Connect with us

NDP

  •  The Director General Infrastructural Concession Regulatory Commission ICRC Mr Michael Ohiani says Nigeria is yet to upscale its infrastructure stock to the level that will drive the economy as expected Ohiani said this while delivering a Keynote Address virtually at the 2022 WorldStage Economic Summit WES with the theme Nigeria s Economy Bridging the Infrastructural Gap on hellip
    Nigeria yet to upscale infrastructure stock- ICRC boss
     The Director General Infrastructural Concession Regulatory Commission ICRC Mr Michael Ohiani says Nigeria is yet to upscale its infrastructure stock to the level that will drive the economy as expected Ohiani said this while delivering a Keynote Address virtually at the 2022 WorldStage Economic Summit WES with the theme Nigeria s Economy Bridging the Infrastructural Gap on hellip
    Nigeria yet to upscale infrastructure stock- ICRC boss
    Economy2 weeks ago

    Nigeria yet to upscale infrastructure stock- ICRC boss

    The Director-General, Infrastructural Concession Regulatory Commission (ICRC), Mr Michael Ohiani says  Nigeria is yet to upscale its infrastructure stock to the level that will drive the economy as expected.Ohiani said this while delivering a Keynote Address virtually at the 2022 WorldStage Economic Summit(WES) with the theme : ‘Nigeria’s Economy: Bridging the Infrastructural Gap” on Wednesday in Lagos.According to him, while the major problem facing the economy is the lack of adequate infrastructure, the government alone cannot afford to provide the funding necessary to achieve the infrastructure up to the level needed.Ohiani said the desired level would stimulate the much needed economic growth.“It is a known fact that infrastructure drives economic growth and development of any nation.“Our nation has over the years, produced several development plans, but unfortunately, we have not yet upscaled our infrastructure stock to the level which will drive the economy as expected,” he said.According to him, the Federal Government is totally committed to the development of infrastructure through Public Private Partnerships (PPP).Ohiani said this is evidenced by President Muhammadu Buhari’s continuous commitment, as provided in the 2021-2025 National Development plan (NDP) which seeks to encourage more private sector participation in National infrastructure development.He said: “The NDP has a projected N348.1 trillion, with the entire government of the federation programmed to provide about N49 trillion.“The remaining amount is programmed to be provided by the private sector.“This has been the trending truth over the years, that the revenue to our government cannot meet the needed infrastructure quantum and speed.”The acting director-general noted that the ICRC Act of 2005 came into existence to enable private sector participation in the development and operation of critical infrastructure, which was hitherto the obligation of the government to provide.Ohiani emphasised that the country needed to have more investments and innovative ideas on infrastructure development using already proven and trusted techniques from around the world.Ohiani also said that there was need for more commitment from the private sector towards the actualisation of those goals.He said that in the past 14 years, ICRC has gotten Federal Executive Council approval for more than 50 projects, amounting to more than N3 trillion in private sector funds and currently providing regulatory guidance on more than 200 projects.“As part of the ICRC mandate, we gazette and publish a list of PPP eligible projects annually, so that prospective investors will know when and what to invest in.“As at May 2022, there are 77 post-contract PPP projects under implementation at the ICRC Projects Disclosure Portal (www.ppp.icrc.gov.ng or www.icrc.gov.ng).“The portal is the first disclosure portal in the world, established in collaboration with the world bank.“As at May 2022, there are 197 pre-contract projects at Development and Procurement phases at the ICRC Website a between 2010 and 2021.“Also, under the regulatory guidance of the ICRC, the Nigerian government has approved PPP projects worth more than 8 billion dollars.“As at May 2022, the ICRC has issued 128 Outline Business Case Compliance Certificates, which show their bankability.“In the same period, the ICRC has issued 50 Full Business Case Compliance Certificates to date,” he said.According to him, the continuing success of PPP’s around the world and even in Africa shows us that government can share in the responsibility of providing infrastructure given the right guidelines, and within the regulatory framework provided by the ICRC establishment Act 2005.The acting director-general noted that government had laid the foundation in the ICRC act, saying, “It is now time for the private sector to take advantage of this huge opportunity to invest and develop critical infrastructure through private finance initiatives”.He said ICRC is opened to investors and could be reached for advice and guidance in the development of PPP projects.Ohiani  commended WorldStage for organising such forum to brainstorm on the challenges causing infrastructural gap in the country and contributing in proferring solutions to it.In his welcome address, Mr Segun Adeleye, Executive Officer (CEO), WorldStage said that the country is currently facing huge infrastructural gap that has hindered the desire to exploit its rich natural and human resources to stimulate development.Adeleye stated that Nigeria was ranked number 116 competitive nation in the world out of 140 countries in the 2019 edition of the Global Competitiveness Report published by the World Economic Forum, largely due to the poor state of its infrastructure.He noted that the money needed to attain the level of infrastructure desired will not come from the Federal budget ; hence, the approval for the creation of the Infrastructure Concession Regulatory Commission (ICRC) in 2021 by President Muhammadu Buhari.The CEO said that the country is  availed with huge potential in the PPP option by ICRC to address infrastructure deficit.A panel discussion led by Mr Dare Mayowa, Publisher, Global Financial Digest resolved that Nigerians must recruit the right leaders that will make various  institutions work effectively and efficiently ; hence fill the infrastructural gap.Other discussants at the panel were Mr Soji Adeleye, CEO Alfecity Institution, Mrs Maureen Chigbo, Publisher, Realnews Managazine, Dr Joy Ogaji, CEO, Association of Power Generation Companies, Nigeria. (

    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  By Abujah Racheal Since independence in 1960 Nigeria has introduced a series of development plans as part of effort to move the country towards the path of growth and development The national development is the country s action plan for national development as approved by the Federal Executive Council FEC The latest one the National Development hellip
    Improving women economic empowerment to boost national development, By Abujah Racheal
     By Abujah Racheal Since independence in 1960 Nigeria has introduced a series of development plans as part of effort to move the country towards the path of growth and development The national development is the country s action plan for national development as approved by the Federal Executive Council FEC The latest one the National Development hellip
    Improving women economic empowerment to boost national development, By Abujah Racheal
    Features2 months ago

    Improving women economic empowerment to boost national development, By Abujah Racheal

    By Abujah RachealSince independence in 1960, Nigeria has introduced a series of development plans as part of effort to move the country towards the path of growth and development.The national development is the country’s action plan for national development, as approved by the Federal Executive Council (FEC). The latest one, the National Development Plan 2021 to 2025, was approved  on November 10, 2021.The plan was expected to succeed the “Economic Recovery and Growth Plan (ERGP) 2017-2020, and the Economic Sustainability Plan 2020” that elapsed in the year 2021.The new development plan is aimed at building a vast infrastructure development, promoting macroeconomic stability and improvement living conditions.Given the importance of Women’s Economic Empowerment (WEE) to the national socio-economic and political development, this report is an analysis of the new plan with the following objectives: To determine whether or not the new plan prioritises WEE; ascertain whether WEE is seen as a strategy for achieving the goals of the plan, identify the similarities and differences between the new plan and the previous development plans and identify the policy issues in the new plan.WEE is increasingly at the centre of international development policy not just as a means to an end, but as an end in itself.To reach several development objectives, such as those set out in the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals, empowering women is seen as key to reducing poverty and improving the health and wellbeing of future generations. Women make up one half of the human population, yet they suffer gross inequalities.Gender gaps in income and human capital persist despite rapid improvement in global living standards and educational attainment, and women continue to dis-proportionately bear the burden of unpaid care work and be subject to gender-based discrimination and violence.According to experts, Nigeria’s fundamental issues in the sub-national WEE Budgets 2018-2021 arePoor Prioritization of WEE: Between 2018 and 2021, some states allocated up to 1 per cent of their capital budgets to WEE-focused programmes. Although there are WEE-related programmes that are lump sum in many some other states’ empowerment projects across the Ministries, Departments & Agencies (MDAs).For the lack of WEE Project coordination: Several States are implementing WEE and there are no known efforts available in such states to coordinate these WEE programmes. While the Federal Ministry of Agriculture is implementing its WEE budget, the Ministries of Enterprises, Finance, Women Affairs, and others are also implementing theirs. This is prone to corruption and the same set of people are capable of benefiting at all times, leaving a large number of others without access.In June and September 2020, the three planning committees namely; Technical Working Group (TWG), Central Working Group (CWG), and National Steering Committee (NSC) were set up to prepare the Medium-Term National Development Plan (MTNDP), 2021 2025, MTNDP 2026-2030 and Agenda 2050.One year after their inauguration, the draft of the long-awaited development plan was approved.The new National Development Plan is aimed at generating 21 million full-time jobs and lifting 35 million people out of poverty by 2025. It is part of the Federal Government’s effort to lift about 100 million Nigerians out of poverty in 10 years.The plan has the following broad strategic objectives: To establish a strong foundation for a diversified economy, with robust MSME growth, and a more-resilient business environment, to invest in critical physical, financial, digital, and innovation infrastructure; to build a solid framework and enhance capacities to strengthen security and ensure good governance, and enable a vibrant, educated, and healthy population.To achieve these objectives, an investment of about N348.1 trillion from both the public and private sectors is estimated between 202 and 2025.While 14 per cent (N49.7 trillion) of the fund will be sourced from the government capital budgetary allocation, 86 per cent (N298.3 trillion) will be sourced from private investors.Expectedly, 59.5 per cent of the N49.7 trillion from the public sector will be contributed by the Federal Government, 27.2 per cent (N13.4 trillion) by the State Governments, and 13.6 per cent (N6.8 trillion) by the Local Governments.The Development Research and Project Centre (DRPC) has suggested that the  Federal Government, as a matter of urgency, should come up with indicators and set interim targets for various WEE promises in the National Development Plan 2021-2025.That the Federal Government of Nigeria should link resources to promises, stating clearly, that the funding commitment of each of the tiers of the government as well as the private sector is to invest in WEE-specific projects annually over a period of five years.The DRPC said that this should also apply to subsequent plans such as the Medium-Term National Development Plan 2026-2030 and Agenda 2050.On the issue of the lack of attention paid to women in some critical sectors such as mining, solid minerals, and creative sector, the MDAs need to ensure that projects and programmes to be designed address the challenges of women working in this sector. This also applies to women in other sectors such as science trade and industry.It said that the government should ensure the production of gender audit of the plan implementation annually, and should always upload the National Development Plan progress implementation report online to guarantee unfettered access to information on the plan implementation in a simplified user-friendly manner, including the availability of a comprehensive report of the plan.It said that there was the need for transparency, accountability, and prudent management of all resources accruing to the plan from all sources and the need for continuous capacity development (training and retraining) of MDAs on gender audit.The state government should avoid the sabotage of the LGAs funding and allow them to carry out their functions as prescribed in the 1999 constitution.According to the DRPC, this is to enable the LGAs implement programmes and projects on WEE at the local level in line with the national development plan 2021-2025.It said that the Civil Society Organisation (CSOs) should conduct high-level advocacy for the WEE implementing MDAs, and endeavour to engage the National Assembly on the amount to be dedicated to the WEE in both their annual ZIP.It advised that CSOs to create awareness on the full implementation of the NDP 2021-2025 and also monitor implementation and simplify the document for effective understanding by the average Nigerian woman.The Minister of Finance, Budget, and National Planning, Mrs. Zainab Ahmed, has also called for the socio-economic empowerment of Nigerian women and girls to achieve the desired strong economic growth in the country.Ahmed said, “the economic and social empowerment of women and girls is critical to our collective vision of a prosperous and resilient Nigeria.“It is therefore imperative that we prioritise the advancement of women in all spheres of society, and specifically in areas relating to their socio-economic empowerment.“If we are to have a stronger and more inclusive economy, it is crucial that we take a long-term and strategic approach to ensuring that women are economically empowered.“Global research shows that, despite their contributions, many women remain economically disempowered. Women are especially vulnerable to poverty and are more likely to be affected by poor service delivery and instabilities.'”She called for the development and implementation of policies, regulatory frameworks, and programmes that are inclusive and gender-sensitive.“And we must remove the socio-economic and cultural barriers that prevent women from participating fully in society and from reaping the economic benefits of their participation.“This is especially important given the evidence that gender-neutral policies are often applied in ways that exclude and disenfranchise women stakeholders and other vulnerable communities,” she said.According to the minister, the economic empowerment of women and girls “is a necessary driver for our country’s development”.She said that her team adopted Gender Responsive Budgeting in the preparation of the recently approved 2022 Budget.“The step was taken, following months of stakeholder-consultations, with support from the International Monetary Fund.She added that the Budget Office would be working with MDAs on the implementation of the gender budgeting provisions, with an initial focus on those sectors that have been considered critical to human capital development, including health, education, and humanitarian affairs.She called for partnership among the various levels of government, CSOs and the private sector, urging all stakeholders to show greater interest in the empowerment of women in the country.“By economically empowering women and ensuring their full participation in society, particularly in leadership and decision-making roles, we can ensure improved economic development outcomes for all,” she said.According to Mrs Mercy Adeojo, founder of Women Strengthening Women in Nigeria, an official Community Interest not-for-profit organisation dedicated to Women across the nation, giving women greater economic empowerment means enabling them to increase their right to economic resources and their control over meaningful decisions that benefit themselves, their households, and their communities.Adeojo said that these include the right to control their own time, their income, and access to participation in existing markets equally, as greater empowerment would improve their well-being and economic status.She said empowering more women to work, results in better growth of third-world economies, because women’s economic empowerment increases economic diversification, and boosts productivity and income equality, resulting in other positive development outcomes.According to her, as a study from the IMF shows, “policies that improve access to educational opportunities and finance for women can contribute to a reduction in inequality and an increase in economic growth for the developing country.She said that providing women and girls with more educational opportunities contributes to reductions in fertility rates and increase in labour force participation rates, and better quality of human capital of the future economy and generations.(NAN)

  •  The Federation s Statistician General Mr Simon Harry says processes are underway to reshuffle the nation s Consumer Price Index CPI which measures the 2022 rate of inflation He made the revelation Thursday in Akwanga Nassarawa state while briefing reporters on the sidelines of a two day retreat for the board and management of the National Bureau of hellip
    Statistician-General confirms date for rebasing of CPI, GDP
     The Federation s Statistician General Mr Simon Harry says processes are underway to reshuffle the nation s Consumer Price Index CPI which measures the 2022 rate of inflation He made the revelation Thursday in Akwanga Nassarawa state while briefing reporters on the sidelines of a two day retreat for the board and management of the National Bureau of hellip
    Statistician-General confirms date for rebasing of CPI, GDP
    General news4 months ago

    Statistician-General confirms date for rebasing of CPI, GDP

    The Federation's Statistician General, Mr Simon Harry, says processes are underway to reshuffle the nation's Consumer Price Index (CPI), which measures the 2022 rate of inflation.

    He made the revelation Thursday in Akwanga, Nassarawa state, while briefing reporters on the sidelines of a two-day retreat for the board and management of the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS). Harry also said that the statistical processes were already underway for the Gross Domestic Product overshoot in 2023. “Certainly there are processes involved for both macroeconomic indicators and without us achieving those processes, there is no way the overshoot can be fully done. . "For the GDP that measures the performance of the economy, there are certain statistical activities that will have to be carried out." He said that the National Business Sample Census (NBSC) had been conducted which would determine the structure and dynamics of business in Nigeria. According to him, the process for the National Agricultural Sample Census (NASC), which determines the state of growth of the agricultural sector, one of the main sectors that drive GDP, has begun. “We are currently carrying out the pilot, the main field work will start in April, so it is a very important activity. “The other major statistical activity that we will be doing is the Nigerian Living Standards Survey (NLSS) because we want the base year to be very current, so we don't want to use the 2018-2019 NLSS. “So, this year, we are conducting a new NLSS and preparations have already started, so in July we will go to the field hoping that the result will be this year. “So until all these activities are completed, one for the CPI as we need the NLSS so that we can form a strong benchmark for the rebalancing, the same for the GDP as well. “We are looking towards the end of the year for the CPI, but for the GDP, we are looking mainly at 2023 to completely rethink it when all these activities have been fully completed and the results have been released.” At the retreat, Harry said it was basically to resolve modalities. for better work efficiency. The Nigerian News Agency reports that r GDP base implies replacing the previous base year used to compile GDP with a new, more recent base year for calculating constant price estimates. Harry also said that the NBS had presented a four-year corporate strategy from 2022 to 2025 that aligns with the National Development Plan (PND). According to him, the strategy is structured in seven priority areas of institutional and organizational development, infrastructure and human resource management. Others are data production, which is the central mandate of the office, defense statistics, information technology and data dissemination. “So the belief is that if all these priority areas are well implemented and meticulously organized, we will certainly be able to take not only the office but the entire statistical system in Nigeria to a higher height. and that is our goal.” The president of the Nigerian Statistical Association (NSA), Mr. Godday Ebuh, said that the place of statistics in NDP cannot be overstated. that effective service delivery depended on efficient, effective and reliable statistics. He said that first and foremost, statistics was about organization, collection and planning, all for effective decision making. “Now, if it is about national development, the key indexes or the key indicators have to do with statistics. "So what are we planning, what are we going to accomplish, so it's trash in, trash out." ”He also said that everyone must be ready to achieve the objectives set out in the plan and promised the association's support in that regard. NBS Governing Board Chairman Kabiru Nakaura said that in order to achieve the NDP in the next five years, emphasis should be placed on the collection and dissemination of data and statistics, as that is the only way to achieve results. According to him, no nation can develop without accurate data. send the data to the government so that it determines where it gets the resources, where to spend the resources and to do things right”. data generation. According to him, synergy is necessary for both agencies to present comprehensive data for national development.

  •  On February 13 Djibouti launched the final implementation of the National Development Plan NDP for the period 2020 2024 Djibouti ICI This is a particularly ambitious plan based on three strategic axes Inclusion Connectivity Institutions A plan that fits within the framework of Vision 2035 the future strategy defined by President Isma l Omar Guelleh hellip
    Djibouti Inclusion – Connectivity – Institutions (ICI): A major step for the country’s emergence
     On February 13 Djibouti launched the final implementation of the National Development Plan NDP for the period 2020 2024 Djibouti ICI This is a particularly ambitious plan based on three strategic axes Inclusion Connectivity Institutions A plan that fits within the framework of Vision 2035 the future strategy defined by President Isma l Omar Guelleh hellip
    Djibouti Inclusion – Connectivity – Institutions (ICI): A major step for the country’s emergence
    Africa5 months ago

    Djibouti Inclusion – Connectivity – Institutions (ICI): A major step for the country’s emergence

    On February 13, Djibouti launched the final implementation of the National Development Plan (NDP) for the period 2020-2024: "Djibouti ICI". This is a particularly ambitious plan, based on three strategic axes: Inclusion - Connectivity - Institutions. A plan that fits within the framework of Vision 2035, the future strategy defined by President Ismaïl Omar Guelleh. And a plan that builds on the strengths of the country, on its will to emerge and modernize, in accordance with the demands of our time.

    In a complex region, Djibouti is working to consolidate its status as a pole of stability, security and development. The previous first five-year plan (2015-2019) made it possible to exceed growth targets and launch essential infrastructure with the completion of new port areas, free zones and the Djibouti-Addis Ababa railway line.

    The Covid 19 pandemic, as in other places, strongly impacted this positive cycle. The adverse effects of this crisis have been contained thanks to the National Solidarity Pact (PEN) 2020. This NPS, which has been included in the Djibouti ICI, has allowed the country to underline the resilience of its model.

    The launch of the Djibouti ICI symbolizes the country's willingness to move forward again, while addressing the structural challenges facing the nation in terms of social inclusion, infrastructure, sustainable development and governance.

    Djibouti ICI focuses on three interdependent and priority axes. The first axis (inclusion) aims to adopt an inclusive model and ensure a better distribution of growth. The second (connectivity) aims to ensure better national integration and strengthen Djibouti's position as the center of the continental economy. The third (institutions) aims to consolidate the realization of rights and freedoms, democracy and public transparency, while strengthening social cohesion.

    The overall budget for the 2020-2024 NDP is estimated at 2.482 billion FDJ (12 billion euros). The objective is to achieve an average growth rate of 8.5% in 2025, with a significant expansion of the private sector.

    These objectives require a great effort in terms of economic governance and the mobilization of internal and external financial resources. This approach is not new. For more than two decades, the country has been committed to this ambitious model. Djibouti has established itself as a key port and logistics hub. Overall wealth has more than doubled since 2000. And today, to increase the competitiveness of the economy, several major projects have been launched. This is the case of the Damerjog industrial estate, the new infrastructure in the field of shipbuilding and oil terminals, and the transformation of the historic port into an international business district. Studies have also begun for the construction of a new international airport.

    The 2020-2024 NDP is a new tool at the service of this national ambition, which is to make Djibouti an emerging nation, open to modernity and fully concerned with the well-being of all its citizens.

  •  The Ministry of Education and Sports has a budget allocation of Shsh 3 6 billion for the fiscal year 2022 2023 which will require Parliament s approval KAMPALA Uganda January 26 2022 APO Group The Ministry of Education and Sports requires an additional Shs28 38 billion to enhance its contingency budget to address the long term effects of disasters on hellip
    Uganda: Education Ministry seeks more funds for disasters, study loans
     The Ministry of Education and Sports has a budget allocation of Shsh 3 6 billion for the fiscal year 2022 2023 which will require Parliament s approval KAMPALA Uganda January 26 2022 APO Group The Ministry of Education and Sports requires an additional Shs28 38 billion to enhance its contingency budget to address the long term effects of disasters on hellip
    Uganda: Education Ministry seeks more funds for disasters, study loans
    Africa5 months ago

    Uganda: Education Ministry seeks more funds for disasters, study loans

    The Ministry of Education and Sports has a budget allocation of Shsh 3.6 billion for the fiscal year 2022/2023, which will require Parliament's approval.

    KAMPALA, Uganda, January 26, 2022/APO Group/ --

    The Ministry of Education and Sports requires an additional Shs28.38 billion to enhance its contingency budget to address the long-term effects of disasters on educational institutions.

    The chairman of Parliament's Education and Sports Committee, Hon John Twesigye, said the Ministry has maintained a budget allocation of Shh12.62 billion to deal with the emergency construction of primary schools and the procurement of lightning rods for areas prone to falling rains. Ray.

    Twesigye was meeting with members of Parliament in the Budget Committee to present a report from the education sector on the national budget framework document.

    The Document includes recommendations for the Education, Sports and Skills Development Subprogram under NDP III for the financial years 2022/2023 - 2026/2027.

    The Ministry of Education and Sports has a budget allocation of Shsh 3.6 billion for the fiscal year 2022/2023, which will require Parliament's approval.

    In his presentation to the Budget Committee, Twesigye said that several schools in the countryside have been affected by disasters and some need relocation or permanent structures.

    "This requires an increase in the contingency budget of the Ministry of Education to at least 41 billion shs. This increase will skillfully address the problem of schools' emergency response to natural disasters," Twesigye said.

    The Honorable Ignatius Wamakuyu, Vice Chairman of the Budget Committee, raised concerns about the duplication of functions for disaster management, where the Prime Minister's Office is the lead agency.

    "How are you working with the Prime Minister's Office to establish a relationship to handle disaster management for schools? Is this a separate budget?" Wamakuyu asked.

    Amolatar Female Deputy, Hon. Agnes Atim Apea, urged the members of the Budget Committee to support the Education Committee's recommendation to increase funding for the sector so that the Ministry can skillfully deal with disasters affecting learning institutions.

    “The floods destroyed almost six schools in my district and when the Prime Minister went there, she told us that the issue of disasters in schools is handled by the Ministry of Education, who told me that they don't have a budget for that. avoid ping pong," Apea said.

    The Education Committee also recommended that the Ministry of Finance allocate an additional shh6.64bn to the Higher Education Student Financing Board to supplement the allotted shh5.75bn intended to support a total of 3,000 students in need to access education. superior through loans.

    Twesigye said available funds can only support 1,419 students in fiscal year 2022/2023, leaving out 1,581 students.

    Apea called for accountability for loans made to students under the Student Loan Program, saying there was discrimination in the allocation of money under the program.

    Hon. Emmanuel Otiam (NRM, West Budama County) said that the issuance of student loans should be a continuous process where students can, at any time, apply for the loans and receive due consideration.

    Hon. Moses Aleper (NRM, Chekwii County, Kadam) supported the provision of additional funds for student loans, but emphasized the need to review the criteria by which loans are made.

    "There is affirmative action in terms of regions, but the disbursement of these loans must be explicit and clear," Aleper said.