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  •  The latest damning findings from a four year investigation into state corruption in South Africa under former leader Jacob Zuma released on Wednesday suggested President Ramaphosa may have acted against some of the allegations against his predecessor Upon receiving the report Ramaphosa then a Zuma MP described the corruption as an assault on our democracy The hellip
    South Africa’s Ramaphosa should have acted against graft under Zuma
     The latest damning findings from a four year investigation into state corruption in South Africa under former leader Jacob Zuma released on Wednesday suggested President Ramaphosa may have acted against some of the allegations against his predecessor Upon receiving the report Ramaphosa then a Zuma MP described the corruption as an assault on our democracy The hellip
    South Africa’s Ramaphosa should have acted against graft under Zuma
    Foreign2 weeks ago

    South Africa’s Ramaphosa should have acted against graft under Zuma

    The latest damning findings from a four-year investigation into state corruption in South Africa under former leader Jacob Zuma, released on Wednesday, suggested President Ramaphosa may have acted against some of the allegations against his predecessor.

    Upon receiving the report, Ramaphosa, then a Zuma MP, described the corruption as an “assault on our democracy”.

    The report was delivered to Ramaphosa at his Pretoria offices by the head of the investigative panel and Chief Justice Raymond Zondo.

    The looting and mismanagement of South Africa's state-owned companies during Zuma's nine years in office, when Ramaphosa was his deputy, has been called “state capture”.

    In all, it took an investigative panel more than 400 days to collect the testimonies of some 300 witnesses, including Ramaphosa.

    Ramaphosa's answers to some questions about what he knew about the corrupt activities were "opaque" and "unfortunately leave some important gaps," according to the report.

    And whether it could have acted to curb bribery, "the mass of evidence before this commission suggests the answer is yes," he said.

    “Surely there was enough credible information in the public domain… at least to prompt him to investigate and perhaps act on a series of serious allegations.

    “As vice president, surely he had a responsibility to do it.”

    Ramaphosa did not immediately respond to the content of the report, but said it "provides us with an opportunity to decisively break from the era of state capture."

    "The capture of the state was really an assault on our democracy, it violated the rights of every man, woman and child in this country."

    The investigation was triggered by a 2016 report by the then anti-corruption ombudsman.

    More than 1,430 people and institutions, including Zuma, were implicated. Zuma has previously denied any wrongdoing.

    Ramaphosa now has four months to act on the panel's recommendations.

    The first volume of the report was published in January and the entire document is now over 5,600 pages long.

    The report described Zuma as a "critical player" in the high-level looting of state-owned companies that dogged his nine-year term, which ended unceremoniously in 2018 when he was forced to resign.

    Zuma was slapped with a 15-month jail sentence last year for refusing to testify before investigators.

    He was granted parole just two months after his imprisonment, but not before his imprisonment sparked riots last July that left more than 350 dead.

    "Looting scheme" The panel said that "Zuma fled from the commission because he knew there were questions" that he would not answer, as he singled out his ally and former chairwoman of the struggling national airline South African Airlines (SAA) for running down the airline.

    Investigations revealed how Zuma's friends, the wealthy Indian-born Gupta brothers, became involved at the highest levels of government and the ruling African National Congress, including influencing ministerial appointments under Zuma.

    Two of the three Gupta tycoons were arrested in Dubai earlier this month and face extradition to South Africa to stand trial.

    "The natural conclusion is that during this period... the ANC under President Zuma allowed, supported and enabled corruption and state capture," the report says.

    Taking office after Zuma was forced to resign over corruption, Ramaphosa took office stating that fighting corruption was a priority of his administration.

    Ramaphosa in 2019 estimated that corruption could have cost South Africa around 500 billion rand ($31.4 billion), then an amount equivalent to about a tenth of the GDP of Africa's most industrialized economy.

    The release of the final report comes as Ramaphosa is embroiled in a scandal following a robbery at his luxury cattle and game farm two years ago.

    A former spy chief, Arthur Fraser, accused him of corruption, alleging that he hid millions of dollars in cash inside sofas and bribed thieves to avoid scrutiny for having large sums of cash at home.

    The scandal risks derailing Ramaphosa's bid for a second term as ANC chairman before the 2024 general election. He says he is the victim of "dirty tricks" and "bullying" by those who oppose his fight against the corruption.

  •  South African President Cyril Ramaphosa received the latest in a series of damning reports from a four year investigation into state corruption during the presidency of his predecessor Jacob Zuma on Wednesday The report was delivered to Ramaphosa at his Union Buildings offices in Pretoria by the head of the investigative panel and Chief Justice Raymond hellip
    Final report into graft under South Africa’s Zuma released
     South African President Cyril Ramaphosa received the latest in a series of damning reports from a four year investigation into state corruption during the presidency of his predecessor Jacob Zuma on Wednesday The report was delivered to Ramaphosa at his Union Buildings offices in Pretoria by the head of the investigative panel and Chief Justice Raymond hellip
    Final report into graft under South Africa’s Zuma released
    Foreign2 weeks ago

    Final report into graft under South Africa’s Zuma released

    South African President Cyril Ramaphosa received the latest in a series of damning reports from a four-year investigation into state corruption during the presidency of his predecessor, Jacob Zuma, on Wednesday.

    The report was delivered to Ramaphosa at his Union Buildings offices in Pretoria by the head of the investigative panel and Chief Justice Raymond Zondo in a televised ceremony.

    The looting and mismanagement of South Africa's state-owned companies during Zuma's nine years in office has been called “state capture”.

    “This report provides us with an opportunity to make a decisive break from the era of state capture,” Ramaphosa said.

    He said that "the capture of the state was really an assault on our democracy, it violated the rights of every man, woman and child in this country."

    The state bribery investigation was triggered by a 2016 report by the country's anti-corruption ombudsman, Thuli Madonsela, who at the time had recommended that the investigation be completed within six months.

    But as more information was unearthed, legal investigations stretched into four years of testimony gathering.

    In all, it took more than 400 days to collect evidence from some 300 witnesses, including Ramaphosa.

    More than 1,430 people and institutions, including Zuma, were implicated.

    Ramaphosa now has four months to act on the panel's recommendations.

    The first volume of the report was published in January and the entire document is now over 5,600 pages long.

    One of the earlier reports published in April described Zuma as a "critical player" in the high-level looting of state-owned companies that dogged his nine-year term, which ended unceremoniously in 2018 when he was forced to resign.

    Zuma was slapped with a 15-month jail sentence last year for refusing to testify before investigators.

    He was granted parole just two months after his imprisonment, but not before his imprisonment sparked riots last July that left more than 350 dead.

    Investigations revealed how Zuma's friends, the wealthy Indian-born Gupta brothers, became involved at the highest levels of government and the ruling African National Congress, including influencing ministerial appointments under Zuma.

    Two of the three Gupta tycoons were arrested in Dubai earlier this month and face extradition to South Africa to stand trial.

  •  The latest damning report on Jacob Zuma s presidency released on Friday assigns him a critical role in a private bid to take over South African utility Eskom A special investigation presented a fourth volume of the huge report with President Cyril Ramaphosa detailing Zuma s key role in corruption through the amalgamation of state party and hellip
    South Africa’s Zuma ‘critical’ to state capture scams
     The latest damning report on Jacob Zuma s presidency released on Friday assigns him a critical role in a private bid to take over South African utility Eskom A special investigation presented a fourth volume of the huge report with President Cyril Ramaphosa detailing Zuma s key role in corruption through the amalgamation of state party and hellip
    South Africa’s Zuma ‘critical’ to state capture scams
    Foreign2 months ago

    South Africa’s Zuma ‘critical’ to state capture scams

    The latest damning report on Jacob Zuma's presidency, released on Friday, assigns him a "critical" role in a private bid to take over South African utility Eskom.

    A special investigation presented a fourth volume of the huge report with President Cyril Ramaphosa, detailing Zuma's key role in corruption through the amalgamation of state, party and private business.

    The report follows four years of investigations led by current Chief Justice Raymond Zondo, which revealed how the wealthy Indian-born Gupta brothers became involved at the highest levels of government and the ruling Congress. African National (ANC).

    "Chairman Zuma's interference in the affairs of the board marked the beginning of the implementation of the Guptas' plan to capture Eskom," the report says.

    "And President Zuma was a key player in that plan," he added.

    "The evidence proves a plan by the Guptas to capture Eskom, install selected Guptas officials in strategic positions... and then divert Eskom assets for the financial benefit of the Guptas," according to the report.

    “The state capture and its agents have caused immense damage to Eskom over many years,” the company said in a statement on Friday, listing the civil actions it has launched to recover some of the billions of South African rand it lost in the scheme.

    Zondo recommended that law enforcement agencies investigate further "with a view to possible criminal prosecution of the parties involved...for their involvement in facilitating fraud, corruption and financial misconduct against Eskom and the State."

    The report also criticizes $10 million worth of asbestos removal contracts and social housing fraud in the Free State province when it was run by ANC chairman Ace Magashule, a Zuma ally, who was indicted over the affair and suspended for the match.

    “A resounding failure, a debacle!” the report said.

    “Either no houses had been built for poor people… or so few houses had been built compared to what was supposed to have been built that they are not worth mentioning.”

    Zuma, 80, is on medical parole after being given a 15-month prison sentence for contempt after refusing to testify before the commission investigating financial sleaze under his presidency.

    His imprisonment sparked riots last July that left more than 350 dead.

    A fifth and final volume of the report is expected on June 15.

  •  The third and final part of the report must be presented to the president before February 28 2022 PRETORIA South Africa January 31 2022 APO Group Tomorrow Tuesday February 1 2022 the Presidency will formally receive the second part of the report of the Judicial Commission for the Investigation of Complaints of State Capture Corruption hellip
    Advisory on handover of Part 2 of State Capture Commission report to The Presidency
     The third and final part of the report must be presented to the president before February 28 2022 PRETORIA South Africa January 31 2022 APO Group Tomorrow Tuesday February 1 2022 the Presidency will formally receive the second part of the report of the Judicial Commission for the Investigation of Complaints of State Capture Corruption hellip
    Advisory on handover of Part 2 of State Capture Commission report to The Presidency
    Africa5 months ago

    Advisory on handover of Part 2 of State Capture Commission report to The Presidency

    The third and final part of the report must be presented to the president before February 28, 2022.

    PRETORIA, South Africa, January 31, 2022/APO Group/ --

    Tomorrow, Tuesday, February 1, 2022, the Presidency will formally receive the second part of the report of the Judicial Commission for the Investigation of Complaints of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector.

    The Presidency will publish this part of the report shortly after the Secretary of the Commission, Prof. Itumeleng Mosala, presents it to the Director General of the Presidency, Ms. Phindile Baleni.

    The Acting Chief Justice of the Supreme Court and Chairman of the Commission, Justice Raymond Zondo, presented the first part of the report to President Cyril Ramaphosa at the Union Buildings, Pretoria, on January 4, 2022. The third and final part of the report will be presented to the president before January 28. February 2022.

    As required by a Gauteng High Court judgment of December 28, 2021, and in line with the corrective action contained in the Public Protector's report of October 2016, the President will submit the Commission's full report to Parliament before June 30, 2022 with an indication of its intentions with respect to the implementation of the recommendations of the Commission.

  •  South African President Cyril Ramaphosa on Monday reprimanded a senior minister after she attacked the constitution saying judges were mental colonized in a scathing attack that has fueled speculation of new rivalries within the ruling party Tourism Minister Lindiwe Sisulu daughter of revered anti apartheid activists Walter and Albertina Sisulu launched her extraordinary attack on hellip
    Ramaphosa fires warning shot after minister slams judges
     South African President Cyril Ramaphosa on Monday reprimanded a senior minister after she attacked the constitution saying judges were mental colonized in a scathing attack that has fueled speculation of new rivalries within the ruling party Tourism Minister Lindiwe Sisulu daughter of revered anti apartheid activists Walter and Albertina Sisulu launched her extraordinary attack on hellip
    Ramaphosa fires warning shot after minister slams judges
    Foreign6 months ago

    Ramaphosa fires warning shot after minister slams judges

    South African President Cyril Ramaphosa on Monday reprimanded a senior minister after she attacked the constitution, saying judges were "mental colonized" in a scathing attack that has fueled speculation of new rivalries within the ruling party. .

    Tourism Minister Lindiwe Sisulu, daughter of revered anti-apartheid activists Walter and Albertina Sisulu, launched her extraordinary attack on both the judiciary and the constitution in op-eds on the Independent Online (IOL) news site in the last days.

    The 67-year-old veteran minister mocked unidentified senior judges as "mentally colonized Africans" who are "all too happy to lick the saliva off those who falsely claim superiority."

    He also attacked South Africa's innovative post-apartheid constitution, saying it had failed to improve the lives of the majority of black South Africans who still live in poverty.

    His comments, which sparked a heated debate, fueled speculation that Sisulu plans to run for leadership of the ruling African National Congress at a party conference in December.

    Ramaphosa responded to what he called "attacks on the independence and integrity of our judiciary" in his weekly bulletin on Monday.

    “We must safeguard ourselves against any and all efforts to diminish our hard-won democracy,” he wrote.

    Without directly referring to Sisulu's article, he also emphasized the "need to protect our constitution, our democratic state and the electoral process from anyone who wants to weaken our democracy."

    The party of the late anti-apartheid icon Nelson Mandela is scheduled to hold leadership elections in December.

    Ramaphosa is widely expected to seek a second five-year term, but he could face a challenge from a faction of the party loyal to former President Jacob Zuma, who is accused of corruption.

    Sisulu, the daughter of Mandela's former comrade-in-arms Walter Sisulu, has served as a lawmaker since the advent of democracy in 1994 and has been a cabinet minister for more than 15 years.

    In his article on IOL, he suggested that some members of the judiciary were judging black South Africans more harshly.

    “At the highest levels of our judicial system are these mentally colonized Africans, who have settled with the worldview and mindset of those who have dispossessed their ancestors,” he wrote.

    “The lack of confidence that permeates their rulings against their own speaks very loudly, while others, safe in their agenda, applaud behind closed doors.”

    He was also scathing about South Africa's much-lauded 1996 constitution, calling it a mere "palliative" for victims of apartheid facing "a sea of ​​African poverty."

    In a follow-up op-ed on IOL on Sunday, he went further, saying the constitution "too often served the few, the powerful and the well-connected" and was "not Holy Scripture."

    His comments about the judiciary drew criticism from Acting Chief Justice Raymond Zondo.

    "This is not a criticism, this is an insult to ... all African judges who serve this country with distinction, with determination to uphold the constitution," Zondo said at a news conference last week.

    Source Credit: TheGuardian