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  •   On the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly of Heads of State and Government President Ramkalawan who is currently leading the Seychelles delegation in New York also participated in several strategic side events for Seychelles Bilateral discussions have been crucial networking platforms and important discussions with key partners and Seychellois stakeholders The President participated as one of the panelists at the African Heads of Government Climate Finance Dialogue organized by Africa Investors Ai and the UN Special Adviser for Africa OSAA At their invitation President Ramkalawan was the keynote speaker at the panel discussion under the guided theme Partnerships and opportunities to implement the investable NDCs Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs President Ramkalawan spoke together with three other African Heads of State which included the President of the Federal Republic of Somalia HE Hassan Sheikh Mohamud and the President of the Republic of Gambia HE Adama Barrow President Ramkalawan also attended Blue Leaders 30X30 Catalytic Action for a Global Network of Fully and Highly Protected Marine Areas and a Strong New High Seas Treaty event held at the Plaza Hotel in New York The event which was organized by the Government of Belgium and Nigeria where President Ramkalawan was one of the Blue Leaders Heads of State who addressed the audience The Prime Minister of Cura ao Gilmar Pisas also made a presentation while the Prime Minister of Belgium made a virtual video statement The main event was opened by the CEO of Blomberg Philanthropies Patricia E Harris and the panel discussions were moderated by the Deputy Prime Minister of Belgium Following the Blue Leaders event the President also held discussions with Mission Blue The Sylvia Earle Alliance President and President legendary oceanographer Her Deepness Dr Sylvia Earle Dr Earle is an Explorer in Residence for the National Geographic Society and is called Her Deepness by the New Yorker and the New York Times a Living Legend of the Library of Congress and Time magazine s first Hero for the Planet Familiar with Seychelles the meeting with the Head of State was an opportunity for Dr Earle to brief President Ramkalawan on her previous expeditions and work in Seychelles as well as to engage in fruitful discussions on how Mission Blue can further support Seychelles Seychelles in its environmental conservation efforts She will soon be in Seychelles for a mission in Aldabra accompanying Prince Albert of Monaco In his capacity as Vice President of the SIDS DOCK Initiative President Ramkalawan also delivered a virtual statement at the 7th session of the SIDS DOCK Assembly SIDS DOCK is an initiative among the member countries of the Alliance of Small Island States AOSIS created to help SIDS transform their energy sectors and address adaptation to climate change in line with the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs of the UN Other side meetings included discussions with the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States Ms Rabab Fatima While at the 77th United Nations General Assembly in New York the president also had the opportunity to engage with a number of world leaders during a closed door high level meeting of the Association of Small Island States AOSIS limited to Heads of State or Government focused on two main issues objective discussion namely progress towards the Adoption of a Multidimensional Vulnerability Index MVI at the UN and the Establishment of a Financing Agreement to Address Loss and Damage at COP27 President Ramkalawan was assisted by Ambassador Ian Madeleine and other Foreign Ministry officials
    President Ramkalawan Participates in Key Side Events and Bilateral Meetings on the Sidelines of the 77th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA)
      On the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly of Heads of State and Government President Ramkalawan who is currently leading the Seychelles delegation in New York also participated in several strategic side events for Seychelles Bilateral discussions have been crucial networking platforms and important discussions with key partners and Seychellois stakeholders The President participated as one of the panelists at the African Heads of Government Climate Finance Dialogue organized by Africa Investors Ai and the UN Special Adviser for Africa OSAA At their invitation President Ramkalawan was the keynote speaker at the panel discussion under the guided theme Partnerships and opportunities to implement the investable NDCs Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs President Ramkalawan spoke together with three other African Heads of State which included the President of the Federal Republic of Somalia HE Hassan Sheikh Mohamud and the President of the Republic of Gambia HE Adama Barrow President Ramkalawan also attended Blue Leaders 30X30 Catalytic Action for a Global Network of Fully and Highly Protected Marine Areas and a Strong New High Seas Treaty event held at the Plaza Hotel in New York The event which was organized by the Government of Belgium and Nigeria where President Ramkalawan was one of the Blue Leaders Heads of State who addressed the audience The Prime Minister of Cura ao Gilmar Pisas also made a presentation while the Prime Minister of Belgium made a virtual video statement The main event was opened by the CEO of Blomberg Philanthropies Patricia E Harris and the panel discussions were moderated by the Deputy Prime Minister of Belgium Following the Blue Leaders event the President also held discussions with Mission Blue The Sylvia Earle Alliance President and President legendary oceanographer Her Deepness Dr Sylvia Earle Dr Earle is an Explorer in Residence for the National Geographic Society and is called Her Deepness by the New Yorker and the New York Times a Living Legend of the Library of Congress and Time magazine s first Hero for the Planet Familiar with Seychelles the meeting with the Head of State was an opportunity for Dr Earle to brief President Ramkalawan on her previous expeditions and work in Seychelles as well as to engage in fruitful discussions on how Mission Blue can further support Seychelles Seychelles in its environmental conservation efforts She will soon be in Seychelles for a mission in Aldabra accompanying Prince Albert of Monaco In his capacity as Vice President of the SIDS DOCK Initiative President Ramkalawan also delivered a virtual statement at the 7th session of the SIDS DOCK Assembly SIDS DOCK is an initiative among the member countries of the Alliance of Small Island States AOSIS created to help SIDS transform their energy sectors and address adaptation to climate change in line with the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs of the UN Other side meetings included discussions with the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States Ms Rabab Fatima While at the 77th United Nations General Assembly in New York the president also had the opportunity to engage with a number of world leaders during a closed door high level meeting of the Association of Small Island States AOSIS limited to Heads of State or Government focused on two main issues objective discussion namely progress towards the Adoption of a Multidimensional Vulnerability Index MVI at the UN and the Establishment of a Financing Agreement to Address Loss and Damage at COP27 President Ramkalawan was assisted by Ambassador Ian Madeleine and other Foreign Ministry officials
    President Ramkalawan Participates in Key Side Events and Bilateral Meetings on the Sidelines of the 77th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA)
    Africa2 weeks ago

    President Ramkalawan Participates in Key Side Events and Bilateral Meetings on the Sidelines of the 77th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA)

    On the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly of Heads of State and Government, President Ramkalawan, who is currently leading the Seychelles delegation in New York, also participated in several strategic side events for Seychelles.

    Bilateral discussions have been crucial networking platforms and important discussions with key partners and Seychellois stakeholders.

    The President participated as one of the panelists at the African Heads of Government Climate Finance Dialogue organized by Africa Investors (Ai) and the UN Special Adviser for Africa (OSAA).

    At their invitation, President Ramkalawan was the keynote speaker at the panel discussion under the guided theme "Partnerships and opportunities to implement the investable NDCs, Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)".

    President Ramkalawan spoke together with three other African Heads of State; which included the President of the Federal Republic of Somalia, HE Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, and the President of the Republic of Gambia, HE Adama Barrow.

    President Ramkalawan also attended Blue Leaders 30X30: Catalytic Action for a Global Network of Fully and Highly Protected Marine Areas and a Strong New High Seas Treaty event held at the Plaza Hotel in New York. The event, which was organized by the Government of Belgium and Nigeria, where President Ramkalawan was one of the Blue Leaders Heads of State who addressed the audience.

    The Prime Minister of Curaçao, Gilmar Pisas, also made a presentation, while the Prime Minister of Belgium made a virtual video statement.

    The main event was opened by the CEO of Blomberg Philanthropies, Patricia E.

    Harris, and the panel discussions were moderated by the Deputy Prime Minister of Belgium.

    Following the Blue Leaders event, the President also held discussions with Mission Blue/The Sylvia Earle Alliance President and President, legendary oceanographer, Her Deepness Dr. Sylvia Earle.

    Dr. Earle is an Explorer-in-Residence for the National Geographic Society, and is called Her Deepness by the New Yorker and the New York Times, a Living Legend of the Library of Congress, and Time magazine's first Hero for the Planet.

    Familiar with Seychelles, the meeting with the Head of State was an opportunity for Dr. Earle to brief President Ramkalawan on her previous expeditions and work in Seychelles, as well as to engage in fruitful discussions on how Mission Blue can further support Seychelles.

    Seychelles in its environmental conservation efforts.

    .

    She will soon be in Seychelles for a mission in Aldabra accompanying Prince Albert of Monaco.

    In his capacity as Vice President of the SIDS DOCK Initiative, President Ramkalawan also delivered a virtual statement at the 7th session of the SIDS DOCK Assembly.

    SIDS DOCK is an initiative among the member countries of the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS) created to help SIDS transform their energy sectors and address adaptation to climate change in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the UN.

    Other side meetings included discussions with the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States, Ms. Rabab Fatima.

    While at the 77th United Nations General Assembly in New York, the president also had the opportunity to engage with a number of world leaders during a closed-door, high-level meeting of the Association of Small Island States (AOSIS), limited to Heads of State or Government focused on two main issues: objective discussion namely; progress towards the Adoption of a Multidimensional Vulnerability Index (MVI) at the UN and the Establishment of a Financing Agreement to Address Loss and Damage at COP27.

    President Ramkalawan was assisted by Ambassador Ian Madeleine and other Foreign Ministry officials.

  •  The Sultan of Sokoto Sa ad Abubakar III has advised Nigerian students and youths to avoid acts of violence by embracing peace for progress Abubakar made the call at the National Secondary Schools Security Awareness Programme organised by the Alumni Association of the National Defence College AANDEC on Wednesday in Abuja The programme was in collaboration with Office of the National Security Adviser NDC and Ufuk Dialogue to commemorate the 2022 International Day of Peace The Sultan said that Nigerian society like any other society had both good and bad people adding that good people were more than the bad ones He said that mentoring young ones who are future leaders remained an important component of peace in the home and the society at large He urged parents to start the mentoring from home saying that if there is peace in the home then there will be peace outside So you must have peace at home first because everything starts from home Your first teacher is your mother from the day you were born when you came out They bring you out cut all the umbilical cord and whatever wash you clean and dress you up The mother is the one handling you from the time until you start running and working and maybe even until they die Your mother is your first teacher and is the most important part of the home If you have a good home look for who is the mother if you have a bad home look for who is the mother and that is why the mothers are so important in our lives If you have bad children running all over the place carrying guns killing people kidnapping ransom or whatever look at the background he said The Sultan commended the alumni association and its partners for putting the programme together with a view to addressing the future He urged all Nigerians to continue to work towards restoring peace saying peace is not the absence of war I believe peace is the presence of justice If there is no justice you can not have peace he added The Chairperson of Access Bank Plc Dr Ajoditsedere Awosika said the youths must understand that the unity of the country would affect its peace and ultimately result in progress Awosika urged the youths to insist on doing the right thing to ensure that peace and unity prevailed in the nation President of AANDEC retired Air Cdre Darlington Abdullahi said the programme was put together to create awareness for various for children and students in all levels of educational system Abdullahi said the target of the programme was to reclaim the children from the hands of criminal groups trying to induct them into criminality He said the programme was also designed to inculcate discipline loyalty patriotic tradition in the students as well as and show them the need to do the right thing at all times Fevzullah Bilgin Managing Director Nigerian Tulip International Colleges one of the partners in the programme said youths remained the future of any nation Bilgin said that peace had become a significant topic in public discourse in recent time adding that the position of the youth was also significant He said it was important to engage the youths in discussing peace and nation building saying that conflicts could be prevented if the youths were engaged and their minds purified The News Agency of Nigeria reports that 15 secondary schools comprising nine public and six private schools in FCT were selected for the programme A student each from the schools made presentation on peace during the event NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Int’l Day of Peace: Sultan urges students to work for peace
     The Sultan of Sokoto Sa ad Abubakar III has advised Nigerian students and youths to avoid acts of violence by embracing peace for progress Abubakar made the call at the National Secondary Schools Security Awareness Programme organised by the Alumni Association of the National Defence College AANDEC on Wednesday in Abuja The programme was in collaboration with Office of the National Security Adviser NDC and Ufuk Dialogue to commemorate the 2022 International Day of Peace The Sultan said that Nigerian society like any other society had both good and bad people adding that good people were more than the bad ones He said that mentoring young ones who are future leaders remained an important component of peace in the home and the society at large He urged parents to start the mentoring from home saying that if there is peace in the home then there will be peace outside So you must have peace at home first because everything starts from home Your first teacher is your mother from the day you were born when you came out They bring you out cut all the umbilical cord and whatever wash you clean and dress you up The mother is the one handling you from the time until you start running and working and maybe even until they die Your mother is your first teacher and is the most important part of the home If you have a good home look for who is the mother if you have a bad home look for who is the mother and that is why the mothers are so important in our lives If you have bad children running all over the place carrying guns killing people kidnapping ransom or whatever look at the background he said The Sultan commended the alumni association and its partners for putting the programme together with a view to addressing the future He urged all Nigerians to continue to work towards restoring peace saying peace is not the absence of war I believe peace is the presence of justice If there is no justice you can not have peace he added The Chairperson of Access Bank Plc Dr Ajoditsedere Awosika said the youths must understand that the unity of the country would affect its peace and ultimately result in progress Awosika urged the youths to insist on doing the right thing to ensure that peace and unity prevailed in the nation President of AANDEC retired Air Cdre Darlington Abdullahi said the programme was put together to create awareness for various for children and students in all levels of educational system Abdullahi said the target of the programme was to reclaim the children from the hands of criminal groups trying to induct them into criminality He said the programme was also designed to inculcate discipline loyalty patriotic tradition in the students as well as and show them the need to do the right thing at all times Fevzullah Bilgin Managing Director Nigerian Tulip International Colleges one of the partners in the programme said youths remained the future of any nation Bilgin said that peace had become a significant topic in public discourse in recent time adding that the position of the youth was also significant He said it was important to engage the youths in discussing peace and nation building saying that conflicts could be prevented if the youths were engaged and their minds purified The News Agency of Nigeria reports that 15 secondary schools comprising nine public and six private schools in FCT were selected for the programme A student each from the schools made presentation on peace during the event NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Int’l Day of Peace: Sultan urges students to work for peace
    Defence/Security2 weeks ago

    Int’l Day of Peace: Sultan urges students to work for peace

    The Sultan of Sokoto, Sa’ad Abubakar III, has advised Nigerian students and youths to avoid acts of violence by embracing peace for progress.

    Abubakar made the call at the National Secondary Schools Security Awareness Programme organised by the Alumni Association of the National Defence College (AANDEC) on Wednesday in Abuja.

    The programme was in collaboration with Office of the National Security Adviser, NDC and Ufuk Dialogue to commemorate the 2022 International Day of Peace.

    The Sultan said that Nigerian society like any other society, had both good and bad people, adding that good people were more than the bad ones.

    He said that mentoring young ones who are future leaders remained an important component of peace in the home and the society at large.

    He urged parents to start the mentoring from home, saying that if there is peace in the home, then there will be peace outside.

    “So you must have peace at home first, because everything starts from home.

    “Your first teacher is your mother from the day you were born, when you came out.

    They bring you out, cut all the umbilical cord and whatever, wash you clean and dress you up.

    “The mother is the one handling you from the time until you start running and working, and maybe even until they die.

    “Your mother is your first teacher and is the most important part of the home.

    “If you have a good home, look for who is the mother; if you have a bad home, look for who is the mother and that is why the mothers are so important in our lives.

    “If you have bad children running all over the place, carrying guns, killing people, kidnapping, ransom, or whatever, look at the background,” he said.

    The Sultan commended the alumni association and its partners for putting the programme together with a view to addressing the future.

    He urged all Nigerians to continue to work towards restoring peace, saying “peace is not the absence of war”.

    “I believe peace is the presence of justice.

    If there is no justice, you can not have peace,” he added.

    The Chairperson of Access Bank Plc, Dr Ajoditsedere Awosika, said the youths must understand that the unity of the country would affect its peace and ultimately result in progress.

    Awosika urged the youths to insist on doing the right thing to ensure that peace and unity prevailed in the nation.

    President of AANDEC, retired Air Cdre. Darlington Abdullahi, said the programme was put together to create awareness for various for children and students in all levels of educational system.

    Abdullahi said the target of the programme was to reclaim the children from the hands of criminal groups trying to induct them into criminality.

    He said the programme was also designed to inculcate discipline, loyalty, patriotic tradition in the students as well as and show them the need to do the right thing at all times.

    Fevzullah Bilgin, Managing Director, Nigerian Tulip International Colleges, one of the partners in the programme, said youths remained the future of any nation.

    Bilgin said that peace had become a significant topic in public discourse in recent time, adding that the position of the youth was also significant.

    He said it was important to engage the youths in discussing peace and nation building, saying that conflicts could be prevented if the youths were engaged and their minds purified.

    The News Agency of Nigeria reports that 15 secondary schools comprising nine public and six private schools in FCT were selected for the programme.

    A student each from the schools made presentation on peace during the event.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  Participants say there is urgent need to scale up financial flows from public and private sources into climate adaptation action across Africa In a statement issued by the African Development Bank on Tuesday the event was held on the sidelines of the 2022 edition of Africa Climate Week ACW The session was titled Limiting Loss and Damage through Enhanced Adaptation Action in Africa It featured a timely discussion of an aspect of climate change that captured and assessed the costs and damages associated with climate change The participants cited the bank s Africa Adaptation Acceleration Programme a joint initiative with the Global Centre on Adaptation as a positive example to scale up climate finance adaptation across Africa The programme seeks to mobilise 25 billion dollars over five years to accelerate and scale climate adaptation actions across the continent Opening the discussion Olufunso Somorin a Regional Principal Officer at AfDB said it was important for African countries to measure climate change related loss and damage Somorin said this was to enable appropriate quantification and well designed responses best suited to country context It was also important to capture those losses occurred even in instances where preventive climate adaptation actions had been taken he said Also speakin Fatten Agad Africa Climate Foundation s Senior Advisor on Climate Diplomacy and Geopolitics called for production of a report that would serve as guidance and baseline for evaluating climate related losses and damage It has already been demonstrated that the socio economic impact faced by African countries in coping with the COVID 19 crisis has been very high Agad said that a burden of financing something such as loss and damage would be unfair Anja Beretta Konrad Adenauer s Director for Energy Security and Climate Change in Africa urged African countries to integrate mechanisms to address losses and damage into their Nationally Determined Contributions NDCs Beretta also called for designated institutions and functioning structures to ensure the efficient and effective use of climate finance to advance the discussion on financial flows into loss and damage Stephane Bonamy Head of the Regional Delegation for the International Committee of the Red Cross in Cameroon said it was imperative for preventive measures to be place early For countries that face both conflict and climate change impacts it is imperative that preventive measures are put in place early enough to reduce the extent of loss and damage faced and lessen the burden on communities Bonamy said that 14 of the 25 most vulnerable countries to climate change impacts worldwide also faced some form of conflict Dr Olumide Abimbola reiterated the need for more African examples of past and current loss and damage to be incorporated into textbooks and journals Abimbola is the Executive Director of the Africa Policy Research Institute in Berlin Furthermore there was agreement among the participants on the need for Africa to prioritise timely comprehensive and large scale adaptation action to avert or minimise future losses and damages Participants also called for new strategic partnerships to drive adaptation policies plans and investments in Africa This would be through the implementation of NDCs and tapping synergies with such initiatives as the Africa Disaster Risk Financing programme The AfDB and Germany s Konrad Adenauer Foundation hosted the event The event provided a forum to discuss the importance of defining and evaluating such losses and damages of property economies lives and livelihoods due to climate disasters ACW is an annual event that engages and empowers stakeholders to drive climate action across countries communities and economies The event is organised by United Nations Climate Change in collaboration with global partners They are the UN Development Programme the UN Environment Programme and the World Bank Group Partners in the region include the Africa Union the AfDB and the UN Economic Commission for Africa UNECA ACW 2022 was held in Gabon NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Participants harp urgent need to increase climate-adaptation finance across Africa
     Participants say there is urgent need to scale up financial flows from public and private sources into climate adaptation action across Africa In a statement issued by the African Development Bank on Tuesday the event was held on the sidelines of the 2022 edition of Africa Climate Week ACW The session was titled Limiting Loss and Damage through Enhanced Adaptation Action in Africa It featured a timely discussion of an aspect of climate change that captured and assessed the costs and damages associated with climate change The participants cited the bank s Africa Adaptation Acceleration Programme a joint initiative with the Global Centre on Adaptation as a positive example to scale up climate finance adaptation across Africa The programme seeks to mobilise 25 billion dollars over five years to accelerate and scale climate adaptation actions across the continent Opening the discussion Olufunso Somorin a Regional Principal Officer at AfDB said it was important for African countries to measure climate change related loss and damage Somorin said this was to enable appropriate quantification and well designed responses best suited to country context It was also important to capture those losses occurred even in instances where preventive climate adaptation actions had been taken he said Also speakin Fatten Agad Africa Climate Foundation s Senior Advisor on Climate Diplomacy and Geopolitics called for production of a report that would serve as guidance and baseline for evaluating climate related losses and damage It has already been demonstrated that the socio economic impact faced by African countries in coping with the COVID 19 crisis has been very high Agad said that a burden of financing something such as loss and damage would be unfair Anja Beretta Konrad Adenauer s Director for Energy Security and Climate Change in Africa urged African countries to integrate mechanisms to address losses and damage into their Nationally Determined Contributions NDCs Beretta also called for designated institutions and functioning structures to ensure the efficient and effective use of climate finance to advance the discussion on financial flows into loss and damage Stephane Bonamy Head of the Regional Delegation for the International Committee of the Red Cross in Cameroon said it was imperative for preventive measures to be place early For countries that face both conflict and climate change impacts it is imperative that preventive measures are put in place early enough to reduce the extent of loss and damage faced and lessen the burden on communities Bonamy said that 14 of the 25 most vulnerable countries to climate change impacts worldwide also faced some form of conflict Dr Olumide Abimbola reiterated the need for more African examples of past and current loss and damage to be incorporated into textbooks and journals Abimbola is the Executive Director of the Africa Policy Research Institute in Berlin Furthermore there was agreement among the participants on the need for Africa to prioritise timely comprehensive and large scale adaptation action to avert or minimise future losses and damages Participants also called for new strategic partnerships to drive adaptation policies plans and investments in Africa This would be through the implementation of NDCs and tapping synergies with such initiatives as the Africa Disaster Risk Financing programme The AfDB and Germany s Konrad Adenauer Foundation hosted the event The event provided a forum to discuss the importance of defining and evaluating such losses and damages of property economies lives and livelihoods due to climate disasters ACW is an annual event that engages and empowers stakeholders to drive climate action across countries communities and economies The event is organised by United Nations Climate Change in collaboration with global partners They are the UN Development Programme the UN Environment Programme and the World Bank Group Partners in the region include the Africa Union the AfDB and the UN Economic Commission for Africa UNECA ACW 2022 was held in Gabon NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Participants harp urgent need to increase climate-adaptation finance across Africa
    Economy2 weeks ago

    Participants harp urgent need to increase climate-adaptation finance across Africa

    Participants say there is urgent need to scale up financial flows from public and private sources into climate adaptation action across Africa. 

    In a statement issued by the African Development Bank on Tuesday, the event was held on the sidelines of the 2022 edition of Africa Climate Week (ACW).

    The session was titled “Limiting Loss and Damage through Enhanced Adaptation Action in Africa”.

    It featured a timely discussion of an aspect of climate change that captured and assessed the costs and damages associated with climate change.   

    The participants cited the bank’s Africa Adaptation Acceleration Programme, a joint initiative with the Global Centre on Adaptation as a positive example to scale up climate finance adaptation across Africa.

    The programme seeks to mobilise 25 billion dollars over five years to accelerate and scale climate adaptation actions across the continent.

    Opening the discussion, Olufunso Somorin, a Regional Principal Officer at AfDB said it was important for African countries to measure climate change related loss and damage. 

    Somorin said this was to enable appropriate quantification and well-designed responses best suited to country context. 

    “It was also important to capture those losses occurred even in instances where preventive climate adaptation actions had been taken,” he said.

    Also speakin, Fatten Agad, Africa Climate Foundation’s Senior Advisor on Climate Diplomacy and Geopolitics, called for production of a report that would serve as guidance and baseline for evaluating climate related losses and damage. 

    “It has already been demonstrated that the socio-economic impact faced by African countries in coping with the COVID-19 crisis has been very high.

    Agad said that a burden of financing something such as loss and damage would be unfair.

    Anja Beretta, Konrad Adenauer’s Director for Energy Security and Climate Change in Africa, urged African countries to integrate mechanisms to address losses and damage into their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). 

    Beretta also called for designated institutions and functioning structures to ensure the efficient and effective use of climate finance to advance the discussion on financial flows into loss and damage.

    Stephane Bonamy, Head of the Regional Delegation for the International Committee of the Red Cross in Cameroon, said it was imperative for preventive measures to be place early. 

    “For countries that face both conflict and climate change impacts, it is imperative that preventive measures are put in place early enough to reduce the extent of loss and damage faced and lessen the burden on communities.

    ”  Bonamy said that 14 of the 25 most vulnerable countries to climate change impacts worldwide also faced some form of conflict.

    Dr Olumide Abimbola reiterated the need for more African examples of past and current loss and damage to be incorporated into textbooks and journals.

    Abimbola is the Executive Director of the Africa Policy Research Institute in Berlin. 

    Furthermore, there was agreement among the participants on the need for Africa to prioritise timely, comprehensive and large-scale adaptation action to avert or minimise future losses and damages.

    Participants also called for new strategic partnerships to drive adaptation policies, plans and investments in Africa.

    This would be through the implementation of NDCs and tapping synergies with such initiatives as the Africa Disaster Risk Financing programme.

    The AfDB and Germany’s Konrad Adenauer Foundation hosted the event.

    The event provided a forum to discuss the importance of defining and evaluating such losses and damages of property, economies, lives and livelihoods due to climate disasters. 

    ACW is an annual event that engages and empowers stakeholders to drive climate action across countries, communities and economies.

    The event is organised by United Nations Climate Change in collaboration with global partners.

    They are the UN Development Programme, the UN Environment Programme and the World Bank Group. 

    Partners in the region include the Africa Union, the AfDB, and the UN Economic Commission for Africa. 

    (UNECA). 

    ACW 2022 was held in Gabon.  


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   The launch today in New York of a 17 signature Ministerial Declaration calling for recognition of the Local Climate Responsive Living Fund as an existing Non Commercial Approach under the Paris Agreement could ministers say unlock significant additional climate finance for adaptation to the impacts of climate change The statement made by some of the world s most vulnerable nations to the impacts of climate change follows recent commitments by COP27 host Egypt to make the November climate conference an opportunity to focus on implementation rather than further negotiation of existing texts and agreements The document presented at the event Making Paris Work for People Adaptation at Scale in Climate Vulnerable Nations is signed by some 17 ministers from LoCAL participating countries and brings together a series of joint commitments to increase climate finance total available nations vulnerable to climate change The signatories represent countries facing some of the worst impacts of climate change but with limited resources to adapt The Local Climate Responsive Living Fund is a proven financial mechanism a solution that is already being implemented said the Hon Prof Wilson K Tarpeh Executive Director and Executive Director of the Environmental Protection Agency in Liberia at today s event Making Paris Work for the People part of the New York Climate Week activities program and a side event to the UN General Assembly Let us work together at COP27 for the adoption of LoCAL as an existing non commercial approach to expand and boost access to climate finance as set out in this Ministerial Declaration With our joint cooperation let us work together to ensure that the The Local Climate Adaptable Life Fund is included in the final document of the COP27 in Egypt And make sure this COP the Africa COP is a solutions COP added the Hon Prof Wilson K Tarpeh The LoCAL Fund is a mechanism to channel financing to local governments for locally directed adaptation to the impacts of climate change and designed by the United Nations Capital Development Fund about ten years ago UNCDF Executive Secretary Preeti Sinha officially opened the event in New York Some 32 countries in Africa Asia the Caribbean and the Pacific are currently designing or implementing their adaptation actions with the LoCAL Fund which has mobilized more than US 125 million for adaptation to date The Ministerial Declaration which builds on intergovernmental discussions held at a meeting of the 9th Annual Board Meeting and the LoCAL Ministerial Meeting in May this year also includes a UNCDF commitment to grow the LoCAL Facility through a US 500 million facility by 2027 This ambitious goal replaces an earlier goal of doubling the size of the facility within the same time period after that goal appears to be met before the end of 2022 LOCAL countries Cambodia The Gambia and C te d Ivoire have made submissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change UNFCCC formally requesting that LoCAL be recognized as an existing NMA and assist their country in achieving their Nationally Determined Contributions NDCs Kenya although not a LoCAL country made a similar presentation as did UNCDF in its capacity as a UN observer at UNFCCC meetings Those presentations were presented at the Bonn Climate Change Conference in June 2022 Today s event adds momentum to the Bonn presentation with ministers and high level participants from Cambodia Jamaica Liberia and Niger calling for recognition of the NMA to achieve greater adaptation financing for African nations Small Island Developing States SIDS and LDCs Many speakers highlighted the fact that while their countries are feeling some of the most acute impacts of climate change they as pre industrial nations have contributed the least to the carbon emissions fueling the crisis We know in Jamaica that climate impacts at the local level our towns and cities our coastal towns and communities and we fully support and are committed to any effort to build the capacities of our local governments so that they can better serve communities and perform the adaptation projects that their constituents need and ask for said the Honorable Matthew Samuda Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation in Jamaica and LoCAL Ministerial Ambassador who delivered the keynote address As a new LoCAL Ambassador I hope we can come together to drive action and secure LoCAL as an existing non commercial approach following Article 6 8 and other desperately needed climate finance The LoCAL approach combines increased climate finance with capacity construction technical support and opportunities for South South learning and exchange LoCAL combines Performance Based Climate Resilience Grants PBCRGs in the form of financial top ups to local government budgets and resources to cover additional costs of climate change adaptation These grants ensure the programming and verification of climate change related expenditures at the local level while providing strong incentives to improve performance on improved resilience through technical support and capacity development LoCAL pilots were first launched more than a decade ago in Bhutan and Cambodia where LoCAL is currently located being implemented at the national level We have seen that LoCAL works said Dr Tin Ponlok Cambodian Secretary of State for the Ministry of the Environment speaking via video link from Phnom Pen To date we have delivered 538 adaptation investments across the country using LoCAL and the performance based climate resilience grant system Many of these are relatively small infrastructure investments roads small bridges water supply etc But they have a massive impact on participating communities allowing them to better withstand the often dire impacts of climate change Furthermore LoCAL builds on the capacity of local government authorities and gives a voice to the communities where it is being implemented through local community consultations Ministers said that the LoCAL approach had much to recommend it including its focus on the use and strengthening of national capacities LoCAL is not a parallel system or an add on program It uses national systems to ensure funds reach their destination communities facing climate change said the Hon Prof Wilson K Tarpeh Executive Director and CEO of the Liberian Environmental Protection Agency Y LoCAL it comes with an agreed monitoring reporting and verification process The Honorable Prof Wilson K Tarpeh Executive Director and Director General of the Liberian Environmental Protection Agency speaking at the 9th Board Meeting in Brussels this year LoCAL participating countries own and direct the future direction of the LoCAL Fund through the LoCAL Board co chaired by the Permanent Representative to the United Nations of the country leading the LDC group at UN Headquarters in New York the President of the LDC group before the UNFCCC together with the Director of Local Transformative Finance of UNCDF Belgium is one of the countries that supports LoCAL with funds most recently for the launch of LoCAL in Mozambique and Uganda Speaking at Tuesday s event Heidy Rombouts Director General for Development Cooperation and Humanitarian Aid at the Belgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs highlighted the potential of countries coming together to highlight adaptation needs underlining the value of LoCAL as a means to unlock collective action The LoCAL mechanism is delivering at scale LoCAL has engaged more than 300 local governments and benefited more than 12 5 million people With the formal recognition of LoCAL as an existing NMA at COP27 the ministers hope that funding can be unlocked for the national deployment of LoCAL in the 32 countries involved in the mechanism this would generate adaptation results for more than 600 million people on the front lines of climate change This event is an important step on the road to COP27 in Egypt from which we have great expectations The COP Presidency has repeatedly called for action not words implementation and not promises said the Honorable Ms Garama Saratou Rabiou Inoussa Minister for the Environment and Combating Desertification speaking in a video message from Niamey the capital of Niger Niger supports the recognition of the LoCAL mechanism as a non market approach under Article 6 8 of the Paris Agreement To engage LoCAL interested governments can submit formal requests to UNCDF to launch the design phase and start raising funding Learn more about Climate Week New York and how we re getting involved
    Ministers prepare for COP27 with a commitment to use the Paris Agreement to boost access to finance for adaptation
      The launch today in New York of a 17 signature Ministerial Declaration calling for recognition of the Local Climate Responsive Living Fund as an existing Non Commercial Approach under the Paris Agreement could ministers say unlock significant additional climate finance for adaptation to the impacts of climate change The statement made by some of the world s most vulnerable nations to the impacts of climate change follows recent commitments by COP27 host Egypt to make the November climate conference an opportunity to focus on implementation rather than further negotiation of existing texts and agreements The document presented at the event Making Paris Work for People Adaptation at Scale in Climate Vulnerable Nations is signed by some 17 ministers from LoCAL participating countries and brings together a series of joint commitments to increase climate finance total available nations vulnerable to climate change The signatories represent countries facing some of the worst impacts of climate change but with limited resources to adapt The Local Climate Responsive Living Fund is a proven financial mechanism a solution that is already being implemented said the Hon Prof Wilson K Tarpeh Executive Director and Executive Director of the Environmental Protection Agency in Liberia at today s event Making Paris Work for the People part of the New York Climate Week activities program and a side event to the UN General Assembly Let us work together at COP27 for the adoption of LoCAL as an existing non commercial approach to expand and boost access to climate finance as set out in this Ministerial Declaration With our joint cooperation let us work together to ensure that the The Local Climate Adaptable Life Fund is included in the final document of the COP27 in Egypt And make sure this COP the Africa COP is a solutions COP added the Hon Prof Wilson K Tarpeh The LoCAL Fund is a mechanism to channel financing to local governments for locally directed adaptation to the impacts of climate change and designed by the United Nations Capital Development Fund about ten years ago UNCDF Executive Secretary Preeti Sinha officially opened the event in New York Some 32 countries in Africa Asia the Caribbean and the Pacific are currently designing or implementing their adaptation actions with the LoCAL Fund which has mobilized more than US 125 million for adaptation to date The Ministerial Declaration which builds on intergovernmental discussions held at a meeting of the 9th Annual Board Meeting and the LoCAL Ministerial Meeting in May this year also includes a UNCDF commitment to grow the LoCAL Facility through a US 500 million facility by 2027 This ambitious goal replaces an earlier goal of doubling the size of the facility within the same time period after that goal appears to be met before the end of 2022 LOCAL countries Cambodia The Gambia and C te d Ivoire have made submissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change UNFCCC formally requesting that LoCAL be recognized as an existing NMA and assist their country in achieving their Nationally Determined Contributions NDCs Kenya although not a LoCAL country made a similar presentation as did UNCDF in its capacity as a UN observer at UNFCCC meetings Those presentations were presented at the Bonn Climate Change Conference in June 2022 Today s event adds momentum to the Bonn presentation with ministers and high level participants from Cambodia Jamaica Liberia and Niger calling for recognition of the NMA to achieve greater adaptation financing for African nations Small Island Developing States SIDS and LDCs Many speakers highlighted the fact that while their countries are feeling some of the most acute impacts of climate change they as pre industrial nations have contributed the least to the carbon emissions fueling the crisis We know in Jamaica that climate impacts at the local level our towns and cities our coastal towns and communities and we fully support and are committed to any effort to build the capacities of our local governments so that they can better serve communities and perform the adaptation projects that their constituents need and ask for said the Honorable Matthew Samuda Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation in Jamaica and LoCAL Ministerial Ambassador who delivered the keynote address As a new LoCAL Ambassador I hope we can come together to drive action and secure LoCAL as an existing non commercial approach following Article 6 8 and other desperately needed climate finance The LoCAL approach combines increased climate finance with capacity construction technical support and opportunities for South South learning and exchange LoCAL combines Performance Based Climate Resilience Grants PBCRGs in the form of financial top ups to local government budgets and resources to cover additional costs of climate change adaptation These grants ensure the programming and verification of climate change related expenditures at the local level while providing strong incentives to improve performance on improved resilience through technical support and capacity development LoCAL pilots were first launched more than a decade ago in Bhutan and Cambodia where LoCAL is currently located being implemented at the national level We have seen that LoCAL works said Dr Tin Ponlok Cambodian Secretary of State for the Ministry of the Environment speaking via video link from Phnom Pen To date we have delivered 538 adaptation investments across the country using LoCAL and the performance based climate resilience grant system Many of these are relatively small infrastructure investments roads small bridges water supply etc But they have a massive impact on participating communities allowing them to better withstand the often dire impacts of climate change Furthermore LoCAL builds on the capacity of local government authorities and gives a voice to the communities where it is being implemented through local community consultations Ministers said that the LoCAL approach had much to recommend it including its focus on the use and strengthening of national capacities LoCAL is not a parallel system or an add on program It uses national systems to ensure funds reach their destination communities facing climate change said the Hon Prof Wilson K Tarpeh Executive Director and CEO of the Liberian Environmental Protection Agency Y LoCAL it comes with an agreed monitoring reporting and verification process The Honorable Prof Wilson K Tarpeh Executive Director and Director General of the Liberian Environmental Protection Agency speaking at the 9th Board Meeting in Brussels this year LoCAL participating countries own and direct the future direction of the LoCAL Fund through the LoCAL Board co chaired by the Permanent Representative to the United Nations of the country leading the LDC group at UN Headquarters in New York the President of the LDC group before the UNFCCC together with the Director of Local Transformative Finance of UNCDF Belgium is one of the countries that supports LoCAL with funds most recently for the launch of LoCAL in Mozambique and Uganda Speaking at Tuesday s event Heidy Rombouts Director General for Development Cooperation and Humanitarian Aid at the Belgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs highlighted the potential of countries coming together to highlight adaptation needs underlining the value of LoCAL as a means to unlock collective action The LoCAL mechanism is delivering at scale LoCAL has engaged more than 300 local governments and benefited more than 12 5 million people With the formal recognition of LoCAL as an existing NMA at COP27 the ministers hope that funding can be unlocked for the national deployment of LoCAL in the 32 countries involved in the mechanism this would generate adaptation results for more than 600 million people on the front lines of climate change This event is an important step on the road to COP27 in Egypt from which we have great expectations The COP Presidency has repeatedly called for action not words implementation and not promises said the Honorable Ms Garama Saratou Rabiou Inoussa Minister for the Environment and Combating Desertification speaking in a video message from Niamey the capital of Niger Niger supports the recognition of the LoCAL mechanism as a non market approach under Article 6 8 of the Paris Agreement To engage LoCAL interested governments can submit formal requests to UNCDF to launch the design phase and start raising funding Learn more about Climate Week New York and how we re getting involved
    Ministers prepare for COP27 with a commitment to use the Paris Agreement to boost access to finance for adaptation
    Africa2 weeks ago

    Ministers prepare for COP27 with a commitment to use the Paris Agreement to boost access to finance for adaptation

    The launch today in New York of a 17-signature Ministerial Declaration calling for recognition of the Local Climate Responsive Living Fund as an existing Non-Commercial Approach under the Paris Agreement could, ministers say, unlock significant additional climate finance for adaptation to the impacts of climate change.

    The statement, made by some of the world's most vulnerable nations to the impacts of climate change, follows recent commitments by COP27 host Egypt to make the November climate conference an opportunity to focus on implementation rather than further negotiation of existing texts and agreements.

    The document, presented at the event 'Making Paris Work for People: Adaptation at Scale in Climate-Vulnerable Nations', is signed by some 17 ministers from LoCAL participating countries and brings together a series of joint commitments to increase climate finance total available.

    nations vulnerable to climate change.

    The signatories represent countries facing some of the worst impacts of climate change but with limited resources to adapt.

    “The Local Climate Responsive Living Fund is a proven financial mechanism, a solution that is already being implemented,” said the Hon Prof. Wilson K.

    Tarpeh, Executive Director and Executive Director of the Environmental Protection Agency in Liberia.

    at today's event 'Making Paris Work for the People', part of the New York Climate Week activities program and a side event to the UN General Assembly.

    “Let us work together at COP27 for the adoption of LoCAL as an existing non-commercial approach to expand and boost access to climate finance, as set out in this Ministerial Declaration… With our joint cooperation, let us work together to ensure that the The Local Climate Adaptable Life Fund is included in the final document of the COP27 in Egypt.

    And make sure this COP, the “Africa COP”, is a solutions COP,” added the Hon Prof. Wilson K.

    Tarpeh.

    The LoCAL Fund is a mechanism to channel financing to local governments for locally directed adaptation to the impacts of climate change and designed by the United Nations Capital Development Fund about ten years ago; UNCDF Executive Secretary Preeti Sinha officially opened the event in New York. Some 32 countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and the Pacific are currently designing or implementing their adaptation actions with the LoCAL Fund, which has mobilized more than US$125 million for adaptation to date.

    The Ministerial Declaration, which builds on intergovernmental discussions held at a meeting of the 9th Annual Board Meeting and the LoCAL Ministerial Meeting in May this year, also includes a UNCDF commitment to grow the LoCAL Facility through a US$500 million facility by 2027.

    This ambitious goal replaces an earlier goal of doubling the size of the facility within the same time period after that goal appears to be met before the end of 2022.

    LOCAL countries Cambodia, The Gambia and Côte d'Ivoire have made submissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), formally requesting that LoCAL be recognized as an existing NMA and assist their country in achieving their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).

    Kenya, although not a LoCAL country, made a similar presentation, as did UNCDF in its capacity as a UN observer at UNFCCC meetings.

    Those presentations were presented at the Bonn Climate Change Conference in June 2022.

    Today's event adds momentum to the Bonn presentation with ministers and high-level participants from Cambodia, Jamaica, Liberia and Niger calling for recognition of the NMA to achieve greater adaptation financing for African nations.

    , Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and LDCs. Many speakers highlighted the fact that while their countries are feeling some of the most acute impacts of climate change, they, as pre-industrial nations, have contributed the least to the carbon emissions fueling the crisis.

    “ We know in Jamaica that climate impacts at the local level: our towns and cities, our coastal towns and communities and we fully support and are committed to any effort to build the capacities of our local governments so that they can better serve communities and perform the adaptation projects that their constituents need and ask for.” said the Honorable Matthew Samuda, Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation in Jamaica and LoCAL Ministerial Ambassador who delivered the keynote address.

    "As a new LoCAL Ambassador, I hope we can come together to drive action and secure LoCAL as an existing non-commercial approach following Article 6.8 and other desperately needed climate finance."

    The LoCAL approach combines increased climate finance with capacity.

    construction, technical support, and opportunities for South-South learning and exchange LoCAL combines Performance-Based Climate Resilience Grants (PBCRGs), in the form of financial top-ups to local government budgets and resources to cover additional costs of climate change adaptation These grants ensure the programming and verification of climate change-related expenditures at the local level, while providing strong incentives to improve performance on improved resilience through technical support and capacity development.

    LoCAL pilots were first launched more than a decade ago in Bhutan and Cambodia, where LoCAL is currently located.

    being implemented at the national level.

    “We have seen that LoCAL works,” said Dr. Tin Ponlok, Cambodian Secretary of State for the Ministry of the Environment, speaking via video link from Phnom Pen. “To date, we have delivered 538 adaptation investments across the country using LoCAL and the performance-based climate resilience grant system.

    Many of these are relatively small infrastructure investments: roads, small bridges, water supply, etc.

    But they have a massive impact on participating communities, allowing them to better withstand the often dire impacts of climate change.” Furthermore, LoCAL builds on the capacity of local government authorities and gives a voice to the communities where it is being implemented through local community consultations.

    Ministers said that the LoCAL approach had much to recommend it, including its focus on the use and strengthening of national capacities.

    “LoCAL is not a parallel system or an 'add-on' program.

    It uses national systems to ensure funds reach their destination – communities facing climate change,” said the Hon Prof. Wilson K.

    Tarpeh, Executive Director and CEO of the Liberian Environmental Protection Agency.

    "Y, [LoCAL] it comes with an agreed monitoring, reporting and verification process.” The Honorable Prof. Wilson K.

    Tarpeh, Executive Director and Director General of the Liberian Environmental Protection Agency speaking at the 9th Board Meeting in Brussels this year.

    LoCAL participating countries own and direct the future direction of the LoCAL Fund through the LoCAL Board, co-chaired by the Permanent Representative to the United Nations of the country leading the LDC group at UN Headquarters in New York, the President of the LDC group before the UNFCCC, together with the Director of Local Transformative Finance of UNCDF.

    Belgium is one of the countries that supports LoCAL with funds, most recently for the launch of LoCAL in Mozambique and Uganda.

    Speaking at Tuesday's event, Heidy Rombouts, Director General for Development, Cooperation and Humanitarian Aid at the Belgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, highlighted the potential of countries coming together to highlight adaptation needs, underlining the value of LoCAL as a means to "unlock collective action".

    The LoCAL mechanism is delivering at scale: LoCAL has engaged more than 300 local governments and benefited more than 12.5 million people.

    With the formal recognition of LoCAL as an existing NMA at COP27, the ministers hope that funding can be unlocked for the national deployment of LoCAL in the 32 countries involved in the mechanism; this would generate adaptation results for more than 600 million people on the front lines of climate change.

    "This event is an important step on the road to COP27 in Egypt, from which we have great expectations...

    The COP Presidency has repeatedly called for action, not words; implementation, and not promises," said the Honorable Ms. Garama Saratou Rabiou Inoussa, Minister for the Environment and Combating Desertification, speaking in a video message from Niamey, the capital of Niger: “Niger supports the recognition of the LoCAL mechanism as a non-market approach under Article 6.8 of the Paris Agreement.

    .” To engage LoCAL, interested governments can submit formal requests to UNCDF to launch the design phase and start raising funding Learn more about Climate Week New York and how we're getting involved.

  •   On the sidelines of the 2022 edition of Africa Climate Week https bit ly 3UEJZAj a session titled Limiting Loss and Damage through Enhanced Adaptation Action in Africa featured a vibrant and timely discussion on an aspect of climate change that generally receives little attention capturing and assessing the costs and damages associated with climate change The African Development Bank and the Konrad Adenauer Foundation of Germany hosted the event which provided a forum for panelists and participants to discuss the importance of defining and assessing such loss and damage to property economies lives and livelihoods due to climatic disasters Africa is recognized as the continent most vulnerable to climate change Moderator Olufunso Somorin Senior Regional Officer African Development Bank opened the discussion He noted that it is important for African countries to measure climate change related loss and damage to enable proper quantification and well designed responses that are best suited to the country context It was also important to capture those losses that occurred even in instances where preemptive climate adaptation actions had been taken he added Fatten Agad senior adviser on climate diplomacy and geopolitics at the Africa Climate Foundation called for the production of a report to serve as a guide and baseline for assessing climate related loss and damage It has already been shown that the socio economic impact faced by African countries in dealing with the Covid 19 crisis has been very high and adding the burden of financing something like loss and damage would be unfair he said Anja Beretta Director of Energy Security and Climate Change in Africa at Konrad Adenauer urged African countries to integrate mechanisms to address loss and damage in their Nationally Determined Contributions NDCs She also called for designated institutions and operational structures to ensure the efficient and effective use of climate finance to advance the discussion on financial flows to loss and damage Stephane Bonamy Head of the International Committee of the Red Cross Regional Delegation in Cameroon said For countries facing both conflict and climate change impacts it is imperative that preventive measures are put in place soon enough to reduce the extent of losses and damages suffered and reduce the burden on communities He pointed out that 14 of the 25 countries most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change worldwide also face some form of conflict Dr Olumide Abimbola Executive Director of the African Policy Research Institute in Berlin reiterated the need to incorporate more African examples of past and current loss and damage into textbooks and journals There was agreement among participants on the need for Africa to prioritize timely comprehensive and large scale adaptation actions to avoid or minimize future loss and damage There was also consensus on the urgent need to expand financial flows from public and private sources to adaptation action across Africa They cited the African Development Bank s Africa Adaptation Accelerator Program https bit ly 3xESy3Y a joint initiative with the Global Adaptation Center as a positive example The program seeks to mobilize 25 billion over five years to accelerate and scale climate adaptation actions across the continent Participants also called for new strategic alliances to drive adaptation policies plans and investments in Africa through the implementation of NDCs and leveraging synergies with initiatives such as the Africa Disaster Risk Financing programme
    Can today’s Adaptation Action minimize future loss and damage in Africa?
      On the sidelines of the 2022 edition of Africa Climate Week https bit ly 3UEJZAj a session titled Limiting Loss and Damage through Enhanced Adaptation Action in Africa featured a vibrant and timely discussion on an aspect of climate change that generally receives little attention capturing and assessing the costs and damages associated with climate change The African Development Bank and the Konrad Adenauer Foundation of Germany hosted the event which provided a forum for panelists and participants to discuss the importance of defining and assessing such loss and damage to property economies lives and livelihoods due to climatic disasters Africa is recognized as the continent most vulnerable to climate change Moderator Olufunso Somorin Senior Regional Officer African Development Bank opened the discussion He noted that it is important for African countries to measure climate change related loss and damage to enable proper quantification and well designed responses that are best suited to the country context It was also important to capture those losses that occurred even in instances where preemptive climate adaptation actions had been taken he added Fatten Agad senior adviser on climate diplomacy and geopolitics at the Africa Climate Foundation called for the production of a report to serve as a guide and baseline for assessing climate related loss and damage It has already been shown that the socio economic impact faced by African countries in dealing with the Covid 19 crisis has been very high and adding the burden of financing something like loss and damage would be unfair he said Anja Beretta Director of Energy Security and Climate Change in Africa at Konrad Adenauer urged African countries to integrate mechanisms to address loss and damage in their Nationally Determined Contributions NDCs She also called for designated institutions and operational structures to ensure the efficient and effective use of climate finance to advance the discussion on financial flows to loss and damage Stephane Bonamy Head of the International Committee of the Red Cross Regional Delegation in Cameroon said For countries facing both conflict and climate change impacts it is imperative that preventive measures are put in place soon enough to reduce the extent of losses and damages suffered and reduce the burden on communities He pointed out that 14 of the 25 countries most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change worldwide also face some form of conflict Dr Olumide Abimbola Executive Director of the African Policy Research Institute in Berlin reiterated the need to incorporate more African examples of past and current loss and damage into textbooks and journals There was agreement among participants on the need for Africa to prioritize timely comprehensive and large scale adaptation actions to avoid or minimize future loss and damage There was also consensus on the urgent need to expand financial flows from public and private sources to adaptation action across Africa They cited the African Development Bank s Africa Adaptation Accelerator Program https bit ly 3xESy3Y a joint initiative with the Global Adaptation Center as a positive example The program seeks to mobilize 25 billion over five years to accelerate and scale climate adaptation actions across the continent Participants also called for new strategic alliances to drive adaptation policies plans and investments in Africa through the implementation of NDCs and leveraging synergies with initiatives such as the Africa Disaster Risk Financing programme
    Can today’s Adaptation Action minimize future loss and damage in Africa?
    Africa2 weeks ago

    Can today’s Adaptation Action minimize future loss and damage in Africa?

    On the sidelines of the 2022 edition of Africa Climate Week (https://bit.ly/3UEJZAj), a session titled Limiting Loss and Damage through Enhanced Adaptation Action in Africa featured a vibrant and timely discussion on an aspect of climate change that generally receives little attention: capturing and assessing the costs and damages associated with climate change.

    The African Development Bank and the Konrad Adenauer Foundation of Germany hosted the event, which provided a forum for panelists and participants to discuss the importance of defining and assessing such loss and damage to property, economies, lives and livelihoods due to climatic disasters.

    Africa is recognized as the continent most vulnerable to climate change.

    Moderator Olufunso Somorin, Senior Regional Officer, African Development Bank, opened the discussion.

    He noted that it is important for African countries to measure climate change-related loss and damage to enable proper quantification and well-designed responses that are best suited to the country context.

    It was also important to capture those losses that occurred even in instances where preemptive climate adaptation actions had been taken, he added.

    Fatten Agad, senior adviser on climate diplomacy and geopolitics at the Africa Climate Foundation, called for the production of a report to serve as a guide and baseline for assessing climate-related loss and damage.

    “It has already been shown that the socio-economic impact faced by African countries in dealing with the Covid-19 crisis has been very high, and adding the burden of financing something like loss and damage would be unfair,” he said.

    Anja Beretta, Director of Energy Security and Climate Change in Africa at Konrad Adenauer, urged African countries to integrate mechanisms to address loss and damage in their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).

    She also called for designated institutions and operational structures to ensure the efficient and effective use of climate finance to advance the discussion on financial flows to loss and damage.

    Stephane Bonamy, Head of the International Committee of the Red Cross Regional Delegation in Cameroon, said: “For countries facing both conflict and climate change impacts, it is imperative that preventive measures are put in place soon enough to reduce the extent of losses.

    and damages suffered and reduce the burden on communities”.

    He pointed out that 14 of the 25 countries most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change worldwide also face some form of conflict.

    Dr. Olumide Abimbola, Executive Director of the African Policy Research Institute in Berlin, reiterated the need to incorporate more African examples of past and current loss and damage into textbooks and journals.

    There was agreement among participants on the need for Africa to prioritize timely, comprehensive and large-scale adaptation actions to avoid or minimize future loss and damage.

    There was also consensus on the urgent need to expand financial flows from public and private sources to adaptation action across Africa.

    They cited the African Development Bank's Africa Adaptation Accelerator Program (https://bit.ly/3xESy3Y), a joint initiative with the Global Adaptation Center, as a positive example.

    The program seeks to mobilize $25 billion over five years to accelerate and scale climate adaptation actions across the continent.

    Participants also called for new strategic alliances to drive adaptation policies, plans and investments in Africa through the implementation of NDCs and leveraging synergies with initiatives such as the Africa Disaster Risk Financing programme.

  •   The recently released Country Climate and Development Report CCDR for the G5 Sahel region estimates that up to 13 5 million people across the Sahel could fall into poverty due to climate change related shocks to 2050 if urgent climate adaptation measures are not taken The Sahel region is particularly vulnerable to land degradation experiencing more extreme droughts floods and other impacts caused by climate change Three of the G5 countries Chad Niger and Mali are among the seven countries most vulnerable to climate change and their ability to adapt is significantly limited by poverty and fragility Climate change is severely affecting people and undermining hard won development gains Analysis shows that it is deepening cycles of poverty fragility and vulnerability across the Sahel said World Bank Vice President for West and Central Africa Ousmane Diagana With the population projected to double to 160 million people in the next 20 years Sahelian countries must accelerate growth and prioritize climate adaptation if they are to reap the demographic dividend and put the region on a growth path sustainable and inclusive The G5 Sahel countries combined contribute less than 1 of global greenhouse gas emissions and all five countries have committed to achieving net zero emissions by 2050 In addition Burkina Faso Chad Mali and Niger pledged in the COP26 in Glasgow to halt and reverse forest loss and land degradation by 2030 Nationally Determined Contributions NDCs under the Paris Agreement and additional estimates in the CCDR show that More than US 30 billion is needed in the G5 Sahel countries for climate actions The Report also shows that the damage caused by climate change can be significantly reduced There are significant opportunities for more resilient development in the Sahel says Clara de Sousa World Bank country director for Burkina Faso Chad Mali and Niger This diagnostic provides a roadmap to help countries scale up reforms and investments to diversify their economies in a more resilient and inclusive way It provides pathways to greening these economies by restoring degraded lands and driving economic opportunity for communities through programs like the Great Green Wall Initiative Across the region millions of people are at risk of or already experiencing food insecurity as a result of lower than expected agricultural production due to climate shocks rising insecurity and rising food prices The food security crisis in the Sahel region is expected to deteriorate further in 2022 Social protection programs and agricultural landscape initiatives to adopt effective resource management practices and increase the use of adaptive technologies could be scaled up to mitigate the impact of the food security crisis and help the agricultural sector become more climate resilient in the medium term All five countries are developing Adaptive Social Protection systems to provide cash transfers and regular services to the poorest and most vulnerable households enabling them to cope and adapt to future climate related shocks The report provides further policy recommendations to advance development and adaptation in five specific sectors or areas Institutions Financing and Risk Mitigation Energy Landscapes including water environment and agriculture and Cities Over the past three years the World Bank Group has provided a record level of financial resources to the G5 Sahel countries as part of its strategy to address fragility conflict and violence with 8 9 billion from the International Association of Development IDA However the climate crisis combined with post COVID 19 economic recovery needs growing insecurity and food security crises as well as the effects of the war in Ukraine on global food fertilizer and energy prices require increased support from the international community World Bank Group Country Climate and Development Reports The World Bank Group Country Climate and Development Reports CCDRs are new core diagnostic reports that integrate climate change and development considerations They will help countries prioritize the most impactful actions that can reduce greenhouse gas GHG emissions and drive adaptation while meeting broader development goals The CCDRs are based on rigorous data and research and identify the main pathways to reduce GHG emissions and climate vulnerabilities including the costs and challenges as well as the benefits and opportunities of doing so The reports suggest concrete priority actions to support the low carbon and resilient transition As public documents the CCDRs aim to inform governments citizens the private sector and development partners and enable commitments to the climate and development agenda The CCDRs will feed into other Bank Group core diagnostics country commitments and operations and help attract funding and direct financing for high impact climate action
    Sahel countries must accelerate growth and prioritize climate adaptation to alleviate poverty and tackle food insecurity: new World Bank Group report
      The recently released Country Climate and Development Report CCDR for the G5 Sahel region estimates that up to 13 5 million people across the Sahel could fall into poverty due to climate change related shocks to 2050 if urgent climate adaptation measures are not taken The Sahel region is particularly vulnerable to land degradation experiencing more extreme droughts floods and other impacts caused by climate change Three of the G5 countries Chad Niger and Mali are among the seven countries most vulnerable to climate change and their ability to adapt is significantly limited by poverty and fragility Climate change is severely affecting people and undermining hard won development gains Analysis shows that it is deepening cycles of poverty fragility and vulnerability across the Sahel said World Bank Vice President for West and Central Africa Ousmane Diagana With the population projected to double to 160 million people in the next 20 years Sahelian countries must accelerate growth and prioritize climate adaptation if they are to reap the demographic dividend and put the region on a growth path sustainable and inclusive The G5 Sahel countries combined contribute less than 1 of global greenhouse gas emissions and all five countries have committed to achieving net zero emissions by 2050 In addition Burkina Faso Chad Mali and Niger pledged in the COP26 in Glasgow to halt and reverse forest loss and land degradation by 2030 Nationally Determined Contributions NDCs under the Paris Agreement and additional estimates in the CCDR show that More than US 30 billion is needed in the G5 Sahel countries for climate actions The Report also shows that the damage caused by climate change can be significantly reduced There are significant opportunities for more resilient development in the Sahel says Clara de Sousa World Bank country director for Burkina Faso Chad Mali and Niger This diagnostic provides a roadmap to help countries scale up reforms and investments to diversify their economies in a more resilient and inclusive way It provides pathways to greening these economies by restoring degraded lands and driving economic opportunity for communities through programs like the Great Green Wall Initiative Across the region millions of people are at risk of or already experiencing food insecurity as a result of lower than expected agricultural production due to climate shocks rising insecurity and rising food prices The food security crisis in the Sahel region is expected to deteriorate further in 2022 Social protection programs and agricultural landscape initiatives to adopt effective resource management practices and increase the use of adaptive technologies could be scaled up to mitigate the impact of the food security crisis and help the agricultural sector become more climate resilient in the medium term All five countries are developing Adaptive Social Protection systems to provide cash transfers and regular services to the poorest and most vulnerable households enabling them to cope and adapt to future climate related shocks The report provides further policy recommendations to advance development and adaptation in five specific sectors or areas Institutions Financing and Risk Mitigation Energy Landscapes including water environment and agriculture and Cities Over the past three years the World Bank Group has provided a record level of financial resources to the G5 Sahel countries as part of its strategy to address fragility conflict and violence with 8 9 billion from the International Association of Development IDA However the climate crisis combined with post COVID 19 economic recovery needs growing insecurity and food security crises as well as the effects of the war in Ukraine on global food fertilizer and energy prices require increased support from the international community World Bank Group Country Climate and Development Reports The World Bank Group Country Climate and Development Reports CCDRs are new core diagnostic reports that integrate climate change and development considerations They will help countries prioritize the most impactful actions that can reduce greenhouse gas GHG emissions and drive adaptation while meeting broader development goals The CCDRs are based on rigorous data and research and identify the main pathways to reduce GHG emissions and climate vulnerabilities including the costs and challenges as well as the benefits and opportunities of doing so The reports suggest concrete priority actions to support the low carbon and resilient transition As public documents the CCDRs aim to inform governments citizens the private sector and development partners and enable commitments to the climate and development agenda The CCDRs will feed into other Bank Group core diagnostics country commitments and operations and help attract funding and direct financing for high impact climate action
    Sahel countries must accelerate growth and prioritize climate adaptation to alleviate poverty and tackle food insecurity: new World Bank Group report
    Africa2 weeks ago

    Sahel countries must accelerate growth and prioritize climate adaptation to alleviate poverty and tackle food insecurity: new World Bank Group report

    The recently released Country Climate and Development Report (CCDR) for the G5 Sahel region estimates that up to 13.5 million people across the Sahel could fall into poverty due to climate change-related shocks to 2050 if urgent climate adaptation measures are not taken.

    The Sahel region is particularly vulnerable to land degradation, experiencing more extreme droughts, floods and other impacts caused by climate change.

    Three of the G5 countries (Chad, Niger and Mali) are among the seven countries most vulnerable to climate change and their ability to adapt is significantly limited by poverty and fragility.

    “Climate change is severely affecting people and undermining hard-won development gains.

    Analysis shows that it is deepening cycles of poverty, fragility and vulnerability across the Sahel,” said World Bank Vice President for West and Central Africa Ousmane Diagana.

    “With the population projected to double to 160 million people in the next 20 years, Sahelian countries must accelerate growth and prioritize climate adaptation if they are to reap the demographic dividend and put the region on a growth path.

    sustainable and inclusive.

    The G5 Sahel countries combined contribute less than 1% of global greenhouse gas emissions, and all five countries have committed to achieving net-zero emissions by 2050.

    In addition, Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali and Niger pledged in the COP26 in Glasgow to halt and reverse forest loss and land degradation by 2030.

    Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) under the Paris Agreement and additional estimates in the CCDR show that More than US$30 billion is needed in the G5 Sahel countries for climate actions.

    The Report also shows that the damage caused by climate change can be significantly reduced.

    “There are significant opportunities for more resilient development in the Sahel,” says Clara de Sousa, World Bank country director for Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali and Niger.

    “This diagnostic provides a roadmap to help countries scale up reforms and investments to diversify their economies in a more resilient and inclusive way.

    It provides pathways to greening these economies by restoring degraded lands and driving economic opportunity for communities through programs like the Great Green Wall Initiative.” Across the region, millions of people are at risk of or already experiencing food insecurity as a result of lower-than-expected agricultural production due to climate shocks, rising insecurity and rising food prices.

    The food security crisis in the Sahel region is expected to deteriorate further in 2022.

    Social protection programs and agricultural landscape initiatives to adopt effective resource management practices and increase the use of adaptive technologies could be scaled up to mitigate the impact of the food security crisis and help the agricultural sector become more climate resilient in the medium term.

    All five countries are developing Adaptive Social Protection systems to provide cash transfers and regular services to the poorest and most vulnerable households, enabling them to cope and adapt to future climate-related shocks.

    The report provides further policy recommendations to advance development and adaptation in five specific sectors or areas: Institutions, Financing and Risk Mitigation, Energy, Landscapes (including water, environment and agriculture) and Cities.

    Over the past three years, the World Bank Group has provided a record level of financial resources to the G5 Sahel countries as part of its strategy to address fragility, conflict and violence, with $8.9 billion from the International Association of Development (IDA).

    However, the climate crisis combined with post-COVID-19 economic recovery needs, growing insecurity and food security crises, as well as the effects of the war in Ukraine on global food, fertilizer and energy prices, require increased support from the international community.

    World Bank Group Country Climate and Development Reports The World Bank Group Country Climate and Development Reports (CCDRs) are new core diagnostic reports that integrate climate change and development considerations.

    They will help countries prioritize the most impactful actions that can reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and drive adaptation, while meeting broader development goals.

    The CCDRs are based on rigorous data and research and identify the main pathways to reduce GHG emissions and climate vulnerabilities, including the costs and challenges, as well as the benefits and opportunities of doing so.

    The reports suggest concrete priority actions to support the low-carbon and resilient transition.

    As public documents, the CCDRs aim to inform governments, citizens, the private sector and development partners and enable commitments to the climate and development agenda.

    The CCDRs will feed into other Bank Group core diagnostics, country commitments, and operations, and help attract funding and direct financing for high-impact climate action.

  •   Climate Envoy Kerry Announces Funding at African Ministers Meeting in Dakar Funding Will Drive Achievement of Global Methane Pledge Goals The US government has announced that it will provide a 5 million grant to the African Development Bank to support efforts to reduce methane gas emissions across Africa Methane accounts for about half of the net increase in global average temperature since the pre industrial era The grant subject to the completion of US national procedures and approvals will go to the multi donor Africa Climate Change Fund https bit ly 3DtKhno which is managed by the African Bank developmental The Fund supports a wide range of activities spanning climate resilience and low carbon growth US Special Presidential Climate Envoy John Kerry made the announcement at a breakfast on the sidelines of the 18th African Ministerial Conference on the Environment in Dakar He said Over 25 countries on the continent have joined the Global Methane Pledge a resounding level of support for the importance of methane in keeping 1 5 degrees within reach I am very pleased that the African Development Bank is responding to increased global attention on methane emissions and is planning to increase its own focus on methane reduction in the coming years Kerry added The Climate and Clean Air Coalition CCAC and the Global Methane Center have also pledged additional funding to address methane emissions in African countries The Global Methane Center will contribute 5 million dollars over the next three years The Center funds methane mitigation efforts The Coalition a voluntary association of governments intergovernmental organizations companies and research institutions will provide 1 2 million The global methane commitment launched during COP26 aims to reduce methane emissions by at least 30 percent from 2020 levels over the next seven years Acknowledging the contributions African Development Bank Vice President for Energy Climate and Green Growth Kevin Kariuki said https bit ly 3R1C7G1 that the Bank planned to create activities within the ACCF to support methane reduction With the support of the US government and other donors and non state actors we intend to create a dedicated pillar of activities within our African Climate Change Fund to support methane reduction including working with countries to include methane in their Nationally Defined Contributions and develop pipeline methane reduction projects for future investment Kariuki said The African Development Bank will publish a methane benchmark report covering methane emissions from the energy and waste sector in Africa at the upcoming COP 27 in Sharm El Sheikh Egypt This will provide an excellent foundation for further focus on methane emissions Kariuki said The African Development Bank s Africa Economic Outlook 2022 projects that Africa will need up to 1 6 trillion between 2020 2030 to implement its climate action and NDC commitments The African Development Bank has committed to mobilizing 25 billion for climate finance by 2025 more than 50 of that funding will go to adaptation projects The resumption of the five day 18th session of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment https bit ly 3SahAQb in Dakar ends on Friday September 16 Organized by the United Nations Environment Programme it provides African environment ministers with a forum to offer policy guidance that will help strengthen Africa s voice at COP27
    US Government Announces Million Grant to Support African Development Bank in Fighting Methane Emissions
      Climate Envoy Kerry Announces Funding at African Ministers Meeting in Dakar Funding Will Drive Achievement of Global Methane Pledge Goals The US government has announced that it will provide a 5 million grant to the African Development Bank to support efforts to reduce methane gas emissions across Africa Methane accounts for about half of the net increase in global average temperature since the pre industrial era The grant subject to the completion of US national procedures and approvals will go to the multi donor Africa Climate Change Fund https bit ly 3DtKhno which is managed by the African Bank developmental The Fund supports a wide range of activities spanning climate resilience and low carbon growth US Special Presidential Climate Envoy John Kerry made the announcement at a breakfast on the sidelines of the 18th African Ministerial Conference on the Environment in Dakar He said Over 25 countries on the continent have joined the Global Methane Pledge a resounding level of support for the importance of methane in keeping 1 5 degrees within reach I am very pleased that the African Development Bank is responding to increased global attention on methane emissions and is planning to increase its own focus on methane reduction in the coming years Kerry added The Climate and Clean Air Coalition CCAC and the Global Methane Center have also pledged additional funding to address methane emissions in African countries The Global Methane Center will contribute 5 million dollars over the next three years The Center funds methane mitigation efforts The Coalition a voluntary association of governments intergovernmental organizations companies and research institutions will provide 1 2 million The global methane commitment launched during COP26 aims to reduce methane emissions by at least 30 percent from 2020 levels over the next seven years Acknowledging the contributions African Development Bank Vice President for Energy Climate and Green Growth Kevin Kariuki said https bit ly 3R1C7G1 that the Bank planned to create activities within the ACCF to support methane reduction With the support of the US government and other donors and non state actors we intend to create a dedicated pillar of activities within our African Climate Change Fund to support methane reduction including working with countries to include methane in their Nationally Defined Contributions and develop pipeline methane reduction projects for future investment Kariuki said The African Development Bank will publish a methane benchmark report covering methane emissions from the energy and waste sector in Africa at the upcoming COP 27 in Sharm El Sheikh Egypt This will provide an excellent foundation for further focus on methane emissions Kariuki said The African Development Bank s Africa Economic Outlook 2022 projects that Africa will need up to 1 6 trillion between 2020 2030 to implement its climate action and NDC commitments The African Development Bank has committed to mobilizing 25 billion for climate finance by 2025 more than 50 of that funding will go to adaptation projects The resumption of the five day 18th session of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment https bit ly 3SahAQb in Dakar ends on Friday September 16 Organized by the United Nations Environment Programme it provides African environment ministers with a forum to offer policy guidance that will help strengthen Africa s voice at COP27
    US Government Announces Million Grant to Support African Development Bank in Fighting Methane Emissions
    Africa3 weeks ago

    US Government Announces $5 Million Grant to Support African Development Bank in Fighting Methane Emissions

    Climate Envoy Kerry Announces Funding at African Ministers Meeting in Dakar; Funding Will Drive Achievement of Global Methane Pledge Goals The US government has announced that it will provide a $5 million grant to the African Development Bank to support efforts to reduce methane gas emissions across Africa.

    Methane accounts for about half of the net increase in global average temperature since the pre-industrial era.

    The grant, subject to the completion of US national procedures and approvals, will go to the multi-donor Africa Climate Change Fund (https://bit.ly/3DtKhno), which is managed by the African Bank developmental.

    The Fund supports a wide range of activities spanning climate resilience and low-carbon growth.

    US Special Presidential Climate Envoy John Kerry made the announcement at a breakfast on the sidelines of the 18th African Ministerial Conference on the Environment in Dakar.

    He said: "Over 25 countries on the continent have joined the Global Methane Pledge, a resounding level of support for the importance of methane in keeping 1.5 degrees within reach."

    "I am very pleased that the African Development Bank is responding to increased global attention on methane emissions and is planning to increase its own focus on methane reduction in the coming years," Kerry added.

    The Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) and the Global Methane Center have also pledged additional funding to address methane emissions in African countries.

    The Global Methane Center will contribute $5 million dollars over the next three years.

    The Center funds methane mitigation efforts.

    The Coalition, a voluntary association of governments, intergovernmental organizations, companies and research institutions, will provide $1.2 million.

    The global methane commitment, launched during COP26, aims to reduce methane emissions by at least 30 percent from 2020 levels over the next seven years.

    Acknowledging the contributions, African Development Bank Vice President for Energy, Climate and Green Growth Kevin Kariuki said (https://bit.ly/3R1C7G1) that the Bank planned to create activities within the ACCF to support methane reduction.

    “With the support of the US government and other donors and non-state actors, we intend to create a dedicated pillar of activities within our African Climate Change Fund to support methane reduction, including working with countries to include methane in their Nationally Defined Contributions and develop pipeline methane reduction projects for future investment,” Kariuki said.

    The African Development Bank will publish a methane benchmark report covering methane emissions from the energy and waste sector in Africa at the upcoming COP 27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt.

    "This will provide an excellent foundation for further focus on methane emissions," Kariuki said.

    The African Development Bank's Africa Economic Outlook 2022 projects that Africa will need up to $1.6 trillion between 2020-2030 to implement its climate action and NDC commitments.

    The African Development Bank has committed to mobilizing $25 billion for climate finance by 2025; more than 50% of that funding will go to adaptation projects.

    The resumption of the five-day 18th session of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment (https://bit.ly/3SahAQb) in Dakar ends on Friday, September 16.

    Organized by the United Nations Environment Programme, it provides African environment ministers with a forum to offer policy guidance that will help strengthen Africa's voice at COP27.

  •  The Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and the U S on Tuesday signed a Memorandum of Understanding MoU on Agriculture Innovation Mission AIM for Climate Speaking at the event in Abuja the Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development Dr Mohammad Abubakar said that food security was both a fundamental objective and expected outcome of development policies in Nigeria Food security is currently both a fundamental objective and an expected outcome of development policies in Nigeria as the country currently faces a challenge in nutrition requirements he said Abubakar said that the AIMS for climate objectives were in line with the objective of the Ministry of Agriculture which is contained in the National Agricultural Technology and Innovation Policy NATIP policy document To show the importance of the sector agriculture is one of the five sectors selected to implement Nigeria s Nationally Determined Contribution NDC The sector by 2030 is expected to achieve potential Green House Gas GHG emissions reduction by 74 million tonnes NDC implementation action plan for the agricultural sector through Climate Smart Agriculture CSA and reforestation measures he said He said the development of organic farming and promotion of organic manure composting for farmers was one of the CSA activities implemented by the ministry The Minister also made it known that the Ministry has been able to embark on CSA activities which included establishment of Pilot Demonstration on Agroforestry and Farmers Managed Natural Regeneration FMNR Also Conversation for Agriculture for Improved Food Security and Livelihood he said Abubakar asked for US intervention to assist the Nigerian agricultural sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the distribution of biofortified drought and flood tolerance seeds and others Another area of intervention the minister is the improvement in genetics of the dairy herd and the upscale of CSA profiling to other States in the country The minister said there was need for intervention in agricultural GHG estimation and accounting at national and sub national levels for adequate mitigation planning Earlier the US Special Envoy on Climate Change John Kerry expressed concern over the devastating effects of climate change which Nigeria is also facing in the agricultural sector and others He said something needed to be done to mitigate the impact which neccessiated AIM climate in US The AIM for climate is innovation mission for Climate it is Initiative we started in the United States with the United Arab Emirates In 2023 the United States will host the climate ministerial that is next spring and we are going to be proud to invite Nigeria to be there taking part in that meeting And we are very happy to have the leadership of Nigeria at the table in Africa and globally as AIM for Climate continues to grow and define itself So we think this really exciting work ahead of us We welcome the partnership of Nigeria in the separate Thank you for being ready to sign this agreement and we look forward to working with you he said nanews NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Nigeria,  U.S , sign MoU on agricultural innovation mission for climate
     The Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and the U S on Tuesday signed a Memorandum of Understanding MoU on Agriculture Innovation Mission AIM for Climate Speaking at the event in Abuja the Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development Dr Mohammad Abubakar said that food security was both a fundamental objective and expected outcome of development policies in Nigeria Food security is currently both a fundamental objective and an expected outcome of development policies in Nigeria as the country currently faces a challenge in nutrition requirements he said Abubakar said that the AIMS for climate objectives were in line with the objective of the Ministry of Agriculture which is contained in the National Agricultural Technology and Innovation Policy NATIP policy document To show the importance of the sector agriculture is one of the five sectors selected to implement Nigeria s Nationally Determined Contribution NDC The sector by 2030 is expected to achieve potential Green House Gas GHG emissions reduction by 74 million tonnes NDC implementation action plan for the agricultural sector through Climate Smart Agriculture CSA and reforestation measures he said He said the development of organic farming and promotion of organic manure composting for farmers was one of the CSA activities implemented by the ministry The Minister also made it known that the Ministry has been able to embark on CSA activities which included establishment of Pilot Demonstration on Agroforestry and Farmers Managed Natural Regeneration FMNR Also Conversation for Agriculture for Improved Food Security and Livelihood he said Abubakar asked for US intervention to assist the Nigerian agricultural sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the distribution of biofortified drought and flood tolerance seeds and others Another area of intervention the minister is the improvement in genetics of the dairy herd and the upscale of CSA profiling to other States in the country The minister said there was need for intervention in agricultural GHG estimation and accounting at national and sub national levels for adequate mitigation planning Earlier the US Special Envoy on Climate Change John Kerry expressed concern over the devastating effects of climate change which Nigeria is also facing in the agricultural sector and others He said something needed to be done to mitigate the impact which neccessiated AIM climate in US The AIM for climate is innovation mission for Climate it is Initiative we started in the United States with the United Arab Emirates In 2023 the United States will host the climate ministerial that is next spring and we are going to be proud to invite Nigeria to be there taking part in that meeting And we are very happy to have the leadership of Nigeria at the table in Africa and globally as AIM for Climate continues to grow and define itself So we think this really exciting work ahead of us We welcome the partnership of Nigeria in the separate Thank you for being ready to sign this agreement and we look forward to working with you he said nanews NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Nigeria,  U.S , sign MoU on agricultural innovation mission for climate
    General news3 weeks ago

    Nigeria,  U.S , sign MoU on agricultural innovation mission for climate

    The Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and the U.

    S. on Tuesday,  signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), on Agriculture Innovation Mission (AIM) for Climate.

    Speaking at the event in Abuja, the Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development, Dr Mohammad Abubakar, said that food security was both a fundamental objective and expected outcome of development policies in Nigeria.

    ” Food security is currently both a fundamental objective and an expected outcome of development policies in Nigeria; as the country currently faces a challenge in nutrition requirements,” he said.

    Abubakar said that the AIMS for climate objectives were in line with the objective of the Ministry of Agriculture which is contained in the National Agricultural Technology and Innovation Policy (NATIP) policy document.

    ” To show the importance of the sector, agriculture is one of the five sectors selected to implement Nigeria’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC).

    ” The sector by 2030 is expected to achieve potential Green House Gas  (GHG) emissions reduction by 74 million tonnes (NDC implementation action plan for the agricultural sector) through Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) and reforestation measures,” he said.

    He said the development of organic farming and promotion of organic manure composting for farmers was  one of the CSA activities implemented by the ministry.

    The Minister also made it known that the Ministry has been able to embark on CSA  activities, which included establishment of Pilot Demonstration on Agroforestry, and Farmers’ Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR) .

    ” Also, Conversation for Agriculture for Improved Food Security and Livelihood,” he said.

    Abubakar, asked for US intervention to assist the Nigerian agricultural sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the distribution of biofortified drought and flood tolerance seeds, and others.

    Another area of intervention the minister is the improvement in genetics of the dairy herd and the upscale of CSA profiling to other States in the country.

    The minister said there was need for intervention in agricultural GHG estimation and accounting at national and sub-national levels for adequate mitigation planning.

    Earlier, the US  Special Envoy on Climate Change, John Kerry, expressed concern over the devastating effects of climate change, which Nigeria is also facing in the agricultural sector and others.

    He said something needed to be done to mitigate the impact which neccessiated AIM climate in US.

    ” The AIM for climate is innovation mission for Climate, it is Initiative we started in the United States with the United Arab Emirates.

    ” In 2023, the United States will host the climate ministerial, that is next spring, and we are going to be proud to invite Nigeria to be there taking part in that meeting. 

    ” And we are very happy to have the leadership of Nigeria at the table in Africa and globally, as AIM for Climate continues to grow and define itself.

    ” So we think this really exciting work ahead of us.

    We welcome the partnership of Nigeria in the separate.

    ” Thank you for being ready to sign this agreement and we look forward to working with you,” he said.

    nanews.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  Africa has been losing from five per cent to 15 per cent of its Gross Domestic Product GDP per capita growth because of climate change and its related impacts Group Acting Chief Economist and Vice President African Development Bank AfDB Mr Kevin Urama said this in a statement posted on AfDB website on Tuesday Urama added that Africa needed 1 6 trillion dollars between 2022 and 2030 to meet its nationally determined contributions NDCs According to the statement the AfDB vice president said this on Sept 7 at a panel discussion on the sidelines of Egypt International Cooperation Forum Egypt ICF 2022 in Cairo NDCs embody efforts by each country to reduce national emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change They are submitted by countries under the Paris Agreement of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change The panel discussion was titled African Countries Ownership in Determining Climate Agenda Collectively African countries received only 18 3 billion dollars in climate finance between 2016 and 2019 This results in a climate finance gap of up to 1288 2 billion dollars annually from 2020 to 2030 Climate change affects Africa severely while the continent contributes to only three per cent of global emissions said Urama He reiterated the need for the global community to meet its 100 billion dollar commitment to help the developing countries and African economies to mitigate the impacts of climate change and to adapt to it Investing in climate adaptation in the context of sustainable development is the best way to cope with the climate change impacts gas must remain included in the continent s plan for the gradual transition to clean energy he said He also affirmed that Africa had great potential in terms of green investment opportunities that the private sector including banks could tap into Egyptian Environment Minister Yasmine Fouad highlighted Egypt s National Strategy for Alignment for both climate mitigation and adaptation which had five key pillars The first pillar focuses on how we can adopt a low greenhouse path which centers on the sectors around renewable transport gas industry and waste The second one relates to adaptation and how best to make the communities more resilient The third and fourth ones are focused on how to protect coastal zones and have more accessibility and availability of water The last one is about the need for developing more smart and integrated concoctions and that s the stereotype of a strategy on climate said Fouad He however added that the fight against climate change needed an integration among the government civil society and the private sector Ghada Wally Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime UNODC said women and young people were among Africa s best assets Wally who is also Director General of the United Nations Office in Vienna stressed the importance of exploring avenues to tap into this significant asset for the sake of the continent s sustainable development The Egypt ICF 2022 was held from Sept 7 to 9 in Cairo NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Africa loses 15% GDP to climate change – AfDB
     Africa has been losing from five per cent to 15 per cent of its Gross Domestic Product GDP per capita growth because of climate change and its related impacts Group Acting Chief Economist and Vice President African Development Bank AfDB Mr Kevin Urama said this in a statement posted on AfDB website on Tuesday Urama added that Africa needed 1 6 trillion dollars between 2022 and 2030 to meet its nationally determined contributions NDCs According to the statement the AfDB vice president said this on Sept 7 at a panel discussion on the sidelines of Egypt International Cooperation Forum Egypt ICF 2022 in Cairo NDCs embody efforts by each country to reduce national emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change They are submitted by countries under the Paris Agreement of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change The panel discussion was titled African Countries Ownership in Determining Climate Agenda Collectively African countries received only 18 3 billion dollars in climate finance between 2016 and 2019 This results in a climate finance gap of up to 1288 2 billion dollars annually from 2020 to 2030 Climate change affects Africa severely while the continent contributes to only three per cent of global emissions said Urama He reiterated the need for the global community to meet its 100 billion dollar commitment to help the developing countries and African economies to mitigate the impacts of climate change and to adapt to it Investing in climate adaptation in the context of sustainable development is the best way to cope with the climate change impacts gas must remain included in the continent s plan for the gradual transition to clean energy he said He also affirmed that Africa had great potential in terms of green investment opportunities that the private sector including banks could tap into Egyptian Environment Minister Yasmine Fouad highlighted Egypt s National Strategy for Alignment for both climate mitigation and adaptation which had five key pillars The first pillar focuses on how we can adopt a low greenhouse path which centers on the sectors around renewable transport gas industry and waste The second one relates to adaptation and how best to make the communities more resilient The third and fourth ones are focused on how to protect coastal zones and have more accessibility and availability of water The last one is about the need for developing more smart and integrated concoctions and that s the stereotype of a strategy on climate said Fouad He however added that the fight against climate change needed an integration among the government civil society and the private sector Ghada Wally Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime UNODC said women and young people were among Africa s best assets Wally who is also Director General of the United Nations Office in Vienna stressed the importance of exploring avenues to tap into this significant asset for the sake of the continent s sustainable development The Egypt ICF 2022 was held from Sept 7 to 9 in Cairo NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Africa loses 15% GDP to climate change – AfDB
    Economy3 weeks ago

    Africa loses 15% GDP to climate change – AfDB

    Africa has been losing from five per cent to 15 per cent of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita growth because of climate change and its related impacts.

    Group Acting Chief Economist and Vice President, African Development Bank (AfDB), Mr Kevin Urama, said this in a statement posted on AfDB website on Tuesday.

    Urama added that Africa needed 1.6 trillion dollars between 2022 and 2030 to meet its nationally determined contributions (NDCs).

    According to the statement, the AfDB vice president said this on Sept. 7 at a panel discussion on the sidelines of Egypt International Cooperation Forum (Egypt-ICF 2022) in Cairo.

    NDCs embody efforts by each country to reduce national emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

    They are submitted by countries under the Paris Agreement of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

    The panel discussion was titled, “African Countries Ownership in Determining Climate Agenda.

    ” “Collectively, African countries received only 18.3 billion dollars in climate finance between 2016 and 2019. This results in a climate finance gap of up to 1288.2 billion dollars annually from 2020 to 2030. “Climate change affects Africa severely, while the continent contributes to only three per cent of global emissions,” said Urama.

    He reiterated the need for the global community to meet its 100-billion-dollar commitment to help the developing countries and African economies to mitigate the impacts of climate change and to adapt to it.

    “Investing in climate adaptation in the context of sustainable development is the best way to cope with the climate change impacts; gas must remain included in the continent’s plan for the gradual transition to clean energy,” he said.

    He also affirmed that Africa had great potential in terms of green investment opportunities that the private sector, including banks, could tap into.

    Egyptian Environment Minister, Yasmine Fouad, highlighted Egypt’s National Strategy for Alignment for both climate mitigation and adaptation, which had five key pillars.

    “The first pillar focuses on how we can adopt a low greenhouse path, which centers on the sectors around renewable transport, gas, industry and waste.

    “The second one relates to adaptation and how best to make the communities more resilient.

    The third and fourth ones are focused on how to protect coastal zones and have more accessibility and availability of water.

    “The last one is about the need for developing more smart and integrated concoctions and that’s the stereotype of a strategy on climate,” said Fouad.

    He, however, added that the fight against climate change needed an integration among the government, civil society and the private sector.

    Ghada Wally, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) said women and young people were among Africa’s best assets.

    Wally, who is also Director-General of the United Nations Office in Vienna, stressed the importance of exploring avenues to tap into “this significant asset for the sake of the continent’s sustainable development.

    ” The Egypt-ICF 2022 was held from Sept. 7 to 9 in Cairo.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   Africa has been losing 5 15 of its per capita GDP growth due to climate change and its related impacts but needs around 1 6 trillion between 2022 and 2030 to meet its national determination contributions 1 says Kevin Urama interim chief economist and vice president of the African Development Bank Group www AfDB org Speaking at a panel discussion titled Ownership of African Countries in Setting the Climate Agenda on the sidelines of the Egypt International Cooperation Forum www EgyptICF AfricanMinisters com Egypt ICF 2022 in Cairo On Wednesday Urama urged developed nations to close the climate finance gap Several senior officials represented the bank at the event notably its Vice President for Energy Climate and Green Growth Dr Kevin Kariuki and its Vice President for Private Sector Infrastructure and Industrialization Mr Solomon Quaynor As a whole African countries received just 18 3 billion in climate finance between 2016 and 2019 Urama said This results in a climate finance gap of up to 1 288 2 billion annually from 2020 to 2030 The chief economist added These sums reflect how the crisis is Climate change severely affects Africa while the continent contributes only 3 of global emissions The global community must honor its 100 billion commitment to help developing countries and African economies mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change Investing in climate adaptation in the context of sustainable development is the best way to deal with the impacts of climate change adding that gas must remain included in the continent s plan for the gradual transition to clean energy Urama highlighted that since the 1850s countries have managed to transition away from coal and use gas as a transition to cleaner energy He also stated that Africa had great potential in terms of green investment opportunities that the private sector including banks could take advantage of Egyptian Environment Minister Yasmine Fouad highlighted Egypt s National Alignment Strategy for both climate mitigation and adaptation She said that she had five key pillars Fouad explained The first pillar focuses on how we can adopt a low greenhouse effect path which focuses on the sectors related to renewable transport gas industry and waste The second relates to adaptation and how best to make communities more resilient The third and fourth are focused on how to protect coastal areas and have more accessibility and availability of water The last one is about the need to develop smarter and more integrated concoctions and that is the stereotype of a climate strategy Fouad added To fight climate change you can t just rely on the government or just the private sector but it s an integration between the government civil society and the private sector Ghada Wally Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and Director General of the United Nations Office at Vienna said Women and youth are among Africa s best assets and highlighted the importance of exploring ways to take advantage of this important asset for the sake of the sustainable development of the continent 1 Nationally Determined Contributions or NDCs are submitted by countries under the Paris Agreement of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change They represent promises of climate action that aim to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees C to 1 5 degrees C above pre industrial levels
    Africa loses up to 15% of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita annually due to climate change –African Development Bank Acting Chief Economist Kevin Urama
      Africa has been losing 5 15 of its per capita GDP growth due to climate change and its related impacts but needs around 1 6 trillion between 2022 and 2030 to meet its national determination contributions 1 says Kevin Urama interim chief economist and vice president of the African Development Bank Group www AfDB org Speaking at a panel discussion titled Ownership of African Countries in Setting the Climate Agenda on the sidelines of the Egypt International Cooperation Forum www EgyptICF AfricanMinisters com Egypt ICF 2022 in Cairo On Wednesday Urama urged developed nations to close the climate finance gap Several senior officials represented the bank at the event notably its Vice President for Energy Climate and Green Growth Dr Kevin Kariuki and its Vice President for Private Sector Infrastructure and Industrialization Mr Solomon Quaynor As a whole African countries received just 18 3 billion in climate finance between 2016 and 2019 Urama said This results in a climate finance gap of up to 1 288 2 billion annually from 2020 to 2030 The chief economist added These sums reflect how the crisis is Climate change severely affects Africa while the continent contributes only 3 of global emissions The global community must honor its 100 billion commitment to help developing countries and African economies mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change Investing in climate adaptation in the context of sustainable development is the best way to deal with the impacts of climate change adding that gas must remain included in the continent s plan for the gradual transition to clean energy Urama highlighted that since the 1850s countries have managed to transition away from coal and use gas as a transition to cleaner energy He also stated that Africa had great potential in terms of green investment opportunities that the private sector including banks could take advantage of Egyptian Environment Minister Yasmine Fouad highlighted Egypt s National Alignment Strategy for both climate mitigation and adaptation She said that she had five key pillars Fouad explained The first pillar focuses on how we can adopt a low greenhouse effect path which focuses on the sectors related to renewable transport gas industry and waste The second relates to adaptation and how best to make communities more resilient The third and fourth are focused on how to protect coastal areas and have more accessibility and availability of water The last one is about the need to develop smarter and more integrated concoctions and that is the stereotype of a climate strategy Fouad added To fight climate change you can t just rely on the government or just the private sector but it s an integration between the government civil society and the private sector Ghada Wally Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and Director General of the United Nations Office at Vienna said Women and youth are among Africa s best assets and highlighted the importance of exploring ways to take advantage of this important asset for the sake of the sustainable development of the continent 1 Nationally Determined Contributions or NDCs are submitted by countries under the Paris Agreement of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change They represent promises of climate action that aim to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees C to 1 5 degrees C above pre industrial levels
    Africa loses up to 15% of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita annually due to climate change –African Development Bank Acting Chief Economist Kevin Urama
    Africa3 weeks ago

    Africa loses up to 15% of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita annually due to climate change –African Development Bank Acting Chief Economist Kevin Urama

    Africa has been losing 5-15% of its per capita GDP growth due to climate change and its related impacts, but needs around $1.6 trillion between 2022 and 2030 to meet its national determination contributions.

    [1]says Kevin Urama, interim chief economist and vice president of the African Development Bank Group (www.AfDB.org).

    Speaking at a panel discussion, titled "Ownership of African Countries in Setting the Climate Agenda", on the sidelines of the Egypt International Cooperation Forum (www.EgyptICF-AfricanMinisters.com) (Egypt-ICF 2022) in Cairo On Wednesday, Urama urged developed nations to close the "climate finance gap."

    Several senior officials represented the bank at the event, notably its Vice President for Energy, Climate and Green Growth, Dr. Kevin Kariuki, and its Vice President for Private Sector, Infrastructure and Industrialization, Mr. Solomon Quaynor.

    “As a whole, African countries received just $18.3 billion in climate finance between 2016 and 2019,” Urama said.

    “This results in a climate finance gap of up to $1,288.2 billion annually from 2020 to 2030.” The chief economist added: “These sums reflect how the crisis is.

    Climate change severely affects Africa, while the continent contributes only 3% of global emissions.

    The global community must honor its $100 billion commitment to help developing countries and African economies mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

    Investing in climate adaptation in the context of sustainable development is the best way to deal with the impacts of climate change, adding that gas must remain included in the continent's plan for the gradual transition to clean energy."

    Urama highlighted that since the 1850s, countries have managed to transition away from coal and use gas as a transition to cleaner energy.

    He also stated that Africa had great potential in terms of green investment opportunities that the private sector, including banks, could take advantage of.

    Egyptian Environment Minister Yasmine Fouad highlighted Egypt's National Alignment Strategy for both climate mitigation and adaptation.

    She said that she had five key pillars.

    Fouad explained: “The first pillar focuses on how we can adopt a low greenhouse effect path, which focuses on the sectors related to renewable transport, gas, industry and waste.

    The second relates to adaptation and how best to make communities more resilient.

    The third and fourth are focused on how to protect coastal areas and have more accessibility and availability of water.

    The last one is about the need to develop smarter and more integrated concoctions and that is the stereotype of a climate strategy.” Fouad added: "To fight climate change, you can't just rely on the government, or just the private sector, but it's an integration between the government, civil society and the private sector."

    Ghada Wally, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and Director General of the United Nations Office at Vienna, said: “Women and youth are among Africa's best assets and highlighted the importance of exploring ways to take advantage of this important asset for the sake of the sustainable development of the continent”.

    [1] Nationally Determined Contributions or “NDCs” are submitted by countries under the Paris Agreement of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

    They represent promises of climate action that aim to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees C, to 1.5 degrees C, above pre-industrial levels.