished her all the best in leading ECOSOC s work in recovering from COVID 19 and implementing the 2030 Agenda during the Decade of Action He thanked everyone who supported him and asked them to extend the same support and cooperation to her In closing Ambassador Kelapile emphasized the need to work together harder and coordinate more With less than eight years to 2030 it is clear that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals must remain our guiding framework
    The new ECOSOC president aims to alleviate the crises that have ‘sunken our societies’
      Bulgaria s Ambassador to the UN slammed the gavel as President of the Economic and Social Council ECOSOC for the first time on Monday with a promise to build on the solid foundations left by the outgoing chief and his office to transform the world into a better world place for the people of today and tomorrow Ambassador Lachezara Stoeva said in her opening speech that she was honored and honored to have been chosen to head one of the UN s main bodies noting that the upcoming session will be particularly challenging for the world In addition to the COVID recovery he highlighted the ongoing war in Ukraine which has triggered massive food insecurity energy shortages and financial crises The new head of ECOSOC referred to initiatives to help overcome the crises that have engulfed our societies Setting your schedule As chair of ECOSOC Ms Stoeva said her first priority was to ensure that the Council and the High Level Political Forum HLPF which is the highlight of her work each year provide sound evidence based policy guidance innovative and actionable to curb and address the impacts of the pandemic on the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs Second its goal is to help close the great financing gap that has dramatically reduced the resilience of many developing nations His third priority is to ensure that preparations move forward for the SDG Summit to take place in September 2023 building momentum and reviving the passion that characterized the crafting and implementation of the SDGs which were agreed upon in 2015 Fourth it seeks to build on the success of this year s Humanitarian Affairs Segment to support and strengthen the United Nations and its humanitarian partners in addressing profound humanitarian challenges around the world Fifth Ambassador Stoeva aims to follow up on the recommendations made to ECOSOC in the Secretary General s Our Common Agenda action plan while her sixth priority will be to provide better access to youth civil society and other He said that his final priority would be to implement the recommendations adopted by the General Assembly in June 2021 to reform the work of ECOSOC and the HLPF Ambassador Stoeva took up her duties as Permanent Representative of Bulgaria to the UN in February last year and served as ECOSOC Vice President responsible for the Management Segment where she successfully led the Council s review of Functional Commissions and Expert Bodies fond farewell In a heartfelt speech outgoing chairman Collen Kelapile said he was deeply honored and elated to have held the top job for the past year Recalling that it was the first time Botswana had held the seat he described it as a momentous occasion both for my country and for me personally Before handing over the reins Mr Kelapile reviewed the main theme of both ECOSOC and the HLPF this month highlighting the eight broad priorities of his mandate which included vaccine equity inequalities post conflict recovery and youth commitment He also highlighted the Council s new Coordination Segment and a revitalized Partnership Forum to guide its subsidiary bodies recalling that it has dealt with conflict post conflict and humanitarian emergencies including in Haiti South Sudan and the Sahel region The outgoing president also drew attention to the meetings during his tenure around the climate crisis the implementation of the New Urban Agenda and support for the advancement of the SDGs during the last months of crisis on multiple fronts I am pleased that the Council adopted a Resolution last Friday to ensure the implementation of the results of the Operational Activities for Development Segment he said Defend the vulnerable As Chair he recalled that ECOSOC continued to advocate for Least Developed Countries LDCs Landlocked Developing Countries LLDCs and Small Island Developing States SIDS as well as a special push on behalf of African countries providing them with a platform to share their experiences and development challenges The Council has been actively involved in the preparations for the Fifth United Nations Conference on LDCs next year and in 2024 the Third Conference on LLDCs and the Fourth Conference on SIDS he said Ambassador Kelapile has called for strengthened international cooperation global solidarity and partnerships to overcome their development challenges and has provided support for an inclusive and sustainable recovery in these countries Looking to the future Passing the gavel to Ambassador Stoeva she wished her all the best in leading ECOSOC s work in recovering from COVID 19 and implementing the 2030 Agenda during the Decade of Action He thanked everyone who supported him and asked them to extend the same support and cooperation to her In closing Ambassador Kelapile emphasized the need to work together harder and coordinate more With less than eight years to 2030 it is clear that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals must remain our guiding framework
    The new ECOSOC president aims to alleviate the crises that have ‘sunken our societies’
    Africa2 months ago

    The new ECOSOC president aims to alleviate the crises that have ‘sunken our societies’

    Bulgaria's Ambassador to the UN slammed the gavel as President of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) for the first time on Monday with a promise to build on the "solid foundations" left by the outgoing chief and his office to transform the world into " a better world". place for the people of today and tomorrow”.

    Ambassador Lachezara Stoeva said in her opening speech that she was "honored and honored" to have been chosen to head one of the UN's main bodies, noting that the upcoming session will be "particularly challenging for the world."

    In addition to the COVID recovery, he highlighted the ongoing war in Ukraine, which has "triggered massive food insecurity, energy shortages and financial crises."

    The new head of ECOSOC referred to initiatives to help overcome "the crises that have engulfed our societies."

    Setting your schedule

    As chair of ECOSOC, Ms Stoeva said her first priority was to ensure that the Council and the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF), which is the highlight of her work each year, provide "sound, evidence-based policy guidance , innovative and actionable. to curb and address the impacts of the pandemic on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

    Second, its goal is to help close the "great financing gap" that has dramatically reduced the resilience of many developing nations.

    His third priority is to ensure that preparations move forward for the SDG Summit to take place in September 2023, building momentum and reviving "the passion that characterized the crafting and implementation of the SDGs", which were agreed upon in 2015.

    Fourth, it seeks to build on the success of this year's Humanitarian Affairs Segment to “support and strengthen” the United Nations and its humanitarian partners in addressing “profound humanitarian challenges” around the world.

    Fifth, Ambassador Stoeva aims to follow up on the recommendations made to ECOSOC in the Secretary-General's Our Common Agenda action plan, while her sixth priority will be to provide better access to youth, civil society and other .

    He said that his final priority would be to implement the recommendations adopted by the General Assembly in June 2021 to reform the work of ECOSOC and the HLPF.

    Ambassador Stoeva took up her duties as Permanent Representative of Bulgaria to the UN in February last year and served as ECOSOC Vice President responsible for the Management Segment, where she successfully led the Council's review of Functional Commissions and Expert Bodies.

    fond farewell

    In a heartfelt speech, outgoing chairman Collen Kelapile said he was "deeply honored and elated" to have held the top job for the past year.

    Recalling that it was the first time Botswana had held the seat, he described it as “a momentous occasion both for my country and for me personally”.

    Before handing over the reins, Mr. Kelapile reviewed the main theme of both ECOSOC and the HLPF this month, highlighting the "eight broad priorities" of his mandate, which included vaccine equity, inequalities, post-conflict recovery and youth. commitment.

    He also highlighted the Council's new Coordination Segment and a revitalized Partnership Forum to guide its subsidiary bodies, recalling that it has dealt with conflict, post-conflict and humanitarian emergencies, including in Haiti, South Sudan and the Sahel region.

    The outgoing president also drew attention to the meetings during his tenure around the climate crisis, the implementation of the New Urban Agenda and support for the advancement of the SDGs during the last months of crisis on multiple fronts.

    “I am pleased that the Council adopted a Resolution last Friday to ensure the implementation of the results of the Operational Activities for Development Segment,” he said.

    Defend the vulnerable

    As Chair, he recalled that ECOSOC continued to advocate for Least Developed Countries (LDCs), Landlocked Developing Countries (LLDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS), as well as a special push on behalf of African countries, “providing them with a platform to share their experiences and development challenges.”

    The Council has been actively involved in the preparations for the Fifth United Nations Conference on LDCs next year and, in 2024, the Third Conference on LLDCs and the Fourth Conference on SIDS, he said.

    Ambassador Kelapile has called for strengthened international cooperation, global solidarity and partnerships to overcome their development challenges and has provided support for an inclusive and sustainable recovery in these countries.

    Looking to the future

    Passing the gavel to Ambassador Stoeva, she wished her “all the best” in leading ECOSOC's work in recovering from COVID-19 and implementing the 2030 Agenda during the Decade of Action.

    He thanked everyone who supported him and asked them to "extend the same support and cooperation" to her.

    In closing, Ambassador Kelapile emphasized the need to work together "harder" and coordinate more.

    “With less than eight years to 2030, it is clear that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals must remain our guiding framework.”

  •   The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO has placed Small Island Developing States SIDS at the center of its work to transform agri food systems due to their vulnerability to the climate crisis and other shocks and its importance in the protection of marine biodiversity Scattered around the world but with only about 65 million inhabitants SIDS account for just 1 percent of global CO2 emissions but bear the brunt of the effects of climate change on their fragile economies To underscore FAO s commitment to island nations that are on the front lines of the climate crisis and other shocks and at the same time play a critical role as stewards of the biodiversity of our oceans Director General QU Dongyu will a two day visit to the Maldives While he is here the FAO Director General is signing a Country Programming Framework with the government Its objective is to support the country s efforts to recover from the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic and build back better increasing resilience to further shocks and addressing development needs Qu he will also meet with various ministers and members of civil society and visit a fishing company and a hydroponic farm which grows products without using soil Innovation is crucial for the future Increased innovation and digitalization can help SIDS and the rest of the world achieve the multiple and cross cutting goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the SAMOA Pathway Framework for Action linking commitments on sustainability in all its dimensions and follow up actions to last year s UN Food Systems Summit Qu said Despite its idyllic image the Indian Ocean country of more than 1 200 islands epitomizes the challenges faced by SIDS in many ways Maldivian officials say they are already feeling the effects of changing rainfall and rising temperatures on food production using their small total of 65 square kilometers of agricultural land Dependent like most SIDS on food imports except fish the Maldives is suffering from unhealthy diets resulting in high rates of non communicable diseases It is also highly vulnerable to fluctuating commodity prices exacerbated by COVID 19 which has hit its vital tourism industry All of these factors contribute to the need for technical knowledge and support as well as financial investments in sustainable and regenerative food consumption distribution and production patterns said Thilmeeza Hussain Permanent Representative of Maldives to the UN and Special Envoy of the President of Maldives the General Assembly said in an opening address to the SIDS Solutions Dialogue convened by FAO last month We look forward to continuing to work with key partners such as the FAO and others to implement the changes needed to ensure equitable and sustainable food systems he added The SIDS Solutions Dialogue was just the latest in a series of platforms that FAO has organized to address the challenges facing SIDS It followed a SIDS Solutions Forum co convened by FAO and the Government of Fiji in August 2021 which showcased a number of innovative ideas developed in SIDS with the potential to be scaled up and replicated These included smartphone apps to promote healthier eating based on locally available foods to provide agricultural information and to collect data on available health resources The forum was the first of an event that will take place every two years Other FAO initiatives specifically targeting SIDS include the Global Program of Action on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States SIDS It addresses the need for a more integrated multi stakeholder approach to the particular challenges they face in trying to achieve food security and nutrition and prioritizes stronger international and inter regional partnerships The COVID 19 Response and Recovery Program also addresses the key needs of SIDS while the establishment of the FAO Office for Small Island Developing States Least Developed Countries and Landlocked Developing Countries helps to draw attention to the vulnerabilities of SIDS as well as developing countries the other two categories and promote a common approach to address the unique challenges facing these countries FAO s flagship initiatives benefit Small Island Developing States In addition several SIDS benefit significantly from the FAO flagship initiatives that are implemented globally Among these are the Mano a Mano Initiative which accelerates investment and rural development the 1000 Digital Villages which help communities take a big step forward in digitization the Technical Platform for Family Farming which supports the cross fertilization from region to region for policy formulation innovation and One Country One Priority Product accelerating the development of new agricultural products All of these initiatives add to a strong commitment by FAO to ensure that SIDS are at the center of efforts under its Strategic Framework to work towards better production better nutrition a better environment and a better life without leaving no one behind in some of the world s most vulnerable communities That vulnerability was further highlighted in the Pacific region by the aftermath of the January 15 undersea volcanic eruption and tsunami in Tonga which left parts of the islands farmland covered in ash and caused extensive damage to fisheries FAO and its UN partners are working with the Government of Tonga to implement plans to help the country s farmers and fishermen rebuild their livelihoods after the disaster
    Supporting Small Island Developing States for a sustainable future
      The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO has placed Small Island Developing States SIDS at the center of its work to transform agri food systems due to their vulnerability to the climate crisis and other shocks and its importance in the protection of marine biodiversity Scattered around the world but with only about 65 million inhabitants SIDS account for just 1 percent of global CO2 emissions but bear the brunt of the effects of climate change on their fragile economies To underscore FAO s commitment to island nations that are on the front lines of the climate crisis and other shocks and at the same time play a critical role as stewards of the biodiversity of our oceans Director General QU Dongyu will a two day visit to the Maldives While he is here the FAO Director General is signing a Country Programming Framework with the government Its objective is to support the country s efforts to recover from the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic and build back better increasing resilience to further shocks and addressing development needs Qu he will also meet with various ministers and members of civil society and visit a fishing company and a hydroponic farm which grows products without using soil Innovation is crucial for the future Increased innovation and digitalization can help SIDS and the rest of the world achieve the multiple and cross cutting goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the SAMOA Pathway Framework for Action linking commitments on sustainability in all its dimensions and follow up actions to last year s UN Food Systems Summit Qu said Despite its idyllic image the Indian Ocean country of more than 1 200 islands epitomizes the challenges faced by SIDS in many ways Maldivian officials say they are already feeling the effects of changing rainfall and rising temperatures on food production using their small total of 65 square kilometers of agricultural land Dependent like most SIDS on food imports except fish the Maldives is suffering from unhealthy diets resulting in high rates of non communicable diseases It is also highly vulnerable to fluctuating commodity prices exacerbated by COVID 19 which has hit its vital tourism industry All of these factors contribute to the need for technical knowledge and support as well as financial investments in sustainable and regenerative food consumption distribution and production patterns said Thilmeeza Hussain Permanent Representative of Maldives to the UN and Special Envoy of the President of Maldives the General Assembly said in an opening address to the SIDS Solutions Dialogue convened by FAO last month We look forward to continuing to work with key partners such as the FAO and others to implement the changes needed to ensure equitable and sustainable food systems he added The SIDS Solutions Dialogue was just the latest in a series of platforms that FAO has organized to address the challenges facing SIDS It followed a SIDS Solutions Forum co convened by FAO and the Government of Fiji in August 2021 which showcased a number of innovative ideas developed in SIDS with the potential to be scaled up and replicated These included smartphone apps to promote healthier eating based on locally available foods to provide agricultural information and to collect data on available health resources The forum was the first of an event that will take place every two years Other FAO initiatives specifically targeting SIDS include the Global Program of Action on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States SIDS It addresses the need for a more integrated multi stakeholder approach to the particular challenges they face in trying to achieve food security and nutrition and prioritizes stronger international and inter regional partnerships The COVID 19 Response and Recovery Program also addresses the key needs of SIDS while the establishment of the FAO Office for Small Island Developing States Least Developed Countries and Landlocked Developing Countries helps to draw attention to the vulnerabilities of SIDS as well as developing countries the other two categories and promote a common approach to address the unique challenges facing these countries FAO s flagship initiatives benefit Small Island Developing States In addition several SIDS benefit significantly from the FAO flagship initiatives that are implemented globally Among these are the Mano a Mano Initiative which accelerates investment and rural development the 1000 Digital Villages which help communities take a big step forward in digitization the Technical Platform for Family Farming which supports the cross fertilization from region to region for policy formulation innovation and One Country One Priority Product accelerating the development of new agricultural products All of these initiatives add to a strong commitment by FAO to ensure that SIDS are at the center of efforts under its Strategic Framework to work towards better production better nutrition a better environment and a better life without leaving no one behind in some of the world s most vulnerable communities That vulnerability was further highlighted in the Pacific region by the aftermath of the January 15 undersea volcanic eruption and tsunami in Tonga which left parts of the islands farmland covered in ash and caused extensive damage to fisheries FAO and its UN partners are working with the Government of Tonga to implement plans to help the country s farmers and fishermen rebuild their livelihoods after the disaster
    Supporting Small Island Developing States for a sustainable future
    Africa7 months ago

    Supporting Small Island Developing States for a sustainable future

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has placed Small Island Developing States (SIDS) at the center of its work to transform agri-food systems, due to their vulnerability to the climate crisis and other shocks and its importance in the protection of marine biodiversity.

    Scattered around the world but with only about 65 million inhabitants, SIDS account for just 1 percent of global CO2 emissions, but bear the brunt of the effects of climate change on their fragile economies.

    To underscore FAO's commitment to island nations that are on the front lines of the climate crisis and other shocks, and at the same time play a critical role as stewards of the biodiversity of our oceans, Director-General QU Dongyu will a two-day visit to the Maldives.

    While he is here, the FAO Director-General is signing a Country Programming Framework with the government. Its objective is to support the country's efforts to recover from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and build back better, increasing resilience to further shocks and addressing development needs. Qu he will also meet with various ministers and members of civil society and visit a fishing company and a hydroponic farm, which grows products without using soil.

    Innovation is crucial for the future

    “Increased innovation and digitalization can help SIDS and the rest of the world achieve the multiple and cross-cutting goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the SAMOA Pathway Framework for Action”, linking commitments on sustainability in all its dimensions. and follow-up actions to last year's UN Food Systems Summit, Qu said.

    Despite its idyllic image, the Indian Ocean country of more than 1,200 islands epitomizes the challenges faced by SIDS in many ways. Maldivian officials say they are already feeling the effects of changing rainfall and rising temperatures on food production using their small total of 65 square kilometers of agricultural land.

    Dependent, like most SIDS, on food imports except fish, the Maldives is suffering from unhealthy diets, resulting in high rates of non-communicable diseases. It is also highly vulnerable to fluctuating commodity prices, exacerbated by COVID-19, which has hit its vital tourism industry.

    All of these factors contribute to the need for "technical knowledge and support, as well as financial investments in sustainable and regenerative food consumption, distribution and production patterns," said Thilmeeza Hussain, Permanent Representative of Maldives to the UN and Special Envoy of the President of Maldives. the General Assembly said in an opening address to the SIDS Solutions Dialogue convened by FAO last month. "We look forward to continuing to work with key partners, such as the FAO and others, to implement the changes needed to ensure equitable and sustainable food systems," he added.

    The SIDS Solutions Dialogue was just the latest in a series of platforms that FAO has organized to address the challenges facing SIDS. It followed a SIDS Solutions Forum, co-convened by FAO and the Government of Fiji in August 2021, which showcased a number of innovative ideas developed in SIDS, with the potential to be scaled up and replicated.

    These included smartphone apps to promote healthier eating, based on locally available foods, to provide agricultural information, and to collect data on available health resources. The forum was the first of an event that will take place every two years.

    Other FAO initiatives specifically targeting SIDS include the Global Program of Action on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States (SIDS). It addresses the need for a more integrated multi-stakeholder approach to the particular challenges they face in trying to achieve food security and nutrition, and prioritizes stronger international and inter-regional partnerships.

    The COVID-19 Response and Recovery Program also addresses the key needs of SIDS, while the establishment of the FAO Office for Small Island Developing States, Least Developed Countries and Landlocked Developing Countries helps to draw attention to the vulnerabilities of SIDS as well as developing countries. the other two categories, and promote a common approach to address the unique challenges facing these countries.

    FAO's flagship initiatives benefit Small Island Developing States

    In addition, several SIDS benefit significantly from the FAO flagship initiatives that are implemented globally. Among these are the Mano a Mano Initiative, which accelerates investment and rural development, the 1000 Digital Villages, which help communities take a big step forward in digitization, the Technical Platform for Family Farming, which supports the cross fertilization from region to region for policy formulation. innovation and One Country One Priority Product, accelerating the development of new agricultural products.

    All of these initiatives add to a strong commitment by FAO to ensure that SIDS are at the center of efforts under its Strategic Framework to work towards better production, better nutrition, a better environment and a better life, without leaving no one behind - in some of the world's most vulnerable communities.

    That vulnerability was further highlighted in the Pacific region by the aftermath of the January 15 undersea volcanic eruption and tsunami in Tonga, which left parts of the islands' farmland covered in ash and caused extensive damage to fisheries. FAO and its UN partners are working with the Government of Tonga to implement plans to help the country's farmers and fishermen rebuild their livelihoods after the disaster.

  •   President Wavel Ramkalawan also took the opportunity to have an exchange with the Director General of the World Trade Organization Dr Ngozi Okonjo Iweala on the sidelines of the Summit where he congratulated her on her latest appointment as head of the Organization She is the first African woman to hold such a position Given that Seychelles will have its WTO Trade Policy Review this year in December the President requested the support of the organization and its members for a rapid and very conclusive review which takes into context the specificities of SIDS and the issue of the Treatment Special and Differentiated During their discussions they touched on fishing subsidies and the TRIP exemption for vaccine production by other WTO members President Ramkalawan assured him of the full support of the Seychelles Preliminary preparations for the Trade Policy Review are under way and a WTO team is expected to visit Seychelles next March
    Seychelles: President holds talks with the Director General of the World Trade Organisation
      President Wavel Ramkalawan also took the opportunity to have an exchange with the Director General of the World Trade Organization Dr Ngozi Okonjo Iweala on the sidelines of the Summit where he congratulated her on her latest appointment as head of the Organization She is the first African woman to hold such a position Given that Seychelles will have its WTO Trade Policy Review this year in December the President requested the support of the organization and its members for a rapid and very conclusive review which takes into context the specificities of SIDS and the issue of the Treatment Special and Differentiated During their discussions they touched on fishing subsidies and the TRIP exemption for vaccine production by other WTO members President Ramkalawan assured him of the full support of the Seychelles Preliminary preparations for the Trade Policy Review are under way and a WTO team is expected to visit Seychelles next March
    Seychelles: President holds talks with the Director General of the World Trade Organisation
    Africa8 months ago

    Seychelles: President holds talks with the Director General of the World Trade Organisation

    President Wavel Ramkalawan also took the opportunity to have an exchange with the Director General of the World Trade Organization, Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, on the sidelines of the Summit, where he congratulated her on her latest appointment as head of the Organization. She is the first African woman to hold such a position.

    Given that Seychelles will have its WTO Trade Policy Review this year in December, the President requested the support of the organization and its members for a rapid and very conclusive review, which takes into context the specificities of SIDS and the issue of the Treatment Special and Differentiated.

    During their discussions, they touched on fishing subsidies and the TRIP exemption for vaccine production by other WTO members. President Ramkalawan assured him of the full support of the Seychelles.

    Preliminary preparations for the Trade Policy Review are under way and a WTO team is expected to visit Seychelles next March.

  •   On the sidelines of the 6th European Union African Union Summit taking place in Belgium President Wavel Ramkalawan held a bilateral discussion with the President of the European Commission Mrs Ursula von der Leyen yesterday morning Friday 18 February On behalf of the Government of Seychelles the President expressed his appreciation for all the support provided by the EU and for being an excellent partner in the development of Seychelles He took the opportunity to brief Ms Ursula von der Leyen on the priority issues relevant to Seychelles today As a Small Island Developing State Seychelles continues to feel the brunt of the effects of climate change and environmental degradation We believe that more emphasis is needed to accelerate climate action by high emitting countries and welcome any support to Seychelles and other island states on climate adaptation climate mitigation and emergency preparedness The pandemic has taught us all many lessons For Seychelles my government has considered it of utmost importance that the country diversify its economy In this regard I hope that the EU will also consider helping us improve the business landscape and implement modern financing mechanisms said President Ramkalawan During the meeting President Ramkalawan and Mrs Ursula von der Leyen discussed issues of mutual interest and value to both Seychelles and the European Union exploring new avenues of cooperation such as the environment climate change ocean governance Blue Economy fisheries maritime security law enforcement cybercrime They also discussed ongoing anti corruption cooperation on capacity building in the fisheries sector and conversion to modern technologies ocean good governance structure blue economy SIDS vulnerability and maritime safety among others Ms Ursula von der Leyen conveyed the EU s commitment to continue partnering with Seychelles and providing technical assistance where needed And as a long standing partner of this island nation it has pledged to enhance cooperation in key areas of mutual interest
    President Ramkalawan meets High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy / Vice-President of the European Commission
      On the sidelines of the 6th European Union African Union Summit taking place in Belgium President Wavel Ramkalawan held a bilateral discussion with the President of the European Commission Mrs Ursula von der Leyen yesterday morning Friday 18 February On behalf of the Government of Seychelles the President expressed his appreciation for all the support provided by the EU and for being an excellent partner in the development of Seychelles He took the opportunity to brief Ms Ursula von der Leyen on the priority issues relevant to Seychelles today As a Small Island Developing State Seychelles continues to feel the brunt of the effects of climate change and environmental degradation We believe that more emphasis is needed to accelerate climate action by high emitting countries and welcome any support to Seychelles and other island states on climate adaptation climate mitigation and emergency preparedness The pandemic has taught us all many lessons For Seychelles my government has considered it of utmost importance that the country diversify its economy In this regard I hope that the EU will also consider helping us improve the business landscape and implement modern financing mechanisms said President Ramkalawan During the meeting President Ramkalawan and Mrs Ursula von der Leyen discussed issues of mutual interest and value to both Seychelles and the European Union exploring new avenues of cooperation such as the environment climate change ocean governance Blue Economy fisheries maritime security law enforcement cybercrime They also discussed ongoing anti corruption cooperation on capacity building in the fisheries sector and conversion to modern technologies ocean good governance structure blue economy SIDS vulnerability and maritime safety among others Ms Ursula von der Leyen conveyed the EU s commitment to continue partnering with Seychelles and providing technical assistance where needed And as a long standing partner of this island nation it has pledged to enhance cooperation in key areas of mutual interest
    President Ramkalawan meets High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy / Vice-President of the European Commission
    Africa8 months ago

    President Ramkalawan meets High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy / Vice-President of the European Commission

    On the sidelines of the 6th European Union-African Union Summit taking place in Belgium, President Wavel Ramkalawan held a bilateral discussion with the President of the European Commission, Mrs. Ursula von der Leyen yesterday morning (Friday 18 February).

    On behalf of the Government of Seychelles, the President expressed his appreciation for all the support provided by the EU and for being an excellent partner in the development of Seychelles. He took the opportunity to brief Ms. Ursula von der Leyen on the priority issues relevant to Seychelles today.

    “As a Small Island Developing State, Seychelles continues to feel the brunt of the effects of climate change and environmental degradation. We believe that more emphasis is needed to accelerate climate action by high emitting countries and welcome any support to Seychelles and other island states on climate adaptation, climate mitigation and emergency preparedness. The pandemic has taught us all many lessons. For Seychelles, my government has considered it of utmost importance that the country diversify its economy. In this regard, I hope that the EU will also consider helping us improve the business landscape and implement modern financing mechanisms,” said President Ramkalawan.

    During the meeting, President Ramkalawan and Mrs. Ursula von der Leyen discussed issues of mutual interest and value to both Seychelles and the European Union, exploring new avenues of cooperation such as the environment, climate change, ocean governance/Blue Economy, fisheries, maritime security, law enforcement/cybercrime. They also discussed ongoing anti-corruption cooperation on capacity building in the fisheries sector and conversion to modern technologies, ocean good governance structure, blue economy, SIDS vulnerability and maritime safety. , among others.

    Ms. Ursula von der Leyen conveyed the EU's commitment to continue partnering with Seychelles and providing technical assistance where needed. And as a long-standing partner of this island nation, it has pledged to enhance cooperation in key areas of mutual interest.

  •   During his mission in Paris France President Wavel Ramkalawan also met with the Director General of UNESCO Ms Audrey Azoulay at UNESCO Headquarters yesterday afternoon During their discussions President Ramkalawan conveyed to Ms Azoulay the sincere appreciation of the Seychellois people for the long standing support provided to Seychelles by UNESCO She highlighted the recent inscription of the moutya dance on the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity He also expressed his gratitude for being named as one of the patrons of the Ocean Decade Alliance together with the Prime Minister of Norway Seychelles is grateful for all the support that UNESCO has given us over the years My country is immensely proud to host two World Heritage Sites Aldabra and Vall e de Mai and a UNESCO Category II Centre the Seychelles IECD for Early Childhood Development Recently we also have the Moutya Dance inscribed on the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity And as a son of Seychelles to be named a Patron of the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission IOC Decade of the Oceans Advisory Board is an honor of the highest order said President Ramkalawan Accepting the nomination of the Ocean Decade Alliance as a member and sponsor the President said he strongly believes that ocean science diplomacy has a crucial role to play in facilitating the emergence and application of the science needed to support ocean governance and its management at all levels UNESCO especially through the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission has provided able and sustained leadership in this and related areas Seychelles will continue to provide the IOC with the support that is required in the pursuit of our common endeavor and in the implementation of the goals of the Decade of the Oceans For her part DG UNESCO Ms Azoulay congratulated Seychelles for its various achievements in promoting climate change despite being a Small Island Developing State SIDS She further reaffirmed UNESCO s commitment to advancing SIDS priorities and echoing the vulnerabilities faced by small island nations on the world stage The meeting was also an opportunity to discuss new avenues of cooperation and how Seychelles can further benefit from key UNESCO programs and frameworks Therefore further promoting the agendas of mutual interests not only for the country but also for the greater good of the SIDS community the world and humanity
    President Ramkalawan meets head of UNESCO
      During his mission in Paris France President Wavel Ramkalawan also met with the Director General of UNESCO Ms Audrey Azoulay at UNESCO Headquarters yesterday afternoon During their discussions President Ramkalawan conveyed to Ms Azoulay the sincere appreciation of the Seychellois people for the long standing support provided to Seychelles by UNESCO She highlighted the recent inscription of the moutya dance on the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity He also expressed his gratitude for being named as one of the patrons of the Ocean Decade Alliance together with the Prime Minister of Norway Seychelles is grateful for all the support that UNESCO has given us over the years My country is immensely proud to host two World Heritage Sites Aldabra and Vall e de Mai and a UNESCO Category II Centre the Seychelles IECD for Early Childhood Development Recently we also have the Moutya Dance inscribed on the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity And as a son of Seychelles to be named a Patron of the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission IOC Decade of the Oceans Advisory Board is an honor of the highest order said President Ramkalawan Accepting the nomination of the Ocean Decade Alliance as a member and sponsor the President said he strongly believes that ocean science diplomacy has a crucial role to play in facilitating the emergence and application of the science needed to support ocean governance and its management at all levels UNESCO especially through the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission has provided able and sustained leadership in this and related areas Seychelles will continue to provide the IOC with the support that is required in the pursuit of our common endeavor and in the implementation of the goals of the Decade of the Oceans For her part DG UNESCO Ms Azoulay congratulated Seychelles for its various achievements in promoting climate change despite being a Small Island Developing State SIDS She further reaffirmed UNESCO s commitment to advancing SIDS priorities and echoing the vulnerabilities faced by small island nations on the world stage The meeting was also an opportunity to discuss new avenues of cooperation and how Seychelles can further benefit from key UNESCO programs and frameworks Therefore further promoting the agendas of mutual interests not only for the country but also for the greater good of the SIDS community the world and humanity
    President Ramkalawan meets head of UNESCO
    Africa8 months ago

    President Ramkalawan meets head of UNESCO

    During his mission in Paris, France, President Wavel Ramkalawan also met with the Director General of UNESCO, Ms. Audrey Azoulay, at UNESCO Headquarters yesterday afternoon.

    During their discussions, President Ramkalawan conveyed to Ms. Azoulay the sincere appreciation of the Seychellois people for the long-standing support provided to Seychelles by UNESCO. She highlighted the recent inscription of the 'moutya' dance on the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. He also expressed his gratitude for being named as one of the patrons of the Ocean Decade Alliance together with the Prime Minister of Norway.

    “Seychelles is grateful for all the support that UNESCO has given us over the years. My country is immensely proud to host two World Heritage Sites 'Aldabra and Vallée de Mai and a UNESCO Category II Centre: the Seychelles IECD for Early Childhood Development. Recently we also have the 'Moutya Dance', inscribed on the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. And as a son of Seychelles, to be named a Patron of the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) Decade of the Oceans Advisory Board is an honor of the highest order,” said President Ramkalawan.

    Accepting the nomination of the Ocean Decade Alliance as a member and sponsor, the President said he strongly believes that ocean science diplomacy has a crucial role to play in facilitating the emergence and application of the science needed to support ocean governance. and its management at all levels. . “UNESCO, especially through the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, has provided able and sustained leadership in this and related areas. Seychelles will continue to provide the IOC with the support that is required in the pursuit of our common endeavor and in the implementation of the goals of the Decade of the Oceans.”

    For her part, DG UNESCO, Ms. Azoulay, congratulated Seychelles for its various achievements in promoting climate change despite being a Small Island Developing State (SIDS). She further reaffirmed UNESCO's commitment to advancing SIDS priorities and echoing the vulnerabilities faced by small island nations on the world stage.

    The meeting was also an opportunity to discuss new avenues of cooperation and how Seychelles can further benefit from key UNESCO programs and frameworks. Therefore, further promoting the agendas of mutual interests, not only for the country but also for the greater good of the SIDS community, the world and humanity.

  •   An Integrated Waste Management Law once drawn up bringing together all the legal provisions on solid and hazardous waste would work sustainably in the long term PORT LOUIS Mauritius February 8 2022 APO Group A consultative workshop on the development of an Integrated Waste Management Legislative Framework opened this morning at the Caudan Arts Centre in Port Louis the Minister of the Environment Solid Waste Management and Climate Change Mr Kavydass Ramano the Resident Representative of the United Nations Development Program UNDP for Mauritius and Seychelles Ms Amanda Serumaga the Director of the Solid Waste Management Division Mr Bhaguthsing Beerachee and other personalities were present at the ceremony The two day workshop is organized by the Solid Waste Management Division of the Ministry of Environment Solid Waste Management and Climate Change in collaboration with UNDP The workshop brings together more than 60 organizations with the aim of ensuring maximum input from all stakeholders at all stages of drafting the Legislative Framework before a validation workshop is held at the end of March 2022 to finalize the next Law In his speech at the ceremony the Minister highlighted that the Legislative Framework was being drafted with a view to moving from a linear approach to a circular economy as envisioned by the Government as the solid waste landscape required major change He indicated that this change must be translated into an adequate legislative framework to guarantee the effective implementation of the various projects focused on the recovery and recycling of resources Furthermore Mr Ramano underlined that an Integrated Waste Management Law bringing together all legal provisions on solid and hazardous waste once drafted would work sustainably in the long term to fully address various issues These include waste collection and sorting in accordance with the new Solid Waste Management Strategy and Action Plan prevention and reduction of waste reuse and recycling closing the cycle treatment and disposal waste management facility licenses technical skills of the operators and illegal dumping and garbage This comprehensive legislation he emphasized must include among others provisions to ensure that waste management strategies and plans are regularly developed implemented and monitored through appropriate institutional structures governance strategies are developed to provide a well functioning system that allows stakeholders to contribute as users providers and enablers are developed private sector involvement in waste management and an effective and efficient information system and reporting requirements to ensure that informed decision making is established For her part Ms Serumaga commended the Government for taking the lead in initiating this important update of the legislative framework for solid waste management in Mauritius and stressed that a legal framework for proper waste management was essential to create appropriate conditions for effective waste management managing all waste streams and creating market based opportunities as well as changing behaviors and supporting sector specific sustainable practices UNDP s mandate the Representative stressed includes support for the development of solutions at the national and subnational levels for the sustainable management of natural resources ecosystem services chemical and hazardous waste He added that UNDP had supported the Solid Waste Management Division in several of its initiatives to improve the waste management system on the island and meet its specific obligations under international conventions such as the Stockholm and Minamata Conventions In addition Ms Serumaga indicated that the UNDP and Global Environment Facility GEF funded project Implementing Low and Non Chemical Sustainable Development in SIDS known as the ISLANDS project was approved by the GEF in December 2021 and implementation is due to begin in the coming months where funds of USD 4 5 million will be allocated to support activities in Mauritius aimed at protecting human health and the environment from the effects harmful chemicals and hazardous waste She highlighted that within the framework of the ISLANDS project fifteen activities were planned regarding the Solid Waste Management Division
    Consultative Workshop on the development of an Integrated Waste Management Legislative Framework
      An Integrated Waste Management Law once drawn up bringing together all the legal provisions on solid and hazardous waste would work sustainably in the long term PORT LOUIS Mauritius February 8 2022 APO Group A consultative workshop on the development of an Integrated Waste Management Legislative Framework opened this morning at the Caudan Arts Centre in Port Louis the Minister of the Environment Solid Waste Management and Climate Change Mr Kavydass Ramano the Resident Representative of the United Nations Development Program UNDP for Mauritius and Seychelles Ms Amanda Serumaga the Director of the Solid Waste Management Division Mr Bhaguthsing Beerachee and other personalities were present at the ceremony The two day workshop is organized by the Solid Waste Management Division of the Ministry of Environment Solid Waste Management and Climate Change in collaboration with UNDP The workshop brings together more than 60 organizations with the aim of ensuring maximum input from all stakeholders at all stages of drafting the Legislative Framework before a validation workshop is held at the end of March 2022 to finalize the next Law In his speech at the ceremony the Minister highlighted that the Legislative Framework was being drafted with a view to moving from a linear approach to a circular economy as envisioned by the Government as the solid waste landscape required major change He indicated that this change must be translated into an adequate legislative framework to guarantee the effective implementation of the various projects focused on the recovery and recycling of resources Furthermore Mr Ramano underlined that an Integrated Waste Management Law bringing together all legal provisions on solid and hazardous waste once drafted would work sustainably in the long term to fully address various issues These include waste collection and sorting in accordance with the new Solid Waste Management Strategy and Action Plan prevention and reduction of waste reuse and recycling closing the cycle treatment and disposal waste management facility licenses technical skills of the operators and illegal dumping and garbage This comprehensive legislation he emphasized must include among others provisions to ensure that waste management strategies and plans are regularly developed implemented and monitored through appropriate institutional structures governance strategies are developed to provide a well functioning system that allows stakeholders to contribute as users providers and enablers are developed private sector involvement in waste management and an effective and efficient information system and reporting requirements to ensure that informed decision making is established For her part Ms Serumaga commended the Government for taking the lead in initiating this important update of the legislative framework for solid waste management in Mauritius and stressed that a legal framework for proper waste management was essential to create appropriate conditions for effective waste management managing all waste streams and creating market based opportunities as well as changing behaviors and supporting sector specific sustainable practices UNDP s mandate the Representative stressed includes support for the development of solutions at the national and subnational levels for the sustainable management of natural resources ecosystem services chemical and hazardous waste He added that UNDP had supported the Solid Waste Management Division in several of its initiatives to improve the waste management system on the island and meet its specific obligations under international conventions such as the Stockholm and Minamata Conventions In addition Ms Serumaga indicated that the UNDP and Global Environment Facility GEF funded project Implementing Low and Non Chemical Sustainable Development in SIDS known as the ISLANDS project was approved by the GEF in December 2021 and implementation is due to begin in the coming months where funds of USD 4 5 million will be allocated to support activities in Mauritius aimed at protecting human health and the environment from the effects harmful chemicals and hazardous waste She highlighted that within the framework of the ISLANDS project fifteen activities were planned regarding the Solid Waste Management Division
    Consultative Workshop on the development of an Integrated Waste Management Legislative Framework
    Africa8 months ago

    Consultative Workshop on the development of an Integrated Waste Management Legislative Framework

    An Integrated Waste Management Law, once drawn up, bringing together all the legal provisions on solid and hazardous waste, would work sustainably in the long term.

    PORT LOUIS, Mauritius, February 8, 2022/APO Group/ --

    A consultative workshop on the development of an Integrated Waste Management Legislative Framework opened this morning at the Caudan Arts Centre, in Port-Louis.

    the Minister of the Environment, Solid Waste Management and Climate Change, Mr. Kavydass Ramano; the Resident Representative of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) for Mauritius and Seychelles, Ms. Amanda Serumaga; the Director of the Solid Waste Management Division, Mr. Bhaguthsing Beerachee; and other personalities were present at the ceremony.

    The two-day workshop is organized by the Solid Waste Management Division of the Ministry of Environment, Solid Waste Management and Climate Change in collaboration with UNDP. The workshop brings together more than 60 organizations with the aim of ensuring maximum input from all stakeholders at all stages of drafting the Legislative Framework before a validation workshop is held at the end of March 2022 to finalize the next Law.

    In his speech at the ceremony, the Minister highlighted that the Legislative Framework was being drafted with a view to moving from a linear approach to a circular economy as envisioned by the Government, as the solid waste landscape required major change. He indicated that this change must be translated into an adequate legislative framework to guarantee the effective implementation of the various projects focused on the recovery and recycling of resources.

    Furthermore, Mr. Ramano underlined that an Integrated Waste Management Law, bringing together all legal provisions on solid and hazardous waste once drafted, would work sustainably in the long term to fully address various issues. These include: waste collection and sorting in accordance with the new Solid Waste Management Strategy and Action Plan; prevention and reduction of waste, reuse and recycling closing the cycle; treatment and disposal; waste management facility licenses; technical skills of the operators; and illegal dumping and garbage.

    “This comprehensive legislation,” he emphasized, “must include, among others, provisions to ensure that: waste management strategies and plans are regularly developed, implemented, and monitored through appropriate institutional structures; governance strategies are developed to provide a well-functioning system that allows stakeholders to contribute as users, providers, and enablers are developed; private sector involvement in waste management; and an effective and efficient information system and reporting requirements to ensure that informed decision-making is established.”

    For her part, Ms. Serumaga commended the Government for taking the lead in initiating this important update of the legislative framework for solid waste management in Mauritius and stressed that a legal framework for proper waste management was essential to create appropriate conditions for effective waste management. managing all waste streams and creating market-based opportunities, as well as changing behaviors and supporting sector-specific sustainable practices.

    "UNDP's mandate," the Representative stressed, "includes support for the development of solutions at the national and subnational levels for the sustainable management of natural resources, ecosystem services, chemical and hazardous waste." He added that UNDP had supported the Solid Waste Management Division in several of its initiatives to improve the waste management system on the island and meet its specific obligations under international conventions such as the Stockholm and Minamata Conventions.

    In addition, Ms. Serumaga indicated that the UNDP and Global Environment Facility (GEF)-funded project, 'Implementing Low and Non-Chemical Sustainable Development in SIDS', known as the ISLANDS project , was approved by the GEF in December 2021 and implementation is due to begin in the coming months, where funds of USD 4.5 million will be allocated to support activities in Mauritius aimed at protecting human health and the environment from the effects harmful chemicals and hazardous waste. She highlighted that within the framework of the ISLANDS project, fifteen activities were planned regarding the Solid Waste Management Division.

  •   The natural environment in each of these three small island developing States in Africa is fragile and threatened ACCRA Ghana December 6 2021 APO Group The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO warns that urgent and transformative measures are needed in the six small island developing States SIDS of Africa due to poverty vulnerability to variations in temperature and rainfall and the increased risk of prolonged droughts and floods caused by climate change A new FAO study Transforming Agriculture in Africa s Small Island Developing States Lessons Learned and Options for Investment in Climate Smart Agriculture in Cape Verde Guinea Bissau and Seychelles warns that these threats combined with the dependence on rainfed agriculture could reduce crop yields and countries food consumption if climate smart techniques and practices are not adopted The study conducted by the FAO Regional Office for Africa and the International Crop Research Institute for the Semi arid Tropics Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security Research Program focuses on one country from each income group within African SIDS Cape Verde middle income Guinea Bissau lowest income and Seychelles highest income But the study finds that they all face the same basic problems and need support to build system wide capacity for transformative action at scale to protect the nutrition and food supply of communities Investments Needed as Climate Change Threatens Small Island Developing States There is an urgent need to invest in renewable energy rainwater harvesting cisterns nutrition sensitive and sustainable local food and climate information systems for farmers herders and fishermen said the study co author and Natural Resources Officer of FAO Albert Nikiema African small island developing states already face so many challenges without climate change and need as many weapons in their arsenal as possible to fight it Agriculture must be climate smart or the livelihoods and health of families will suffer The study presented today at a larger FAO event examining climate smart agriculture presents statistics and analysis to form a comprehensive picture of the three selected African Small Island Developing States their location and economic challenges and options most suitable and adaptable available Guinea Bissau has an especially high malnutrition rate of 20 7 percent of its population which is one of the highest of all SIDS in the world It also has the highest number of people living below the poverty line of the three African SIDS with 69 3 percent of the population with Cape Verde with 26 6 percent of people living below the threshold poverty and Seychelles 13 6 percent They all have a limited resource base depend on ocean resources have high food imports and high energy transportation and fuel costs It is a specific and complex picture It is not a problem of his creation The natural environment in each of these three small island developing States in Africa is fragile and threatened said Nora Berrahmouni FAO Senior Forestry Officer High tides floods and storms are a concern for everyone and many people in Seychelles for example remember the storm that washed away 1000 of its endemic palm trees Floods have affected agricultural lands in all three African SIDS in the last decade frightening for the 58 percent of Guinea Bissau s population who make a living from agriculture And it is also important to note that all 58 SIDS in the world combined produce only one percent of carbon dioxide emissions This is not a problem of your making What FAO and its partners are doing Beyond raising awareness and offering science based solutions FAO has helped develop the Global Program of Action GAP on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States and is supporting Small Island Developing States through policy advice analysis and technical assistance An FAO project in the six African Small Island Developing States helps smallholders identify opportunities to access high value market niches through fair trade or organic labeling Hundreds of farmers have been trained in climate smart agriculture and promoting healthy nutrition The three selected African SIDS projects include In Guinea Bissau s Bijag s archipelago of 88 islands and islets FAO is supporting communities to build terrestrial reservoirs for rainwater harvesting and to install solar panels for pumps during the dry season to allow them to grow tomatoes lettuce cabbage and carrots elsewhere lean dry season In Cape Verde FAO has partnered with local NGOs to provide cooking schools to raise awareness of nutritious sustainable and affordable local foods that have not traditionally been integrated into meals In the Seychelles FAO supports efforts to diversify the dominant tourism industry towards agritourism and the cultivation of products locally and sustainably rather than importing large quantities of food products
    FAO urges Small Island Developing States in Africa to Urgently Accelerate the Transition to Climate-smart, Sustainable Agriculture
      The natural environment in each of these three small island developing States in Africa is fragile and threatened ACCRA Ghana December 6 2021 APO Group The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO warns that urgent and transformative measures are needed in the six small island developing States SIDS of Africa due to poverty vulnerability to variations in temperature and rainfall and the increased risk of prolonged droughts and floods caused by climate change A new FAO study Transforming Agriculture in Africa s Small Island Developing States Lessons Learned and Options for Investment in Climate Smart Agriculture in Cape Verde Guinea Bissau and Seychelles warns that these threats combined with the dependence on rainfed agriculture could reduce crop yields and countries food consumption if climate smart techniques and practices are not adopted The study conducted by the FAO Regional Office for Africa and the International Crop Research Institute for the Semi arid Tropics Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security Research Program focuses on one country from each income group within African SIDS Cape Verde middle income Guinea Bissau lowest income and Seychelles highest income But the study finds that they all face the same basic problems and need support to build system wide capacity for transformative action at scale to protect the nutrition and food supply of communities Investments Needed as Climate Change Threatens Small Island Developing States There is an urgent need to invest in renewable energy rainwater harvesting cisterns nutrition sensitive and sustainable local food and climate information systems for farmers herders and fishermen said the study co author and Natural Resources Officer of FAO Albert Nikiema African small island developing states already face so many challenges without climate change and need as many weapons in their arsenal as possible to fight it Agriculture must be climate smart or the livelihoods and health of families will suffer The study presented today at a larger FAO event examining climate smart agriculture presents statistics and analysis to form a comprehensive picture of the three selected African Small Island Developing States their location and economic challenges and options most suitable and adaptable available Guinea Bissau has an especially high malnutrition rate of 20 7 percent of its population which is one of the highest of all SIDS in the world It also has the highest number of people living below the poverty line of the three African SIDS with 69 3 percent of the population with Cape Verde with 26 6 percent of people living below the threshold poverty and Seychelles 13 6 percent They all have a limited resource base depend on ocean resources have high food imports and high energy transportation and fuel costs It is a specific and complex picture It is not a problem of his creation The natural environment in each of these three small island developing States in Africa is fragile and threatened said Nora Berrahmouni FAO Senior Forestry Officer High tides floods and storms are a concern for everyone and many people in Seychelles for example remember the storm that washed away 1000 of its endemic palm trees Floods have affected agricultural lands in all three African SIDS in the last decade frightening for the 58 percent of Guinea Bissau s population who make a living from agriculture And it is also important to note that all 58 SIDS in the world combined produce only one percent of carbon dioxide emissions This is not a problem of your making What FAO and its partners are doing Beyond raising awareness and offering science based solutions FAO has helped develop the Global Program of Action GAP on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States and is supporting Small Island Developing States through policy advice analysis and technical assistance An FAO project in the six African Small Island Developing States helps smallholders identify opportunities to access high value market niches through fair trade or organic labeling Hundreds of farmers have been trained in climate smart agriculture and promoting healthy nutrition The three selected African SIDS projects include In Guinea Bissau s Bijag s archipelago of 88 islands and islets FAO is supporting communities to build terrestrial reservoirs for rainwater harvesting and to install solar panels for pumps during the dry season to allow them to grow tomatoes lettuce cabbage and carrots elsewhere lean dry season In Cape Verde FAO has partnered with local NGOs to provide cooking schools to raise awareness of nutritious sustainable and affordable local foods that have not traditionally been integrated into meals In the Seychelles FAO supports efforts to diversify the dominant tourism industry towards agritourism and the cultivation of products locally and sustainably rather than importing large quantities of food products
    FAO urges Small Island Developing States in Africa to Urgently Accelerate the Transition to Climate-smart, Sustainable Agriculture
    Africa10 months ago

    FAO urges Small Island Developing States in Africa to Urgently Accelerate the Transition to Climate-smart, Sustainable Agriculture

    The natural environment in each of these three small island developing States in Africa is fragile and threatened

    ACCRA, Ghana, December 6, 2021 / APO Group / -

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) warns that urgent and transformative measures are needed in the six small island developing States (SIDS) of Africa due to poverty, vulnerability to variations in temperature and rainfall and the increased risk of prolonged droughts and floods. caused by climate change. A new FAO study, Transforming Agriculture in Africa's Small Island Developing States: Lessons Learned and Options for Investment in Climate-Smart Agriculture in Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau and Seychelles, warns that these threats, combined with the dependence on rainfed agriculture could reduce crop yields and countries' food consumption, if climate-smart techniques and practices are not adopted.

    The study, conducted by the FAO Regional Office for Africa and the International Crop Research Institute for the Semi-arid Tropics / Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security Research Program, focuses on one country from each income group within African SIDS: Cape Verde (middle income), Guinea-Bissau (lowest income) and Seychelles (highest income). But the study finds that they all face the same basic problems and need support to build system-wide capacity for transformative action at scale to protect the nutrition and food supply of communities.

    Investments Needed as Climate Change Threatens Small Island Developing States

    "There is an urgent need to invest in renewable energy, rainwater harvesting cisterns, nutrition-sensitive and sustainable local food, and climate information systems for farmers, herders and fishermen," said the study co-author and Natural Resources Officer of FAO, Albert Nikiema. . “African small island developing states already face so many challenges without climate change and need as many weapons in their arsenal as possible to fight it. Agriculture must be climate-smart, or the livelihoods and health of families will suffer. "

    The study, presented today at a larger FAO event examining climate-smart agriculture, presents statistics and analysis to form a comprehensive picture of the three selected African Small Island Developing States, their location and economic challenges, and options. most suitable and adaptable available. Guinea-Bissau has an especially high malnutrition rate of 20.7 percent of its population, which is one of the highest of all SIDS in the world. It also has the highest number of people living below the poverty line of the three African SIDS with 69.3 percent of the population, with Cape Verde with 26.6 percent of people living below the threshold. poverty and Seychelles 13.6 percent. They all have a limited resource base, depend on ocean resources, have high food imports, and high energy, transportation and fuel costs. It is a specific and complex picture.

    "It is not a problem of his creation"

    "The natural environment in each of these three small island developing States in Africa is fragile and threatened," said Nora Berrahmouni, FAO Senior Forestry Officer. “High tides, floods and storms are a concern for everyone and many people in Seychelles, for example, remember the storm that washed away 1000 of its endemic palm trees. Floods have affected agricultural lands in all three African SIDS in the last decade, frightening for the 58 percent of Guinea-Bissau's population who make a living from agriculture. And it is also important to note that all 58 SIDS in the world combined produce only one percent of carbon dioxide emissions. This is not a problem of your making. "

    What FAO and its partners are doing

    Beyond raising awareness and offering science-based solutions, FAO has helped develop the Global Program of Action (GAP) on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States, and is supporting Small Island Developing States through policy advice, analysis and technical assistance.

    An FAO project in the six African Small Island Developing States helps smallholders identify opportunities to access high-value market niches through fair trade or organic labeling. Hundreds of farmers have been trained in climate-smart agriculture and promoting healthy nutrition.

    The three selected African SIDS projects include:

    In Guinea-Bissau's Bijagós archipelago of 88 islands and islets, FAO is supporting communities to build terrestrial reservoirs for rainwater harvesting and to install solar panels for pumps during the dry season to allow them to grow tomatoes. , lettuce, cabbage and carrots elsewhere. lean dry season.

    In Cape Verde, FAO has partnered with local NGOs to provide cooking schools to raise awareness of nutritious, sustainable and affordable local foods that have not traditionally been integrated into meals.

    In the Seychelles, FAO supports efforts to diversify the dominant tourism industry towards agritourism and the cultivation of products locally and sustainably, rather than importing large quantities of food products.

  •   Africa Climate Talks ACT Is back The second session of the third edition of the Very Intensive Africa Climate Talks ACT Ended on May 18 2021 The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa ECA in partnership with the University of Cabo Verde hosted the elaborate two day calendar that brought together over 120 participants representing key climate voices and actors in Africa The third Africa Climate Talks ACT Is part of a series of ECA s African Climate Policy Center ACPC webinars on Climate Change and Development in Africa African Perspectives on Climate Resilient Recovery in Africa from COVID 19 This edition took place virtually Launched in 2015 the African climate talks serve as a forum for global dialogue on climate change and development This climate meeting serves as a space for dialogue for continental stakeholders to engage in open speeches aimed at catalyzing emerging African perspectives on the most pressing concerns related to climate change and development The focus of the 3rd Africa Climate Negotiations explored the convergence of COVID 19 and climate crises and what this means for vulnerable communities and global governance and climate action during and beyond the pandemic Said Jean Paul Adam director of the Technology Climate Change and Natural Resources Management Division of the Economic Commission for Africa ECA According to Adam the second session of the 3rd ACT innovated in particular for African Small Island Developing States SIDS by questioning ideas for building resilient economies through green and blue economic lanes African island countries have braved the economic downturn as their tourism sectors depressed due to travel restrictions from the pandemic Island states also face threats of ocean acidification and sea level rise The deliberations and resolutions of this very engaging forum contribute to the achievement of Africa s Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs through climate resilient development James Murombedzi who heads the African Center for Climate Policy ACPC noted that the ACT brings together African universities civil society the private sector regional institutions and development partners to stimulate a pan African discourse aimed at contributing to the consolidation of African discourse on how to better respond to climate change in the COVID era 19 and beyond The ACT 2021 congregation The forum takes place against the backdrop of the unprecedented social and economic challenges associated with the crisis of the Covid 19 pandemic According to Murombedzi the centerpiece of ACT discussions focused on the global triple storm of Covid 19 climate change and economic deceleration Solutions offering low carbon and climate resilient economies decent jobs and alternative sustainable development pathways pursuing the objective of the Paris Agreement have been ACT s strengths deliberations There are many similarities between the Covid 19 pandemic and the climate change crisis as well as some important divergences Said Murombedzi Both crises pose an existential threat to Africa and suffer from the consequences of disinformation and infodemics According to Murombedzi the third ACT tried to find out how the lessons and experiences of managing the Covid 19 pandemic can be leveraged to promote a resilient green and blue recovery He also sought to find pathways for Africa s post pandemic climate conscious reconstruction through concerted global partnerships solidarity and a strong multilateral framework This year s ACT is significant as the Atlantic Ocean island nation Cabo Verde will host the first continental climate platform the Ninth Conference on Climate Change and Development in Africa CCDA IX which will be held from August 23 to 27 2021 The organizational framework for the second session of the Third Africa Climate Talks included five focus groups to facilitate the consolidation of key messages The first group looked at what Africa should seek to benefit from COP 26 and how this can be done Africa s voice and action in global climate governance and the geopolitical landscape lessons from Africa s journey through the UNFCCC process for the COVID 19 era and beyond was the main task of the second group The third group reflected on building resilience and innovative ideas for African solutions to Africa s climate and recovery challenges The constitution of climate justice and a just recovery as well as the transition for Africa was the mandate of the fourth group The final group addressed the issue of harnessing the green and blue economy for African SIDS and coastal economies as well as the challenges and opportunities beyond COVID 19 How to achieve and secure the means for a holistic implementation of durable solutions based on the solid foundation of the UNFCCC common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capacities of countries were also the main pillars of discussion at this session of the talks Strengthening Africa s voice and action in global climate governance and the resulting geopolitical landscape in the COVID 19 era and beyond is one of the three expected outcomes of the second session of the third climate negotiations in Africa The second expected outcome is a better understanding of how to harness the links between climate change the COVID 19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis to build a green and resilient future in Africa beyond the pandemic The expected end result is the strengthening of regional strategies and global frameworks for a just transition to resilient economies and the achievement of the goals of the Paris Agreement The act Forum is a series of scholar led spaces for dialogue that aim to stimulate broad discourse informed by new common African positions on relevant issues at the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on climate change governance processes says Murombedzi
    ECA and University of Cabo Verde host Africa climate talks
      Africa Climate Talks ACT Is back The second session of the third edition of the Very Intensive Africa Climate Talks ACT Ended on May 18 2021 The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa ECA in partnership with the University of Cabo Verde hosted the elaborate two day calendar that brought together over 120 participants representing key climate voices and actors in Africa The third Africa Climate Talks ACT Is part of a series of ECA s African Climate Policy Center ACPC webinars on Climate Change and Development in Africa African Perspectives on Climate Resilient Recovery in Africa from COVID 19 This edition took place virtually Launched in 2015 the African climate talks serve as a forum for global dialogue on climate change and development This climate meeting serves as a space for dialogue for continental stakeholders to engage in open speeches aimed at catalyzing emerging African perspectives on the most pressing concerns related to climate change and development The focus of the 3rd Africa Climate Negotiations explored the convergence of COVID 19 and climate crises and what this means for vulnerable communities and global governance and climate action during and beyond the pandemic Said Jean Paul Adam director of the Technology Climate Change and Natural Resources Management Division of the Economic Commission for Africa ECA According to Adam the second session of the 3rd ACT innovated in particular for African Small Island Developing States SIDS by questioning ideas for building resilient economies through green and blue economic lanes African island countries have braved the economic downturn as their tourism sectors depressed due to travel restrictions from the pandemic Island states also face threats of ocean acidification and sea level rise The deliberations and resolutions of this very engaging forum contribute to the achievement of Africa s Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs through climate resilient development James Murombedzi who heads the African Center for Climate Policy ACPC noted that the ACT brings together African universities civil society the private sector regional institutions and development partners to stimulate a pan African discourse aimed at contributing to the consolidation of African discourse on how to better respond to climate change in the COVID era 19 and beyond The ACT 2021 congregation The forum takes place against the backdrop of the unprecedented social and economic challenges associated with the crisis of the Covid 19 pandemic According to Murombedzi the centerpiece of ACT discussions focused on the global triple storm of Covid 19 climate change and economic deceleration Solutions offering low carbon and climate resilient economies decent jobs and alternative sustainable development pathways pursuing the objective of the Paris Agreement have been ACT s strengths deliberations There are many similarities between the Covid 19 pandemic and the climate change crisis as well as some important divergences Said Murombedzi Both crises pose an existential threat to Africa and suffer from the consequences of disinformation and infodemics According to Murombedzi the third ACT tried to find out how the lessons and experiences of managing the Covid 19 pandemic can be leveraged to promote a resilient green and blue recovery He also sought to find pathways for Africa s post pandemic climate conscious reconstruction through concerted global partnerships solidarity and a strong multilateral framework This year s ACT is significant as the Atlantic Ocean island nation Cabo Verde will host the first continental climate platform the Ninth Conference on Climate Change and Development in Africa CCDA IX which will be held from August 23 to 27 2021 The organizational framework for the second session of the Third Africa Climate Talks included five focus groups to facilitate the consolidation of key messages The first group looked at what Africa should seek to benefit from COP 26 and how this can be done Africa s voice and action in global climate governance and the geopolitical landscape lessons from Africa s journey through the UNFCCC process for the COVID 19 era and beyond was the main task of the second group The third group reflected on building resilience and innovative ideas for African solutions to Africa s climate and recovery challenges The constitution of climate justice and a just recovery as well as the transition for Africa was the mandate of the fourth group The final group addressed the issue of harnessing the green and blue economy for African SIDS and coastal economies as well as the challenges and opportunities beyond COVID 19 How to achieve and secure the means for a holistic implementation of durable solutions based on the solid foundation of the UNFCCC common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capacities of countries were also the main pillars of discussion at this session of the talks Strengthening Africa s voice and action in global climate governance and the resulting geopolitical landscape in the COVID 19 era and beyond is one of the three expected outcomes of the second session of the third climate negotiations in Africa The second expected outcome is a better understanding of how to harness the links between climate change the COVID 19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis to build a green and resilient future in Africa beyond the pandemic The expected end result is the strengthening of regional strategies and global frameworks for a just transition to resilient economies and the achievement of the goals of the Paris Agreement The act Forum is a series of scholar led spaces for dialogue that aim to stimulate broad discourse informed by new common African positions on relevant issues at the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on climate change governance processes says Murombedzi
    ECA and University of Cabo Verde host Africa climate talks
    Africa1 year ago

    ECA and University of Cabo Verde host Africa climate talks

    Africa Climate Talks (ACT!) Is back. The second session of the third edition of the Very Intensive Africa Climate Talks (ACT!) Ended on May 18, 2021. The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), in partnership with the University of Cabo Verde, hosted the elaborate two-day calendar that brought together over 120 participants, representing key climate voices and actors in Africa.

    The third Africa Climate Talks (ACT!) Is part of a series of ECA's African Climate Policy Center (ACPC) webinars on “Climate Change and Development in Africa: African Perspectives on Climate Resilient Recovery in Africa. from COVID-19 ”. This edition took place virtually.

    Launched in 2015, the African climate talks serve as a forum for global dialogue on climate change and development. This climate meeting serves as a space for dialogue for continental stakeholders to engage in open speeches aimed at catalyzing emerging African perspectives on the most pressing concerns related to climate change and development.

    “The focus of the 3rd Africa Climate Negotiations explored the convergence of COVID-19 and climate crises and what this means for vulnerable communities and global governance and climate action during and beyond the pandemic . Said Jean-Paul Adam, director of the Technology, Climate Change and Natural Resources Management Division of the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA).

    According to Adam, the second session of the 3rd ACT! innovated in particular for African Small Island Developing States (SIDS) by questioning ideas for building resilient economies through green and blue economic lanes. African island countries have braved the economic downturn as their tourism sectors depressed due to travel restrictions from the pandemic. Island states also face threats of ocean acidification and sea level rise.

    The deliberations and resolutions of this very engaging forum contribute to the achievement of Africa's Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through climate resilient development.

    James Murombedzi, who heads the African Center for Climate Policy (ACPC), noted that the ACT! brings together African universities, civil society, the private sector, regional institutions and development partners to stimulate a pan-African discourse aimed at contributing to the consolidation of African discourse on how to better respond to climate change in the COVID era -19 and beyond.

    The ACT 2021 congregation! The forum takes place against the backdrop of the unprecedented social and economic challenges associated with the crisis of the Covid-19 pandemic. According to Murombedzi, the centerpiece of ACT! discussions focused on the global triple storm of Covid-19, climate change and economic deceleration. Solutions offering low-carbon and climate-resilient economies, decent jobs and alternative sustainable development pathways pursuing the objective of the Paris Agreement have been ACT's strengths! deliberations.

    "There are many similarities between the Covid-19 pandemic and the climate change crisis, as well as some important divergences." Said Murombedzi. “Both crises pose an existential threat to Africa and suffer from the consequences of disinformation and 'infodemics'.

    According to Murombedzi, the third ACT! tried to find out how the lessons and experiences of managing the Covid-19 pandemic can be leveraged to promote a resilient green and blue recovery. He also sought to find pathways for Africa's post-pandemic climate-conscious reconstruction through concerted global partnerships, solidarity and a strong multilateral framework.

    This year's ACT is significant as the Atlantic Ocean island nation Cabo Verde will host the first continental climate platform, the Ninth Conference on Climate Change and Development in Africa (CCDA-IX) which will be held from August 23 to 27, 2021.

    The organizational framework for the second session of the Third Africa Climate Talks included five focus groups to facilitate the consolidation of key messages. The first group looked at what Africa should seek to benefit from COP 26, and how this can be done. Africa's voice and action in global climate governance and the geopolitical landscape - lessons from Africa's journey through the UNFCCC process for the COVID-19 era and beyond was the main task of the second group. The third group reflected on building resilience and innovative ideas for African solutions to Africa's climate and recovery challenges. The constitution of climate justice and a just recovery as well as the transition for Africa was the mandate of the fourth group. The final group addressed the issue of harnessing the green and blue economy for African SIDS and coastal economies as well as the challenges and opportunities beyond COVID-19.

    How to achieve and secure the means for a holistic implementation of durable solutions, based on the solid foundation of the UNFCCC, common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capacities of countries were also the main pillars of discussion at this session of the talks. .

    Strengthening Africa's voice and action in global climate governance and the resulting geopolitical landscape in the COVID-19 era and beyond is one of the three expected outcomes of the second session of the third climate negotiations in Africa. The second expected outcome is a better understanding of how to harness the links between climate change, the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis to build a green and resilient future in Africa beyond the pandemic. The expected end result is the strengthening of regional strategies and global frameworks for a just transition to resilient economies and the achievement of the goals of the Paris Agreement.

    "The act! Forum is a series of scholar-led spaces for dialogue that aim to stimulate broad discourse informed by new common African positions on relevant issues at the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on climate change governance processes, says Murombedzi.