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  •  Artificial Intelligence AI and Analytics Accelerating the Development of Africa s Hydrocarbons Sector
    Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Analytics: Accelerating the Development of Africa’s Hydrocarbons Sector
     Artificial Intelligence AI and Analytics Accelerating the Development of Africa s Hydrocarbons Sector
    Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Analytics: Accelerating the Development of Africa’s Hydrocarbons Sector
    Africa11 hours ago

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Analytics: Accelerating the Development of Africa’s Hydrocarbons Sector

    With Africa pursuing the exploitation of its hydrocarbon reserves to address growing energy poverty and fuel industrialization, artificial intelligence (AI) and analytics technologies present a tremendous opportunity for the continent to accelerate the development of oil and gas resources.

    gas.

    As such, the continent's premier event for the oil and gas sector, the African Energy Week (AEW) (www.AECWeek.com), taking place from 18-21 October 2022 in Cape Town, will host high-level discussion panels.

    and meetings to discuss the critical role AI and analytics play in improving the production, storage, transportation and exploitation of hydrocarbons to make energy poverty history across the African continent by 2030.

    While Africa has had massive oil and gas discoveries in recent years, including the Greater Tortue Ahmeyim off the coast of Senegal and Mauritania, Luiperd and Brulpadda in South Africa, and the Rovuma Basin discoveries off the coast of Mozambique, among others: the development it has been slow due in large part to restricted investment, the impacts of COVID-19, and a lack of modern digital solutions.

    With more than 600 million living without access to electricity in Africa, Africa's accelerated oil and gas development is key to making energy poverty history.

    Now, with the rise of AI and analytics in the oil and gas sector, an opportunity has arisen for Africa to drive modern and sustainable energy growth for years to come.

    With oil and gas production in Africa declining due to the natural decline of legacy projects, increasing the use of AI and analytics in the upstream segment could help streamline drilling activities, revitalize the sector and expand oil reserves.

    mainland hydrocarbons for energy reliability, saving project developers, operators and owners time and resources.

    Furthermore, as African hydrocarbon-producing countries such as Nigeria lose billions in revenue due to theft and vandalism of infrastructure, a condition that holds back the expansion of Africa's oil and gas sector, intelligence tools Artificial intelligence and analytics can help optimize industry growth by improving infrastructure maintenance and safety across the oil and gas value chain, helping to reduce energy and revenue loss and, in the process, stimulates investment in the entire oil and gas sector.

    Furthermore, despite the fact that Africa accounts for less than 3% of all carbon emissions, policies related to the global energy transition are hindering the deployment of the necessary investments to boost the continent's hydrocarbon sector.

    However, by applying artificial intelligence and analytics, African hydrocarbon-producing countries and companies have an opportunity to track carbon footprints and improve energy and environmental sustainability while maximizing oil and gas production, and in the process , attract the investments needed to boost energy production and drive economic growth.

    Finally, with spending on digital solutions including AI and analytics within the global oil and gas sector set to increase by 7.5% from $17.7 billion in 2020 to $17.17 billion in 2025 as companies streamline processes trade, Africa's hydrocarbon industry is well positioned to drive socio-economic transformation.

    through job creation and the establishment of a modern, next-generation workforce in energy.

    “The digital transformation of African oil and gas operations is key for Africa to achieve its energy access and sustainability goals.

    By accelerating the adoption of AI and analytics tools, Africa's oil and gas sector will help create demand for digital tools, putting Africa at the forefront of the digital revolution by fostering technological development and job creation and in the process, boosting socio-economic growth,” said NJ Ayuk, the chief executive of the African Energy Chamber (AEC), adding that, “Representing the continent's official meeting place for energy stakeholders, AEW 2022 will be the place to promote new technologies, invest in current and future energy projects, and drive developments that will make energy poverty history in Africa by 2030.” The ACS, as the voice of the African energy sector, believes that the application of AI and analytics in the African oil and gas industry is critical to addressing the barriers to growth in the industry.

    Accordingly, AEW 2022 will host one-on-one interviews and panel discussions with oil and gas and technology industry leaders to explore the role of digitalization in Africa's oil and gas sector.

  •  MSGBC Oil Gas amp Power Launches Golf Tournament
    MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power Launches Golf Tournament
     MSGBC Oil Gas amp Power Launches Golf Tournament
    MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power Launches Golf Tournament
    Africa4 days ago

    MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power Launches Golf Tournament

    Energy Capital & Power (ECP) (www.EnergyCapitalPower.com), in association with the African Energy Chamber, is proud to announce a nine-hole golf tournament challenge to follow two days of packed programming on September 1 and 2 at the world.

    renowned CICAD headquarters in Dakar for MSGBC 2022.

    Celebrating the formation of the Dakar Energy Club, an NGO collective for civic and corporate leaders in the energy sector that promotes informal and intersectional dialogues on energy futures, the scramble-format contest on September will bring together 16 teams of three players at the Pointe des Almadies Golf Club at the King Fahd Hotel on the picturesque coast of Dakar.

    As well as participating in the sport itself, delegates will have a unique opportunity to network with an array of energy professionals, private and public sector executives and investors from the global energy scene.

    As the MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power conference moves forward to redefine an energy future that develops Africa, the golf tournament will help forge partnerships, put new deals on the table and usher in a new era of collaboration and cooperation in Africa.

    With numerous large-scale hydrocarbon projects currently underway throughout the MSGBC region, the most notable include the 15 trillion cubic foot Greater Tortue Ahmeyim gas development and the 100,000 barrel per day Sangomar field project, as well as more of $40 billion in green hydrogen developments being pursued In Mauritania, the opportunities for investors in the oil, gas and renewable energy sectors are endless.

    As such, after learning about project updates, licensing rounds and cross-sector business opportunities during the two-day program at MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power 2022, MSGBC Golf Day will build on the conference dialogue and serve as an ideal networking opportunity for interested parties to sign agreements following the knowledge gained at the conference.

    Places are strictly limited to 50 participants, so registered delegates interested in participating in this unique networking opportunity after the hustle and bustle of the MSBGC Oil, Gas and Energy Conference & Expo are invited to email ECP International Conference Director, Sandra Sheikh, at sandra@energycapitalpower.com.

    RSVP.

    For more information, visit https://bit.ly/3a4fuRb.

  •  Paul Eardley Taylor will speak on financing Africa s energy future at the African Energy Week AEW 2022
    Paul Eardley-Taylor will speak on financing Africa’s energy future at the African Energy Week (AEW) 2022
     Paul Eardley Taylor will speak on financing Africa s energy future at the African Energy Week AEW 2022
    Paul Eardley-Taylor will speak on financing Africa’s energy future at the African Energy Week (AEW) 2022
    Africa4 days ago

    Paul Eardley-Taylor will speak on financing Africa’s energy future at the African Energy Week (AEW) 2022

    During the continent's premier event for the African oil and gas industry, African Energy Week (AEW) (www.AECWeek.com) 2022, discussions will largely focus on how the continent will finance the development of its energetic resources.

    As the world begins to look to Africa as a potential supplier of global oil and gas demand in 2022, there is no better time than now to increase investment in the continent.

    In line with this discussion, the African Energy Chamber (AEC) is proud to announce that Paul Eardley-Taylor, Head of Oil & Gas for South Africa at Standard Bank, will attend AEW 2022 to join high-level financial discussions.

    .

    With more than 20 years of experience in the energy investment and corporate sector, specifically in the fields of oil, gas, renewable energy and energy, Eardley-Taylor will be participating as an expert in energy sector finance at this year's event.

    Coupled with more than 10 years of experience as an advisor, banker and financier, Eardley-Taylor is well positioned to drive the dialogue on finance in Africa.

    Throughout his tenure as Head of Oil and Gas, Eardley-Taylor has driven and continues to drive investment in African energy.

    His experience makes him an optimal partner for investors, a valuable debate participant and a key figure in the financial sector in Africa.

    For Africa in 2022, increasing investment represents a top priority for many countries on the continent.

    With current estimated reserves estimated at 125 billion barrels of oil and more than 600 trillion cubic feet of gas, most of which remain untapped, the continent's resources have the potential to meet both continental and international energy demand.

    .

    On the exploration front, investment will be key to unlocking reserves in marginal basins, offshore and onshore.

    Recently announced licensing rounds in Africa, such as in the Democratic Republic of the Congo; Senegal; Angola; Mauritania and many more have opened up lucrative opportunities for frontier explorers and through further investment a wave of developments will no doubt be unlocked.

    Similarly, on the intermediate and downstream front, the injection of capital throughout the energy value chain will trigger a new era of energy security and independence in Africa thanks to infrastructure developments and energy access.

    In a post-COVID-19 global geopolitical context, recovering economies across the continent are in desperate need of new sources of energy.

    In this sense, it is imperative to enhance investment in Africa, as it will not only ensure that the continent alleviates energy poverty, but will boost industrialization, multi-sector revival and long-term socio-economic growth.

    As such, AEW 2022, which represents the official meeting place for African energy players, is committed to driving investment and development across the African energy sector and value chain.

    By introducing global financiers to African opportunities, providing the perfect platform for interested parties to sign deals, network and form partnerships, AEW 2022 is set to unleash new capital growth in Africa.

    While meeting global energy security is important, ensuring the continent is electrified and industrialized is a top priority.

    Therefore, under the mandate to make energy poverty history by 2030, AEW 2022 will host panel discussions, investor forums and one-on-one meetings, focused on financing Africa's energy future.

    “By coming to AEW 2022 and participating in the dialogue and decision-making, Eardley-Taylor has put African energy and Africa's development first,” said AEC Executive Chairman NJ Ayuk, adding, “AEC is proud to host to Paul Eardley-Taylor at AEW 2022 and hopes to define a new narrative about investing in Africa.

    Increasing investment is of paramount importance to the continent and by ensuring that finance represents a key point of discussion, AEW 2022 is committed to making a strong case for investment targeting Africa in 2022 and beyond."

  •  OPEC President and Congolese Oil Minister Bruno Itoua to Lead Investment Discussions at MSGBC Oil Gas amp Power 2022 in Senegal
    OPEC President and Congolese Oil Minister Bruno Itoua to Lead Investment Discussions at MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power 2022 in Senegal
     OPEC President and Congolese Oil Minister Bruno Itoua to Lead Investment Discussions at MSGBC Oil Gas amp Power 2022 in Senegal
    OPEC President and Congolese Oil Minister Bruno Itoua to Lead Investment Discussions at MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power 2022 in Senegal
    Africa4 days ago

    OPEC President and Congolese Oil Minister Bruno Itoua to Lead Investment Discussions at MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power 2022 in Senegal

    Energy Capital & Power (ECP) (https://EnergyCapitalPower.com) is proud to announce that HE Bruno Itoua, Minister of Hydrocarbons of the Republic of Congo and President of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), has been confirmed as a speaker at MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power Conference & Exhibition 2022 (https://bit.ly/3a4fuRb), now less than three weeks away.

    HE Minister Itoua will join the respective ministers of Senegal (HE Sophia Gladima), Mauritania (HE Abdessalam Ould Mohamed Salah), Gambia (Hon. Abdoulie Jobe), Guinea-Bissau (HE Dionisio Cabi) and Equatorial Guinea (HE Gabriel Mbaga Obiang Lima) together with the Director General of the Sierra Leone Petroleum Directorate in the Office of the President, Foday Mansaray, addressing the delegates gathered at the ministerial forum that followed President HE Macky Sall's speech on September 1 in Dakar.

    Since assuming the OPEC presidency in January from neighboring Angola, HE Minister Itoua has led the Congo through a robust oil-led economic recovery, achieving solid 5% GDP growth while mitigating production declines.

    to stabilize the country's production at 275,000 barrels per day.

    Thanks to HE Minister Itoua's vision, the 13 oil-rich nations that make up OPEC, which control 40% of the world's oil supply, have been able to return demand to pre-COVID-19 levels, removing restrictions of 10 million barrels per day imposed.

    during the 2020 recession and seeing global commodity prices hit a high of over $100 a barrel in April, which represents a seven-year high.

    HE Minister Itoua's leadership role as Minister of Hydrocarbons of the Democratic Republic of the Congo gives him a wealth of experience to share with the emerging energy mega-players of the MSGBC basin.

    With a mature extractive sector dating back decades, Congo-Brazzaville has 2.9 billion barrels of crude oil and 10 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of natural gas reserves, lauded for its private-sector involvement by companies like Perenco.

    , Eni and TotalEnergies, with upstream oil representing 50% of national GDP, 70% of government revenues and 80% of net exports.

    By contrast, the MSGBC nations boast 50 tcf of natural gas, 9 billion barrels of oil equivalent between them, but remain at the start of world-class production levels, $9 billion in oil projects, and gas that will come into operation next year.

    MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power 2022 host nation Senegal has 500,000 barrels of oil in Sangomar and Gambia has potentially triple that with discoveries by Australian mega-company FAR.

    All MSGBC nations are ramping up exploration similarly to the Congo with license rounds ranging from five to 27 blocks hitting the market this year.

    In short, HE Minister Itoua's presence at the MSGBC ministerial forum could be a game changer, contributing unprecedented strategic insights to forge strong public-private partnerships and ties with a new slate of multinationals to join a set of companies.

    international oil companies (IOCs) and investors who diversify rapidly.

    to the region from Africa, Europe, Asia, America, Australia and the Middle East. Currently active in the basin are companies such as bp, Woodside, Kosmos, FAR, Petronas, PetroNor and Tullow Oil, however the Congo triad of Perenco, Eni and TotalEnergies represent some of the largest IOC investors operating in Africa, responsible for many of the largest hydrocarbon developments in West Africa in recent years.

    The Director of the ECP International Conference, Sandra Sheikh, states that, “HE Bruno Itoua brings to the table unique global and national policy experiences in shaping sustainable hydrocarbon sectors for social and economic benefit, driving development.

    His insights at the MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power 2022 Ministerial Panel this September are particularly welcome and appreciated, recognizing the basin's nascent but thriving industry with billions of dollars of investment already underway, expected to be double in the decade.” For more information on MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power 2022, which takes place in less than a month in the Senegalese capital Dakar, please visit https://MSGBCPOilGasAndPower.com.

  •  MNJTF force commander seeks regional forces partnership to end insecurity
    MNJTF force commander seeks regional forces partnership to end insecurity
     MNJTF force commander seeks regional forces partnership to end insecurity
    MNJTF force commander seeks regional forces partnership to end insecurity
    Defence/Security5 days ago

    MNJTF force commander seeks regional forces partnership to end insecurity

    The Force Commander Multinational Joint Task Force MNJTF, Maj.-Gen. Abdul Khalifah has called for partnership with other regional forces to defeat terrorism in the Lake Chad area and the Sahel.

    Khalifah made the call when he received the new Force Commander of Operation Barkhane, French born Maj.-Gen. Bruno Baratz in the MNJTF Headquarters Camp Farcha in Ndjamena Chad. This is contained in a statement from the spokesman of the MNJTF on Wednesday, Lt.-Col. K.

    A Adegoke.

    The News Agency of Nigeria reports that MNJTF comprises of troops from Nigeria, Chad, Cameroon and Niger Republic and has its headquarters in Ndjamena, Chad. The commander appreciated the cooperation between Operation Barkhane and the MNJTF noting that the feat should be sustained.

    He equally thanked the troops for their stabilising roles in the fight against terrorism in the region and urged for sustenance.

    He assured the new commander of his commitment to tackle insurgency in the region.

    Responding, Baratz also praised the effective role of MNJTF in bringing stability in its area of operations.

    Baratz said that operation Barkhane is in the process Mali, but would continue to work with other countries in fighting terrorism in the region.

    NAN reports that operation Barkhane is an ongoing anti-insurgent operation that started on Aug. 1, 2014 and is led by the French military against Islamist groups in Africa’s Sahel region.

    It consists of a roughly 5,000-strong French force, which is permanently headquartered in N’Djamena.

    NAN also reports that yhe operation is led in co-operation with five countries, all of which are former French colonies that span the Sahel: Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania and Niger.

    The countries are collectively referred to as the ”G5 Sahel”.

    In another development, the outgoing Commander Sector I of the MNJTF based in Cameroon, Brig.-Gen. Bouba Debekreo, introduced his successor, Col. Tiokap Loti, to the force commander of the MNJTF.

    Debekreo thanked the force commander for the support and guidance given him and urged for same to be extended to his successor.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  Malian and white soldiers involved in 33 civilian deaths
    Malian and ‘white’ soldiers involved in 33 civilian deaths
     Malian and white soldiers involved in 33 civilian deaths
    Malian and ‘white’ soldiers involved in 33 civilian deaths
    Foreign2 weeks ago

    Malian and ‘white’ soldiers involved in 33 civilian deaths

    The Malian army and “white-skinned soldiers” were involved in the deaths of 33 civilians, according to an expert report to the UN seen by AFP Friday.

    The bodies of 29 Mauritanians and four Malians were found near the village of Robinet El Ataye in the Segou region, where 33 civilians had been beaten and taken away on March 5, a Panel of Experts on Mali said in a report to the UN Security Council late last month.

    A diplomatic source in New York told AFP that the white soldiers were paramilitaries of Russia’s Wagner group.

    The civilians’ disappearance stoked friction between Mali and Mauritania at the time.

    Nouakchott accused the Malian army of “recurrent criminal acts” against Mauritanian citizens in the border region.

    Bamako said there was no proof its army was involved.

    The two countries in mid-March launched a joint investigation but its results had not yet been published as of early August.

    Western countries say Russian paramilitaries in Mali are mercenaries from the controversial Wagner group while Bamako describes them as “instructors” for its security forces.

    The Malian army has conducted numerous military operations to “hunt down” jihadist groups in the Segou and Mopti regions of central Mali since the beginning of the year.

    Its soldiers have been accused of abuses on several occasions by NGOs.

  •  The role of Algeria Egypt and Nigeria in Africa s quest for European gas market share by NJ Ayuk
    The role of Algeria, Egypt and Nigeria in Africa’s quest for European gas market share (by NJ Ayuk)
     The role of Algeria Egypt and Nigeria in Africa s quest for European gas market share by NJ Ayuk
    The role of Algeria, Egypt and Nigeria in Africa’s quest for European gas market share (by NJ Ayuk)
    Africa2 weeks ago

    The role of Algeria, Egypt and Nigeria in Africa’s quest for European gas market share (by NJ Ayuk)

    By NJ Ayuk, Executive Chairman, African Energy Chamber (www.EnergyChamber.org) Reduced deliveries of Russian natural gas is a source of anxiety for the European Union, and rightly so, given that the bloc has been too dependent for too long weather.

    for a long time at Gazprom, a Russian majority state-owned company that serves as a de facto political instrument for the Kremlin.

    But this anxiety is also a source of potential for African gas producers, as it is driving European consumers to look elsewhere for fuel.

    This search has drawn attention to a number of African gas projects that are likely to help Europe in the future, especially as the EU seeks to permanently move away from reliance on Russian gas.

    Both Tanzania and Mozambique, for example, are planning large-scale offshore development plans that will support liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants capable of shipping large volumes of the fuel to European markets by the end of the decade.

    The Republic of the Congo hopes to accelerate a medium-scale modular project that can start production a few years earlier.

    Meanwhile, other greenfield initiatives are being discussed in Mauritania and Namibia, and several large international companies have come together to bring new fields online to facilitate LNG production in Angola.

    All of these projects are exciting and new.

    For the time being, however, they are not going to have much concrete impact on the European energy balance.

    That's because they can't.

    They are not ready yet.

    The African Gas Timeline These projects have great potential, but their potential has yet to be realized.

    In countries like Tanzania and Mozambique, we know the gas is there because the International Oil Companies (IOCs) have seen, measured, analyzed and tested it; they just don't have time yet to drill all the development wells and build all the infrastructure needed to extract it and convert it into LNG for export.

    In the Republic of Congo, we know the gas is there, and the big Italian company Eni is already extracting it, just not on a scale that can immediately serve buyers in Europe or local power plants.

    These obstacles can be overcome.

    Holes can be filled, wells drilled, pipelines connected, gas liquefaction plants built, tankers chartered.

    But it will take time, years, not weeks or months, to organize the necessary financing, sign the necessary contracts, gather the necessary materials, etc.

    However, this does not mean that Africa cannot play a role in helping the EU wean itself off its dependence on Russian gas in the short term.

    Absolutely not!

    The importance of existing capacity But much of that assistance, at least in the short term, will come from existing capacity, that is, from places in Africa that are already producing gas for export to Europe.

    Above all, it will come from these three countries: Algeria, Egypt and Nigeria, which will account for 80% of African gas production between 2022 and 2025, according to the African Energy Chamber's State of African Energy Q2 2022 report, prepared in consultation with Rystad Energy.

    (Algeria, Egypt and Nigeria will also account for about 60% of the continent's total LNG production capacity during the same period, even as construction of new facilities progresses, the report says.) These three states are already known to be the largest.

    gas producers in Africa.

    According to the 2022 edition of BP's World Energy Statistical Review, they accounted for just over 83% of the 257.5 billion cubic meters (bcm) of gas extracted in Africa in 2021 (for context, that's roughly the equivalent of all the gas consumed by Iran in a year), Algeria contributes 100.8 bcm (or more than 39% of the total), Egypt 67.8 bcm (more than 26%) and Nigeria 45.9 bcm (almost 18% ).

    In addition, they also account for the vast majority of Africa's gas liquefaction capacity of around 75.3 million tonnes per year (mtpa), with Algeria contributing 29.3 mtpa, Nigeria 22.2 mtpa, and Egypt 12.

    .2 mtpa.

    Algeria and Egypt have the only operating LNG plants in North Africa, while Nigeria is home to a plant that accounts for nearly 66% of sub-Saharan Africa's total LNG production capacity of 33.8 mtpa.

    Algeria, for its part, not only has LNG; It also has pipes.

    It is already using two of them, the Medgaz and TransMed systems, to pump fuel directly to Spain and Italy through the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea. Together these two pipelines are capable of handling up to 40 bcm per year of gas.

    The good news is that Algeria, Egypt and Nigeria are already supplying a good deal of the gas that Europe has been using to supplement Russian supplies.

    Even better, they also have enough spare capacity to make their plans to ramp up production in the coming years realistic.

    Signs of confidence Italy's Eni — and the Italian government, which has a majority stake in the company — are equally confident in the potential of these countries to help meet Europe's gas needs, as evidenced by the decision to turn to Algeria and Egypt in the search for alternatives to Russian gas.

    Both Italian government officials and Eni executives have traveled to Egypt and Algeria since Russia's invasion of Ukraine in late February to negotiate and sign new supply deals.

    Similarly, French oil major TotalEnergies recently extended its commitment to a project in Algeria's North Berkine basin, in part with the aim of finding ways to export associated gas from its oil fields to Europe.

    They had good reason for making these decisions, and good reason to hope that they would pay off in the short term!

    It is worth noting, of course, that Africa can help make up some of the difference, not all of it.

    It cannot serve as a substitute source for the entire volume of 155 bcm that Russia delivered to the EU in 2021!

    But you can play a key role in this process, and you don't have to wait to start.

  •  Senegal and Mauritania must capitalize on their vast natural gas resources as quickly as possible by NJ Ayuk
    Senegal and Mauritania must capitalize on their vast natural gas resources as quickly as possible (by NJ Ayuk)
     Senegal and Mauritania must capitalize on their vast natural gas resources as quickly as possible by NJ Ayuk
    Senegal and Mauritania must capitalize on their vast natural gas resources as quickly as possible (by NJ Ayuk)
    Africa2 weeks ago

    Senegal and Mauritania must capitalize on their vast natural gas resources as quickly as possible (by NJ Ayuk)

    By NJ Ayuk, CEO of the African Chamber of Energy Senegal and Mauritania could be described as rising stars in the energy industry.

    After one major offshore discovery after another in the region between 2014 and 2017, it has become clear that the region has massive reserves of natural gas: up to 1.13 trillion cubic meters (tcm) in proven reserves in Senegal and 28 .3 billion cubic meters (bcm) in Mauritania.

    There was a time in the not too distant past when the chances of Senegal and Mauritania fully capitalizing on their rich resources were not entirely certain.

    The great African discoveries of oil and gas were greeted with hand wringing by Western countries and environmental organizations.

    The general argument was that African countries were better off leaving their oil resources in the ground so that they would not contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and global warming.

    International oil companies (IOCs) and investors were increasingly reluctant to support African oil projects.

    But now, world events have changed much of that.

    During the last months of 2021, global demand for gas began to outstrip supply, driving natural gas prices to record highs in Asia, Europe and the US.

    Russia's dependence on gas in response to its invasion of Ukraine .

    The situation has become even more urgent for Europe in recent months: Russia has responded to Europe's plans to gradually use less Russian gas with immediate reductions in gas deliveries.

    As a result, Western countries that once pressured African countries to give up their oil resources are now investing in African oil and gas projects.

    They are interested in building African infrastructure.

    They are focused on doing whatever they can to help meet your pressing gas needs.

    I wouldn't describe the under-supplied gas market or the suffering in Ukraine as opportunities, but these situations have created a new reality for African countries with oil and gas reserves.

    My advice to Senegal and Mauritania, and the companies that have discovered oil there, is to be aggressive in keeping their projects on schedule.

    Natural gas and liquefied natural gas (LNG) projects are already in various stages of development in Senegal and Mauritania, but it is imperative that stakeholders do all they can to push their projects forward.

    They must avoid delays because it is impossible to know how long European countries will be willing to invest and promote these projects.

    The reality is that while Senegal and Mauritania now have a better chance to capitalize on their gas for domestic needs, to monetize gas, and to grow and diversify their economies with gas, their window to achieve those things has an invisible expiration date.

    The African Chamber of Energy addresses this issue in its Petroleum Laws - Benchmarking Report for Senegal and Mauritania, to be published soon.

    One of the report's key recommendations for government leaders and international oil companies (IOCs) in Senegal and Mauritania is to make it a priority to avoid project deadline delays.

    We have already seen declines As our report points out, projects in the region have already faced some obstacles.

    Take a look at Greater Tortue Ahmeyim (GTA), the offshore LNG project on the Senegal-Mauritania maritime border being developed by BP, Kosmos Energy, Senegal's national oil company Petrosen and the Societe Mauritanienne des Hydrocarbures (SMHPM) of Mauritania.

    The project's floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) project, a Phase 1 development, was initially scheduled to come online in 2022.

    Project partners now plan to complete Phase 1 in 2023.

    The initial delay was caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, but the project also experienced a small “timeline shift” due to cost inflation, which delayed completion of Phase 1 from Q1 2023 to Q3.

    GTA, and the other projects in the region, from the Yakaar-Teranga LNG and power project to BP's BirAllah gas project off the coast of Mauritania, must move forward.

    As our report says, “Any delay in these projects that are already looking at from the late 2020s to the mid 2030s (barring the launch of GTA FLNG Phase 1) may result in no can fully utilize the under-supplied LNG market in the coming years.” It is also important to recognize that while European countries are doing their best to import natural gas from Africa, they are working just as furiously to source gas from other regions of the world, including the US, Guyana, Qatar and Azerbaijan.

    As Stanley Reed wrote for The New York Times, “As Russia tightens its grip on natural gas supplies, Europe is looking everywhere for energy to keep its economy running.

    Coal-fired power plants are being revived.

    Billions are being spent on terminals to bring in liquefied natural gas, much of it from shale fields in Texas...

    Across Europe, fears are growing that a Russian gas cutoff will force governments to ration fuel already companies to close factories, measures that could put thousands of jobs at risk.” We must also remember that Europe also considers green energy sources as part of its energy solution.

    Once again, European leaders are looking to Africa to meet some of those needs, in particular green hydrogen (produced without fossil fuels), which is a valuable opportunity.

    But that doesn't mean we shouldn't recognize the urgency of helping Europe meet its natural gas needs while we still can.

    To miss out on all that gas can do for Senegal and Mauritania, in what it can do to help eradicate energy poverty, build businesses and create jobs, would be a heartbreaking loss.

    We can do this.

    I understand that some gas project delays, like those caused by the pandemic, are out of anyone's control.

    But there are steps governments and companies can take to keep projects moving forward.

    As I have made clear more than once, the governments of Senegal and Mauritania are to be commended for all that they have done to create a positive environment for doing business in their countries.

    Their tax policies were created specifically to attract IOCs, and that was exactly what needed to be done.

    With that said, I would encourage oil and gas ministries to continue to find and eliminate bureaucracy and inefficiencies that may impede the progress of gas projects.

    I am encouraged by the words of Moustapha Bechir, Director General for Hydrocarbons at the Mauritanian Ministry of Petroleum, Energy and Mines, who has said that the ministry is working to optimize Phase 2 of the GTA FLNG project.

    “We are now remodeling Phase 2 to better fit the concept and to speed it up and maximize project economics,” Bechir said in 2021.

    As for the companies that have been exploring in Senegal and Mauritania, those that are moving forward with projects gas and LNG, have also made great strides.

    I would simply encourage them to be proactive in recognizing situations that could interfere with project timelines so that they can be addressed as efficiently as possible.

    I have told my employees and fellow African energy stakeholders that we still have work to do, there is still much good we can achieve.

    The same goes for the governments and companies of Senegal and Mauritania.

    The region's natural gas really does have the power to benefit ordinary people.

    It can make it possible for millions, many for the first time, to experience life with reliable electricity.

    You can create business opportunities and empower people to make a good living.

    And it can lay the foundation, through industrialization and economic diversification, for a pattern of long-term growth and stability.

    We simply need to move quickly and decisively to make these things happen.

  •  The 27th Session of the Executive Committee of United Cities and Local Governments UCLG Africa in Nouakchott Mauritania
    The 27th Session of the Executive Committee of United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) Africa in Nouakchott (Mauritania)
     The 27th Session of the Executive Committee of United Cities and Local Governments UCLG Africa in Nouakchott Mauritania
    The 27th Session of the Executive Committee of United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) Africa in Nouakchott (Mauritania)
    Africa2 weeks ago

    The 27th Session of the Executive Committee of United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) Africa in Nouakchott (Mauritania)

    The 27th Ordinary Session of the Executive Committee of United Cities and Local Governments of Africa (UCLG Africa) (www.UCLGA.org) meets on August 02, 2022 in Nouakchott (Mauritania).

    The meeting is organized by the Nouakchott Region.

    This 27th session of the Executive Committee is the first of the new leadership team of UCLG Africa elected at the General Assembly on May 19, 2022 in Kisumu, Kenya, during the Africities 9 Summit.

    It is mainly dedicated to the approval of the accounts of the organization for the year 2021, to the evaluation of the results of the Africities Summit (Kisumu, May 17-21, 2022), to the discussion of the strategic orientations of the new leadership.

    UCLG Africa team, and the participation of Africa in the bodies and commissions of UCLG-World.

    The official opening of the 27th session was attended by the Ministers of the Interior and Decentralization, the Minister of Finance and the Minister of Urbanism; as well as the President of the Association of Mayors of Mauritania, the Presidents of the Regions of Mauritania and several other important personalities.

    On behalf of UCLG Africa, the session was held under the chairmanship of Ms. Fatimetou Abdel Malick, President of the Nouakchott Region (Mauritania) and President of UCLG Africa, in the presence of: - Ms. Christine Mba Ndutume, Mayor from Libreville (Gabon) and Vice President of UCLG Africa for the Central African Region; - Ms. Kouame Badou Harlette, wife N'Guessan, Mayor of the Municipality of Arrash and Secretary General of the Union of Cities and Municipalities of Côte d'Ivoire, on behalf of Mr. Claude Paulin Danho, President of the Union of Cities and Municipalities of Côte d'Ivoire (UVICOCI) and Vice President of UCLG Africa for the West African Region; - M.

    Jeffrey Sibisibi, President of the Botswana Local Authorities Association (BALA) and Vice President of UCLG Africa for the Southern Africa Region; - Mrs. Rohey Malick Lowe, Mayor of the city of Banjul (Gambia) and President of the Network of Local Elected Women of Africa (REFELA).

    As a reminder, the Executive Committee of UCLG Africa is the body in charge of the political direction of the organization.

    The Executive Committee is made up of 16 members, 15 members elected by the General Assembly of UCLG Africa (3 from each of the 5 African regions), plus the President of the Network of Locally Elected Women of Africa (REFELA), who is the permanent committee for gender equality of UCLG Africa.

  •  One month to go until MSGBC Oil Gas amp Power 2022
    One month to go until MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power 2022
     One month to go until MSGBC Oil Gas amp Power 2022
    One month to go until MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power 2022
    Africa2 weeks ago

    One month to go until MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power 2022

    Within a month, Energy Capital & Power (ECP) (https://EnergyCapitalPower.com), together with regional ministries and national oil companies (NOC) together with the Presidency of Senegal, will organize MSGBC Oil, Gas & Power 2022 in Dakar.

    To mark this milestone, the company has released exciting program details that provide an inside look at two jam-packed days of highly anticipated programming planned for delegates in attendance this September.

    Beginning with the keynote address by HE Macky Sall, President of Senegal and President of the African Union, on day one, this major West African energy and development forum will seek to write the future of African energy developing Africa in light of the latest findings, innovations, investor interests and political reforms.

    According to the latest itinerary of the conference, a ministerial panel with the respective energy ministers of Senegal, Mauritania, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Namibia and Sierra Leone is announced on September 1: HE Sophie Gladima, HE Abdessalam Ould Mohamed Salah, H.E. .

    Abdoulie Jobe, HE Dionisio Cabi, HE Gabriel Mbaga Obiang Lima, H.E. Dr Mohammed Amin Adam, HE Tom Alweendo and Foday Mansaray.

    This momentous meeting is immediately followed by a similar convening of the heads of the West African NOCs and then an exclusive lunch workshop that pushes for the representation of women in power.

    Gathered delegates will have access to unique strategic insights shared by the basin's two largest multinational hydrocarbon players, Woodside and bp, working on respective $4.6 and $4.8 billion mega-developments in Greater Tortue Ahmeyim and Sangomar.

    In addition, local companies spanning the services and transportation, exploration, production, security, technology and utilities sectors will benefit from exposure to investors flocking to the event from Africa, Europe, Asia, the Americas, Australia and the Middle East thanks to to the two exhibition halls.

    dozen floor stands.

    For the first time in the region, MSGBC 2022 will feature a live digest showcase for policymakers and executives marking the launch of the International Energy Agency's Africa Energy Outlook report and accompanying white paper on gas, presented by the Africa Programs, Rita Madeira.

    These game-changing amalgamations of global research highlight a roadmap toward universal electrification across the continent by 2030, fully integrated local content policies creating four million new energy jobs, and valorization of discovered natural gas reserves.

    in Africa while only taking the continent's global share of related energy.

    emissions from 3 to 3.5%.

    A series of breakout sessions highlighting the specific energy scenes of MSGBC nations will span the two-day event, announcing new development openings from offshore Mauritania, Senegal, seven Gambia and five Guinea-Bissau blocks, seeking to consolidate and diversify international oil company representation in the region from the existing list that includes FAR, bp, Premier Oil, Capricorn, Star Oil, Addax, Petronas, ExxonMobil and Kosmos.

    Similarly, MSGBC 2022 will fuel exploration expansion in West Africa as part of a strong recovery from 2020's near-complete stagnation in drilling and development delays, noting that less than 20% of the country's nine billion Barrels of oil estimated to date in the MSGBC basin have been located to date.

    Finally, an awards gala dinner will serve to highlight key stakeholders pioneering Africa's energy future and a growth-oriented equitable energy transition, all related to the central theme, "The Future of Natural Gas: Growth through strategic investment and policy formulation.

    Director of the ECP International Conference, Sandra Sheikh, states that, “With close to $10 billion in energy projects coming online next year and nearly $50 billion more in the pipeline, this year is the turning point for MSGBC energy industry, this conference is your platform.

    Europe is already looking to Africa to meet a market demand of 30 billion cubic meters of natural gas by 2030 created by its withdrawal from Russian suppliers and Africa currently has the means to produce 5000 megatons of hydrogen for less than $ 2 per kg, Mauritania leading the charge.

    That sum is equivalent to the global demand for primary energy.

    Therefore, as West Africa settles into a key role as an emerging energy mega-exporter supported by burgeoning industrial development, MSGBC 2022 provides a stage for industry stakeholders to come together in productive discourse to write a sustainable and expanded future for African energy”.

    For more information, visit https://MSGBCOilGasandPower.com/.