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  •   A malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria described as catastrophic and a critical emergency has yet to be recognized by the UN The lack of recognition means that there is no funding and few organizations can respond to the crisis in an area where thousands of children are seriously ill The UN must include northwestern Nigeria in the humanitarian response plan and the international community must urgently respond to the emergency As the malnutrition crisis in northwestern Nigeria continues at catastrophic levels M decins Sans Fronti res MSF is calling on the humanitarian community to respond to the emergency needs of people in the region and for northwestern Nigeria to be included in the UN humanitarian response plan allowing a broader and more sustained response Since the beginning of 2022 MSF teams have witnessed an extraordinarily high number of malnourished children in MSF programs located in five northwestern Nigerian states Multiple factors have led to a sharp increase in malnutrition in the region over the past year With rising insecurity climate change and global food price inflation in a post pandemic world we can only imagine this crisis getting worse says Dr Simba Tirima MSF representative in Nigeria The Nigerian authorities need support to deal with a crisis of this magnitude This must now include emergency humanitarian funding for organizations capable of responding and a commitment to include north western Nigeria in the UN humanitarian response plan for 2023 says Dr Tirima Since January MSF teams working in collaboration with Nigerian health authorities have treated nearly 100 000 children suffering from acute malnutrition in 34 outpatient centres We have also admitted around 17 000 children requiring hospital care in 10 hospitalization centers in Kano Zamfara Katsina Sokoto and Kebbi states In Zamfara state one of the areas most affected by ongoing violence and banditry we recorded a 64 increase in the number of severely malnourished children treated in MSF supported outpatient nutrition departments from January to August 2022 compared to January to August 2022 August 2021 Our nutrition surveys have also underlined the severity of the crisis even in areas less affected by violence and insecurity In the Mashi local government area of Katsina state MSF found a global acute malnutrition rate of 27 4 and a severe acute malnutrition rate of 7 1 in June despite the community being relatively free from violence and forced displacement These rates indicate a critical emergency The current UN humanitarian response plan for Nigeria focuses on the critical situation in the northeast region of the country excluding the northwest Unlike MSF which is not funded by the humanitarian response plan many organizations are currently unable to respond to acute needs in the northwest because they rely on the response plan for funding We understand that the United Nations donors and other stakeholders are increasingly aware of the scope of the crisis in the northwest but it is necessary to go beyond discussions said Froukje Pelsma MSF head of mission in Nigeria It is essential that the North West be included in Nigeria s next humanitarian response plan for 2023 because it plays a key role in mobilizing resources to save lives
    UN must recognize ‘critical emergency’ malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria
      A malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria described as catastrophic and a critical emergency has yet to be recognized by the UN The lack of recognition means that there is no funding and few organizations can respond to the crisis in an area where thousands of children are seriously ill The UN must include northwestern Nigeria in the humanitarian response plan and the international community must urgently respond to the emergency As the malnutrition crisis in northwestern Nigeria continues at catastrophic levels M decins Sans Fronti res MSF is calling on the humanitarian community to respond to the emergency needs of people in the region and for northwestern Nigeria to be included in the UN humanitarian response plan allowing a broader and more sustained response Since the beginning of 2022 MSF teams have witnessed an extraordinarily high number of malnourished children in MSF programs located in five northwestern Nigerian states Multiple factors have led to a sharp increase in malnutrition in the region over the past year With rising insecurity climate change and global food price inflation in a post pandemic world we can only imagine this crisis getting worse says Dr Simba Tirima MSF representative in Nigeria The Nigerian authorities need support to deal with a crisis of this magnitude This must now include emergency humanitarian funding for organizations capable of responding and a commitment to include north western Nigeria in the UN humanitarian response plan for 2023 says Dr Tirima Since January MSF teams working in collaboration with Nigerian health authorities have treated nearly 100 000 children suffering from acute malnutrition in 34 outpatient centres We have also admitted around 17 000 children requiring hospital care in 10 hospitalization centers in Kano Zamfara Katsina Sokoto and Kebbi states In Zamfara state one of the areas most affected by ongoing violence and banditry we recorded a 64 increase in the number of severely malnourished children treated in MSF supported outpatient nutrition departments from January to August 2022 compared to January to August 2022 August 2021 Our nutrition surveys have also underlined the severity of the crisis even in areas less affected by violence and insecurity In the Mashi local government area of Katsina state MSF found a global acute malnutrition rate of 27 4 and a severe acute malnutrition rate of 7 1 in June despite the community being relatively free from violence and forced displacement These rates indicate a critical emergency The current UN humanitarian response plan for Nigeria focuses on the critical situation in the northeast region of the country excluding the northwest Unlike MSF which is not funded by the humanitarian response plan many organizations are currently unable to respond to acute needs in the northwest because they rely on the response plan for funding We understand that the United Nations donors and other stakeholders are increasingly aware of the scope of the crisis in the northwest but it is necessary to go beyond discussions said Froukje Pelsma MSF head of mission in Nigeria It is essential that the North West be included in Nigeria s next humanitarian response plan for 2023 because it plays a key role in mobilizing resources to save lives
    UN must recognize ‘critical emergency’ malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria
    Africa3 days ago

    UN must recognize ‘critical emergency’ malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria

    A malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria, described as catastrophic and a critical emergency, has yet to be recognized by the UN.

    The lack of recognition means that there is no funding and few organizations can respond to the crisis in an area where thousands of children are seriously ill.

    The UN must include northwestern Nigeria in the humanitarian response plan and the international community must urgently respond to the emergency.

    As the malnutrition crisis in northwestern Nigeria continues at catastrophic levels, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is calling on the humanitarian community to respond to the emergency needs of people in the region and for northwestern Nigeria to be included in the UN humanitarian response plan.

    allowing a broader and more sustained response.

    Since the beginning of 2022, MSF teams have witnessed an extraordinarily high number of malnourished children in MSF programs located in five northwestern Nigerian states.

    Multiple factors have led to a sharp increase in malnutrition in the region over the past year.

    “With rising insecurity, climate change and global food price inflation in a post-pandemic world, we can only imagine this crisis getting worse,” says Dr Simba Tirima, MSF representative in Nigeria.

    "The Nigerian authorities need support to deal with a crisis of this magnitude."

    “This must now include emergency humanitarian funding for organizations capable of responding and a commitment to include north-western Nigeria in the UN humanitarian response plan for 2023,” says Dr Tirima.

    Since January, MSF teams working in collaboration with Nigerian health authorities have treated nearly 100,000 children suffering from acute malnutrition in 34 outpatient centres.

    We have also admitted around 17,000 children requiring hospital care in 10 hospitalization centers in Kano, Zamfara, Katsina, Sokoto and Kebbi states.

    In Zamfara state, one of the areas most affected by ongoing violence and banditry, we recorded a 64% increase in the number of severely malnourished children treated in MSF-supported outpatient nutrition departments from January to August 2022, compared to January to August 2022.

    August 2021.

    Our nutrition surveys have also underlined the severity of the crisis, even in areas less affected by violence and insecurity.

    In the Mashi local government area of ​​Katsina state, MSF found a global acute malnutrition rate of 27.4% and a severe acute malnutrition rate of 7.1% in June, despite the community being relatively free from violence and forced displacement.

    These rates indicate a critical emergency.

    The current UN humanitarian response plan for Nigeria focuses on the critical situation in the northeast region of the country, excluding the northwest.

    Unlike MSF, which is not funded by the humanitarian response plan, many organizations are currently unable to respond to acute needs in the northwest because they rely on the response plan for funding.

    "We understand that the United Nations, donors and other stakeholders are increasingly aware of the scope of the crisis in the northwest, but it is necessary to go beyond discussions," said Froukje Pelsma, MSF head of mission in Nigeria.

    "It is essential that the North West be included in Nigeria's next humanitarian response plan for 2023, because it plays a key role in mobilizing resources to save lives."

  •   As the malnutrition crisis in northwestern Nigeria continues at catastrophic levels M decins Sans Fronti res MSF calls on the international and humanitarian community to respond to the emergency needs of people in the region and for the northwestern from Nigeria to be included in the UN humanitarian response plan allowing for a broader and more sustained response Since the beginning of 2022 MSF teams have witnessed an extraordinarily high number of malnourished children in MSF programs located in five northwestern Nigerian states Multiple factors have led to a sharp increase in malnutrition in the region over the past year With rising insecurity climate change and global food price inflation in a post pandemic world we can only imagine this crisis getting worse said Dr Simba Tirima MSF representative in Nigeria The Nigerian authorities need support to deal with a crisis of this magnitude This must include emergency humanitarian funding now for organizations capable of responding and a commitment to include north western Nigeria in the UN humanitarian response plan for 2023 Since January MSF teams working in collaboration with Nigerian health authorities have treated nearly 100 000 acutely malnourished children in 34 outpatient centers and admitted some 17 000 children requiring hospital care in 10 inpatient centers in the states from Kano Zamfara Katsina Sokoto and Kebbi In Zamfara state one of the areas most affected by ongoing violence and banditry we recorded a 64 increase in the number of severely malnourished children treated in MSF supported outpatient nutrition departments from January to August 2022 compared to January to August 2021 MSF nutritional surveys have also underlined the severity of the crisis even in areas less affected by violence and insecurity In the Mashi local government area of Katsina state MSF found a global acute malnutrition rate of 27 4 and a severe acute malnutrition rate of 7 1 in June despite the community being relatively free from violence and forced displacement These rates indicate a critical emergency The current UN humanitarian response plan for Nigeria focuses on the critical situation in the northeast region of the country excluding the northwest Unlike MSF which is not funded by the humanitarian response plan many organizations are currently unable to respond to acute needs in the northwest because they depend on it for funding We understand that the United Nations donors and other stakeholders are increasingly aware of the scope of the crisis in the northwest but it is necessary to go beyond discussions said Froukje Pelsma MSF head of mission in Nigeria It is essential that the North West be included in Nigeria s next humanitarian response plan for 2023 because it plays a key role in mobilizing resources to save lives
    The catastrophic malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria must be urgently acknowledged
      As the malnutrition crisis in northwestern Nigeria continues at catastrophic levels M decins Sans Fronti res MSF calls on the international and humanitarian community to respond to the emergency needs of people in the region and for the northwestern from Nigeria to be included in the UN humanitarian response plan allowing for a broader and more sustained response Since the beginning of 2022 MSF teams have witnessed an extraordinarily high number of malnourished children in MSF programs located in five northwestern Nigerian states Multiple factors have led to a sharp increase in malnutrition in the region over the past year With rising insecurity climate change and global food price inflation in a post pandemic world we can only imagine this crisis getting worse said Dr Simba Tirima MSF representative in Nigeria The Nigerian authorities need support to deal with a crisis of this magnitude This must include emergency humanitarian funding now for organizations capable of responding and a commitment to include north western Nigeria in the UN humanitarian response plan for 2023 Since January MSF teams working in collaboration with Nigerian health authorities have treated nearly 100 000 acutely malnourished children in 34 outpatient centers and admitted some 17 000 children requiring hospital care in 10 inpatient centers in the states from Kano Zamfara Katsina Sokoto and Kebbi In Zamfara state one of the areas most affected by ongoing violence and banditry we recorded a 64 increase in the number of severely malnourished children treated in MSF supported outpatient nutrition departments from January to August 2022 compared to January to August 2021 MSF nutritional surveys have also underlined the severity of the crisis even in areas less affected by violence and insecurity In the Mashi local government area of Katsina state MSF found a global acute malnutrition rate of 27 4 and a severe acute malnutrition rate of 7 1 in June despite the community being relatively free from violence and forced displacement These rates indicate a critical emergency The current UN humanitarian response plan for Nigeria focuses on the critical situation in the northeast region of the country excluding the northwest Unlike MSF which is not funded by the humanitarian response plan many organizations are currently unable to respond to acute needs in the northwest because they depend on it for funding We understand that the United Nations donors and other stakeholders are increasingly aware of the scope of the crisis in the northwest but it is necessary to go beyond discussions said Froukje Pelsma MSF head of mission in Nigeria It is essential that the North West be included in Nigeria s next humanitarian response plan for 2023 because it plays a key role in mobilizing resources to save lives
    The catastrophic malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria must be urgently acknowledged
    Africa4 days ago

    The catastrophic malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria must be urgently acknowledged

    As the malnutrition crisis in northwestern Nigeria continues at catastrophic levels, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) calls on the international and humanitarian community to respond to the emergency needs of people in the region, and for the northwestern from Nigeria to be included in the UN humanitarian response.

    plan, allowing for a broader and more sustained response.

    Since the beginning of 2022, MSF teams have witnessed an extraordinarily high number of malnourished children in MSF programs located in five northwestern Nigerian states.

    Multiple factors have led to a sharp increase in malnutrition in the region over the past year.

    “With rising insecurity, climate change and global food price inflation in a post-pandemic world, we can only imagine this crisis getting worse,” said Dr Simba Tirima, MSF representative in Nigeria.

    “The Nigerian authorities need support to deal with a crisis of this magnitude.

    This must include emergency humanitarian funding now for organizations capable of responding and a commitment to include north-western Nigeria in the UN humanitarian response plan for 2023.” Since January, MSF teams working in collaboration with Nigerian health authorities have treated nearly 100,000 acutely malnourished children in 34 outpatient centers and admitted some 17,000 children requiring hospital care in 10 inpatient centers in the states.

    from Kano, Zamfara, Katsina, Sokoto and Kebbi.

    .

    In Zamfara state, one of the areas most affected by ongoing violence and banditry, we recorded a 64% increase in the number of severely malnourished children treated in MSF-supported outpatient nutrition departments from January to August 2022 compared to January to August 2021.

    MSF nutritional surveys have also underlined the severity of the crisis, even in areas less affected by violence and insecurity.

    In the Mashi local government area of ​​Katsina state, MSF found a global acute malnutrition rate of 27.4% and a severe acute malnutrition rate of 7.1% in June, despite the community being relatively free from violence and forced displacement.

    These rates indicate a critical emergency.

    The current UN humanitarian response plan for Nigeria focuses on the critical situation in the northeast region of the country, excluding the northwest.

    Unlike MSF, which is not funded by the humanitarian response plan, many organizations are currently unable to respond to acute needs in the northwest because they depend on it for funding.

    "We understand that the United Nations, donors and other stakeholders are increasingly aware of the scope of the crisis in the northwest, but it is necessary to go beyond discussions," said Froukje Pelsma, MSF head of mission in Nigeria.

    “It is essential that the North West be included in Nigeria's next humanitarian response plan for 2023, because it plays a key role in mobilizing resources to save lives.

  •   In recent weeks an upsurge in intercommunal violence in Kwamouth territory Mai Ndombe province Democratic Republic of the Congo has led to persecution and the killing of people houses and villages burned to the ground roadblocks set up to intercept to supposed enemies Thousands of people have fled their homes into the forest or crossed the River Kwa to find refuge in makeshift sites in Bolobo territory When we arrived in the area we found thousands of people living in deplorable conditions homeless without access to clean water or sanitation says Dr Dieya Papy a medical officer with the M decins Sans Fronti res MSF emergency team The area has a high prevalence of malaria and people s living conditions clearly put them at risk of getting sick We had to move fast she says Responding to immediate needs MSF s emergency team arrived in Kwamouth on 24 August to respond to people s most pressing needs while calling on other aid organizations to join the response In a context of high tension the small team also did everything possible to help people who had fled further afield Our priority was to transport the seriously injured to Kinshasa and improve living conditions in the sites as best we could installing latrines and water points and distributing essentials such as mosquito nets soap and water disinfection tablets says Dr Daddy People s access to healthcare was extremely limited in the area so we made donations to local health centers and opened mobile clinics at the sites for displaced people in Simbambili and Sokoa says Dr Papy During the last three weeks MSF staff assisted by two nurses from the Ministry of Health have provided more than 750 medical consultations through mobile clinics mainly for malaria and respiratory infections They have also transported seriously injured people to hospitals in Kinshasa by boat and by road Patients traumatized by violence In addition to people s immediate medical needs violent events have also left many people psychologically traumatized When I heard the shots I ran away with my sister to our aunt s house says 11 year old Astrid But when we got there the men threatened us with their weapons They wanted us to show them the houses inhabited by people from the community they were persecuting They said they would kill my little sister if we didn t So we point to the house in front of us They went there and killed two children she says MSF psychologist Joel Christopher Bolombo has provided mental health care to trauma patients since he arrived in Kwamouth three weeks ago Some patients have nightmares develop a mistrust of other communities that they didn t have before or show signs of depression or feelings of guilt he says In addition to providing traditional medical care it is essential to help them express their feelings through words or drawings These types of events leave patients with invisible wounds that also need to be treated says Bolombo Violence spreads to Bandundu By mid September the security situation in Kwamouth had improved enough to allow many of the displaced people to return to their homes while fighting and violence moved east towards the Bandundu city Last week we sent a mobile team down the road to Bandundu to assess needs and we immediately found seriously injured people who we transferred to Kinshasa says Dr Papy The situation in this area remains extremely tense This week we saw with our own eyes villages burned and people massacred in a very worrying pattern of attacks and revenge attacks he says Therefore we have decided to strengthen our presence in Bandundu to provide assistance to displaced people and respond to medical needs While the security situation in the town of Kwamouth has improved in the past week tensions and violence continue to flare as happened on 20 September when an attack took place near the town Following the attack MSF staff helped treat the wounded at Kwamouth General Hospital At this point we will leave a team in Kwamouth to be able to respond to any new outbreaks of violence and needs says Dr Papy This is not the first time that MSF has launched an emergency response in Ma Ndombe province following intercommunal violence Following clashes between the Tende and Nunu communities in Yumbi in December 2018 which killed hundreds of people in just a few days an MSF team treated the wounded at the general referral hospital in Yumbi and ran mobile clinics to provide medical care and psychological support
    Democratic Republic of the Congo: Thousands of people affected by intercommunal violence in Maï-Ndombe province
      In recent weeks an upsurge in intercommunal violence in Kwamouth territory Mai Ndombe province Democratic Republic of the Congo has led to persecution and the killing of people houses and villages burned to the ground roadblocks set up to intercept to supposed enemies Thousands of people have fled their homes into the forest or crossed the River Kwa to find refuge in makeshift sites in Bolobo territory When we arrived in the area we found thousands of people living in deplorable conditions homeless without access to clean water or sanitation says Dr Dieya Papy a medical officer with the M decins Sans Fronti res MSF emergency team The area has a high prevalence of malaria and people s living conditions clearly put them at risk of getting sick We had to move fast she says Responding to immediate needs MSF s emergency team arrived in Kwamouth on 24 August to respond to people s most pressing needs while calling on other aid organizations to join the response In a context of high tension the small team also did everything possible to help people who had fled further afield Our priority was to transport the seriously injured to Kinshasa and improve living conditions in the sites as best we could installing latrines and water points and distributing essentials such as mosquito nets soap and water disinfection tablets says Dr Daddy People s access to healthcare was extremely limited in the area so we made donations to local health centers and opened mobile clinics at the sites for displaced people in Simbambili and Sokoa says Dr Papy During the last three weeks MSF staff assisted by two nurses from the Ministry of Health have provided more than 750 medical consultations through mobile clinics mainly for malaria and respiratory infections They have also transported seriously injured people to hospitals in Kinshasa by boat and by road Patients traumatized by violence In addition to people s immediate medical needs violent events have also left many people psychologically traumatized When I heard the shots I ran away with my sister to our aunt s house says 11 year old Astrid But when we got there the men threatened us with their weapons They wanted us to show them the houses inhabited by people from the community they were persecuting They said they would kill my little sister if we didn t So we point to the house in front of us They went there and killed two children she says MSF psychologist Joel Christopher Bolombo has provided mental health care to trauma patients since he arrived in Kwamouth three weeks ago Some patients have nightmares develop a mistrust of other communities that they didn t have before or show signs of depression or feelings of guilt he says In addition to providing traditional medical care it is essential to help them express their feelings through words or drawings These types of events leave patients with invisible wounds that also need to be treated says Bolombo Violence spreads to Bandundu By mid September the security situation in Kwamouth had improved enough to allow many of the displaced people to return to their homes while fighting and violence moved east towards the Bandundu city Last week we sent a mobile team down the road to Bandundu to assess needs and we immediately found seriously injured people who we transferred to Kinshasa says Dr Papy The situation in this area remains extremely tense This week we saw with our own eyes villages burned and people massacred in a very worrying pattern of attacks and revenge attacks he says Therefore we have decided to strengthen our presence in Bandundu to provide assistance to displaced people and respond to medical needs While the security situation in the town of Kwamouth has improved in the past week tensions and violence continue to flare as happened on 20 September when an attack took place near the town Following the attack MSF staff helped treat the wounded at Kwamouth General Hospital At this point we will leave a team in Kwamouth to be able to respond to any new outbreaks of violence and needs says Dr Papy This is not the first time that MSF has launched an emergency response in Ma Ndombe province following intercommunal violence Following clashes between the Tende and Nunu communities in Yumbi in December 2018 which killed hundreds of people in just a few days an MSF team treated the wounded at the general referral hospital in Yumbi and ran mobile clinics to provide medical care and psychological support
    Democratic Republic of the Congo: Thousands of people affected by intercommunal violence in Maï-Ndombe province
    Africa4 days ago

    Democratic Republic of the Congo: Thousands of people affected by intercommunal violence in Maï-Ndombe province

    In recent weeks, an upsurge in intercommunal violence in Kwamouth territory, Mai-Ndombe province, Democratic Republic of the Congo, has led to persecution and the killing of people, houses and villages burned to the ground, roadblocks set up to intercept to supposed enemies.

    Thousands of people have fled their homes into the forest or crossed the River Kwa to find refuge in makeshift sites in Bolobo territory.

    “When we arrived in the area, we found thousands of people living in deplorable conditions, homeless, without access to clean water or sanitation,” says Dr. Dieya Papy, a medical officer with the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) emergency team.

    “The area has a high prevalence of malaria and people's living conditions clearly put them at risk of getting sick.

    We had to move fast,” she says.

    Responding to immediate needs MSF's emergency team arrived in Kwamouth on 24 August to respond to people's most pressing needs, while calling on other aid organizations to join the response.

    In a context of high tension, the small team also did everything possible to help people who had fled further afield.

    “Our priority was to transport the seriously injured to Kinshasa and improve living conditions in the sites as best we could, installing latrines and water points and distributing essentials such as mosquito nets, soap and water disinfection tablets,” says Dr. .Daddy.

    “People's access to healthcare was extremely limited in the area, so we made donations to local health centers and opened mobile clinics at the sites for displaced people in Simbambili and Sokoa,” says Dr. Papy. During the last three weeks, MSF staff, assisted by two nurses from the Ministry of Health, have provided more than 750 medical consultations through mobile clinics, mainly for malaria and respiratory infections.

    They have also transported seriously injured people to hospitals in Kinshasa by boat and by road.

    Patients traumatized by violence In addition to people's immediate medical needs, violent events have also left many people psychologically traumatized.

    “When I heard the shots, I ran away with my sister to our aunt's house,” says 11-year-old Astrid*.

    “But when we got there, the men threatened us with their weapons.

    They wanted us to show them the houses inhabited by people from the community they were persecuting.” “They said they would kill my little sister if we didn't.

    So, we point to the house in front of us.

    They went there and killed two children,” she says.

    MSF psychologist Joel-Christopher Bolombo has provided mental health care to trauma patients since he arrived in Kwamouth three weeks ago.

    “Some patients have nightmares, develop a mistrust of other communities that they didn't have before, or show signs of depression or feelings of guilt,” he says.

    “In addition to providing traditional medical care, it is essential to help them express their feelings through words or drawings.

    These types of events leave patients with invisible wounds that also need to be treated,” says Bolombo.

    Violence spreads to Bandundu By mid-September, the security situation in Kwamouth had improved enough to allow many of the displaced people to return to their homes, while fighting and violence moved east towards the Bandundu city.

    “Last week, we sent a mobile team down the road to Bandundu to assess needs, and we immediately found seriously injured people who we transferred to Kinshasa,” says Dr Papy. "The situation in this area remains extremely tense."

    "This week we saw with our own eyes villages burned and people massacred, in a very worrying pattern of attacks and revenge attacks," he says.

    Therefore, we have decided to strengthen our presence in Bandundu to provide assistance to displaced people and respond to medical needs.” While the security situation in the town of Kwamouth has improved in the past week, tensions and violence continue to flare, as happened on 20 September when an attack took place near the town.

    Following the attack, MSF staff helped treat the wounded at Kwamouth General Hospital.

    “At this point, we will leave a team in Kwamouth to be able to respond to any new outbreaks of violence and needs,” says Dr Papy. This is not the first time that MSF has launched an emergency response in Maï-Ndombe province following intercommunal violence.

    Following clashes between the Tende and Nunu communities in Yumbi in December 2018, which killed hundreds of people in just a few days, an MSF team treated the wounded at the general referral hospital in Yumbi and ran mobile clinics to provide medical care and psychological support.

  •   Immediately after the declaration of an Ebola outbreak in Uganda s central district of Mubende on September 20 the Ministry of Health asked M decins Sans Fronti res M decins Sans Fronti res to support its efforts in combating the spread of the disease On Wednesday September 21 an MSF team made up of six people mainly doctors and logisticians traveled to the town of Mubende to assess the situation and the needs of the regional reference hospital where the first case was detected Since the assessment MSF has started to set up an Ebola isolation and treatment center at Mubende hospital We are also exploring the possibility of setting up a second center in the town of Madudu some 25 km to the north where the first person to die of Ebola originated and where several suspected cases are reported But the priority today is to improve patient care in the current structure MSF is assembling a team of doctors epidemiologists and logistics specialists experienced in handling haemorrhagic fever cases that should be ready to start work early next week The organization remains available for the Ministry of Health to intervene further when needs are identified The last Ebola outbreak in the country occurred in 2019 MSF intervened in the country to support the Ugandan health authorities in the management of people who had been in contact with these confirmed cases the creation of an Ebola treatment unit Ebola and assistance to improve the infection Prevention and control measures
    Uganda: Doctors Without Borders (MSF) responds to Ebola outbreak
      Immediately after the declaration of an Ebola outbreak in Uganda s central district of Mubende on September 20 the Ministry of Health asked M decins Sans Fronti res M decins Sans Fronti res to support its efforts in combating the spread of the disease On Wednesday September 21 an MSF team made up of six people mainly doctors and logisticians traveled to the town of Mubende to assess the situation and the needs of the regional reference hospital where the first case was detected Since the assessment MSF has started to set up an Ebola isolation and treatment center at Mubende hospital We are also exploring the possibility of setting up a second center in the town of Madudu some 25 km to the north where the first person to die of Ebola originated and where several suspected cases are reported But the priority today is to improve patient care in the current structure MSF is assembling a team of doctors epidemiologists and logistics specialists experienced in handling haemorrhagic fever cases that should be ready to start work early next week The organization remains available for the Ministry of Health to intervene further when needs are identified The last Ebola outbreak in the country occurred in 2019 MSF intervened in the country to support the Ugandan health authorities in the management of people who had been in contact with these confirmed cases the creation of an Ebola treatment unit Ebola and assistance to improve the infection Prevention and control measures
    Uganda: Doctors Without Borders (MSF) responds to Ebola outbreak
    Africa7 days ago

    Uganda: Doctors Without Borders (MSF) responds to Ebola outbreak

    Immediately after the declaration of an Ebola outbreak in Uganda's central district of Mubende on September 20, the Ministry of Health asked Médecins Sans Frontières/Médecins Sans Frontières to support its efforts in combating the spread of the disease.

    On Wednesday, September 21, an MSF team made up of six people, mainly doctors and logisticians, traveled to the town of Mubende to assess the situation and the needs of the regional reference hospital where the first case was detected.

    Since the assessment, MSF has started to set up an Ebola isolation and treatment center at Mubende hospital.

    We are also exploring the possibility of setting up a second center in the town of Madudu, some 25 km to the north, where the first person to die of Ebola originated and where several suspected cases are reported.

    But the priority today is to improve patient care in the current structure.

    MSF is assembling a team of doctors, epidemiologists and logistics specialists experienced in handling haemorrhagic fever cases that should be ready to start work early next week.

    The organization remains available for the Ministry of Health to intervene further when needs are identified.

    The last Ebola outbreak in the country occurred in 2019.

    MSF intervened in the country to support the Ugandan health authorities in the management of people who had been in contact with these confirmed cases, the creation of an Ebola treatment unit Ebola and assistance to improve the infection.

    Prevention and control measures.

  •   In August inter communal violence broke out in Kwamouth Territory an area half a day s boat ride north of the capital Kinshasa For the past month MSF has been the only aid organization on site providing medical care and assistance to people displaced from their homes With the fighting moving east MSF is also deploying emergency teams near the town of Bandundu where violence remains a concern In recent weeks an upsurge in intercommunal violence in the Kwamouth Territory has resulted in people being hunted down and killed houses and villages burned to the ground roadblocks set up to intercept perceived enemies and thousands fleeing their homes to the forest or cross the Kwa River to take refuge in makeshift sites in Bolobo territory When we arrived in the area we found thousands of people living in deplorable conditions homeless without access to clean water or sanitation says Dr Dieya Papy a medical officer with the MSF emergency team The area has a high prevalence of malaria and people s living conditions clearly put them at risk of getting sick We had to act quickly Responding to immediate needs The MSF emergency team arrived in Kwamouth on 24 August to respond to people s most pressing needs while calling on other aid organizations to join the response In a context of high tension the small team also did their best to help people who had fled further afield Our priority was to transport the seriously injured to Kinshasa and improve living conditions in the sites as best we could installing latrines and water points and distributing essentials like mosquito nets soap and tablets to disinfect the water says Dr Papy People s access to healthcare was extremely limited in the area so we made donations to local health centers and opened mobile clinics at the sites for displaced people in Simbambili and Sokoa During the last three weeks MSF staff assisted by two nurses from the Ministry of Health have provided more than 750 medical consultations through mobile clinics mainly for malaria and respiratory infections They have also transported seriously injured people to hospitals in Kinshasa by boat and by road Patients traumatized by violence In addition to people s immediate medical needs violent events have also left many people psychologically traumatized When I heard the shots I ran away with my sister to our aunt s house says 11 year old Astrid not her real name But when we got there the men threatened us with their weapons They wanted us to show them the houses inhabited by people from the community they were persecuting They said they would kill my little sister if we didn t she pointed to the house in front of us They went there and killed two children MSF psychologist Joel Christopher Bolombo has provided mental health care to trauma patients since he arrived in Kwamouth three weeks ago Some patients have nightmares develop a mistrust of other communities that they didn t have before or show signs of depression or feelings of guilt he says In addition to providing traditional medical care it is essential to help them express their feelings through words or drawings These types of events leave patients with invisible wounds that also need to be addressed Violence spreads to Bandundu By mid September the security situation in Kwamouth had improved enough to allow many of the displaced people to return to their homes while fighting and violence moved east towards the Bandundu city team along the road to Bandundu to assess the needs and we immediately found seriously injured people who we transferred to Kinshasa says Dr Papy The situation in this area remains extremely tense This week we saw with our own eyes villages burned and people massacred in a very worrying pattern of attacks and revenge attacks Therefore we have decided to strengthen our presence in Bandundu to provide assistance to displaced people and respond to medical needs While the security situation in the town of Kwamouth has improved in the past week tensions and violence continue to flare as happened on 20 September when an attack took place near the town Following the attack MSF staff helped treat the wounded at Kwamouth General Hospital At this point we will leave a team in Kwamouth to be able to respond to any new outbreaks of violence and needs says Dr Papy This is not the first time that MSF has launched an emergency response in Ma Ndombe province following intercommunal violence Following clashes between the Tende and Nunu communities in Yumbi in December 2018 which killed hundreds of people in just a few days an MSF team treated the wounded at the general referral hospital in Yumbi and ran mobile clinics to provide medical care and psychological support
    Democratic Republic of the Congo: Thousands affected by the outbreak of violence in the province of Maï-Ndombe
      In August inter communal violence broke out in Kwamouth Territory an area half a day s boat ride north of the capital Kinshasa For the past month MSF has been the only aid organization on site providing medical care and assistance to people displaced from their homes With the fighting moving east MSF is also deploying emergency teams near the town of Bandundu where violence remains a concern In recent weeks an upsurge in intercommunal violence in the Kwamouth Territory has resulted in people being hunted down and killed houses and villages burned to the ground roadblocks set up to intercept perceived enemies and thousands fleeing their homes to the forest or cross the Kwa River to take refuge in makeshift sites in Bolobo territory When we arrived in the area we found thousands of people living in deplorable conditions homeless without access to clean water or sanitation says Dr Dieya Papy a medical officer with the MSF emergency team The area has a high prevalence of malaria and people s living conditions clearly put them at risk of getting sick We had to act quickly Responding to immediate needs The MSF emergency team arrived in Kwamouth on 24 August to respond to people s most pressing needs while calling on other aid organizations to join the response In a context of high tension the small team also did their best to help people who had fled further afield Our priority was to transport the seriously injured to Kinshasa and improve living conditions in the sites as best we could installing latrines and water points and distributing essentials like mosquito nets soap and tablets to disinfect the water says Dr Papy People s access to healthcare was extremely limited in the area so we made donations to local health centers and opened mobile clinics at the sites for displaced people in Simbambili and Sokoa During the last three weeks MSF staff assisted by two nurses from the Ministry of Health have provided more than 750 medical consultations through mobile clinics mainly for malaria and respiratory infections They have also transported seriously injured people to hospitals in Kinshasa by boat and by road Patients traumatized by violence In addition to people s immediate medical needs violent events have also left many people psychologically traumatized When I heard the shots I ran away with my sister to our aunt s house says 11 year old Astrid not her real name But when we got there the men threatened us with their weapons They wanted us to show them the houses inhabited by people from the community they were persecuting They said they would kill my little sister if we didn t she pointed to the house in front of us They went there and killed two children MSF psychologist Joel Christopher Bolombo has provided mental health care to trauma patients since he arrived in Kwamouth three weeks ago Some patients have nightmares develop a mistrust of other communities that they didn t have before or show signs of depression or feelings of guilt he says In addition to providing traditional medical care it is essential to help them express their feelings through words or drawings These types of events leave patients with invisible wounds that also need to be addressed Violence spreads to Bandundu By mid September the security situation in Kwamouth had improved enough to allow many of the displaced people to return to their homes while fighting and violence moved east towards the Bandundu city team along the road to Bandundu to assess the needs and we immediately found seriously injured people who we transferred to Kinshasa says Dr Papy The situation in this area remains extremely tense This week we saw with our own eyes villages burned and people massacred in a very worrying pattern of attacks and revenge attacks Therefore we have decided to strengthen our presence in Bandundu to provide assistance to displaced people and respond to medical needs While the security situation in the town of Kwamouth has improved in the past week tensions and violence continue to flare as happened on 20 September when an attack took place near the town Following the attack MSF staff helped treat the wounded at Kwamouth General Hospital At this point we will leave a team in Kwamouth to be able to respond to any new outbreaks of violence and needs says Dr Papy This is not the first time that MSF has launched an emergency response in Ma Ndombe province following intercommunal violence Following clashes between the Tende and Nunu communities in Yumbi in December 2018 which killed hundreds of people in just a few days an MSF team treated the wounded at the general referral hospital in Yumbi and ran mobile clinics to provide medical care and psychological support
    Democratic Republic of the Congo: Thousands affected by the outbreak of violence in the province of Maï-Ndombe
    Africa1 week ago

    Democratic Republic of the Congo: Thousands affected by the outbreak of violence in the province of Maï-Ndombe

    In August, inter-communal violence broke out in Kwamouth Territory, an area half a day's boat ride north of the capital, Kinshasa; For the past month, MSF has been the only aid organization on site, providing medical care and assistance to people displaced from their homes; With the fighting moving east, MSF is also deploying emergency teams near the town of Bandundu, where violence remains a concern.

    In recent weeks, an upsurge in intercommunal violence in the Kwamouth Territory has resulted in people being hunted down and killed, houses and villages burned to the ground, roadblocks set up to intercept perceived enemies, and thousands fleeing their homes to the forest.

    or cross the Kwa River to take refuge in makeshift sites in Bolobo territory.

    "When we arrived in the area, we found thousands of people living in deplorable conditions, homeless, without access to clean water or sanitation," says Dr. Dieya Papy, a medical officer with the MSF emergency team.

    "The area has a high prevalence of malaria and people's living conditions clearly put them at risk of getting sick.

    We had to act quickly."

    Responding to immediate needs The MSF emergency team arrived in Kwamouth on 24 August to respond to people's most pressing needs, while calling on other aid organizations to join the response In a context of high tension, the small team also did their best to help people who had fled further afield.

    "Our priority was to transport the seriously injured to Kinshasa and improve living conditions in the sites as best we could, installing latrines and water points and distributing essentials like mosquito nets, soap and tablets to disinfect the water," says Dr. Papy. "People's access to healthcare was extremely limited in the area, so we made donations to local health centers and opened mobile clinics at the sites for displaced people in Simbambili and Sokoa."

    During the last three weeks, MSF staff, assisted by two nurses from the Ministry of Health, have provided more than 750 medical consultations through mobile clinics, mainly for malaria and respiratory infections.

    They have also transported seriously injured people to hospitals in Kinshasa by boat and by road.

    Patients traumatized by violence In addition to people's immediate medical needs, violent events have also left many people psychologically traumatized.

    "When I heard the shots, I ran away with my sister to our aunt's house," says 11-year-old Astrid.

    [not her real name].

    “But when we got there, the men threatened us with their weapons.

    They wanted us to show them the houses inhabited by people from the community they were persecuting.

    They said they would kill my little sister if we didn't.

    she pointed to the house in front of us.

    They went there and killed two children.” MSF psychologist Joel-Christopher Bolombo has provided mental health care to trauma patients since he arrived in Kwamouth three weeks ago.

    “Some patients have nightmares, develop a mistrust of other communities that they didn't have before, or show signs of depression or feelings of guilt,” he says.

    “In addition to providing traditional medical care, it is essential to help them express their feelings through words or drawings.

    These types of events leave patients with invisible wounds that also need to be addressed.” Violence spreads to Bandundu By mid-September, the security situation in Kwamouth had improved enough to allow many of the displaced people to return to their homes, while fighting and violence moved east towards the Bandundu city.

    team along the road to Bandundu to assess the needs, and we immediately found seriously injured people who we transferred to Kinshasa," says Dr. Papy. "The situation in this area remains extremely tense.

    This week we saw with our own eyes villages burned and people massacred, in a very worrying pattern of attacks and revenge attacks.

    Therefore, we have decided to strengthen our presence in Bandundu to provide assistance to displaced people and respond to medical needs.” While the security situation in the town of Kwamouth has improved in the past week, tensions and violence continue to flare, as happened on 20 September when an attack took place near the town.

    Following the attack, MSF staff helped treat the wounded at Kwamouth General Hospital.

    “At this point, we will leave a team in Kwamouth to be able to respond to any new outbreaks of violence and needs,” says Dr Papy. This is not the first time that MSF has launched an emergency response in Maï-Ndombe province following intercommunal violence.

    Following clashes between the Tende and Nunu communities in Yumbi in December 2018, which killed hundreds of people in just a few days, an MSF team treated the wounded at the general referral hospital in Yumbi and ran mobile clinics to provide medical care and psychological support.

  •   An estimated 1 6 million South Sudanese residents and refugees living in the town of Jebel Aulia south of Khartoum Sudan struggle to access basic health care and adequate water and sanitation services especially during the season of rains In response M decins Sans Fronti res M decins Sans Fronti res MSF teams are now supporting a clinic in the Al Rasheed neighborhood of Jebel Aulia town where they have already treated almost 4 000 patients since July The Al Rasheed clinic was facing drug shortages as well as problems with water and waste management says Assane Compaore MSF head of mission in Sudan MSF now supports the Al Rasheed clinic and provides free healthcare services for people of all ages and to fill the gap to reduce illness and death in the community We are now primarily seeing respiratory tract infections urinary tract infections and gastrointestinal illnesses among our patients highlighting the basic health care needs in the area says Compaore MSF is working together with its partners to provide free basic medical and emergency care maternal and mental health care to all patients who come to the facilities For seriously ill patients who require admission to hospital a referral system has been established so that they can be transferred to facilities in Khartoum if necessary MSF s work also focuses on improving access to clean water in and around the facility Our team is also launching a disease surveillance system in communities to keep people healthier and mitigate any future outbreaks MSF is also providing training to medical staff at the facility on early detection of outbreaks as well as emergency interventions
    Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) support for a clinic in southern Khartoum highlights the need for more health facilities
      An estimated 1 6 million South Sudanese residents and refugees living in the town of Jebel Aulia south of Khartoum Sudan struggle to access basic health care and adequate water and sanitation services especially during the season of rains In response M decins Sans Fronti res M decins Sans Fronti res MSF teams are now supporting a clinic in the Al Rasheed neighborhood of Jebel Aulia town where they have already treated almost 4 000 patients since July The Al Rasheed clinic was facing drug shortages as well as problems with water and waste management says Assane Compaore MSF head of mission in Sudan MSF now supports the Al Rasheed clinic and provides free healthcare services for people of all ages and to fill the gap to reduce illness and death in the community We are now primarily seeing respiratory tract infections urinary tract infections and gastrointestinal illnesses among our patients highlighting the basic health care needs in the area says Compaore MSF is working together with its partners to provide free basic medical and emergency care maternal and mental health care to all patients who come to the facilities For seriously ill patients who require admission to hospital a referral system has been established so that they can be transferred to facilities in Khartoum if necessary MSF s work also focuses on improving access to clean water in and around the facility Our team is also launching a disease surveillance system in communities to keep people healthier and mitigate any future outbreaks MSF is also providing training to medical staff at the facility on early detection of outbreaks as well as emergency interventions
    Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) support for a clinic in southern Khartoum highlights the need for more health facilities
    Africa2 weeks ago

    Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) support for a clinic in southern Khartoum highlights the need for more health facilities

    An estimated 1.6 million South Sudanese residents and refugees living in the town of Jebel Aulia, south of Khartoum, Sudan, struggle to access basic health care and adequate water and sanitation services, especially during the season.

    of rains In response, Médecins Sans Frontières/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are now supporting a clinic in the Al-Rasheed neighborhood of Jebel Aulia town, where they have already treated almost 4,000 patients since July. “The Al-Rasheed clinic was facing drug shortages, as well as problems with water and waste management,” says Assane Compaore, MSF head of mission in Sudan.

    “MSF now supports the Al-Rasheed clinic and provides free healthcare services for people of all ages and to fill the gap to reduce illness and death in the community.” “We are now primarily seeing respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections and gastrointestinal illnesses among our patients, highlighting the basic health care needs in the area,” says Compaore.

    MSF is working together with its partners to provide free basic medical and emergency care, maternal and mental health care to all patients who come to the facilities.

    For seriously ill patients who require admission to hospital, a referral system has been established so that they can be transferred to facilities in Khartoum if necessary.

    MSF's work also focuses on improving access to clean water in and around the facility.

    Our team is also launching a disease surveillance system in communities to keep people healthier and mitigate any future outbreaks.

    MSF is also providing training to medical staff at the facility on early detection of outbreaks, as well as emergency interventions.

  •   Today on the occasion of World Humanitarian Day the humanitarian community of northeastern Nigeria pays tribute to all humanitarian workers who step forward to respond to the crisis in the region every day by providing vital assistance to millions of women children and men This year s theme ItTakesAVillage is based on the metaphor It takes a village to raise a child At an event marking World Humanitarian Day today in Maiduguri Mr Matthias Schmale United Nations UN Humanitarian and Resident Coordinator for Nigeria said Just like it takes a village to raise a child it takes a whole community to help people in need to provide urgent medical care shelter food protection transportation security water and much more He noted that the humanitarian village in northeast Nigeria is proud to include volunteers and paid staff from civil society national and international NGOs the government the United Nations and the people affected by the crisis themselves The vast majority of humanitarian workers in Nigeria including those most at risk are Nigerian Despite the many challenges in this crisis we should all be immensely proud of the impact humanitarian workers are having in north east Nigeria Through our combined effort our humanitarian village provided assistance to five million people a year That assistance saved countless lives improved living conditions and protected the most vulnerable said Mr Schmale Some of this assistance continues to empower affected people as part of this village to help themselves World Humanitarian Day also advocates for the safety and security of humanitarian workers who often work in volatile and unpredictable environments Since 2016 35 aid workers have been killed in northeast Nigeria according to the Aid Workers Security Database AWSD Twenty two have been injured and 28 kidnapped So far in 2022 six aid workers have been kidnapped and one killed in the region AWSD Globally in 2021 some 460 aid workers fell victim to 267 major attacks 140 aid workers were killed 203 seriously injured and 117 abducted This marks the highest number of deaths of aid workers on record since 2013 according to Humanitarian Outcomes The humanitarian crisis has continued unabated in northeast Nigeria with 8 4 million people in need of humanitarian assistance this year according to the 2022 Humanitarian Needs Overview The deteriorating food security and nutrition situation is a one of the most worrying areas of this crisis For children in northeast Nigeria the nutritional situation is becoming increasingly worrying Approximately 1 74 million children under the age of five are expected to be acutely malnourished in the Northeast in 2022 Levels of acute malnutrition in Borno and Yobe states are the highest on record since 2016 and admissions for severe acute malnutrition in nutritional treatment centers are at an all time high levels since surveillance began in 2017 After visiting a nutritional stabilization center in Damaturo and an MSF hospital in Maiduguri Mr Schmale noted that the increasing number of children admitted to these and other facilities is deeply concerning We cannot allow children to suffer and some die because they don t have enough to eat Mr Schmale stressed that As we celebrate this day we must remember that 4 1 million people in the Northeast are facing hunger trying to cope with its dangerous repercussions We must put them and all people affected by the crisis at the center of World Humanitarian Day The 4 1 million is a projection from the Cadre Harmonis of March 2022 a joint assessment of food security of the number of people who will face food insecurity at critical levels in this lean season without knowing when or from where your next meal will come Among them it is estimated that 600 000 are at emergency levels For an already vulnerable population this puts their very survival at risk To respond to these and other urgent needs the humanitarian community in northeast Nigeria works together as a village banding together to bring aid where it is needed most The UN and its partners aim to help 5 5 million people through the 2022 Humanitarian Response Plan and funding is urgently needed The plan requested 1 1 billion but is currently only 27 percent funded
    World Humanitarian Day 2022: A tribute to humanitarian workers on the front lines in north-east Nigeria
      Today on the occasion of World Humanitarian Day the humanitarian community of northeastern Nigeria pays tribute to all humanitarian workers who step forward to respond to the crisis in the region every day by providing vital assistance to millions of women children and men This year s theme ItTakesAVillage is based on the metaphor It takes a village to raise a child At an event marking World Humanitarian Day today in Maiduguri Mr Matthias Schmale United Nations UN Humanitarian and Resident Coordinator for Nigeria said Just like it takes a village to raise a child it takes a whole community to help people in need to provide urgent medical care shelter food protection transportation security water and much more He noted that the humanitarian village in northeast Nigeria is proud to include volunteers and paid staff from civil society national and international NGOs the government the United Nations and the people affected by the crisis themselves The vast majority of humanitarian workers in Nigeria including those most at risk are Nigerian Despite the many challenges in this crisis we should all be immensely proud of the impact humanitarian workers are having in north east Nigeria Through our combined effort our humanitarian village provided assistance to five million people a year That assistance saved countless lives improved living conditions and protected the most vulnerable said Mr Schmale Some of this assistance continues to empower affected people as part of this village to help themselves World Humanitarian Day also advocates for the safety and security of humanitarian workers who often work in volatile and unpredictable environments Since 2016 35 aid workers have been killed in northeast Nigeria according to the Aid Workers Security Database AWSD Twenty two have been injured and 28 kidnapped So far in 2022 six aid workers have been kidnapped and one killed in the region AWSD Globally in 2021 some 460 aid workers fell victim to 267 major attacks 140 aid workers were killed 203 seriously injured and 117 abducted This marks the highest number of deaths of aid workers on record since 2013 according to Humanitarian Outcomes The humanitarian crisis has continued unabated in northeast Nigeria with 8 4 million people in need of humanitarian assistance this year according to the 2022 Humanitarian Needs Overview The deteriorating food security and nutrition situation is a one of the most worrying areas of this crisis For children in northeast Nigeria the nutritional situation is becoming increasingly worrying Approximately 1 74 million children under the age of five are expected to be acutely malnourished in the Northeast in 2022 Levels of acute malnutrition in Borno and Yobe states are the highest on record since 2016 and admissions for severe acute malnutrition in nutritional treatment centers are at an all time high levels since surveillance began in 2017 After visiting a nutritional stabilization center in Damaturo and an MSF hospital in Maiduguri Mr Schmale noted that the increasing number of children admitted to these and other facilities is deeply concerning We cannot allow children to suffer and some die because they don t have enough to eat Mr Schmale stressed that As we celebrate this day we must remember that 4 1 million people in the Northeast are facing hunger trying to cope with its dangerous repercussions We must put them and all people affected by the crisis at the center of World Humanitarian Day The 4 1 million is a projection from the Cadre Harmonis of March 2022 a joint assessment of food security of the number of people who will face food insecurity at critical levels in this lean season without knowing when or from where your next meal will come Among them it is estimated that 600 000 are at emergency levels For an already vulnerable population this puts their very survival at risk To respond to these and other urgent needs the humanitarian community in northeast Nigeria works together as a village banding together to bring aid where it is needed most The UN and its partners aim to help 5 5 million people through the 2022 Humanitarian Response Plan and funding is urgently needed The plan requested 1 1 billion but is currently only 27 percent funded
    World Humanitarian Day 2022: A tribute to humanitarian workers on the front lines in north-east Nigeria
    Africa1 month ago

    World Humanitarian Day 2022: A tribute to humanitarian workers on the front lines in north-east Nigeria

    Today, on the occasion of World Humanitarian Day, the humanitarian community of northeastern Nigeria pays tribute to all humanitarian workers who step forward to respond to the crisis in the region every day by providing vital assistance to millions of women, children and men.

    This year's theme #ItTakesAVillage is based on the metaphor, 'It takes a village to raise a child.' At an event marking World Humanitarian Day today in Maiduguri, Mr. Matthias Schmale, United Nations (UN) Humanitarian and Resident Coordinator for Nigeria, said: "Just like it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a whole community to help people in need.

    ; to provide urgent medical care, shelter, food, protection, transportation, security, water and much more.” He noted that the humanitarian 'village' in northeast Nigeria is proud to include volunteers and paid staff from civil society, national and international NGOs, the government, the United Nations and the people affected by the crisis themselves.

    The vast majority of humanitarian workers in Nigeria, including those most at risk, are Nigerian.

    "Despite the many challenges in this crisis, we should all be immensely proud of the impact humanitarian workers are having in north-east Nigeria.

    Through our combined effort, our humanitarian 'village' provided assistance to five million people a year.

    That assistance saved countless lives, improved living conditions and protected the most vulnerable," said Mr. Schmale.

    Some of this assistance continues to empower affected people as part of this village to help themselves.

    World Humanitarian Day also advocates for the safety and security of humanitarian workers, who often work in volatile and unpredictable environments.

    Since 2016, 35 aid workers have been killed in northeast Nigeria, according to the Aid Workers Security Database (AWSD).

    Twenty-two have been injured and 28 kidnapped.

    So far in 2022, six aid workers have been kidnapped and one killed in the region (AWSD).

    Globally, in 2021, some 460 aid workers fell victim to 267 major attacks: 140 aid workers were killed, 203 seriously injured and 117 abducted.

    This marks the highest number of deaths of aid workers on record since 2013, according to Humanitarian Outcomes.

    The humanitarian crisis has continued unabated in northeast Nigeria, with 8.4 million people in need of humanitarian assistance this year, according to the 2022 Humanitarian Needs Overview.

    The deteriorating food security and nutrition situation is a one of the most worrying areas of this crisis.

    For children in northeast Nigeria, the nutritional situation is becoming increasingly worrying.

    Approximately 1.74 million children under the age of five are expected to be acutely malnourished in the Northeast in 2022.

    Levels of acute malnutrition in Borno and Yobe states are the highest on record since 2016, and admissions for severe acute malnutrition in nutritional treatment centers are at an all time high.

    levels since surveillance began in 2017.

    After visiting a nutritional stabilization center in Damaturo and an MSF hospital in Maiduguri, Mr Schmale noted that "the increasing number of children admitted to these and other facilities is deeply concerning.

    We cannot allow children to suffer and some die because they don't have enough to eat."

    Mr. Schmale stressed that, "As we celebrate this day, we must remember that 4.1 million people in the Northeast are facing hunger, trying to cope with its dangerous repercussions.

    We must put them, and all people affected by the crisis , at the center of World Humanitarian Day".

    The 4.1 million is a projection from the Cadre Harmonisé of March 2022 (a joint assessment of food security) of the number of people who will face food insecurity at critical levels in this lean season, without knowing when or from where.

    your next meal will come.

    Among them, it is estimated that 600,000 are at emergency levels.

    For an already vulnerable population, this puts their very survival at risk.

    To respond to these and other urgent needs, the humanitarian community in northeast Nigeria works together as a 'village', banding together to bring aid where it is needed most.

    The UN and its partners aim to help 5.5 million people through the 2022 Humanitarian Response Plan, and funding is urgently needed.

    The plan requested $1.1 billion but is currently only 27 percent funded.

  •  The international medical humanitarian organisation M decins Sans Fronti res MSF also known as Doctors Without Borders in collaboration with the State Ministry of Health SMoH has expanded the capacity of its inpatient treatment facility for malnourished children to 565 beds to respond to an increasing influx of the patients in Katsina state The capacity is increased through opening of 80 bed Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Centre ITFC including 30 bed Intensive Care Unit ICU at Dr Yusha u Armaya u Maternal and Paediatric Health Facility in Kofar Sauri and the extension at Turai Ummaru YarAdua Maternity and Children Hospital in Katsina the state capital Governor of Katsina State Aminu Bello Masari together with MSF team inaugurated the new ward in a ceremony also attended by the commissioner of health royal fathers volunteers and others on Monday MSF teams has been witnessing an alarming rise in admissions of malnourished children in its facilities in Katsina since the start of the year In June the team had to quickly increase their inpatient capacity to 280 beds but the influx of malnourished children was so significant both in outpatient and inpatient that restricted admission criteria had to be introduced for some outpatient treatment centres Between January and July MSF teams in Katsina have admitted and treated over five thousand children suffering from severe malnutrition with complications under its inpatient programme while about 50 thousand children have so far been enrolled under the outpatient program with currently more 20 000 children in the cohort for of follow up We had to put in place temporary structures by way of extension at the Turai YarAdua Hospital to effectively manage and treat the increasing number of children suffering from malnutrition and further expand the bed capacity at Kofar Sauri says Hassan Issa MSF Emergency Coordinator in Katsina Nigeria We are working in collaboration with the state government and our teams are ready to treat up to 100 000 malnourished children this year in our nutrition programme in Katsina state alone Katsina is one of the chronically food insecure states in Northwest Nigeria with a low level of coverage in terms of malnutrition case management The state is going through escalating levels of violence and displacement have pushed many communities to their limits In recent years armed groups that are locally referred to as bandits have intensified attacks killings kidnappings lootings and sexual violence Many people cannot farm cattle are stolen and markets and trade are disrupted amidst soaring staple food prices which remain above the five year average in most Nigerian markets in an already fragile health context The lean season or hunger gap is approaching its peak and the malaria transmission is further deteriorating the health and nutritional status with more severe cases admitted that need intensive medical care blood transfusion perfusion NG tube to feed children etc in inpatients says Hassan Issa MSF teams support in the treatment of malaria through test and treat for outpatients with about 800 treated since the beginning of July MSF also continues to support Jibia IDPs with drug donations and in July about 500 consultation was done from which 70 percent were children under five years old We have reached at our maximum capacity and the patients are still arriving in large numbers We again strongly urge all other health and humanitarian actors to immediately take steps to address the alarming inflow of the malnourished children If the current humanitarian assistance lags far behind in northwest Nigeria that s partly because the UN have failed to include the region in its humanitarian response plan for the country for the current year which primarily focuses on the critical situation in the northeast As a result many organisations are struggling to follow up on assessments and secure funding to implement lifesaving support in northwest Nigeria despite the known acute needs Other than Katsina MSF teams has been providing treatment to malnourished children in Kano Zamfara Sokoto and Kebbi states We are supporting 8 inpatient and 31 outpatient facilities across five states in the Northwest In MSF run or supported outpatient nutrition centres almost 53 000 patients of severe acute malnutrition SAM and about 25 000 patients of moderate acute malnutrition MAM were admitted between January and end of July 2022 M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Borders MSF is an international independent medical humanitarian organisation that delivers emergency aid to people affected by armed conflict epidemics natural disasters and exclusion from healthcare MSF first started working in Nigeria in 1996 and currently provides healthcare services in 11 states across the country
    Doctors-Without-Borders expands inpatient facility to 565 beds in Katsina
     The international medical humanitarian organisation M decins Sans Fronti res MSF also known as Doctors Without Borders in collaboration with the State Ministry of Health SMoH has expanded the capacity of its inpatient treatment facility for malnourished children to 565 beds to respond to an increasing influx of the patients in Katsina state The capacity is increased through opening of 80 bed Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Centre ITFC including 30 bed Intensive Care Unit ICU at Dr Yusha u Armaya u Maternal and Paediatric Health Facility in Kofar Sauri and the extension at Turai Ummaru YarAdua Maternity and Children Hospital in Katsina the state capital Governor of Katsina State Aminu Bello Masari together with MSF team inaugurated the new ward in a ceremony also attended by the commissioner of health royal fathers volunteers and others on Monday MSF teams has been witnessing an alarming rise in admissions of malnourished children in its facilities in Katsina since the start of the year In June the team had to quickly increase their inpatient capacity to 280 beds but the influx of malnourished children was so significant both in outpatient and inpatient that restricted admission criteria had to be introduced for some outpatient treatment centres Between January and July MSF teams in Katsina have admitted and treated over five thousand children suffering from severe malnutrition with complications under its inpatient programme while about 50 thousand children have so far been enrolled under the outpatient program with currently more 20 000 children in the cohort for of follow up We had to put in place temporary structures by way of extension at the Turai YarAdua Hospital to effectively manage and treat the increasing number of children suffering from malnutrition and further expand the bed capacity at Kofar Sauri says Hassan Issa MSF Emergency Coordinator in Katsina Nigeria We are working in collaboration with the state government and our teams are ready to treat up to 100 000 malnourished children this year in our nutrition programme in Katsina state alone Katsina is one of the chronically food insecure states in Northwest Nigeria with a low level of coverage in terms of malnutrition case management The state is going through escalating levels of violence and displacement have pushed many communities to their limits In recent years armed groups that are locally referred to as bandits have intensified attacks killings kidnappings lootings and sexual violence Many people cannot farm cattle are stolen and markets and trade are disrupted amidst soaring staple food prices which remain above the five year average in most Nigerian markets in an already fragile health context The lean season or hunger gap is approaching its peak and the malaria transmission is further deteriorating the health and nutritional status with more severe cases admitted that need intensive medical care blood transfusion perfusion NG tube to feed children etc in inpatients says Hassan Issa MSF teams support in the treatment of malaria through test and treat for outpatients with about 800 treated since the beginning of July MSF also continues to support Jibia IDPs with drug donations and in July about 500 consultation was done from which 70 percent were children under five years old We have reached at our maximum capacity and the patients are still arriving in large numbers We again strongly urge all other health and humanitarian actors to immediately take steps to address the alarming inflow of the malnourished children If the current humanitarian assistance lags far behind in northwest Nigeria that s partly because the UN have failed to include the region in its humanitarian response plan for the country for the current year which primarily focuses on the critical situation in the northeast As a result many organisations are struggling to follow up on assessments and secure funding to implement lifesaving support in northwest Nigeria despite the known acute needs Other than Katsina MSF teams has been providing treatment to malnourished children in Kano Zamfara Sokoto and Kebbi states We are supporting 8 inpatient and 31 outpatient facilities across five states in the Northwest In MSF run or supported outpatient nutrition centres almost 53 000 patients of severe acute malnutrition SAM and about 25 000 patients of moderate acute malnutrition MAM were admitted between January and end of July 2022 M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Borders MSF is an international independent medical humanitarian organisation that delivers emergency aid to people affected by armed conflict epidemics natural disasters and exclusion from healthcare MSF first started working in Nigeria in 1996 and currently provides healthcare services in 11 states across the country
    Doctors-Without-Borders expands inpatient facility to 565 beds in Katsina
    Health2 months ago

    Doctors-Without-Borders expands inpatient facility to 565 beds in Katsina

    The international medical humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) also known as Doctors Without Borders in collaboration with the State Ministry of Health (SMoH) has expanded the capacity of its inpatient treatment facility for malnourished children to 565 beds to respond to an increasing influx of the patients in Katsina state.The capacity is increased through opening of 80-bed Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Centre (ITFC) including 30 bed Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Dr. Yusha’u Armaya’u Maternal and Paediatric Health Facility in Kofar Sauri and the extension at Turai Ummaru YarAdua Maternity and Children Hospital in Katsina, the state capital.Governor of Katsina State Aminu Bello Masari together with MSF team inaugurated the new ward in a ceremony, also attended by the commissioner of health, royal fathers, volunteers, and others on Monday.MSF teams has been witnessing an alarming rise in admissions of malnourished children in its facilities in Katsina since the start of the year. In June, the team had to quickly increase their inpatient capacity to 280 beds, but the influx of malnourished children was so significant both in outpatient and inpatient that restricted admission criteria had to be introduced for some outpatient treatment centres.Between January and July, MSF teams in Katsina have admitted and treated over five thousand children suffering from severe malnutrition with complications under its inpatient programme while about 50 thousand children have so far been enrolled under the outpatient program with currently more 20,000 children in the cohort for of follow up.“We had to put in place temporary structures by way of extension at the Turai YarAdua Hospital to effectively manage and treat the increasing number of children suffering from malnutrition, and further expand the bed capacity at Kofar Sauri”, says Hassan Issa, MSF Emergency Coordinator in Katsina, Nigeria. “We are working in collaboration with the state government and our teams are ready to treat up to 100,000 malnourished children this year in our nutrition programme in Katsina state alone.”Katsina is one of the chronically food-insecure states in Northwest Nigeria with a low level of coverage in terms of malnutrition case management. The state is going through escalating levels of violence and displacement have pushed many communities to their limits. In recent years, armed groups that are locally referred to as ‘bandits’ have intensified attacks, killings, kidnappings, lootings and sexual violence. Many people cannot farm, cattle are stolen, and markets and trade are disrupted amidst soaring staple food prices – which remain above the five-year average in most Nigerian markets– in an already fragile health context.“The lean season or hunger gap is approaching its peak, and the malaria transmission is further deteriorating the health and nutritional status with more severe cases admitted that need intensive medical care (blood transfusion, perfusion, NG tube to feed children etc) in inpatients.” says Hassan Issa. .MSF teams support in the treatment of malaria through test and treat for outpatients with about 800 treated since the beginning of July. MSF also continues to support Jibia IDPs with drug donations and in July about 500 consultation was done from which 70 percent were children under five years old. “We have reached at our maximum capacity, and the patients are still arriving in large numbers. We again strongly urge all other health and humanitarian actors to immediately take steps to address the alarming inflow of the malnourished children.”If the current humanitarian assistance lags far behind in northwest Nigeria, that’s partly because the UN have failed to include the region in its humanitarian response plan for the country for the current year, which primarily focuses on the critical situation in the northeast. As a result, many organisations are struggling to follow up on assessments and secure funding to implement lifesaving support in northwest Nigeria, despite the known acute needs.Other than Katsina, MSF teams has been providing treatment to malnourished children in Kano, Zamfara, Sokoto and Kebbi states. We are supporting 8 inpatient and 31 outpatient facilities across five states in the Northwest. In MSF run or supported outpatient nutrition centres, almost 53,000 patients of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and about 25,000 patients of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) were admitted between January and end of July 2022.Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is an international, independent, medical humanitarian organisation that delivers emergency aid to people affected by armed conflict, epidemics, natural disasters and exclusion from healthcare. MSF first started working in Nigeria in 1996, and currently provides healthcare services in 11 states across the country.

  •   The whole family was in the field working when the shooting started We fled and walked for three hours to Rumangabo in the rain says Ponsie Benda 54 We couldn t go back to the house We left with what we had on us As clashes between the armed group M23 and the Congolese army closed in on his village the father of 13 children found refuge in the Virunga National Park primary school in Rumangabo in June 190 000 people in need Like Ponsie more than 190 000 people have had to flee their homes since the end of March 2022 in the Rutshuru and Nyiragongo territories of North Kivu province following the resurgence of the armed group M23 and intermittent clashes with the Congolese Army PONSIE BENDA RIGHT 54 HIS WIFE of hers AND 13 CHILDREN WERE DISPLACED AFTER THE FIGHT CLOSER TO THEIR HOMETOWN We slept outside I built this shelter with wooden sticks We eat boiled leaves from Monday to Sunday My wife takes them from people s fields asking the owners first There is mutual help because the community knows how much we are suffering Most people have gathered along the national highway linking Rutshuru to Goma the capital of North Kivu often in overcrowded places We slept outside I built this shelter with wooden sticks I m going to get banana and eucalyptus leaves to cover it That way at least the kids will be a little bit protected says Ponsie When he and his family arrived in Rumangabo the school classrooms were already full and they had no choice but to settle in the courtyard At the Rugabo stadium in the center of Rutshuru more than 1 400 families have gathered UNHCR has built community shelters but even so conditions remain extremely precarious some 35 families share an 18 by 5 meter tent When it rains the water floods the ground in the shelters and we spend the night in the water says Agrippine N Maganya 53 who arrived in Rutshuru with six of her 10 children more than four months ago The others must be in Uganda by now I haven t heard from them since the flight she says The proximity in internally displaced persons IDP sites combined with the lack of showers and latrines is a major risk factor for the spread of infectious diseases such as measles or cholera says B n dicte Lecoq M decins Sans Fronti res MSF emergency coordinator Stomachs are empty Adding to the lack of shelter is the lack of food We have nothing to eat Sometimes people I know from my village give me some food that they collected in the neighbourhoods says Obed Mashabi 20 who found refuge in the Rugabo stadium at the end of March We eat boiled leaves from Monday to Sunday adds Ponsie My wife takes them from other people s fields asking the owners first There is mutual help because the community knows how much we are suffering They share what little they have The people we treat have empty stomachs says Lecoq It is essential to increase food distributions or the situation could get even worse At the Rutshuru general referral hospital the MSF supported unit for severely malnourished children has been full for several weeks with a bed occupancy rate of 140 In the health structures that our teams are supporting in the Rutshuru and Nyiragongo territories the average number of consultations often exceeds 100 per day The three main diseases observed are malaria respiratory infections and diarrhoea Given the magnitude of the needs our teams cannot be everywhere Health structures are overwhelmed and face a serious lack of medicines In the face of this emergency more actors must be mobilized to ensure that all people can access care says Lecoq OBED MASHABI 20 FOUND SHELTER IN RUGABO STADIUM AT THE END OF MARCH We don t have anything to eat Sometimes people I know from my town give me some food that they collected in the neighborhoods We have food in the village in the fields but we can t go back The war continues there Everything must be rotting Beyond the immediate needs the long term consequences for affected communities are also a cause for concern Most depend on agriculture so lack of access to their fields for weeks or even months could exacerbate food insecurity for thousands of people in the region We have food in the town in the fields but we can t go back The war continues there Everything must be rotting says Obed Limited humanitarian assistance Although the crisis has lasted for several months Agrippine Ponsie and Obed lament the lack of humanitarian assistance received so far I have never received any distribution of food no bowls no pots nothing says Agrippina No one has come here If we had gotten help we wouldn t be out like this adds Ponsie The recent outbreak of violence in Rutshuru and Nyiragongo territories is exacerbating an already dire humanitarian situation with an estimated total of 1 6 million people displaced and more than 2 5 million people in need in North Kivu province in June of 2022 For Agrippine the more the weeks go by the more the hope of returning home diminishes I have no hope of going home any time soon There is no improvement she says Ponsie shares her discouragement Why is there still war in North Kivu This is not the first time we have had to flee I don t know how my children can grow up in war
    Hundreds of thousands at risk without food, shelter or medical care in North Kivu
      The whole family was in the field working when the shooting started We fled and walked for three hours to Rumangabo in the rain says Ponsie Benda 54 We couldn t go back to the house We left with what we had on us As clashes between the armed group M23 and the Congolese army closed in on his village the father of 13 children found refuge in the Virunga National Park primary school in Rumangabo in June 190 000 people in need Like Ponsie more than 190 000 people have had to flee their homes since the end of March 2022 in the Rutshuru and Nyiragongo territories of North Kivu province following the resurgence of the armed group M23 and intermittent clashes with the Congolese Army PONSIE BENDA RIGHT 54 HIS WIFE of hers AND 13 CHILDREN WERE DISPLACED AFTER THE FIGHT CLOSER TO THEIR HOMETOWN We slept outside I built this shelter with wooden sticks We eat boiled leaves from Monday to Sunday My wife takes them from people s fields asking the owners first There is mutual help because the community knows how much we are suffering Most people have gathered along the national highway linking Rutshuru to Goma the capital of North Kivu often in overcrowded places We slept outside I built this shelter with wooden sticks I m going to get banana and eucalyptus leaves to cover it That way at least the kids will be a little bit protected says Ponsie When he and his family arrived in Rumangabo the school classrooms were already full and they had no choice but to settle in the courtyard At the Rugabo stadium in the center of Rutshuru more than 1 400 families have gathered UNHCR has built community shelters but even so conditions remain extremely precarious some 35 families share an 18 by 5 meter tent When it rains the water floods the ground in the shelters and we spend the night in the water says Agrippine N Maganya 53 who arrived in Rutshuru with six of her 10 children more than four months ago The others must be in Uganda by now I haven t heard from them since the flight she says The proximity in internally displaced persons IDP sites combined with the lack of showers and latrines is a major risk factor for the spread of infectious diseases such as measles or cholera says B n dicte Lecoq M decins Sans Fronti res MSF emergency coordinator Stomachs are empty Adding to the lack of shelter is the lack of food We have nothing to eat Sometimes people I know from my village give me some food that they collected in the neighbourhoods says Obed Mashabi 20 who found refuge in the Rugabo stadium at the end of March We eat boiled leaves from Monday to Sunday adds Ponsie My wife takes them from other people s fields asking the owners first There is mutual help because the community knows how much we are suffering They share what little they have The people we treat have empty stomachs says Lecoq It is essential to increase food distributions or the situation could get even worse At the Rutshuru general referral hospital the MSF supported unit for severely malnourished children has been full for several weeks with a bed occupancy rate of 140 In the health structures that our teams are supporting in the Rutshuru and Nyiragongo territories the average number of consultations often exceeds 100 per day The three main diseases observed are malaria respiratory infections and diarrhoea Given the magnitude of the needs our teams cannot be everywhere Health structures are overwhelmed and face a serious lack of medicines In the face of this emergency more actors must be mobilized to ensure that all people can access care says Lecoq OBED MASHABI 20 FOUND SHELTER IN RUGABO STADIUM AT THE END OF MARCH We don t have anything to eat Sometimes people I know from my town give me some food that they collected in the neighborhoods We have food in the village in the fields but we can t go back The war continues there Everything must be rotting Beyond the immediate needs the long term consequences for affected communities are also a cause for concern Most depend on agriculture so lack of access to their fields for weeks or even months could exacerbate food insecurity for thousands of people in the region We have food in the town in the fields but we can t go back The war continues there Everything must be rotting says Obed Limited humanitarian assistance Although the crisis has lasted for several months Agrippine Ponsie and Obed lament the lack of humanitarian assistance received so far I have never received any distribution of food no bowls no pots nothing says Agrippina No one has come here If we had gotten help we wouldn t be out like this adds Ponsie The recent outbreak of violence in Rutshuru and Nyiragongo territories is exacerbating an already dire humanitarian situation with an estimated total of 1 6 million people displaced and more than 2 5 million people in need in North Kivu province in June of 2022 For Agrippine the more the weeks go by the more the hope of returning home diminishes I have no hope of going home any time soon There is no improvement she says Ponsie shares her discouragement Why is there still war in North Kivu This is not the first time we have had to flee I don t know how my children can grow up in war
    Hundreds of thousands at risk without food, shelter or medical care in North Kivu
    Africa2 months ago

    Hundreds of thousands at risk without food, shelter or medical care in North Kivu

    “The whole family was in the field working when the shooting started.

    We fled and walked for three hours to Rumangabo in the rain,” says Ponsie Benda, 54.

    “We couldn't go back to the house.

    We left with what we had on us”.

    As clashes between the armed group M23 and the Congolese army closed in on his village, the father of 13 children found refuge in the Virunga National Park primary school in Rumangabo in June. 190,000 people in need Like Ponsie, more than 190,000 people have had to flee their homes since the end of March 2022 in the Rutshuru and Nyiragongo territories of North Kivu province, following the resurgence of the armed group M23 and intermittent clashes with the Congolese Army. PONSIE BENDA (RIGHT), 54, HIS WIFE of hers AND 13 CHILDREN WERE DISPLACED AFTER THE FIGHT CLOSER TO THEIR HOMETOWN “We slept outside.

    I built this shelter with wooden sticks.

    We eat boiled leaves from Monday to Sunday.

    My wife takes them from people's fields, asking the owners first.

    There is mutual help because the community knows how much we are suffering”.

    Most people have gathered along the national highway linking Rutshuru to Goma, the capital of North Kivu, often in overcrowded places.

    “We slept outside.

    I built this shelter with wooden sticks.

    I'm going to get banana and eucalyptus leaves to cover it.

    That way at least the kids will be a little bit protected,” says Ponsie.

    When he and his family arrived in Rumangabo, the school classrooms were already full and they had no choice but to settle in the courtyard.

    At the Rugabo stadium in the center of Rutshuru, more than 1,400 families have gathered.

    UNHCR has built community shelters, but even so, conditions remain extremely precarious: some 35 families share an 18-by-5-meter tent.

    “When it rains, the water floods the ground in the shelters and we spend the night in the water,” says Agrippine N'Maganya, 53, who arrived in Rutshuru with six of her 10 children more than four months ago.

    "The others must be in Uganda by now...

    I haven't heard from them since the flight," she says.

    “The proximity in internally displaced persons (IDP) sites, combined with the lack of showers and latrines, is a major risk factor for the spread of infectious diseases such as measles or cholera,” says Bénédicte Lecoq, Médecins Sans Frontières ( MSF) emergency coordinator.

    Stomachs are empty Adding to the lack of shelter is the lack of food.

    “We have nothing to eat.

    Sometimes people I know from my village give me some food that they collected in the neighbourhoods,” says Obed Mashabi, 20, who found refuge in the Rugabo stadium at the end of March.

    "We eat boiled leaves from Monday to Sunday," adds Ponsie.

    “My wife takes them from other people's fields, asking the owners first.

    There is mutual help because the community knows how much we are suffering.

    They share what little they have.” “The people we treat have empty stomachs,” says Lecoq.

    “It is essential to increase food distributions or the situation could get even worse.” At the Rutshuru general referral hospital, the MSF-supported unit for severely malnourished children has been full for several weeks, with a bed occupancy rate of 140%.

    In the health structures that our teams are supporting in the Rutshuru and Nyiragongo territories, the average number of consultations often exceeds 100 per day.

    The three main diseases observed are malaria, respiratory infections and diarrhoea.

    “Given the magnitude of the needs, our teams cannot be everywhere.

    Health structures are overwhelmed and face a serious lack of medicines.

    In the face of this emergency, more actors must be mobilized to ensure that all people can access care,” says Lecoq.

    OBED MASHABI, 20, FOUND SHELTER IN RUGABO STADIUM AT THE END OF MARCH “We don't have anything to eat.

    Sometimes people I know from my town give me some food that they collected in the neighborhoods.

    We have food in the village, in the fields, but we can't go back.

    The war continues there.

    Everything must be rotting.

    Beyond the immediate needs, the long-term consequences for affected communities are also a cause for concern.

    Most depend on agriculture, so lack of access to their fields for weeks or even months could exacerbate food insecurity for thousands of people in the region.

    “We have food in the town, in the fields, but we can't go back.

    The war continues there.

    Everything must be rotting,” says Obed. Limited humanitarian assistance Although the crisis has lasted for several months, Agrippine, Ponsie and Obed lament the lack of humanitarian assistance received so far.

    “I have never received any distribution of food, no bowls, no pots; nothing,” says Agrippina.

    “No one has come here.

    If we had gotten help, we wouldn't be out like this,” adds Ponsie.

    The recent outbreak of violence in Rutshuru and Nyiragongo territories is exacerbating an already dire humanitarian situation with an estimated total of 1.6 million people displaced and more than 2.5 million people in need in North Kivu province in June of 2022.

    For Agrippine, the more the weeks go by, the more the hope of returning home diminishes.

    “I have no hope of going home any time soon.

    There is no improvement,” she says.

    Ponsie shares her discouragement.

    "Why is there still war in North Kivu?

    This is not the first time we have had to flee.

    I don't know how my children can grow up in war."

  •   In a world first M decins Sans Fronti res M decins Sans Fronti res MSF and the South Sudanese Ministry of Health are carrying out a large scale vaccination campaign in response to an outbreak of hepatitis E The campaign is taking place in the Bentiu IDP camp people in the Unity State of South Sudan There is no specific treatment for hepatitis E so preventing its spread is critical especially among pregnant women who face a mortality rate of up to 25 percent if infected Hepatitis E is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis which causes liver inflammation and damage leading to approximately 20 million infections and 44 000 deaths per year Large scale outbreaks often occur where water and sanitation are inadequate such as in refugee and displaced persons camps as it is transmitted through fecal contamination of food and water As well as being particularly deadly for pregnant women it also increases the risk of miscarriages and stillbirths The fight against hepatitis E has been long and frustrating said Dr Monica Rull MSF s medical director For the past two decades MSF has been responding to hepatitis E outbreaks in displacement camps trying to control the disease in difficult conditions and seeing the devastating impact on extremely vulnerable communities With the experience of this vaccination campaign we hope to change the way we approach hepatitis E in the future In March and April 2022 MSF and the South Sudanese Ministry of Health jointly carried out the first two rounds of the hepatitis E vaccination campaign in Bentiu Approximately 25 000 people including pregnant women have received the vaccine A third and final round will take place in October 2022 Given the successful implementation and enthusiastic community response in the first two rounds this groundbreaking vaccination campaign can serve as an example and be replicated in similar settings handling hepatitis E outbreaks said Dr John Rumunu CEO of preventive health services in Ministry of Health of South Sudan I hope the vaccine will help reduce hepatitis E infections and deaths in Bentiu and beyond Bentiu is the largest displaced persons camp in South Sudan established in 2014 at the height of the civil war Today there are approximately 112 000 people residing there many of whom have fled recent violence and flooding MSF has been present in Bentiu since its inception and has seen outbreaks of hepatitis E since 2015 The outbreaks are a result of poor living conditions including lack of access to adequate water sanitation and hygiene In 2021 extreme flooding and new influxes of displaced people exacerbated already dire living conditions increasing the spread of waterborne diseases including hepatitis E Since July 2021 MSF has treated 759 patients with confirmed hepatitis E 17 of whom died The only available hepatitis E vaccine Hecolin has been shown in clinical trials to be highly effective in preventing disease and the World Health Organization WHO has recommended that it be considered for use in outbreak responses since 2015 However Until now it has only been used individually in China where it is licensed and used to vaccinate travellers The vaccination campaign in Bentiu is the first time it has been used in response to a public health emergency This is a significant milestone in global efforts to tackle hepatitis E said Melanie Marti medical officer for immunization vaccines and biologicals at WHO This is the first time a vaccine has been used to combat the effects of this potentially devastating disease This is despite the fact that the vaccine has been licensed for more than a decade and it has been WHO policy to use it in outbreak settings since then 2015 At WHO we strongly recommend that all countries experiencing an outbreak use the hepatitis E vaccine including in pregnant women The success of the Bentiu vaccination campaign demonstrates that it is possible to use the vaccine to respond to outbreaks even in difficult conditions The South Sudan Ministry of Health and MSF are monitoring and reporting on the results of the vaccination campaign While other outbreak control measures including improved water and sanitation services are also needed health officials believe this vaccination campaign is an important step in reducing the burden of hepatitis E in the future MSF hopes the campaign will encourage other countries to use the vaccine as part of measures to control hepatitis E outbreaks
    South Sudan: MSF carries out the first global vaccination campaign against hepatitis E
      In a world first M decins Sans Fronti res M decins Sans Fronti res MSF and the South Sudanese Ministry of Health are carrying out a large scale vaccination campaign in response to an outbreak of hepatitis E The campaign is taking place in the Bentiu IDP camp people in the Unity State of South Sudan There is no specific treatment for hepatitis E so preventing its spread is critical especially among pregnant women who face a mortality rate of up to 25 percent if infected Hepatitis E is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis which causes liver inflammation and damage leading to approximately 20 million infections and 44 000 deaths per year Large scale outbreaks often occur where water and sanitation are inadequate such as in refugee and displaced persons camps as it is transmitted through fecal contamination of food and water As well as being particularly deadly for pregnant women it also increases the risk of miscarriages and stillbirths The fight against hepatitis E has been long and frustrating said Dr Monica Rull MSF s medical director For the past two decades MSF has been responding to hepatitis E outbreaks in displacement camps trying to control the disease in difficult conditions and seeing the devastating impact on extremely vulnerable communities With the experience of this vaccination campaign we hope to change the way we approach hepatitis E in the future In March and April 2022 MSF and the South Sudanese Ministry of Health jointly carried out the first two rounds of the hepatitis E vaccination campaign in Bentiu Approximately 25 000 people including pregnant women have received the vaccine A third and final round will take place in October 2022 Given the successful implementation and enthusiastic community response in the first two rounds this groundbreaking vaccination campaign can serve as an example and be replicated in similar settings handling hepatitis E outbreaks said Dr John Rumunu CEO of preventive health services in Ministry of Health of South Sudan I hope the vaccine will help reduce hepatitis E infections and deaths in Bentiu and beyond Bentiu is the largest displaced persons camp in South Sudan established in 2014 at the height of the civil war Today there are approximately 112 000 people residing there many of whom have fled recent violence and flooding MSF has been present in Bentiu since its inception and has seen outbreaks of hepatitis E since 2015 The outbreaks are a result of poor living conditions including lack of access to adequate water sanitation and hygiene In 2021 extreme flooding and new influxes of displaced people exacerbated already dire living conditions increasing the spread of waterborne diseases including hepatitis E Since July 2021 MSF has treated 759 patients with confirmed hepatitis E 17 of whom died The only available hepatitis E vaccine Hecolin has been shown in clinical trials to be highly effective in preventing disease and the World Health Organization WHO has recommended that it be considered for use in outbreak responses since 2015 However Until now it has only been used individually in China where it is licensed and used to vaccinate travellers The vaccination campaign in Bentiu is the first time it has been used in response to a public health emergency This is a significant milestone in global efforts to tackle hepatitis E said Melanie Marti medical officer for immunization vaccines and biologicals at WHO This is the first time a vaccine has been used to combat the effects of this potentially devastating disease This is despite the fact that the vaccine has been licensed for more than a decade and it has been WHO policy to use it in outbreak settings since then 2015 At WHO we strongly recommend that all countries experiencing an outbreak use the hepatitis E vaccine including in pregnant women The success of the Bentiu vaccination campaign demonstrates that it is possible to use the vaccine to respond to outbreaks even in difficult conditions The South Sudan Ministry of Health and MSF are monitoring and reporting on the results of the vaccination campaign While other outbreak control measures including improved water and sanitation services are also needed health officials believe this vaccination campaign is an important step in reducing the burden of hepatitis E in the future MSF hopes the campaign will encourage other countries to use the vaccine as part of measures to control hepatitis E outbreaks
    South Sudan: MSF carries out the first global vaccination campaign against hepatitis E
    Africa2 months ago

    South Sudan: MSF carries out the first global vaccination campaign against hepatitis E

    In a world first, Médecins Sans Frontières/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and the South Sudanese Ministry of Health are carrying out a large-scale vaccination campaign in response to an outbreak of hepatitis E. The campaign is taking place in the Bentiu IDP camp. people in the Unity State of South Sudan. There is no specific treatment for hepatitis E, so preventing its spread is critical, especially among pregnant women who face a mortality rate of up to 25 percent if infected.

    Hepatitis E is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis, which causes liver inflammation and damage, leading to approximately 20 million infections and 44,000 deaths per year. Large-scale outbreaks often occur where water and sanitation are inadequate, such as in refugee and displaced persons camps, as it is transmitted through fecal contamination of food and water. As well as being particularly deadly for pregnant women, it also increases the risk of miscarriages and stillbirths.

    "The fight against hepatitis E has been long and frustrating," said Dr. Monica Rull, MSF's medical director. “For the past two decades, MSF has been responding to hepatitis E outbreaks in displacement camps, trying to control the disease in difficult conditions and seeing the devastating impact on extremely vulnerable communities. With the experience of this vaccination campaign, we hope to change the way we approach hepatitis E in the future.”

    In March and April 2022, MSF and the South Sudanese Ministry of Health jointly carried out the first two rounds of the hepatitis E vaccination campaign in Bentiu. Approximately 25,000 people, including pregnant women, have received the vaccine. A third and final round will take place in October 2022.

    "Given the successful implementation and enthusiastic community response in the first two rounds, this groundbreaking vaccination campaign can serve as an example and be replicated in similar settings handling hepatitis E outbreaks," said Dr. John Rumunu, CEO of preventive health services in Ministry of Health of South Sudan. "I hope the vaccine will help reduce hepatitis E infections and deaths in Bentiu and beyond."

    Bentiu is the largest displaced persons camp in South Sudan, established in 2014 at the height of the civil war. Today, there are approximately 112,000 people residing there, many of whom have fled recent violence and flooding. MSF has been present in Bentiu since its inception and has seen outbreaks of hepatitis E since 2015. The outbreaks are a result of poor living conditions, including lack of access to adequate water, sanitation and hygiene.

    In 2021, extreme flooding and new influxes of displaced people exacerbated already dire living conditions, increasing the spread of waterborne diseases, including hepatitis E. Since July 2021, MSF has treated 759 patients with confirmed hepatitis E, 17 of whom died. .

    The only available hepatitis E vaccine, Hecolin, has been shown in clinical trials to be highly effective in preventing disease, and the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended that it be considered for use in outbreak responses since 2015. However Until now, it has only been used individually in China, where it is licensed and used to vaccinate travellers. The vaccination campaign in Bentiu is the first time it has been used in response to a public health emergency.

    "This is a significant milestone in global efforts to tackle hepatitis E," said Melanie Marti, medical officer for immunization, vaccines and biologicals at WHO. "This is the first time a vaccine has been used to combat the effects of this potentially devastating disease. This is despite the fact that the vaccine has been licensed for more than a decade, and it has been WHO policy to use it in outbreak settings since then". 2015. At WHO, we strongly recommend that all countries experiencing an outbreak use the hepatitis E vaccine, including in pregnant women."

    The success of the Bentiu vaccination campaign demonstrates that it is possible to use the vaccine to respond to outbreaks, even in difficult conditions. The South Sudan Ministry of Health and MSF are monitoring and reporting on the results of the vaccination campaign. While other outbreak control measures, including improved water and sanitation services, are also needed, health officials believe this vaccination campaign is an important step in reducing the burden of hepatitis E in the future. MSF hopes the campaign will encourage other countries to use the vaccine as part of measures to control hepatitis E outbreaks.