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  •  Dialogue between Myanmar s junta and ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi to end the bloody crisis sparked by the ouster of her government last year is not impossible a junta spokesman told AFP on Friday The Southeast Asian nation has been in chaos since the coup with renewed fighting with rebellious ethnic groups dozens of hellip
    Dialogue with Suu Kyi ‘not impossible’ says Myanmar junta
     Dialogue between Myanmar s junta and ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi to end the bloody crisis sparked by the ouster of her government last year is not impossible a junta spokesman told AFP on Friday The Southeast Asian nation has been in chaos since the coup with renewed fighting with rebellious ethnic groups dozens of hellip
    Dialogue with Suu Kyi ‘not impossible’ says Myanmar junta
    Foreign2 days ago

    Dialogue with Suu Kyi ‘not impossible’ says Myanmar junta

    Dialogue between Myanmar's junta and ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi to end the bloody crisis sparked by the ouster of her government last year "is not impossible," a junta spokesman told AFP on Friday.

    The Southeast Asian nation has been in chaos since the coup, with renewed fighting with rebellious ethnic groups, dozens of "People's Defense Forces" springing up to fight the junta and the tattered economy.

    Suu Kyi, 77, has been held virtually incommunicado by the military and was recently transferred from house arrest to solitary confinement as she faces multiple trials that could see her sentenced to more than 150 years in jail.

    "There is nothing impossible in politics," board spokesman Zaw Min Tun told AFP when asked if the board could enter into dialogue with Suu Kyi to resolve the turmoil.

    "We cannot say that (negotiations with Suu Kyi) are impossible."

    "Several countries" had urged opening dialogue with the Nobel laureate, he said, without giving details.

    Diplomatic efforts spearheaded by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), of which Myanmar is a member, have so far failed to stem the bloodshed.

    Last year, the bloc agreed to a "five-point consensus," calling for a cessation of violence and constructive dialogue, but the junta has largely ignored it.

    ASEAN envoy and Cambodian Foreign Minister Prak Sokhonn arrived in Myanmar on Wednesday for his second visit to boost dialogue between the junta and opponents of his government.

    He met with junta chief Min Aung Hlaing on Thursday and met with members of various political parties in the army-built capital Naypyidaw on Friday, a spokesman for the junta said.

    The board has said that he will not be allowed to visit Suu Kyi.

    “We have done everything that she asked for related to her health and living situation,” said Zaw Min Tun regarding Suu Kyi's new living conditions in prison.

    Fighting continues across swaths of the country, with local media reporting killings and burnings by junta troops as they struggle to crush opposition to the coup.

    Nearly 700,000 people have been forced to flee their homes since the coup, the United Nations said in May.

    Thailand on Thursday disabled F-16 fighter jets after a Myanmar plane involved in clashes with anti-coup fighters near its border violated its airspace, officials said.

    China's foreign minister was due to land in Myanmar on Friday for a regional meeting, in what will be Beijing's most high-profile visit to Myanmar since the coup.

    It was unclear whether a meeting between Wang Yi and board chief Min Aung Hlaing would take place, a board spokesman said.

    China is a major arms supplier and ally of the junta and has refused to label the military takeover a "coup."

  •  The President of the Human Rights Council Ambassador Federico Villegas Argentina today announced the appointment of Radhika Coomaraswamy of Sri Lanka to serve as a member of the International Commission of Human Rights Experts on Ethiopia Ms Coomaraswamy will join Kaari Betty Murungi from Kenya Chair and Steven Ratner from the United States of America hellip
    Human rights council president appoints Radhika Coomaraswamy of Sri Lanka to serve on Ethiopia rights body
     The President of the Human Rights Council Ambassador Federico Villegas Argentina today announced the appointment of Radhika Coomaraswamy of Sri Lanka to serve as a member of the International Commission of Human Rights Experts on Ethiopia Ms Coomaraswamy will join Kaari Betty Murungi from Kenya Chair and Steven Ratner from the United States of America hellip
    Human rights council president appoints Radhika Coomaraswamy of Sri Lanka to serve on Ethiopia rights body
    Africa5 days ago

    Human rights council president appoints Radhika Coomaraswamy of Sri Lanka to serve on Ethiopia rights body

    The President of the Human Rights Council, Ambassador Federico Villegas (Argentina), today announced the appointment of Radhika Coomaraswamy of Sri Lanka to serve as a member of the International Commission of Human Rights Experts on Ethiopia. Ms. Coomaraswamy will join Kaari Betty Murungi from Kenya (Chair) and Steven Ratner from the United States of America, who were appointed to the human rights investigative body on March 2, 2022.

    The Geneva-based Human Rights Council created the Commission of Experts on Human Rights on December 17, 2021 with the mandate to investigate allegations of violations and abuses of international human rights, humanitarian and refugee law in Ethiopia committed from November 3, 2020 by all parties to the conflict. .

    Today's appointment follows Fatou Bensouda's resignation as a member of the three-person Commission on June 8, 2022, following her nomination to serve as the Gambia's High Commissioner to the United Kingdom.

    Ms. Coomaraswamy brings to this position years of experience as a human rights lawyer, expert and advocate, having held various positions in her country and internationally. He has held various previous positions, including as a member of the Human Rights Council's Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar from 2017 to 2019 and as Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict from 2006 to 2012. (see biography below).

    The Commission of Human Rights Experts on Ethiopia will deliver an oral report to the Human Rights Council on June 30, which will be its first appearance before the Council. The Commission plans to present a full written report to the human rights body in September and subsequently to the UN General Assembly session later this year.

    Biography of Radhika Coomaraswamy

    Radhika Coomaraswamy (Sri Lanka), a lawyer by training and former Chairperson of the Sri Lanka Human Rights Commission, is an internationally renowned human rights defender who has served as the UN Special Rapporteur on violence against women (1994 -2003) and as a Member of the Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar ordered by the Human Rights Council from 2017 to 2019. In addition, she served as Under-Secretary-General and Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict (2006-2012), for which he was commissioned to prepare the Secretary-General's annual report on children and armed conflict. In 2014, Ms. Coomaraswamy was appointed by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon as lead author of a Global Study on the implementation of UN Security Council resolution 1325 on women, peace and security. He received his BA from Yale University, his JD from Columbia University, an LLM from Harvard University, and honorary doctorates from Amherst College, Katholieke Universities Leuven, University of Edinburgh, University of Essex, and CUNY School of Law.

  •  One of the first moves by the Myanmar military during its coup last year was to place Aung San Suu Kyi the country s de facto civilian leader and a figurehead of democracy who has spent decades fighting the government under house arrest military On Thursday the board announced that the 77 year old Nobel laureate would be hellip
    Ousted Myanmar leader Suu Kyi’s solitary confinement: what we know
     One of the first moves by the Myanmar military during its coup last year was to place Aung San Suu Kyi the country s de facto civilian leader and a figurehead of democracy who has spent decades fighting the government under house arrest military On Thursday the board announced that the 77 year old Nobel laureate would be hellip
    Ousted Myanmar leader Suu Kyi’s solitary confinement: what we know
    Foreign1 week ago

    Ousted Myanmar leader Suu Kyi’s solitary confinement: what we know

    One of the first moves by the Myanmar military during its coup last year was to place Aung San Suu Kyi, the country's de facto civilian leader and a figurehead of democracy who has spent decades fighting the government, under house arrest. military.

    On Thursday, the board announced that the 77-year-old Nobel laureate would be transferred to solitary confinement in a prison in the capital Naypyidaw.

    AFP takes a look at what we know about Suu Kyi's new lockdown.

    Where is he now? After more than a year of house arrest at an undisclosed location in Naypyidaw, Suu Kyi was transferred Wednesday amid heightened security to a prison complex on the western side of the sprawling military-built capital.

    Satellite images show a series of buildings surrounded by a wall and set back from a main road, but details about where in the complex she is stopped are scant.

    Richard Horsey of the International Crisis Group (ICG) said reports indicated Suu Kyi would be housed in "specially designed housing" in the prison.

    What are your new conditions? Suu Kyi will no longer be cared for by the dozen maids who accompanied her during her house arrest.

    Instead, prison authorities will provide three aides to care for her, a source with knowledge of the matter said.

    Suu Kyi will also be without her dog Taichido, which was given to her in 2010 by her UK-born youngest son when he made a rare visit to Myanmar, according to local media.

    His new conditions are a far cry from the years he spent under house arrest during the previous junta, when he lived in his family's colonial-era lakeside mansion in Yangon and used to give speeches to crowds on the other side of the wall. his garden.

    Why have they moved it? Until now, Suu Kyi, the daughter of independence hero Aung San, had been largely spared the prison time spent by thousands of other democracy activists during decades of military rule.

    "It is difficult to explain the reason for this decision after more than a year" of house arrest, a former deputy from Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy party, who did not want to be identified, told AFP.

    The move was "cruel and there is definitely malice behind it," said ICG's Horsey.

    "But there may also be logistical reasons: The regime can easily force her to attend court hearings inside the prison, whereas before she sometimes refused to travel" to court, she said.

    Independent analyst David Mathieson said the move was "certainly a sign that they don't care about their welfare".

    How is it going? Suu Kyi remained optimistic after the transfer to jail, a source with knowledge of the case told AFP.

    “She is used to facing any kind of situation calmly,” said the source, who requested anonymity.

    Suu Kyi spent around 15 years under house arrest under previous boards, leading a simple life dominated by reading, meditation and prayer.

    “It was important to establish a routine and strictly follow it to avoid irresponsible waste of time,” he wrote in the 1990s.

    However, she has missed several hearings in her trial and at times seems weary from the frequency of her near-daily court appearances.

    And now that? His trial on a host of corruption and other charges, which human rights groups denounce as a sham, will continue inside the prison compound, the board said.

    Suu Kyi faces a prison sentence of more than 150 years if convicted on all counts. She has already been convicted of various crimes and sentenced to 11 years in prison.

    "What else can you assume other than that the board wants to make sure she spends the rest of her life behind bars," Human Rights Watch's Manny Maung told AFP.

  •  Brazil remains at the top of the FIFA Coca Cola World Ranking www FIFA com France drops out of the top three Kazakhstan makes the most progress Between the final qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 matches in the UEFA and Concacaf Nations Leagues qualifiers for the Asian and African continental championships and a host of friendly hellip
    Brazil still on top, Argentina on the podium
     Brazil remains at the top of the FIFA Coca Cola World Ranking www FIFA com France drops out of the top three Kazakhstan makes the most progress Between the final qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 matches in the UEFA and Concacaf Nations Leagues qualifiers for the Asian and African continental championships and a host of friendly hellip
    Brazil still on top, Argentina on the podium
    Africa1 week ago

    Brazil still on top, Argentina on the podium

    Brazil remains at the top of the FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking (www.FIFA.com); France drops out of the top three; Kazakhstan makes the most progress.

    Between the final qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022™, matches in the UEFA and Concacaf Nations Leagues, qualifiers for the Asian and African continental championships, and a host of friendly matches, international football has been missing since the last edition. of the FIFA/Coca-Cola Ranking in March.

    During this period a total of 280 international meetings were held with significant ramifications in the Ranking: of the 211 countries that appear in the world ranking, 177 experienced movement.

    Three months after snatching the top spot in the FIFA/Coca-Cola Ranking from Belgium (2nd, -), Brazil (1st, -) have widened the gap on their closest challenger. Argentina (3rd, plus 1) occupies the last of the podium places to the detriment of France (4th, minus 1), who have paid the price of four games without winning in the UEFA Nations League.

    Spain (6th, plus 1), the Netherlands (8th, plus 2) and Denmark (10th, plus 1) advance in the Top 10, while Italy (7th, minus 1) and Portugal (9th, minus 1) head in the opposite direction. . For its part, Mexico (12th, minus 3) leaves the Top 10 completely.

    With an increase of 11 places, Kazakhstan (114, plus 11) made the most progress in this edition. Cuba (167, plus 10), Greece (48, plus 7) and Malaysia (147, plus 7) also made notable gains. Kosovo (106, plus 1) and Comoros (126, plus 2) continue their ascent to once again reach all-time highs in the Ranking.

    The next FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking will be published on August 25, 2022.

    Click HERE (https://fifa.fans/3QDvCtQ) to see the full standings.

    Leader Brazil (unchanged) Moves into the top 10 Denmark (10, plus 1) Drops out of the top 10 Mexico (12, minus 3) Games played in total 280 Most games played Mexico, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (6 each) Greatest movement of points Kazakhstan (plus 31.51)Most movement by places Kazakhstan (plus 11 places)Most drop by points Myanmar (minus 32.65)Most drop by places Egypt and Nepal (minus 8 places)Newly qualified teams NoneTeams that are no longer Ranked NoneInactive teams that are no longer ranked None

  •  Myanmar s Suu Kyi transferred to solitary confinement Prison Naypyidaw June 23 2022 Myanmar s ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been transferred from house arrest to a prison in the capital Naypyidaw There she would be held in solitary confinement military spokesperson Zaw Min Tun said on Thursday It is confirmed that Daw Aung hellip
    Myanmar’s Suu Kyi transferred to solitary confinement
     Myanmar s Suu Kyi transferred to solitary confinement Prison Naypyidaw June 23 2022 Myanmar s ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been transferred from house arrest to a prison in the capital Naypyidaw There she would be held in solitary confinement military spokesperson Zaw Min Tun said on Thursday It is confirmed that Daw Aung hellip
    Myanmar’s Suu Kyi transferred to solitary confinement
    Foreign1 week ago

    Myanmar’s Suu Kyi transferred to solitary confinement

    Myanmar’s Suu Kyi transferred to solitary confinement

     

    Prison

    Naypyidaw, June 23, 2022 Myanmar’s ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been transferred from house arrest to a prison in the capital Naypyidaw.

    There, she would be held in solitary confinement, military spokesperson Zaw Min Tun said on Thursday.

    “It is confirmed that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was sent to the prison in accordance with criminal laws,’’ Zaw Min Tun said in a statement.

    He added that she was well treated in solitary confinement.

    Suu Kyi faces 11 corruption charges, each of which carries a potential sentence of up to 15 years in prison.

    In April, she received her first conviction for accepting a bribe of 600,000 dollars in cash and gold bars from the former chief minister of Yangon.

    She has denied the claim.

    Journalists and members of the public were banned from attending the trial and Suu Kyi was barred from speaking to the media.

    Human rights activists have spoken of a show trial.

    Myanmar’s military junta has now ordered all legal proceedings and trial hearings to be moved from a courtroom to prison, according to the local media and sources familiar with the proceedings.

    Suu Kyi was arrested on Feb. 1, hours before the military overthrew Myanmar’s democratically elected civilian leaders and returned the country to military rule.

    Since then, Myanmar has been in political turmoil, with the military struggling to contain peaceful street protests.

    Civil disobedience movements and armed resistance fighters were trying to unseat the military government by force.

    According to the rights group Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, at least 1,900 people have been killed and more than 14,000 arrested since the coup. (

    NewsSourceCredit: NAN