Connect with us

IRC

  •   As world leaders gather at this year s UN General Assembly David Miliband President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee and Abdirahman Abdishakur Special Presidential Envoy for Drought Response to the Federal Republic of Somalia issue a joint statement on the impending famine in Somalia and need for urgent action The window to save tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of lives in Somalia is rapidly closing said Special Envoy Abdirahman Abdishakur There is still time to prevent massive loss of life but when famine breaks out it will be too late More than 7 million people more than half the population of Somalia are in need of emergency food aid 300 000 people are at risk of famine unless urgent action is taken and two million more are on the brink Fifty four percent of children in Somalia are expected to experience acute malnutrition in the next year World leaders cannot and must not fail to face this moment While there has been a commendable increase in funding particularly from the United States the international community at large has not received the necessary support to avert catastrophe Donors cannot wait they must step up now and ensure funding quickly reaches those on the front lines best placed to avert humanitarian catastrophe David Miliband President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee said The world has pledged never again to allow a famine to develop in Somalia or to act so late but little more than a decade later without international action Immediately a catastrophic famine will hit parts of Somalia in October In 2011 half of all deaths in the region occurred before famine was declared It should be a shame that history risks repeating itself The number of people in pre famine or famine like conditions in Somalia has increased by 500 since the beginning of the year In one IRC malnutrition clinic in Somalia alone acute cases increased by more than 800 in just four months The IRC has operated in Somalia for decades We commend Somalia s creation of the role of Special Envoy to mobilize the international community We appreciate our partnership with the government as We are moving forward to save lives but we need more support Uniquely vulnerable to food insecurity East Africa is now mired in the lingering economic impacts of the COVID 19 pandemic escalating internal conflict rising food and fuel prices as a result of the fallout from war in Ukraine and the worst drought in decades aggravated by climate change While Ethiopia Kenya and Somalia represent 2 percent of the world s population they are home to 70 percent of the world s most extremely food insecure people During this UNGA high level week member states and multilateral agencies must mount a rapid and focused international response to the famine with the aim of preventing the worst impacts in Somalia Mr Miliband and Mr Abdishakur urge the international community to take the following actions Donors must fully fund the 1 5 billion humanitarian appeal for Somalia less than 70 funded to date and ensure further direct funding for frontline responders The UN High Level Task Force on Famine Prevention should focus its efforts on countries most at risk of famine including Somalia The task force must engage with key stakeholders to address future responses to potential famines and mobilize funds early on While early warning systems accurately predict food insecurity political will and investment are needed to build resilience through robust long term multisectoral interventions that can start well before famine is likely to break out Climate adaptation financing is an indispensable part of these efforts and will have the added benefit of helping to address the needs of millions of people already living with the worst impacts of the climate crisis Donors UNICEF WFP and WHO must support national nutrition programs in adopting new models of care that simplify and decentralize the treatment of undernutrition with children and caregivers at the center Numerous studies show that a simplified combined protocol using a single product a simplified dosing schedule and simplified diagnostic criteria is equally effective in curing children but is more cost effective and easier to scale than the more complex standard approach The inefficiencies of the current bifurcated system have resulted in an 80 treatment gap with 4 out of 5 wasted children unable to access the treatment they need
    Joint statement by David Miliband and Somalia’s Special Envoy for Drought Response, Abdirahman Abdishakur, as a declaration of famine looms in Somalia
      As world leaders gather at this year s UN General Assembly David Miliband President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee and Abdirahman Abdishakur Special Presidential Envoy for Drought Response to the Federal Republic of Somalia issue a joint statement on the impending famine in Somalia and need for urgent action The window to save tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of lives in Somalia is rapidly closing said Special Envoy Abdirahman Abdishakur There is still time to prevent massive loss of life but when famine breaks out it will be too late More than 7 million people more than half the population of Somalia are in need of emergency food aid 300 000 people are at risk of famine unless urgent action is taken and two million more are on the brink Fifty four percent of children in Somalia are expected to experience acute malnutrition in the next year World leaders cannot and must not fail to face this moment While there has been a commendable increase in funding particularly from the United States the international community at large has not received the necessary support to avert catastrophe Donors cannot wait they must step up now and ensure funding quickly reaches those on the front lines best placed to avert humanitarian catastrophe David Miliband President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee said The world has pledged never again to allow a famine to develop in Somalia or to act so late but little more than a decade later without international action Immediately a catastrophic famine will hit parts of Somalia in October In 2011 half of all deaths in the region occurred before famine was declared It should be a shame that history risks repeating itself The number of people in pre famine or famine like conditions in Somalia has increased by 500 since the beginning of the year In one IRC malnutrition clinic in Somalia alone acute cases increased by more than 800 in just four months The IRC has operated in Somalia for decades We commend Somalia s creation of the role of Special Envoy to mobilize the international community We appreciate our partnership with the government as We are moving forward to save lives but we need more support Uniquely vulnerable to food insecurity East Africa is now mired in the lingering economic impacts of the COVID 19 pandemic escalating internal conflict rising food and fuel prices as a result of the fallout from war in Ukraine and the worst drought in decades aggravated by climate change While Ethiopia Kenya and Somalia represent 2 percent of the world s population they are home to 70 percent of the world s most extremely food insecure people During this UNGA high level week member states and multilateral agencies must mount a rapid and focused international response to the famine with the aim of preventing the worst impacts in Somalia Mr Miliband and Mr Abdishakur urge the international community to take the following actions Donors must fully fund the 1 5 billion humanitarian appeal for Somalia less than 70 funded to date and ensure further direct funding for frontline responders The UN High Level Task Force on Famine Prevention should focus its efforts on countries most at risk of famine including Somalia The task force must engage with key stakeholders to address future responses to potential famines and mobilize funds early on While early warning systems accurately predict food insecurity political will and investment are needed to build resilience through robust long term multisectoral interventions that can start well before famine is likely to break out Climate adaptation financing is an indispensable part of these efforts and will have the added benefit of helping to address the needs of millions of people already living with the worst impacts of the climate crisis Donors UNICEF WFP and WHO must support national nutrition programs in adopting new models of care that simplify and decentralize the treatment of undernutrition with children and caregivers at the center Numerous studies show that a simplified combined protocol using a single product a simplified dosing schedule and simplified diagnostic criteria is equally effective in curing children but is more cost effective and easier to scale than the more complex standard approach The inefficiencies of the current bifurcated system have resulted in an 80 treatment gap with 4 out of 5 wasted children unable to access the treatment they need
    Joint statement by David Miliband and Somalia’s Special Envoy for Drought Response, Abdirahman Abdishakur, as a declaration of famine looms in Somalia
    Africa2 weeks ago

    Joint statement by David Miliband and Somalia’s Special Envoy for Drought Response, Abdirahman Abdishakur, as a declaration of famine looms in Somalia

    As world leaders gather at this year's UN General Assembly, David Miliband, President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee, and Abdirahman Abdishakur, Special Presidential Envoy for Drought Response to the Federal Republic of Somalia, issue a joint statement on the impending famine in Somalia.

    and need for urgent action.

    "The window to save tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of lives in Somalia is rapidly closing," said Special Envoy Abdirahman Abdishakur.

    “There is still time to prevent massive loss of life, but when famine breaks out, it will be too late.

    More than 7 million people, more than half the population of Somalia, are in need of emergency food aid.

    300,000 people are at risk of famine unless urgent action is taken, and two million more are on the brink.

    Fifty-four percent of children in Somalia are expected to experience acute malnutrition in the next year.

    World leaders cannot and must not fail to face this moment.

    While there has been a commendable increase in funding, particularly from the United States, the international community at large has not received the necessary support to avert catastrophe.

    Donors cannot wait, they must step up now and ensure funding quickly reaches those on the front lines best placed to avert humanitarian catastrophe.” David Miliband, President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee, said: "The world has pledged 'never again' to allow a famine to develop in Somalia or to act so late, but little more than a decade later, without international action Immediately, a catastrophic famine will hit parts of Somalia in October.

    In 2011, half of all deaths in the region occurred before famine was declared.

    It should be a shame that history risks repeating itself.

    The number of people in pre-famine or famine-like conditions in Somalia has increased by 500% since the beginning of the year.In one IRC malnutrition clinic in Somalia alone, acute cases increased by more than 800% in just four months.

    The IRC has operated in Somalia for decades We commend Somalia's creation of the role of Special Envoy to mobilize the international community We appreciate our partnership with the government as We are moving forward to save lives, but we need more support.” Uniquely vulnerable to food insecurity, East Africa is now mired in the lingering economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, escalating internal conflict, rising food and fuel prices as a result of the fallout from war in Ukraine and the worst drought in decades aggravated by climate change.

    While Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia represent 2 percent of the world's population, they are home to 70 percent of the world's most extremely food insecure people.

    During this UNGA high-level week, member states and multilateral agencies must mount a rapid and focused international response to the famine, with the aim of preventing the worst impacts in Somalia.

    Mr. Miliband and Mr. Abdishakur urge the international community to take the following actions: Donors must fully fund the $1.5 billion humanitarian appeal for Somalia, less than 70% funded to date, and ensure further direct funding for frontline responders.

    The UN High-Level Task Force on Famine Prevention should focus its efforts on countries most at risk of famine, including Somalia.

    The task force must engage with key stakeholders to address future responses to potential famines and mobilize funds early on.

    While early warning systems accurately predict food insecurity, political will and investment are needed to build resilience through robust, long-term, multisectoral interventions that can start well before famine is likely to break out.

    Climate adaptation financing is an indispensable part of these efforts and will have the added benefit of helping to address the needs of millions of people already living with the worst impacts of the climate crisis.

    Donors, UNICEF, WFP and WHO must support national nutrition programs in adopting new models of care that simplify and decentralize the treatment of undernutrition, with children and caregivers at the center.

    Numerous studies show that a simplified combined protocol using a single product, a simplified dosing schedule, and simplified diagnostic criteria is equally effective in curing children, but is more cost-effective and easier to scale than the more complex, standard approach.

    The inefficiencies of the current bifurcated system have resulted in an 80% treatment gap, with 4 out of 5 wasted children unable to access the treatment they need.

  •   As the United Nations announces that famine is at the door in Somalia the IRC warns that millions of lives are at stake if world leaders do not immediately and urgently ensure that committed funds reach implementing partners and frontline organizations working directly on the ground Thousands of people have already lost their lives and millions more are at stake in East Africa where four inadequate rainy seasons have crippled the livelihoods and access to food of more than 36 million people David Miliband President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee said This is a devastating announcement IRC teams see how the situation is getting worse faster than the data shows The UN has announced that a famine could happen this year A famine designation will be too late people are already dying During the last famine in Somalia in 2011 half of all deaths occurred before the famine was declared It took two years to assess the total death toll The international community has pledged to never again allow famine in Somalia or wait that long to act but this year it is repeating the same mistake The international community must take a no holds barred approach acting now without waiting for a declaration We are now in a fight to save lives it is a fight against time that the international community is currently losing A famine is entirely preventable we already know that an unprecedented fifth and sixth failed rains are forecast meaning people will go hungry next year with repercussions on health and lives lasting for months if not years Now it is up to world leaders to urgently step forward to prevent famine by ensuring that committed funds are quickly transferred to implementing partners on the ground and increase direct funding to NGOs During 2011 when a famine was declared more than 260 000 people died half of them children under the age of five Severely malnourished children become thin weak and lethargic They have almost constant diarrhea Your muscles atrophy as all but the most essential systems in your body shut down In addition to the physical symptoms they become emotionally withdrawn and disconnected from the world around them In the longer term malnutrition can lead to poor immunity to serious infections stunted growth and a restricted ability to learn It is a moral responsibility to prevent an entire generation from suffering from these conditions East Africa is home to some of the oldest IRC programs globally with operations in Somalia for over 40 years Kenya for 30 years and Ethiopia for 20 years Today more than 2 000 IRC staff members in the region are expanding our programs to address the current drought and rising food insecurity including expanding into new areas to meet dire needs The IRC provides nutrition water and sanitation women s protection and empowerment and cash assistance services to drought affected populations in East Africa
    United Nations announces famine looming in Somalia: International Rescue Committee warns millions of lives are at risk as drought continues to cause extreme famine
      As the United Nations announces that famine is at the door in Somalia the IRC warns that millions of lives are at stake if world leaders do not immediately and urgently ensure that committed funds reach implementing partners and frontline organizations working directly on the ground Thousands of people have already lost their lives and millions more are at stake in East Africa where four inadequate rainy seasons have crippled the livelihoods and access to food of more than 36 million people David Miliband President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee said This is a devastating announcement IRC teams see how the situation is getting worse faster than the data shows The UN has announced that a famine could happen this year A famine designation will be too late people are already dying During the last famine in Somalia in 2011 half of all deaths occurred before the famine was declared It took two years to assess the total death toll The international community has pledged to never again allow famine in Somalia or wait that long to act but this year it is repeating the same mistake The international community must take a no holds barred approach acting now without waiting for a declaration We are now in a fight to save lives it is a fight against time that the international community is currently losing A famine is entirely preventable we already know that an unprecedented fifth and sixth failed rains are forecast meaning people will go hungry next year with repercussions on health and lives lasting for months if not years Now it is up to world leaders to urgently step forward to prevent famine by ensuring that committed funds are quickly transferred to implementing partners on the ground and increase direct funding to NGOs During 2011 when a famine was declared more than 260 000 people died half of them children under the age of five Severely malnourished children become thin weak and lethargic They have almost constant diarrhea Your muscles atrophy as all but the most essential systems in your body shut down In addition to the physical symptoms they become emotionally withdrawn and disconnected from the world around them In the longer term malnutrition can lead to poor immunity to serious infections stunted growth and a restricted ability to learn It is a moral responsibility to prevent an entire generation from suffering from these conditions East Africa is home to some of the oldest IRC programs globally with operations in Somalia for over 40 years Kenya for 30 years and Ethiopia for 20 years Today more than 2 000 IRC staff members in the region are expanding our programs to address the current drought and rising food insecurity including expanding into new areas to meet dire needs The IRC provides nutrition water and sanitation women s protection and empowerment and cash assistance services to drought affected populations in East Africa
    United Nations announces famine looming in Somalia: International Rescue Committee warns millions of lives are at risk as drought continues to cause extreme famine
    Africa4 weeks ago

    United Nations announces famine looming in Somalia: International Rescue Committee warns millions of lives are at risk as drought continues to cause extreme famine

    As the United Nations announces that "famine is at the door" in Somalia, the IRC warns that millions of lives are at stake if world leaders do not immediately and urgently ensure that committed funds reach implementing partners and frontline organizations working directly on the ground.

    Thousands of people have already lost their lives and millions more are at stake in East Africa, where four inadequate rainy seasons have crippled the livelihoods and access to food of more than 36 million people.

    David Miliband, President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee said: “This is a devastating announcement.

    IRC teams see how the situation is getting worse faster than the data shows.

    The UN has announced that a famine could happen this year - A famine designation will be too late - people are already dying.

    During the last famine in Somalia in 2011, half of all deaths occurred before the famine was declared.

    It took two years to assess the total death toll.

    The international community has pledged to “never again” allow famine in Somalia or wait that long to act, but this year it is repeating the same mistake.

    The international community must take a no-holds-barred approach, acting now without waiting for a declaration.

    We are now in a fight to save lives, it is a fight against time that the international community is currently losing.

    A famine is entirely preventable: we already know that an unprecedented fifth and sixth failed rains are forecast, meaning people will go hungry next year, with repercussions on health and lives lasting for months, if not years.

    Now it is up to world leaders to urgently step forward to prevent famine by ensuring that committed funds are quickly transferred to implementing partners on the ground and increase direct funding to NGOs. “During 2011, when a famine was declared, more than 260,000 people died, half of them children under the age of five.

    Severely malnourished children become thin, weak, and lethargic.

    They have almost constant diarrhea.

    Your muscles atrophy as all but the most essential systems in your body shut down.

    In addition to the physical symptoms, they become emotionally withdrawn and disconnected from the world around them.

    In the longer term, malnutrition can lead to poor immunity to serious infections, stunted growth, and a restricted ability to learn.

    It is a moral responsibility to prevent an entire generation from suffering from these conditions.” East Africa is home to some of the oldest IRC programs globally, with operations in Somalia for over 40 years, Kenya for 30 years, and Ethiopia for 20 years.

    Today, more than 2,000 IRC staff members in the region are expanding our programs to address the current drought and rising food insecurity, including expanding into new areas to meet dire needs.

    The IRC provides nutrition, water and sanitation, women's protection and empowerment, and cash assistance services to drought-affected populations in East Africa.

  •   The International Rescue Committee calls for urgent action by the EU and its member states as the number of refugees and other migrants who risk making the treacherous journey from North Africa to Europe continues to rise According to UNHCR more than 35 000 people have arrived in Italy by sea so far this year with 192 arrivals reported as recently as a few nights ago This marks an increase from the 27 200 received during the same period in 2021 Tragically at least 875 people have lost their lives along the Central Mediterranean Route so far in 2022 As the number of people forced to making these dangerous journeys continues to increase the IRC urges the EU and its member states to urgently expand safe and regular pathways of protection in Europe and ensure they are supported throughout their journeys Susanna Zanfrini IRC Italy Bureau Chief says No one should be forced to risk their life on a dilapidated or unseaworthy boat in search of safety and security Yet again this summer we are seeing an increase in the number of people attempting to cross one of the world s deadliest migration routes Many of these people have been driven from their homes by growing food insecurity unemployment and the impact of climate change with some fleeing violence conflict or persecution in countries such as Afghanistan Sudan or Somalia Those arriving in Lampedusa are crammed into a reception center that is currently more than four times full almost 1 900 housed in a space meant for just 350 This desperate situation could and should have been avoided Arrivals to islands like Lampedusa tend to peak during the summer months due to better weather conditions Instead of shirking their responsibilities and demonizing people seeking protection Italy and other EU states must cooperate to expand regular and safe paths for those forced to make the desperate journey across the sea and welcome newcomers with humanity dignity and spirit of solidarity Tom Garofalo IRC Country Director for Libya says People are desperate to leave Libya because of the conditions they live in Every day they know that they can be kidnapped arbitrarily detained and subjected to violence and abuse Risking life at sea is the last resort Tragically however this route through the Central Mediterranean Sea is fraught with danger and has already claimed the lives of more than 870 people this year In 2022 more than 9 800 refugees asylum seekers and other migrants were intercepted by Libyan authorities including the Coast Guard and returned to Libyan shores IRC teams at disembarkation points in Libya regularly treat the horrific injuries suffered by those sent back to the country dehydration exhaustion burns from fuel leaks and other physical and mental scars from their traumatic journeys Yet instead of receiving the lasting support they need most are sent to detention where conditions are often deplorable As we head into the peak summer months we know that more and more desperate people will attempt the perilous journey from Libya to safety in Europe It is absolutely critical that the EU relaunch its own dedicated search and rescue mission in the Mediterranean as soon as possible to prevent further suffering and loss of life Imogen Sudbury IRC Executive Director for Policy and Advocacy Europe says As the number of displaced people worldwide has ballooned to over 100 million for the first time it is imperative that EU leaders take urgent and principled action to prevent further suffering on Europe s borders If they don t the Mediterranean will not simply become a graveyard for more people seeking protection but for its own values of human rights dignity and equality As the death toll rises in the central Mediterranean IRC calls on the EU and its member states to Expand safe and regular pathways of protection and mobility from Africa to Europe so that people are not forced to risk their lives in dangerous places The first step will be to commit to resettling at least 40 000 refugees by 2023 paying particular attention to needs along the Central Mediterranean Route This must be complemented by the extension of safe and regular routes to Europe through humanitarian corridors family reunification and work or study visas Urgently establishing an EU funded search and rescue mission in the Mediterranean Sea as well as ensuring that any support including financial technological or training to the Libyan authorities including the Coast Guard in policies and practices that refer to migration is conditional on the defense of the human rights of people on the move Strengthen coordination with other actors of maritime rescue including NGOs so that all people rescued at sea are taken to a place of safety which Libya is not as the UNHCR has repeatedly stated Prioritize ending arbitrary detention and the release of all people currently held in detention centers in all diplomatic efforts with the Libyan authorities while urging the latter to ensure alternatives to detention for people on the move especially women and children who face specific protection risks Support partner countries along the Central Mediterranean Route in promoting access to services and protection measures especially for women children and other people in vulnerable situations as well as guaranteeing access to information on services basic social legal and administrative along the route Reach a political solution for a permanent legally binding and predictable shared responsibility system based on relocations so that Europe s border countries do not take on a disproportionate responsibility for supporting new arrivals Present in Libya since August 2016 the IRC provides life saving health and protection services supports broader health system strengthening efforts and builds the capacity of Libyan youth in peacebuilding and governance initiatives So far in 2022 the IRC has carried out 49 emergency responses supporting more than 3 800 people including 190 women and 228 children In Italy the IRC works to protect refugees and asylum seekers focusing on women unaccompanied children and those requiring psychosocial support The IRC works with partners to improve its ability to quickly identify trafficking survivors and strengthen their access to legal assistance and support The Refugee info online platform provides clear and timely information for refugees and asylum seekers in need of local support services enabling them to make informed decisions about their lives
    International Rescue Committee (IRC): As Mediterranean death toll mounts, Europe must urgently expand safe pathways for people on the move
      The International Rescue Committee calls for urgent action by the EU and its member states as the number of refugees and other migrants who risk making the treacherous journey from North Africa to Europe continues to rise According to UNHCR more than 35 000 people have arrived in Italy by sea so far this year with 192 arrivals reported as recently as a few nights ago This marks an increase from the 27 200 received during the same period in 2021 Tragically at least 875 people have lost their lives along the Central Mediterranean Route so far in 2022 As the number of people forced to making these dangerous journeys continues to increase the IRC urges the EU and its member states to urgently expand safe and regular pathways of protection in Europe and ensure they are supported throughout their journeys Susanna Zanfrini IRC Italy Bureau Chief says No one should be forced to risk their life on a dilapidated or unseaworthy boat in search of safety and security Yet again this summer we are seeing an increase in the number of people attempting to cross one of the world s deadliest migration routes Many of these people have been driven from their homes by growing food insecurity unemployment and the impact of climate change with some fleeing violence conflict or persecution in countries such as Afghanistan Sudan or Somalia Those arriving in Lampedusa are crammed into a reception center that is currently more than four times full almost 1 900 housed in a space meant for just 350 This desperate situation could and should have been avoided Arrivals to islands like Lampedusa tend to peak during the summer months due to better weather conditions Instead of shirking their responsibilities and demonizing people seeking protection Italy and other EU states must cooperate to expand regular and safe paths for those forced to make the desperate journey across the sea and welcome newcomers with humanity dignity and spirit of solidarity Tom Garofalo IRC Country Director for Libya says People are desperate to leave Libya because of the conditions they live in Every day they know that they can be kidnapped arbitrarily detained and subjected to violence and abuse Risking life at sea is the last resort Tragically however this route through the Central Mediterranean Sea is fraught with danger and has already claimed the lives of more than 870 people this year In 2022 more than 9 800 refugees asylum seekers and other migrants were intercepted by Libyan authorities including the Coast Guard and returned to Libyan shores IRC teams at disembarkation points in Libya regularly treat the horrific injuries suffered by those sent back to the country dehydration exhaustion burns from fuel leaks and other physical and mental scars from their traumatic journeys Yet instead of receiving the lasting support they need most are sent to detention where conditions are often deplorable As we head into the peak summer months we know that more and more desperate people will attempt the perilous journey from Libya to safety in Europe It is absolutely critical that the EU relaunch its own dedicated search and rescue mission in the Mediterranean as soon as possible to prevent further suffering and loss of life Imogen Sudbury IRC Executive Director for Policy and Advocacy Europe says As the number of displaced people worldwide has ballooned to over 100 million for the first time it is imperative that EU leaders take urgent and principled action to prevent further suffering on Europe s borders If they don t the Mediterranean will not simply become a graveyard for more people seeking protection but for its own values of human rights dignity and equality As the death toll rises in the central Mediterranean IRC calls on the EU and its member states to Expand safe and regular pathways of protection and mobility from Africa to Europe so that people are not forced to risk their lives in dangerous places The first step will be to commit to resettling at least 40 000 refugees by 2023 paying particular attention to needs along the Central Mediterranean Route This must be complemented by the extension of safe and regular routes to Europe through humanitarian corridors family reunification and work or study visas Urgently establishing an EU funded search and rescue mission in the Mediterranean Sea as well as ensuring that any support including financial technological or training to the Libyan authorities including the Coast Guard in policies and practices that refer to migration is conditional on the defense of the human rights of people on the move Strengthen coordination with other actors of maritime rescue including NGOs so that all people rescued at sea are taken to a place of safety which Libya is not as the UNHCR has repeatedly stated Prioritize ending arbitrary detention and the release of all people currently held in detention centers in all diplomatic efforts with the Libyan authorities while urging the latter to ensure alternatives to detention for people on the move especially women and children who face specific protection risks Support partner countries along the Central Mediterranean Route in promoting access to services and protection measures especially for women children and other people in vulnerable situations as well as guaranteeing access to information on services basic social legal and administrative along the route Reach a political solution for a permanent legally binding and predictable shared responsibility system based on relocations so that Europe s border countries do not take on a disproportionate responsibility for supporting new arrivals Present in Libya since August 2016 the IRC provides life saving health and protection services supports broader health system strengthening efforts and builds the capacity of Libyan youth in peacebuilding and governance initiatives So far in 2022 the IRC has carried out 49 emergency responses supporting more than 3 800 people including 190 women and 228 children In Italy the IRC works to protect refugees and asylum seekers focusing on women unaccompanied children and those requiring psychosocial support The IRC works with partners to improve its ability to quickly identify trafficking survivors and strengthen their access to legal assistance and support The Refugee info online platform provides clear and timely information for refugees and asylum seekers in need of local support services enabling them to make informed decisions about their lives
    International Rescue Committee (IRC): As Mediterranean death toll mounts, Europe must urgently expand safe pathways for people on the move
    Africa2 months ago

    International Rescue Committee (IRC): As Mediterranean death toll mounts, Europe must urgently expand safe pathways for people on the move

    The International Rescue Committee calls for urgent action by the EU and its member states as the number of refugees and other migrants who risk making the treacherous journey from North Africa to Europe continues to rise.

    According to UNHCR, more than 35,000 people have arrived in Italy by sea so far this year, with 192 arrivals reported as recently as a few nights ago.

    This marks an increase from the 27,200 received during the same period in 2021.

    Tragically, at least 875 people have lost their lives along the Central Mediterranean Route so far in 2022.

    As the number of people forced to making these dangerous journeys continues to increase, the IRC urges the EU and its member states to urgently expand safe and regular pathways of protection in Europe, and ensure they are supported throughout their journeys.

    Susanna Zanfrini, IRC Italy Bureau Chief, says: “No one should be forced to risk their life on a dilapidated or unseaworthy boat in search of safety and security.

    Yet again this summer, we are seeing an increase in the number of people attempting to cross one of the world's deadliest migration routes.

    Many of these people have been driven from their homes by growing food insecurity, unemployment and the impact of climate change, with some fleeing violence, conflict or persecution in countries such as Afghanistan, Sudan or Somalia.

    “Those arriving in Lampedusa are crammed into a reception center that is currently more than four times full: almost 1,900 housed in a space meant for just 350.

    This desperate situation could and should have been avoided.

    Arrivals to islands like Lampedusa tend to peak during the summer months due to better weather conditions.

    Instead of shirking their responsibilities and demonizing people seeking protection, Italy and other EU states must cooperate to expand regular and safe paths for those forced to make the desperate journey across the sea, and welcome newcomers with humanity, dignity and spirit.

    of solidarity.” Tom Garofalo, IRC Country Director for Libya, says: “People are desperate to leave Libya because of the conditions they live in.

    Every day they know that they can be kidnapped, arbitrarily detained and subjected to violence and abuse.

    Risking life at sea is the last resort.

    Tragically, however, this route through the Central Mediterranean Sea is fraught with danger and has already claimed the lives of more than 870 people this year.

    "In 2022, more than 9,800 refugees, asylum seekers and other migrants were intercepted by Libyan authorities, including the Coast Guard, and returned to Libyan shores.

    IRC teams at disembarkation points in Libya regularly treat the horrific injuries suffered by those sent back to the country: dehydration, exhaustion, burns from fuel leaks, and other physical and mental scars from their traumatic journeys.Yet instead of receiving the lasting support they need, most are sent to detention where conditions are often deplorable.

    As we head into the peak summer months, we know that more and more desperate people will attempt the perilous journey from Libya to safety in Europe.

    It is absolutely critical that the EU relaunch its own dedicated search and rescue mission in the Mediterranean as soon as possible to prevent further suffering and loss of life."

    Imogen Sudbury, IRC Executive Director for Policy and Advocacy, Europe, says: "As the number of displaced people worldwide has ballooned to over 100 million for the first time, it is imperative that EU leaders take urgent and principled action to prevent further suffering on Europe's borders.

    If they don't, the Mediterranean will not simply become a graveyard for more people seeking protection, but for its own values ​​of human rights, dignity and equality."

    As the death toll rises in the central Mediterranean, IRC calls on the EU and its member states to: Expand safe and regular pathways of protection and mobility from Africa to Europe so that people are not forced to risk their lives in dangerous places.

    The first step will be to commit to resettling at least 40,000 refugees by 2023, paying particular attention to needs along the Central Mediterranean Route.

    This must be complemented by the extension of safe and regular routes to Europe through humanitarian corridors, family reunification and work or study visas Urgently establishing an EU-funded search and rescue mission in the Mediterranean Sea, as well as ensuring that any support , including financial, technological or training, to the Libyan authorities, including the Coast Guard, in policies and practices that refer to migration, is conditional on the defense of the human rights of people on the move Strengthen coordination with other actors of maritime rescue, including NGOs – so that all people rescued at sea are taken to a place of safety, which Libya is not, as the UNHCR has repeatedly stated.

    Prioritize ending arbitrary detention and the release of all people currently held in detention centers in all diplomatic efforts with the Libyan authorities, while urging the latter to ensure alternatives to detention for people on the move, especially women and children who face specific protection.

    risks Support partner countries along the Central Mediterranean Route in promoting access to services and protection measures, especially for women, children and other people in vulnerable situations, as well as guaranteeing access to information on services basic social, legal and administrative along the route.

    Reach a political solution for a permanent, legally binding and predictable shared responsibility system based on relocations, so that Europe's border countries do not take on a disproportionate responsibility for supporting new arrivals.

    Present in Libya since August 2016, the IRC provides life-saving health and protection services, supports broader health system strengthening efforts, and builds the capacity of Libyan youth in peacebuilding and governance initiatives.

    So far in 2022, the IRC has carried out 49 emergency responses, supporting more than 3,800 people, including 190 women and 228 children.

    In Italy, the IRC works to protect refugees and asylum seekers, focusing on women, unaccompanied children and those requiring psychosocial support.

    The IRC works with partners to improve its ability to quickly identify trafficking survivors and strengthen their access to legal assistance and support.

    The Refugee.info online platform provides clear and timely information for refugees and asylum seekers in need of local support services, enabling them to make informed decisions about their lives.

  •   IRC teams report that people have already started starving in Ethiopia Somalia Kenya 20 million will go hungry across the region by September with at least 3 million facing emergency and catastrophic levels of hunger risking death In 2011 260 000 people starved to death which equates to 6 5 million deaths in the US With a catastrophic famine looming on the horizon in East Africa the International Rescue Committee IRC today released its first Crisis Alert update to its annual Emergency Watch List highlighting that more than 3 million people could die without urgent international funding The IRC s annual watch list identifies the top countries most at risk of deterioration from a humanitarian perspective over the course of the year The IRC is issuing a crisis alert update in light of the fallout from the war in Ukraine which combined with the increasingly damaging impact of climate change conflict and COVID 19 has pushed East Africa into a predictable crisis dangerously neglected by the international community and emblematic of the global system failure highlighted on this year s Watch List After four consecutive failed rains hunger in the region is getting worse week after week outstripping the limited funds available Since the beginning of the year the number of people suffering from hunger in Somalia due to drought has nearly doubled The number of people in Kenya on the brink of famine has tripled In just one of the IRC s nutrition clinics in Mogadishu from April to May the IRC has seen a 265 increase in admissions of children under 5 suffering from severe malnutrition IRC teams on the ground report that people have already started to starve and the window to prevent mass deaths is rapidly closing Despite the promise of never again allowing a famine of disastrous proportions to occur the number of people suffering from extreme hunger around the world has reached a new global high and with a fifth failed rain on the horizon the drought in East Africa is now the oldest in decades During the peak of the 2011 famine which affected an estimated 14 million people 30 000 people died each month a total of at least 260 000 deaths Adjusting for population that would be on par with 6 5 million deaths in the United States including more than 3 million children under the age of 5 the equivalent of more than six COVID 19 pandemics Against this dire backdrop East Africa has struggled to attract the attention and funding it desperately needs While billions of dollars in aid have been made available for the response in Ukraine the international community has failed to respond to its global consequences including skyrocketing food and fuel prices East Africa has been hit particularly hard importing 90 of its wheat from Russia and Ukraine alone The new US funding announced this week is very welcome but even once spent the humanitarian response plan for the region would be funded at 40 of assessed need Even once the new US funding announced this week is met the humanitarian response plan for the region would be 40 funded After just over three months the US 1 9 billion appeal for the humanitarian response in Ukraine was 85 funded a demonstration of the ability to mobilize resources when the political will exists David Miliband President and CEO of the IRC said There is nothing natural about famine in the 21st century While a complex set of factors is driving extreme hunger the slide toward famine and mass death is man made fueled by international inaction This crisis was predictable and preventable It has been building for two years of repeated warnings and worsening hunger What we are witnessing is an unnatural disaster of catastrophic proportions Every day of inaction is a matter of life and death The crisis in East Africa is emblematic of the failure of the international system failure of prevention failure of response and failure of leadership The severe underfunding of humanitarian responses is depriving millions of people of the assistance they need to survive As famine alarms sound donors have been looking in the rearview mirror waiting for data collection and death rates to confirm what the IRC is already seeing on the ground Instead the international community should look through the windshield to the future respond now with a no regrets approach before it is too late The new US funding announced this week should be a first step not the last recommendations Activate the humanitarian system A full scale up of the humanitarian response is required to mitigate famine in East Africa The response must seek to apply the lessons of past efforts to avert famine with rapid investment in proven approaches including cash assistance to meet the needs of food insecure communities Take a no regrets approach to financing Donors must fully fund humanitarian responses across the region and directly fund frontline NGOs which can grow rapidly Mobilize resources for humanitarian access negotiations take steps to mitigate the impact of the conflict on humanitarian access and ensure that aid can reach those who need it most Address global trade challenges stemming from the war in Ukraine pursue all avenues to ease global export restrictions and restart Ukraine s exports including ending the blockade on Ukraine s Black Sea ports to alleviate global shortages of cereals
    International Rescue Committee (IRC) warns: 3 million face life-threatening famine without urgent funding as unprecedented famine threatens East Africa
      IRC teams report that people have already started starving in Ethiopia Somalia Kenya 20 million will go hungry across the region by September with at least 3 million facing emergency and catastrophic levels of hunger risking death In 2011 260 000 people starved to death which equates to 6 5 million deaths in the US With a catastrophic famine looming on the horizon in East Africa the International Rescue Committee IRC today released its first Crisis Alert update to its annual Emergency Watch List highlighting that more than 3 million people could die without urgent international funding The IRC s annual watch list identifies the top countries most at risk of deterioration from a humanitarian perspective over the course of the year The IRC is issuing a crisis alert update in light of the fallout from the war in Ukraine which combined with the increasingly damaging impact of climate change conflict and COVID 19 has pushed East Africa into a predictable crisis dangerously neglected by the international community and emblematic of the global system failure highlighted on this year s Watch List After four consecutive failed rains hunger in the region is getting worse week after week outstripping the limited funds available Since the beginning of the year the number of people suffering from hunger in Somalia due to drought has nearly doubled The number of people in Kenya on the brink of famine has tripled In just one of the IRC s nutrition clinics in Mogadishu from April to May the IRC has seen a 265 increase in admissions of children under 5 suffering from severe malnutrition IRC teams on the ground report that people have already started to starve and the window to prevent mass deaths is rapidly closing Despite the promise of never again allowing a famine of disastrous proportions to occur the number of people suffering from extreme hunger around the world has reached a new global high and with a fifth failed rain on the horizon the drought in East Africa is now the oldest in decades During the peak of the 2011 famine which affected an estimated 14 million people 30 000 people died each month a total of at least 260 000 deaths Adjusting for population that would be on par with 6 5 million deaths in the United States including more than 3 million children under the age of 5 the equivalent of more than six COVID 19 pandemics Against this dire backdrop East Africa has struggled to attract the attention and funding it desperately needs While billions of dollars in aid have been made available for the response in Ukraine the international community has failed to respond to its global consequences including skyrocketing food and fuel prices East Africa has been hit particularly hard importing 90 of its wheat from Russia and Ukraine alone The new US funding announced this week is very welcome but even once spent the humanitarian response plan for the region would be funded at 40 of assessed need Even once the new US funding announced this week is met the humanitarian response plan for the region would be 40 funded After just over three months the US 1 9 billion appeal for the humanitarian response in Ukraine was 85 funded a demonstration of the ability to mobilize resources when the political will exists David Miliband President and CEO of the IRC said There is nothing natural about famine in the 21st century While a complex set of factors is driving extreme hunger the slide toward famine and mass death is man made fueled by international inaction This crisis was predictable and preventable It has been building for two years of repeated warnings and worsening hunger What we are witnessing is an unnatural disaster of catastrophic proportions Every day of inaction is a matter of life and death The crisis in East Africa is emblematic of the failure of the international system failure of prevention failure of response and failure of leadership The severe underfunding of humanitarian responses is depriving millions of people of the assistance they need to survive As famine alarms sound donors have been looking in the rearview mirror waiting for data collection and death rates to confirm what the IRC is already seeing on the ground Instead the international community should look through the windshield to the future respond now with a no regrets approach before it is too late The new US funding announced this week should be a first step not the last recommendations Activate the humanitarian system A full scale up of the humanitarian response is required to mitigate famine in East Africa The response must seek to apply the lessons of past efforts to avert famine with rapid investment in proven approaches including cash assistance to meet the needs of food insecure communities Take a no regrets approach to financing Donors must fully fund humanitarian responses across the region and directly fund frontline NGOs which can grow rapidly Mobilize resources for humanitarian access negotiations take steps to mitigate the impact of the conflict on humanitarian access and ensure that aid can reach those who need it most Address global trade challenges stemming from the war in Ukraine pursue all avenues to ease global export restrictions and restart Ukraine s exports including ending the blockade on Ukraine s Black Sea ports to alleviate global shortages of cereals
    International Rescue Committee (IRC) warns: 3 million face life-threatening famine without urgent funding as unprecedented famine threatens East Africa
    Africa3 months ago

    International Rescue Committee (IRC) warns: 3 million face life-threatening famine without urgent funding as unprecedented famine threatens East Africa

    IRC teams report that people have already started starving in Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya; 20 million will go hungry across the region by September, with at least 3 million facing emergency and catastrophic levels of hunger, risking death; In 2011, 260,000 people starved to death, which equates to 6.5 million deaths in the US.

    With a catastrophic famine looming on the horizon in East Africa, the International Rescue Committee (IRC) today released its first Crisis Alert update to its annual Emergency Watch List, highlighting that more than 3 million people could die without urgent international funding.

    The IRC's annual watch list identifies the top countries most at risk of deterioration from a humanitarian perspective over the course of the year. The IRC is issuing a crisis alert update in light of the fallout from the war in Ukraine, which, combined with the increasingly damaging impact of climate change, conflict and COVID-19, has pushed East Africa into a predictable crisis dangerously neglected by the international community. and emblematic of the global “system failure” highlighted on this year’s Watch List.

    After four consecutive failed rains, hunger in the region is getting worse week after week, outstripping the limited funds available. Since the beginning of the year, the number of people suffering from hunger in Somalia due to drought has nearly doubled. The number of people in Kenya on the brink of famine has tripled. In just one of the IRC's nutrition clinics in Mogadishu, from April to May, the IRC has seen a 265% increase in admissions of children under 5 suffering from severe malnutrition. IRC teams on the ground report that people have already started to starve and the window to prevent mass deaths is rapidly closing.

    Despite the promise of "never again", allowing a famine of disastrous proportions to occur, the number of people suffering from extreme hunger around the world has reached a new global high, and with a fifth failed rain on the horizon, the drought in East Africa is now the oldest in decades. During the peak of the 2011 famine, which affected an estimated 14 million people, 30,000 people died each month, a total of at least 260,000 deaths. Adjusting for population, that would be on par with 6.5 million deaths in the United States, including more than 3 million children under the age of 5, the equivalent of more than six COVID-19 pandemics.

    Against this dire backdrop, East Africa has struggled to attract the attention and funding it desperately needs. While billions of dollars in aid have been made available for the response in Ukraine, the international community has failed to respond to its global consequences, including skyrocketing food and fuel prices. East Africa has been hit particularly hard, importing 90% of its wheat from Russia and Ukraine alone. The new US funding announced this week is very welcome, but even once spent, the humanitarian response plan for the region would be funded at 40% of assessed need.

    Even once the new US funding announced this week is met, the humanitarian response plan for the region would be 40% funded. After just over three months, the US$1.9 billion appeal for the humanitarian response in Ukraine was 85% funded, a demonstration of the ability to mobilize resources when the political will exists.

    David Miliband, President and CEO of the IRC, said: “There is nothing natural about famine in the 21st century. While a complex set of factors is driving extreme hunger, the slide toward famine and mass death is man-made, fueled by international inaction. This crisis was predictable and preventable. It has been building for two years of repeated warnings and worsening hunger. What we are witnessing is an unnatural disaster of catastrophic proportions.

    “Every day of inaction is a matter of life and death. The crisis in East Africa is emblematic of the failure of the international system: failure of prevention, failure of response and failure of leadership.

    “The severe underfunding of humanitarian responses is depriving millions of people of the assistance they need to survive. As famine alarms sound, donors have been looking in the rearview mirror, waiting for data collection and death rates to confirm what the IRC is already seeing on the ground. Instead, the international community should look through the windshield to the future: respond now, with a 'no regrets' approach, before it is too late. The new US funding announced this week should be a first step, not the last."

    recommendations

    Activate the humanitarian system: A full scale-up of the humanitarian response is required to mitigate famine in East Africa. The response must seek to apply the lessons of past efforts to avert famine with rapid investment in proven approaches, including cash assistance to meet the needs of food-insecure communities. Take a "no regrets" approach to financing. Donors must fully fund humanitarian responses across the region and directly fund frontline NGOs, which can grow rapidly. Mobilize resources for humanitarian access negotiations: take steps to mitigate the impact of the conflict on humanitarian access and ensure that aid can reach those who need it most. Address global trade challenges stemming from the war in Ukraine: pursue all avenues to ease global export restrictions and restart Ukraine's exports, including ending the blockade on Ukraine's Black Sea ports to alleviate global shortages of cereals.

  •   265 increase in severely malnourished children under 5 in just one IRC clinic in Somalia between April and May 2022 200 increase in the price of fuel and treatment of malnutrition since the outbreak of the war in Ukraine seriously affecting aid delivery 230 000 people already living in famine conditions 7 million out of a population of just 16 million at risk of famine in Somalia over the next 2 months if aid is not increased immediately As the worst drought in decades ravages East Africa and the crisis in Ukraine affects global fuel and food prices the IRC has seen a sharp rise in admissions for acute malnutrition at IRC clinics in Somalia and a clinic recorded a 265 increase in admissions from April to May 2022 Hashi Abdi Supply Chain Manager at IRC Somalia said We have had to drastically reconsider our operations due to the sharp increase in prices and fuel in recent months When we do not have enough medical supplies in our clinics we have to turn away the increasing number of patients who need it critical care and support This is happening with increasing frequency as vital aid is being diverted to help Ukraine leading to an even more drastic reduction in the aid we are able to provide As always this is hitting the most vulnerable hardest Without immediate international funding a catastrophic famine is surely on the horizon for Somalia and the region as a whole 250 000 people half of whom were children died during the 2011 famine which came after three consecutive seasons without adequate rainfall and the humanitarian response plan was less than 50 funded The 2022 humanitarian response plan for Somali food security is currently only 20 funded as we enter the fifth consecutive season without adequate rainfall exacerbated by increasing climate pressure The IRC is calling on international leaders and donors to commit urgent and immediate funding to the drought in East Africa to avert the looming famine The IRC is operational in major areas of interest including Mogadishu Puntland southwestern and central Somalia and is significantly expanding our programming to help families with medical care for malnourished children unconditional cash transfers to help people to quickly get the support they need rehabilitation of wells and water sources as well as mobile health services to reach deeper into the most affected areas The IRC began working in Somalia in 1981 after the conflict between Somalia and Ethiopia Over the years operations have faced various interruptions due to insecurity and civil unrest but it has been operating continuously since 2007
    International Rescue Committee (IRC) Records 265% Rise in Nutrition Cases as Risk of Catastrophic Famine in Somalia Increases
      265 increase in severely malnourished children under 5 in just one IRC clinic in Somalia between April and May 2022 200 increase in the price of fuel and treatment of malnutrition since the outbreak of the war in Ukraine seriously affecting aid delivery 230 000 people already living in famine conditions 7 million out of a population of just 16 million at risk of famine in Somalia over the next 2 months if aid is not increased immediately As the worst drought in decades ravages East Africa and the crisis in Ukraine affects global fuel and food prices the IRC has seen a sharp rise in admissions for acute malnutrition at IRC clinics in Somalia and a clinic recorded a 265 increase in admissions from April to May 2022 Hashi Abdi Supply Chain Manager at IRC Somalia said We have had to drastically reconsider our operations due to the sharp increase in prices and fuel in recent months When we do not have enough medical supplies in our clinics we have to turn away the increasing number of patients who need it critical care and support This is happening with increasing frequency as vital aid is being diverted to help Ukraine leading to an even more drastic reduction in the aid we are able to provide As always this is hitting the most vulnerable hardest Without immediate international funding a catastrophic famine is surely on the horizon for Somalia and the region as a whole 250 000 people half of whom were children died during the 2011 famine which came after three consecutive seasons without adequate rainfall and the humanitarian response plan was less than 50 funded The 2022 humanitarian response plan for Somali food security is currently only 20 funded as we enter the fifth consecutive season without adequate rainfall exacerbated by increasing climate pressure The IRC is calling on international leaders and donors to commit urgent and immediate funding to the drought in East Africa to avert the looming famine The IRC is operational in major areas of interest including Mogadishu Puntland southwestern and central Somalia and is significantly expanding our programming to help families with medical care for malnourished children unconditional cash transfers to help people to quickly get the support they need rehabilitation of wells and water sources as well as mobile health services to reach deeper into the most affected areas The IRC began working in Somalia in 1981 after the conflict between Somalia and Ethiopia Over the years operations have faced various interruptions due to insecurity and civil unrest but it has been operating continuously since 2007
    International Rescue Committee (IRC) Records 265% Rise in Nutrition Cases as Risk of Catastrophic Famine in Somalia Increases
    Africa3 months ago

    International Rescue Committee (IRC) Records 265% Rise in Nutrition Cases as Risk of Catastrophic Famine in Somalia Increases

    265% increase in severely malnourished children under 5 in just one IRC clinic in Somalia between April and May 2022; 200% increase in the price of fuel and treatment of malnutrition since the outbreak of the war in Ukraine, seriously affecting aid delivery: 230,000 people already living in famine conditions; 7 million out of a population of just 16 million at risk of famine in Somalia over the next 2 months if aid is not increased immediately.

    As the worst drought in decades ravages East Africa and the crisis in Ukraine affects global fuel and food prices, the IRC has seen a sharp rise in admissions for acute malnutrition at IRC clinics in Somalia, and a clinic recorded a 265% increase in admissions from April to May 2022.

    Hashi Abdi, Supply Chain Manager at IRC Somalia, said:

    "We have had to drastically reconsider our operations due to the sharp increase in prices and fuel in recent months. When we do not have enough medical supplies in our clinics, we have to turn away the increasing number of patients who need it." critical care and support. This is happening with increasing frequency as vital aid is being diverted to help Ukraine, leading to an even more drastic reduction in the aid we are able to provide. As always, this is hitting the most vulnerable hardest. Without immediate international funding, a catastrophic famine is surely on the horizon for Somalia and the region as a whole."

    250,000 people, half of whom were children, died during the 2011 famine which came after three consecutive seasons without adequate rainfall and the humanitarian response plan was less than 50% funded. The 2022 humanitarian response plan for Somali food security is currently only 20% funded as we enter the fifth consecutive season without adequate rainfall, exacerbated by increasing climate pressure. The IRC is calling on international leaders and donors to commit urgent and immediate funding to the drought in East Africa to avert the looming famine.

    The IRC is operational in major areas of interest, including Mogadishu, Puntland, southwestern and central Somalia, and is significantly expanding our programming to help families with medical care for malnourished children, unconditional cash transfers to help people to quickly get the support they need, rehabilitation of wells and water sources, as well as mobile health services to reach deeper into the most affected areas.

    The IRC began working in Somalia in 1981 after the conflict between Somalia and Ethiopia. Over the years, operations have faced various interruptions due to insecurity and civil unrest, but it has been operating continuously since 2007.

  •   Despite the fact that more than a third of the country s population depends on humanitarian aid organizations working in Mali already face serious access limitations OSLO Norway January 19 2022 APO Group The new sanctions against Mali could have a devastating impact on the country where one in three people already depends on humanitarian aid 13 NGOs are urging all states and agencies that support these sanctions to unequivocally commit to applying humanitarian exemptions so that vital aid can reach all those in need A group of 13 NGOs are calling on the international community to protect the people of Mali following the announcement of new sanctions against the country in response to the interim authorities decision to postpone promised democratic elections for next month Last week the European Union announced plans to support the Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS in implementing collective sanctions against Mali ECOWAS restrictions include closing borders and imposing a trade embargo as well as cutting off financial aid and freezing the country s assets in the Central Bank of West African States Mali s transitional government has reciprocated closing its borders with all ECOWAS member states except Guinea These sanctions will have devastating consequences for the people and the humanitarian situation in Mali The people of Mali are already facing the worst food insecurity seen in 10 years with more than 7 5 million people more than a third of the country s population in need of humanitarian assistance It is critical that these new restrictions do not further hamper people s ability to access humanitarian assistance and basic social services in a country where 70 of food is imported and where 1 2 million Malians face food crisis Mali relies heavily on foreign assistance to finance basic social services In the area of health for example external donors covered 33 of total health spending in 2019 Malians are already bearing the brunt of the humanitarian catastrophe punctuated by horrific attacks on civilians Sanctions must not stop us from providing essential assistance in a country where drought rising insecurity and the economic impacts of COVID 19 are already they are pushing millions of Malians over the edge says Elena Vicario director of the Norwegian Council for Refugees in Mali The United States has also underlined its support for ECOWAS while France in its first weeks of presidency of the Council of the European Union has suspended flights to Mali The 13 organisations comprising the Norwegian Refugee Council NRC and the International Rescue Committee IRC are calling for urgent humanitarian exemptions from the sanctions and any related administrative processes must be urgently clarified to protect the humanitarian response in Mali To continue their work effectively humanitarian actors must have unrestricted access to transport vital goods including food and medicine as well as guarantees that they can transfer funds into the country without violating sanctions Despite the fact that more than a third of the country s population depends on humanitarian aid organizations working in Mali already face severe access limitations It is imperative that the international community continues to respond to people s urgent needs and that any new sanctions have concrete humanitarian exemptions These must be monitored and implemented or the most vulnerable people in Mali will pay the price says Franck Vannetelle IRC Country Director in Mali Mali ECOWAS and members of the international community that support these sanctions must monitor their impact and unequivocally commit to apply humanitarian exemptions in accordance with existing guidelines taking all necessary measures to limit the impact of these measures on civilians The full list of signatories includes International Rescue Committee Action Against Hunger CARE CECI Danish Refugee Council HELP Mercy Corps Norwegian Church Aid Norwegian Refugee Council Oxfam Plan International Terre des hommes Lausanne World Vision
    New sanctions risk plunging the people of Mali further into a humanitarian crisis
      Despite the fact that more than a third of the country s population depends on humanitarian aid organizations working in Mali already face serious access limitations OSLO Norway January 19 2022 APO Group The new sanctions against Mali could have a devastating impact on the country where one in three people already depends on humanitarian aid 13 NGOs are urging all states and agencies that support these sanctions to unequivocally commit to applying humanitarian exemptions so that vital aid can reach all those in need A group of 13 NGOs are calling on the international community to protect the people of Mali following the announcement of new sanctions against the country in response to the interim authorities decision to postpone promised democratic elections for next month Last week the European Union announced plans to support the Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS in implementing collective sanctions against Mali ECOWAS restrictions include closing borders and imposing a trade embargo as well as cutting off financial aid and freezing the country s assets in the Central Bank of West African States Mali s transitional government has reciprocated closing its borders with all ECOWAS member states except Guinea These sanctions will have devastating consequences for the people and the humanitarian situation in Mali The people of Mali are already facing the worst food insecurity seen in 10 years with more than 7 5 million people more than a third of the country s population in need of humanitarian assistance It is critical that these new restrictions do not further hamper people s ability to access humanitarian assistance and basic social services in a country where 70 of food is imported and where 1 2 million Malians face food crisis Mali relies heavily on foreign assistance to finance basic social services In the area of health for example external donors covered 33 of total health spending in 2019 Malians are already bearing the brunt of the humanitarian catastrophe punctuated by horrific attacks on civilians Sanctions must not stop us from providing essential assistance in a country where drought rising insecurity and the economic impacts of COVID 19 are already they are pushing millions of Malians over the edge says Elena Vicario director of the Norwegian Council for Refugees in Mali The United States has also underlined its support for ECOWAS while France in its first weeks of presidency of the Council of the European Union has suspended flights to Mali The 13 organisations comprising the Norwegian Refugee Council NRC and the International Rescue Committee IRC are calling for urgent humanitarian exemptions from the sanctions and any related administrative processes must be urgently clarified to protect the humanitarian response in Mali To continue their work effectively humanitarian actors must have unrestricted access to transport vital goods including food and medicine as well as guarantees that they can transfer funds into the country without violating sanctions Despite the fact that more than a third of the country s population depends on humanitarian aid organizations working in Mali already face severe access limitations It is imperative that the international community continues to respond to people s urgent needs and that any new sanctions have concrete humanitarian exemptions These must be monitored and implemented or the most vulnerable people in Mali will pay the price says Franck Vannetelle IRC Country Director in Mali Mali ECOWAS and members of the international community that support these sanctions must monitor their impact and unequivocally commit to apply humanitarian exemptions in accordance with existing guidelines taking all necessary measures to limit the impact of these measures on civilians The full list of signatories includes International Rescue Committee Action Against Hunger CARE CECI Danish Refugee Council HELP Mercy Corps Norwegian Church Aid Norwegian Refugee Council Oxfam Plan International Terre des hommes Lausanne World Vision
    New sanctions risk plunging the people of Mali further into a humanitarian crisis
    Africa9 months ago

    New sanctions risk plunging the people of Mali further into a humanitarian crisis

    Despite the fact that more than a third of the country's population depends on humanitarian aid, organizations working in Mali already face serious access limitations

    OSLO, Norway, January 19, 2022/APO Group/ --

    The new sanctions against Mali could have a devastating impact on the country, where one in three people already depends on humanitarian aid. 13 NGOs are urging all states and agencies that support these sanctions to unequivocally commit to applying humanitarian exemptions, so that vital aid can reach all those in need.

    A group of 13 NGOs are calling on the international community to protect the people of Mali, following the announcement of new sanctions against the country in response to the interim authorities' decision to postpone promised democratic elections for next month.

    Last week, the European Union announced plans to support the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in implementing collective sanctions against Mali. ECOWAS restrictions include closing borders and imposing a trade embargo, as well as cutting off financial aid and freezing the country's assets in the Central Bank of West African States. Mali's transitional government has reciprocated, closing its borders with all ECOWAS member states except Guinea.

    These sanctions will have devastating consequences for the people and the humanitarian situation in Mali. The people of Mali are already facing the worst food insecurity seen in 10 years, with more than 7.5 million people, more than a third of the country's population, in need of humanitarian assistance. It is critical that these new restrictions do not further hamper people's ability to access humanitarian assistance and basic social services in a country where 70% of food is imported and where 1.2 million Malians face food crisis. Mali relies heavily on foreign assistance to finance basic social services. In the area of ​​health, for example, external donors covered 33% of total health spending in 2019.

    "Malians are already bearing the brunt of the humanitarian catastrophe, punctuated by horrific attacks on civilians. Sanctions must not stop us from providing essential assistance in a country where drought, rising insecurity and the economic impacts of COVID-19 are already they are pushing millions of Malians over the edge,” says Elena Vicario, director of the Norwegian Council for Refugees in Mali.

    The United States has also underlined its support for ECOWAS, while France - in its first weeks of presidency of the Council of the European Union - has suspended flights to Mali.

    The 13 organisations, comprising the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) and the International Rescue Committee (IRC), are calling for urgent humanitarian exemptions from the sanctions and any related administrative processes must be urgently clarified, to protect the humanitarian response in Mali. To continue their work effectively, humanitarian actors must have unrestricted access to transport vital goods, including food and medicine, as well as guarantees that they can transfer funds into the country without violating sanctions.

    “Despite the fact that more than a third of the country's population depends on humanitarian aid, organizations working in Mali already face severe access limitations. It is imperative that the international community continues to respond to people's urgent needs and that any new sanctions have concrete humanitarian exemptions. These must be monitored and implemented, or the most vulnerable people in Mali will pay the price”, says Franck Vannetelle, IRC Country Director in Mali.

    Mali, ECOWAS and members of the international community that support these sanctions must monitor their impact and unequivocally commit to apply humanitarian exemptions in accordance with existing guidelines, taking all necessary measures to limit the impact of these measures on civilians.

    The full list of signatories includes:

    International Rescue Committee Action Against Hunger CARE CECI Danish Refugee Council HELP Mercy Corps Norwegian Church Aid Norwegian Refugee Council Oxfam Plan International Terre des hommes Lausanne World Vision

  •   Libyan authorities violently arrested hundreds of migrants and refugees overnight at a protest camp in front of a closed aid center in Tripoli aid groups said on Monday The Norwegian Refugee Council NRC and the International Rescue Committee IRC are alarmed by the detention of more than 600 migrants refugees and asylum seekers early Monday morning the groups said in a joint statement IRC Libya chief Thomas Garofalo said the group s medical teams had treated several wounded people including a gunshot wound We understand that hundreds of people including many women and children have now been sent to detention centers where conditions are often already dire he added Witnesses told us that they encountered violence this morning and that the makeshift tents were set on fire said Dax Roque NRC country director The center had been providing aid to refugees and asylum seekers before it was permanently closed in December prompting some immigrants to set up a protest camp outside the facility Libya has become a key conduit for immigrants desperately trying to reach Europe since the fall of dictator Moamer Kadhafi in 2011 plunged the country into anarchy Many end up stranded in the country where they are abused by human trafficking gangs human rights groups say Libyan authorities faced an international protest in October after the arrest of thousands of migrants in raids that left at least one person dead Days later guards shot dead six immigrants at the Al Mabani detention center in Tripoli while at least 24 others were wounded the International Organization for Migration said Since the mass detention of thousands of migrants refugees and asylum seekers in October last year the situation of this population in Libya has only worsened said Roque Source Credit TheGuardian
    Libya authorities arrest over 600 migrants
      Libyan authorities violently arrested hundreds of migrants and refugees overnight at a protest camp in front of a closed aid center in Tripoli aid groups said on Monday The Norwegian Refugee Council NRC and the International Rescue Committee IRC are alarmed by the detention of more than 600 migrants refugees and asylum seekers early Monday morning the groups said in a joint statement IRC Libya chief Thomas Garofalo said the group s medical teams had treated several wounded people including a gunshot wound We understand that hundreds of people including many women and children have now been sent to detention centers where conditions are often already dire he added Witnesses told us that they encountered violence this morning and that the makeshift tents were set on fire said Dax Roque NRC country director The center had been providing aid to refugees and asylum seekers before it was permanently closed in December prompting some immigrants to set up a protest camp outside the facility Libya has become a key conduit for immigrants desperately trying to reach Europe since the fall of dictator Moamer Kadhafi in 2011 plunged the country into anarchy Many end up stranded in the country where they are abused by human trafficking gangs human rights groups say Libyan authorities faced an international protest in October after the arrest of thousands of migrants in raids that left at least one person dead Days later guards shot dead six immigrants at the Al Mabani detention center in Tripoli while at least 24 others were wounded the International Organization for Migration said Since the mass detention of thousands of migrants refugees and asylum seekers in October last year the situation of this population in Libya has only worsened said Roque Source Credit TheGuardian
    Libya authorities arrest over 600 migrants
    Foreign9 months ago

    Libya authorities arrest over 600 migrants

    Libyan authorities violently arrested hundreds of migrants and refugees overnight at a protest camp in front of a closed aid center in Tripoli, aid groups said on Monday.

    "The Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) and the International Rescue Committee (IRC) are alarmed by the detention of more than 600 migrants, refugees and asylum seekers" early Monday morning, the groups said in a joint statement.

    IRC Libya chief Thomas Garofalo said the group's medical teams had treated several wounded people, including a gunshot wound.

    "We understand that hundreds of people, including many women and children, have now been sent to detention centers where conditions are often already dire," he added.

    "Witnesses told us that they encountered violence this morning and that the makeshift tents were set on fire," said Dax Roque, NRC country director.

    The center had been providing aid to refugees and asylum seekers before it was permanently closed in December, prompting some immigrants to set up a protest camp outside the facility.

    Libya has become a key conduit for immigrants desperately trying to reach Europe since the fall of dictator Moamer Kadhafi in 2011 plunged the country into anarchy.

    Many end up stranded in the country where they are abused by human trafficking gangs, human rights groups say.

    Libyan authorities faced an international protest in October after the arrest of thousands of migrants in raids that left at least one person dead.

    Days later, guards shot dead six immigrants at the Al-Mabani detention center in Tripoli, while at least 24 others were wounded, the International Organization for Migration said.

    "Since the mass detention of thousands of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in October last year, the situation of this population in Libya has only worsened," said Roque.

    Source Credit: TheGuardian

  •   Data shows that more than 3 million people in Somalia are affected by the ongoing historical drought with nearly 170 000 displaced in search of food water and pasture NAIROBI Kenya January 6 2022 APO Group Deteriorating drought in Somalia and southeastern Ethiopia The driest conditions seen this season in 40 years in some regions have led to a worsening humanitarian crisis recent evaluations by the International Rescue Committee IRC have found More people go hungry as food and water prices rise community members are selling their properties at lower prices and even being forced to leave their homes more livestock die due to reduced pasture and more children drop out of school Somalia and Ethiopia are listed on IRC s 2022 Emergency Watch List as two of the 20 countries most at risk of a deteriorating humanitarian crisis this year As the situation continues to deteriorate amid the rise in COVID 19 Omicron cases in East Africa despite a weak health system the IRC urges the international community to support communities in Somalia and Ethiopia by providing food water and cash assistance urgently Kurt Tjossem Regional Vice President for East Africa at IRC says Water resources are being increasingly depleted as a result of drought conditions Women and girls walk long distances to fetch water often putting them at risk of violence Malnutrition cases doubled in parts of Ethiopia s Oromia region during this dry season and diarrhea is being reported among children under the age of five Data shows that more than 3 million people in Somalia are affected by the ongoing historical drought with nearly 170 000 displaced in search of food water and pasture We have launched a response in the Somali region of Ethiopia but more funds are needed to scale up in other areas Farmers have started to suffer livestock losses due to disease and reduced pasture which depletes income food security and the ability of households to survive the impact of the drought In the Ethiopian region of Oromia 11 schools have been closed so far Market prices for basic foodstuffs have started to rise and some households are now unable to meet their food needs As people are forced to migrate from their communities in search of food and pasture to feed their animals the risk of conflict over resources increases Both Somalia and Ethiopia face severe funding constraints amid an unprecedented humanitarian crisis in the region It is imperative that we continue to respond to the situation by providing emergency cash assistance food water and sanitation services as well as hygiene promotion to combat major health problems With more funding IRC can continue programming to support those most in need in the region as the drought worsens
    Driest conditions in Ethiopia and Somalia seen in forty years threaten the wellbeing of millions
      Data shows that more than 3 million people in Somalia are affected by the ongoing historical drought with nearly 170 000 displaced in search of food water and pasture NAIROBI Kenya January 6 2022 APO Group Deteriorating drought in Somalia and southeastern Ethiopia The driest conditions seen this season in 40 years in some regions have led to a worsening humanitarian crisis recent evaluations by the International Rescue Committee IRC have found More people go hungry as food and water prices rise community members are selling their properties at lower prices and even being forced to leave their homes more livestock die due to reduced pasture and more children drop out of school Somalia and Ethiopia are listed on IRC s 2022 Emergency Watch List as two of the 20 countries most at risk of a deteriorating humanitarian crisis this year As the situation continues to deteriorate amid the rise in COVID 19 Omicron cases in East Africa despite a weak health system the IRC urges the international community to support communities in Somalia and Ethiopia by providing food water and cash assistance urgently Kurt Tjossem Regional Vice President for East Africa at IRC says Water resources are being increasingly depleted as a result of drought conditions Women and girls walk long distances to fetch water often putting them at risk of violence Malnutrition cases doubled in parts of Ethiopia s Oromia region during this dry season and diarrhea is being reported among children under the age of five Data shows that more than 3 million people in Somalia are affected by the ongoing historical drought with nearly 170 000 displaced in search of food water and pasture We have launched a response in the Somali region of Ethiopia but more funds are needed to scale up in other areas Farmers have started to suffer livestock losses due to disease and reduced pasture which depletes income food security and the ability of households to survive the impact of the drought In the Ethiopian region of Oromia 11 schools have been closed so far Market prices for basic foodstuffs have started to rise and some households are now unable to meet their food needs As people are forced to migrate from their communities in search of food and pasture to feed their animals the risk of conflict over resources increases Both Somalia and Ethiopia face severe funding constraints amid an unprecedented humanitarian crisis in the region It is imperative that we continue to respond to the situation by providing emergency cash assistance food water and sanitation services as well as hygiene promotion to combat major health problems With more funding IRC can continue programming to support those most in need in the region as the drought worsens
    Driest conditions in Ethiopia and Somalia seen in forty years threaten the wellbeing of millions
    Africa9 months ago

    Driest conditions in Ethiopia and Somalia seen in forty years threaten the wellbeing of millions

    Data shows that more than 3 million people in Somalia are affected by the ongoing historical drought, with nearly 170,000 displaced in search of food, water and pasture.

    NAIROBI, Kenya, January 6, 2022 / APO Group / -

    Deteriorating drought in Somalia and southeastern Ethiopia; The driest conditions seen this season in 40 years in some regions have led to a worsening humanitarian crisis, recent evaluations by the International Rescue Committee (IRC) have found. More people go hungry as food and water prices rise, community members are selling their properties at lower prices and even being forced to leave their homes, more livestock die due to reduced pasture and more children drop out of school. Somalia and Ethiopia are listed on IRC's 2022 Emergency Watch List as two of the 20 countries most at risk of a deteriorating humanitarian crisis this year. As the situation continues to deteriorate amid the rise in COVID-19 Omicron cases in East Africa, despite a weak health system, the IRC urges the international community to support communities in Somalia and Ethiopia by providing food. , water and cash assistance urgently.

    Kurt Tjossem, Regional Vice President for East Africa at IRC, says: “Water resources are being increasingly depleted as a result of drought conditions. Women and girls walk long distances to fetch water, often putting them at risk of violence. Malnutrition cases doubled in parts of Ethiopia's Oromia region during this dry season and diarrhea is being reported among children under the age of five. Data shows that more than 3 million people in Somalia are affected by the ongoing historical drought, with nearly 170,000 displaced in search of food, water and pasture. We have launched a response in the Somali region of Ethiopia, but more funds are needed to scale up in other areas. "

    “Farmers have started to suffer livestock losses due to disease and reduced pasture, which depletes income, food security and the ability of households to survive the impact of the drought. In the Ethiopian region of Oromia, 11 schools have been closed so far. Market prices for basic foodstuffs have started to rise and some households are now unable to meet their food needs. As people are forced to migrate from their communities in search of food and pasture to feed their animals, the risk of conflict over resources increases ”.

    “Both Somalia and Ethiopia face severe funding constraints amid an unprecedented humanitarian crisis in the region. It is imperative that we continue to respond to the situation by providing emergency cash assistance, food, water and sanitation services, as well as hygiene promotion to combat major health problems. With more funding, IRC can continue programming to support those most in need in the region as the drought worsens. "

  •   The increase in aid dollars to deal with the ripple effects of climate change conflict and Covid is long overdue NAIROBI Kenya November 19 2021 APO Group As US Secretary of State Anthony Blinken continues his visit to Africa the IRC calls on the United States and other wealthy countries to redouble their efforts to address the humanitarian emergencies unfolding on the continent in particular in Ethiopia Nigeria and Sudan While the United States has donated millions of vaccines to Africa the supply of Covid 19 vaccines is not the only humanitarian concern The triple emergency of Covid conflict and climate change is taking its toll while the amount of aid and humanitarian diplomacy devoted to these emergencies is grossly out of step with the realities and needs on the ground Amanda Catanzano Acting Vice President of Policy and Advocacy at the International Rescue Committee said Despite new vaccine donations and the Biden administration s Covid pledges more ambitious actions will be needed from states United and other donor governments to achieve 40 vaccine coverage against Covid by the end of 2021 and 70 by mid 2022 across Africa particularly in fragile and conflictual contexts on the continent which are already being left behind Frontline NGOs which can reach where governments and health systems cannot need faster and easier access to donor funding to help support vaccine delivery in the most difficult settings to reach Only five African countries or less than 10 of the 54 African countries are expected to achieve the 40 coverage target by year end At the current rate Africa still faces a shortage of 275 million COVID 19 vaccines to meet this target Climate related events including locust infestations droughts and extreme weather events are causing unprecedented needs on the continent And while Covid vaccinations can help stem the virus the impact of the pandemic on rising food prices and overloading health systems is worsening and requires broader solutions beyond donations from vaccines In Kenya in particular the health system was already overwhelmed and the pandemic was accompanied by worsening epidemics of malaria and cholera in Dadaab and Kakuma Refugee families in Kakuma live together in small tents and makeshift houses and are confined together in small spaces without access to proper water sanitation and hygiene making conditions conducive to the spread of COVID 19 and other diseases The increase in aid dollars to deal with the ripple effects of climate change conflict and Covid is long overdue Donations of Covid vaccines are simply not enough to address ongoing humanitarian emergencies with multiple root causes
    IRC calls for bold action around Blinken’s visit to Africa
      The increase in aid dollars to deal with the ripple effects of climate change conflict and Covid is long overdue NAIROBI Kenya November 19 2021 APO Group As US Secretary of State Anthony Blinken continues his visit to Africa the IRC calls on the United States and other wealthy countries to redouble their efforts to address the humanitarian emergencies unfolding on the continent in particular in Ethiopia Nigeria and Sudan While the United States has donated millions of vaccines to Africa the supply of Covid 19 vaccines is not the only humanitarian concern The triple emergency of Covid conflict and climate change is taking its toll while the amount of aid and humanitarian diplomacy devoted to these emergencies is grossly out of step with the realities and needs on the ground Amanda Catanzano Acting Vice President of Policy and Advocacy at the International Rescue Committee said Despite new vaccine donations and the Biden administration s Covid pledges more ambitious actions will be needed from states United and other donor governments to achieve 40 vaccine coverage against Covid by the end of 2021 and 70 by mid 2022 across Africa particularly in fragile and conflictual contexts on the continent which are already being left behind Frontline NGOs which can reach where governments and health systems cannot need faster and easier access to donor funding to help support vaccine delivery in the most difficult settings to reach Only five African countries or less than 10 of the 54 African countries are expected to achieve the 40 coverage target by year end At the current rate Africa still faces a shortage of 275 million COVID 19 vaccines to meet this target Climate related events including locust infestations droughts and extreme weather events are causing unprecedented needs on the continent And while Covid vaccinations can help stem the virus the impact of the pandemic on rising food prices and overloading health systems is worsening and requires broader solutions beyond donations from vaccines In Kenya in particular the health system was already overwhelmed and the pandemic was accompanied by worsening epidemics of malaria and cholera in Dadaab and Kakuma Refugee families in Kakuma live together in small tents and makeshift houses and are confined together in small spaces without access to proper water sanitation and hygiene making conditions conducive to the spread of COVID 19 and other diseases The increase in aid dollars to deal with the ripple effects of climate change conflict and Covid is long overdue Donations of Covid vaccines are simply not enough to address ongoing humanitarian emergencies with multiple root causes
    IRC calls for bold action around Blinken’s visit to Africa
    Africa11 months ago

    IRC calls for bold action around Blinken’s visit to Africa

    The increase in aid dollars to deal with the ripple effects of climate change, conflict and Covid is long overdue

    NAIROBI, Kenya, November 19, 2021 / APO Group / -

    As US Secretary of State Anthony Blinken continues his visit to Africa, the IRC calls on the United States and other wealthy countries to redouble their efforts to address the humanitarian emergencies unfolding on the continent, in particular in Ethiopia, Nigeria and Sudan. While the United States has donated millions of vaccines to Africa, the supply of Covid-19 vaccines is not the only humanitarian concern. The triple emergency of Covid, conflict and climate change is taking its toll, while the amount of aid and humanitarian diplomacy devoted to these emergencies is grossly out of step with the realities and needs on the ground.

    Amanda Catanzano, Acting Vice President of Policy and Advocacy at the International Rescue Committee, said: “Despite new vaccine donations and the Biden administration's Covid pledges, more ambitious actions will be needed from states. -United and other donor governments to achieve 40% vaccine coverage against Covid by the end of 2021 and 70% by mid-2022 across Africa, particularly in fragile and conflictual contexts on the continent which are already being left behind. Frontline NGOs, which can reach where governments and health systems cannot, need faster and easier access to donor funding to help support vaccine delivery in the most difficult settings. to reach. Only five African countries, or less than 10% of the 54 African countries, are expected to achieve the 40% coverage target by year-end. At the current rate, Africa still faces a shortage of 275 million COVID-19 vaccines to meet this target.

    “Climate-related events including locust infestations, droughts and extreme weather events are causing unprecedented needs on the continent. And while Covid vaccinations can help stem the virus, the impact of the pandemic on rising food prices and overloading health systems is worsening and requires broader solutions beyond donations from vaccines. In Kenya in particular, the health system was already overwhelmed and the pandemic was accompanied by worsening epidemics of malaria and cholera in Dadaab and Kakuma. Refugee families in Kakuma live together in small tents and makeshift houses and are confined together in small spaces without access to proper water, sanitation and hygiene, making conditions conducive to the spread of COVID-19 and other diseases.

    “The increase in aid dollars to deal with the ripple effects of climate change, conflict and Covid is long overdue. Donations of Covid vaccines are simply not enough to address ongoing humanitarian emergencies with multiple root causes. "

  •   For a country in such an unstable situation the combined effects of climate change and conflict have devastating consequences for already vulnerable populations JUBA South Sudan October 18 2021 APO Group The International Rescue Committee IRC launches emergency response as conflict epidemics such as hepatitis E and the worst flooding seen in 60 years in most parts of South Sudan leave more than 600 000 people in the need for urgent humanitarian aid Caroline Sekyewa IRC Country Director in South Sudan said Since May the impact of the floods has left more than 450 000 people in 22 counties of South Sudan in need of food water shelter hygiene health services as well as health services protection especially for women girls and children This year the effects of climate change have resulted in unusually heavy rains and flood waters from the Sudd floodplains have increased forcing people to leave their homes and leaving them without sufficient food and water For a country in such an unstable situation the combined effects of climate change and conflict have devastating consequences for already vulnerable populations Hepatitis E cases in Bentui camp increased by more than 60 from 2019 to 2020 putting already vulnerable populations even more at risk Half a million people are in need of emergency assistance including nutrition water and sanitation basic household items shelter and health services IRC will focus on health protection water and nutrition services for those affected in South Awiel and Unity State For more than 30 years IRC has been one of the largest aid providers in South Sudan providing emergency aid and supporting vulnerable populations in hard to reach areas Our health response includes capacity building in state clinics training of local health workers nutrition programs and sanitation services We also offer support to survivors of sexual violence and child protection services Community leaders and government officials are trained in the importance of respecting human rights IRC helps empower people through cash assistance skills training and livelihoods Learn more about the IRC s response in South Sudan
    IRC launches emergency response for more than half a million people affected by conflict, hepatitis E and severe flooding in South Sudan
      For a country in such an unstable situation the combined effects of climate change and conflict have devastating consequences for already vulnerable populations JUBA South Sudan October 18 2021 APO Group The International Rescue Committee IRC launches emergency response as conflict epidemics such as hepatitis E and the worst flooding seen in 60 years in most parts of South Sudan leave more than 600 000 people in the need for urgent humanitarian aid Caroline Sekyewa IRC Country Director in South Sudan said Since May the impact of the floods has left more than 450 000 people in 22 counties of South Sudan in need of food water shelter hygiene health services as well as health services protection especially for women girls and children This year the effects of climate change have resulted in unusually heavy rains and flood waters from the Sudd floodplains have increased forcing people to leave their homes and leaving them without sufficient food and water For a country in such an unstable situation the combined effects of climate change and conflict have devastating consequences for already vulnerable populations Hepatitis E cases in Bentui camp increased by more than 60 from 2019 to 2020 putting already vulnerable populations even more at risk Half a million people are in need of emergency assistance including nutrition water and sanitation basic household items shelter and health services IRC will focus on health protection water and nutrition services for those affected in South Awiel and Unity State For more than 30 years IRC has been one of the largest aid providers in South Sudan providing emergency aid and supporting vulnerable populations in hard to reach areas Our health response includes capacity building in state clinics training of local health workers nutrition programs and sanitation services We also offer support to survivors of sexual violence and child protection services Community leaders and government officials are trained in the importance of respecting human rights IRC helps empower people through cash assistance skills training and livelihoods Learn more about the IRC s response in South Sudan
    IRC launches emergency response for more than half a million people affected by conflict, hepatitis E and severe flooding in South Sudan
    Africa12 months ago

    IRC launches emergency response for more than half a million people affected by conflict, hepatitis E and severe flooding in South Sudan

    For a country in such an unstable situation, the combined effects of climate change and conflict have devastating consequences for already vulnerable populations.

    JUBA, South Sudan, October 18, 2021 / APO Group / -

    The International Rescue Committee (IRC) launches emergency response as conflict, epidemics such as hepatitis E and the worst flooding seen in 60 years in most parts of South Sudan leave more than 600,000 people in the need for urgent humanitarian aid.

    Caroline Sekyewa, IRC Country Director in South Sudan, said:

    “Since May, the impact of the floods has left more than 450,000 people in 22 counties of South Sudan in need of food, water, shelter, hygiene, health services as well as health services. protection, especially for women, girls and children. This year, the effects of climate change have resulted in unusually heavy rains and flood waters from the Sudd floodplains have increased, forcing people to leave their homes and leaving them without sufficient food and water. For a country in such an unstable situation, the combined effects of climate change and conflict have devastating consequences for already vulnerable populations. Hepatitis E cases in Bentui camp increased by more than 60% from 2019 to 2020, putting already vulnerable populations even more at risk.

    “Half a million people are in need of emergency assistance, including nutrition, water and sanitation, basic household items, shelter and health services. IRC will focus on health, protection, water and nutrition services for those affected in South Awiel and Unity State. "

    For more than 30 years, IRC has been one of the largest aid providers in South Sudan, providing emergency aid and supporting vulnerable populations in hard-to-reach areas. Our health response includes capacity building in state clinics, training of local health workers, nutrition programs and sanitation services. We also offer support to survivors of sexual violence and child protection services. Community leaders and government officials are trained in the importance of respecting human rights. IRC helps empower people through cash assistance, skills training and livelihoods. Learn more about the IRC's response in South Sudan.