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  •   The African Development Bank Group s www AfDB org sixth edition of the Africa Energy Market Place AEMP focused on Djibouti Eritrea and Ethiopia under the theme Delivering Desert to Power in the Horn of Africa Enhancing Regional Power Trade The virtual event was held from 25 27 October 2022 and brought together approximately 111 participants from governments the private sector and development partners to highlight and discuss strategic projects and priority energy sector reforms in the three countries This year s edition highlighted the development of the Bank s Desert to Power Initiative which aims to accelerate socioeconomic development through the deployment of 10GW of solar power in the 11 countries of the Sahel region including Djibouti Eritrea and Ethiopia Opening the three day event African Development Bank AfDB Vice President Dr Kevin Kariuki encouraged participants to leverage the opportunities presented by the AEMP He told participants The AEMP platform devises a collaborative mechanism and concerted approach to monitoring and implementation of the Country Priority Plans beyond the AEMP event to achieve the desired objectives Dr Daniel Schroth Bank Director for Renewable Energy presented the Desert to Power initiative http bit ly 3hZruHV and the Bank s ongoing initiatives in the Horn of Africa countries Desert to Power s robust value proposition for the Horn of Africa countries includes mobilizing concessional resources at scale availing project preparation support and facilitating match making opportunities with the private sector seizing the energy potential of the three countries present he said Djibouti s Minister of Energy and Natural Resources Yonis Ali Guedi shared the country s long term goal citing that our goal is to transit from thermal to 100 Renewable Energy by optimizing the energy mix of geothermal wind and solar and to achieve universal access by 2035 leveraging the country s huge RE potentials Eritrea s Director of Energy Tesfay Ghebrehiwet on behalf of the Mine and Energy minister reminded participants that the country has currently huge suppressed power demands in industrial mining and agriculture sectors and only 40 access rate He also presented urgent projects that needed support in the country There is a pressing need to reinforce the National Electricity Grid to enable integration with neighboring countries and facilitate power trade under the East Africa Power Pool while also reducing regulatory challenges hampering private sector investments in our power sector he said adding that his country is pleased to be counted under the Desert to Power Initiative which aligns with the country s priorities The government of Ethiopia presented its ambitions including current revision of its energy sector policy to focus on increasing private sector participation Dr Ing Habtamu Itefa Minister of Water and Energy also mentioned the country s green energy ambitions We just launched a Green Hydrogen strategy to enable local production for both domestic consumption and export to the European market a discussion is ongoing to sign a bilateral agreement for development and export of green hydrogen with Germany he said The cross country session which focused on reinforcing the East Africa Power Pool EAPP also saw some critical discussions to prioritize investments into regional transmission networks in the region A key outcome was the opportunity to invite private investment into transmission programs through Public Private Partnership models In addition there were also calls to strategically unlock the potential of linking the EAPP with the Southern Africa Power Pool This according to experts at the event was a first step to creating the continental power market in Africa The outcomes of the AEMP could become the small building blocks of the bigger African voice for COP7 for example the emphasis on the fact that energy transition comes with a cost a cost that comes from Climate Finance that the African continent is struggling to access noted Dr Abdul Kamara African Development Bank Deputy Director General for the East African region In closing remarks for the three day meeting Wale Shonibare Bank Director for Energy Financial Solutions Policy and Regulation reminded participants that the ultimate goal of the AEMP and its policy dialogue with Governments is to not only develop implementable actions with the respective countries but to secure commitment of all stakeholders to implement them in the coming years Power Africa the European Investment Bank the International Energy Agency IEA Africa50 Africa Infrastructure Development Association AfIDA the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank the International Finance Corporation the European Union the World Bank the East Africa Power Pool the Southern Africa Power Pool the UK s Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office JICA Agence Francaise de Development were among the many participants The Africa Energy Market Place is a collaborative investment platform created by the African Development Bank as part of the New Deal on Energy for Africa the transformative partnership to light up and power Africa in keeping with the Bank s High 5 strategic priorities
    Regional Power Trade in Djibouti, Eritrea and Ethiopia Captured Attention at 6th Africa Energy Market Place
      The African Development Bank Group s www AfDB org sixth edition of the Africa Energy Market Place AEMP focused on Djibouti Eritrea and Ethiopia under the theme Delivering Desert to Power in the Horn of Africa Enhancing Regional Power Trade The virtual event was held from 25 27 October 2022 and brought together approximately 111 participants from governments the private sector and development partners to highlight and discuss strategic projects and priority energy sector reforms in the three countries This year s edition highlighted the development of the Bank s Desert to Power Initiative which aims to accelerate socioeconomic development through the deployment of 10GW of solar power in the 11 countries of the Sahel region including Djibouti Eritrea and Ethiopia Opening the three day event African Development Bank AfDB Vice President Dr Kevin Kariuki encouraged participants to leverage the opportunities presented by the AEMP He told participants The AEMP platform devises a collaborative mechanism and concerted approach to monitoring and implementation of the Country Priority Plans beyond the AEMP event to achieve the desired objectives Dr Daniel Schroth Bank Director for Renewable Energy presented the Desert to Power initiative http bit ly 3hZruHV and the Bank s ongoing initiatives in the Horn of Africa countries Desert to Power s robust value proposition for the Horn of Africa countries includes mobilizing concessional resources at scale availing project preparation support and facilitating match making opportunities with the private sector seizing the energy potential of the three countries present he said Djibouti s Minister of Energy and Natural Resources Yonis Ali Guedi shared the country s long term goal citing that our goal is to transit from thermal to 100 Renewable Energy by optimizing the energy mix of geothermal wind and solar and to achieve universal access by 2035 leveraging the country s huge RE potentials Eritrea s Director of Energy Tesfay Ghebrehiwet on behalf of the Mine and Energy minister reminded participants that the country has currently huge suppressed power demands in industrial mining and agriculture sectors and only 40 access rate He also presented urgent projects that needed support in the country There is a pressing need to reinforce the National Electricity Grid to enable integration with neighboring countries and facilitate power trade under the East Africa Power Pool while also reducing regulatory challenges hampering private sector investments in our power sector he said adding that his country is pleased to be counted under the Desert to Power Initiative which aligns with the country s priorities The government of Ethiopia presented its ambitions including current revision of its energy sector policy to focus on increasing private sector participation Dr Ing Habtamu Itefa Minister of Water and Energy also mentioned the country s green energy ambitions We just launched a Green Hydrogen strategy to enable local production for both domestic consumption and export to the European market a discussion is ongoing to sign a bilateral agreement for development and export of green hydrogen with Germany he said The cross country session which focused on reinforcing the East Africa Power Pool EAPP also saw some critical discussions to prioritize investments into regional transmission networks in the region A key outcome was the opportunity to invite private investment into transmission programs through Public Private Partnership models In addition there were also calls to strategically unlock the potential of linking the EAPP with the Southern Africa Power Pool This according to experts at the event was a first step to creating the continental power market in Africa The outcomes of the AEMP could become the small building blocks of the bigger African voice for COP7 for example the emphasis on the fact that energy transition comes with a cost a cost that comes from Climate Finance that the African continent is struggling to access noted Dr Abdul Kamara African Development Bank Deputy Director General for the East African region In closing remarks for the three day meeting Wale Shonibare Bank Director for Energy Financial Solutions Policy and Regulation reminded participants that the ultimate goal of the AEMP and its policy dialogue with Governments is to not only develop implementable actions with the respective countries but to secure commitment of all stakeholders to implement them in the coming years Power Africa the European Investment Bank the International Energy Agency IEA Africa50 Africa Infrastructure Development Association AfIDA the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank the International Finance Corporation the European Union the World Bank the East Africa Power Pool the Southern Africa Power Pool the UK s Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office JICA Agence Francaise de Development were among the many participants The Africa Energy Market Place is a collaborative investment platform created by the African Development Bank as part of the New Deal on Energy for Africa the transformative partnership to light up and power Africa in keeping with the Bank s High 5 strategic priorities
    Regional Power Trade in Djibouti, Eritrea and Ethiopia Captured Attention at 6th Africa Energy Market Place
    Africa2 months ago

    Regional Power Trade in Djibouti, Eritrea and Ethiopia Captured Attention at 6th Africa Energy Market Place

    The African Development Bank Group’s (www.AfDB.org) sixth edition of the Africa Energy Market Place (AEMP), focused on Djibouti, Eritrea and Ethiopia under the theme: Delivering Desert to Power in the Horn of Africa - Enhancing Regional Power Trade.

    The virtual event was held from 25-27 October 2022 and brought together approximately 111 participants from governments, the private sector and development partners to highlight and discuss strategic projects and priority energy sector reforms in the three countries.

    This year’s edition highlighted the development of the Bank’s Desert to Power Initiative which aims to accelerate socioeconomic development through the deployment of 10GW of solar power in the 11 countries of the Sahel region, including Djibouti, Eritrea and Ethiopia.

    Opening the three-day event, African Development Bank (AfDB), Vice President Dr. Kevin Kariuki encouraged participants to leverage the opportunities presented by the AEMP.

    He told participants, “The AEMP platform devises a collaborative mechanism and concerted approach to monitoring and implementation of the Country Priority Plans beyond the AEMP event to achieve the desired objectives”.

    Dr, Daniel Schroth, Bank Director for Renewable Energy, presented the Desert to Power initiative (http://bit.ly/3hZruHV) and the Bank’s ongoing initiatives in the Horn of Africa countries.

    “Desert to Power’s robust value proposition for the Horn of Africa countries includes mobilizing concessional resources at scale, availing project preparation support and facilitating match-making opportunities with the private sector seizing the energy potential of the three countries present,” he said.

    Djibouti’s Minister of Energy and Natural Resources Yonis Ali Guedi, shared the country’s long-term goal, citing that “our goal is to transit from thermal to 100% Renewable Energy, by optimizing the energy mix of geothermal, wind and solar and to achieve universal access by 2035, leveraging the country’s huge RE potentials”.

    Eritrea’s Director of Energy Tesfay Ghebrehiwet, on behalf of the Mine and Energy minister reminded participants that the country has currently huge, suppressed power demands in industrial, mining and agriculture sectors and only 40% access rate.

    He also presented urgent projects that needed support in the country “There is a pressing need to reinforce the National Electricity Grid to enable integration with neighboring countries and facilitate power trade under the East Africa Power Pool, while also reducing regulatory challenges hampering private sector investments in our power sector, he said, adding that his country is pleased to be counted under the Desert to Power Initiative which aligns with the country’s priorities.

    The government of Ethiopia presented its ambitions including current revision of its energy sector policy to focus on increasing private sector participation.

    Dr. Ing. Habtamu Itefa, Minister of Water and Energy also mentioned the country’s green energy ambitions.

    “We just launched a Green Hydrogen strategy to enable local production for both domestic consumption and export to the European market, a discussion is ongoing to sign a bilateral agreement for development and export of green hydrogen with Germany,” he said.

    The cross-country session which focused on reinforcing the East Africa Power Pool (EAPP) also saw some critical discussions to prioritize investments into regional transmission networks in the region.

    A key outcome was the opportunity to invite private investment into transmission programs, through Public Private Partnership models.

    In addition, there were also calls to strategically unlock the potential of linking the EAPP with the Southern Africa Power Pool. This according to experts at the event, was a first step to creating the continental power market in Africa.

     “The outcomes of the AEMP could become the small building blocks of the bigger African voice for COP7, for example the emphasis on the fact that energy transition comes with a cost, a cost that comes from Climate Finance that the African continent is struggling to access,” noted Dr Abdul Kamara, African Development Bank Deputy Director General for the East African region.

    In closing remarks for the three-day meeting, Wale Shonibare, Bank Director for Energy Financial Solutions, Policy and Regulation reminded participants that “the ultimate goal of the AEMP and its policy dialogue with Governments is to not only develop implementable actions with the respective countries but to secure commitment of all stakeholders to implement them in the coming years”.

    Power Africa, the European Investment Bank, the International Energy Agency (IEA), Africa50, Africa Infrastructure Development Association (AfIDA), the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, the International Finance Corporation, the European Union, the World Bank, the East Africa Power Pool, the Southern Africa Power Pool, the UK’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, JICA, Agence Francaise de Development, were among the many participants.

    The Africa Energy Market Place is a collaborative investment platform created by the African Development Bank as part of the New Deal on Energy for Africa, the transformative partnership to light up and power Africa, in keeping with the Bank’s High 5 strategic priorities.

  •   Described as the African COP the recently concluded COP27 held in Egypt s Sharm el Sheikh region 6 18 November was set to shine a spotlight on Africa s role in the energy transition Africa finds itself in a unique position when it comes to the climate crisis Despite being responsible for only three to seven percent http bit ly 3V4bhiO of global greenhouse gas emissions estimates vary Africa is likely to be at the forefront of the extreme weather consequences Africa s susceptibility to the impacts of climate change will herald significant challenges in the coming years in both human and economic terms With agriculture accounting for some 23 percent of total GDP in sub Saharan Africa both increasing water scarcity and unpredictable flooding for instance will destabilise agricultural markets and negatively affect economic growth At the same time the continent s energy needs are growing Sub Saharan Africa s population is expected to reach 2 2 billion by 2050 http bit ly 3VgJn2W and with only 67 percent of the population http bit ly 3ENYrjr with access to electricity currently or rather 600 million people without http bit ly 3hWXvQH governments will need to produce more energy more quickly With this top of mind the governments of Democratic Republic of Congo Ghana Kenya Nigeria and others under the Kigali Communique http bit ly 3US0jgI and Gas Exporting Countries Forum GECF are eager to bring gas under the umbrella of transition fuels committing to replacing this with renewables in the longer term African countries sitting on major oil and gas reserves http bit ly 3Vcdg4v including Nigeria 206 53 tfc Senegal 120 tfc Mozambique 100 tcf Tanzania 57 54 tfc and others are seeking to leverage the price boom and lure investors Yet with institutions such as the International Energy Agency IEA cautioning investors against funding new oil gas and coal supply projects in the weeks leading up to the conference and climate activists hopeful that conference stakeholders would take a hard stance on the continent s gas ambitions the conference was going to offer little in the way of concrete solutions Furthermore the developed world s renewed commitments to the USD 100 billion earmarked to help the developing world in its transition and to adapt to the impact of extreme climates did little to reduce growing mistrust that developed countries will pay their fair share having failed to meet these targets thus far But beyond the challenges in securing the financing to support the transition how feasible is an energy transition in Africa really Despite the urgency to address both the impacts and drivers of climate change on the continent most African countries are positioned differently to those in the global north to shift to renewable or transition energy production There are various challenges that relate to energy production distribution and access which will only be exacerbated by the dual impact of a growing population and increased industrialisation And crucially the percentage of the population in sub Saharan Africa currently with access to electricity is the lowest of any developing region Opportunities green er The continent has several options available to steer away from heavily polluting coal or oil but much like investments into the traditional energy sector there are limitations not least concerns over adequate infrastructure political will and the upfront investment required to get the transition right Solar In many parts of the continent sunlight is in ample supply A recent report http bit ly 3tJNDfO estimates that Africa has 60 percent of the best solar resources globally yet only a tiny proportion of this capacity is currently being tapped the entire continent s installed solar capacity is estimated to be half that of the UK http bit ly 3ENRwqe Compared to other renewables solar is relatively easy to install even in remote locations and small scale solutions can provide off grid power both at the individual household or community levels While pay as you go or power purchase agreement models for solar are being introduced across the continent to get around the relatively high upfront costs of installation solar cannot offer a complete solution For one photovoltaic panels rely on sunshine to operate meaning they have a much smaller capacity factor http bit ly 3Asz8k7 than other power generation methods that offer more consistent output And second while the technology is constantly developing and getting more efficient solar requires large areas for installation capital investment and remains reliant on increasingly in demand battery minerals Gas Ghana s deputy minister of oil Mohammed Amin Adam recently spoke http bit ly 3AwBA9m about the need for gas to be part of Africa s transition from more carbon intensive fuels such as coal lest it risk falling victim to the transition curse of revenue losses He further warned of a more cautious investment approach to hydrocarbon exploitation The International Energy Agency s Africa Energy Outlook 2022 https bit ly 3tJNDfO report estimates there are some 5 000 billion cubic meters of discovered but untapped natural gas resources on the continent The emissions impact of using these reserves would be minimal to the global greenhouse gas total but there is some debate http bit ly 3V0RykA as to whether gas presents a more attractive long term investment than renewables particularly given the infrastructural challenges inherent in expanding the user base of gas in more rural areas Nuclear Currently only one African country South Africa produces nuclear power commercially There is no shortage of uranium on the continent with Namibia and Niger among the top six global uranium producers http bit ly 3UUeUYW Several African countries including Algeria Ghana Morocco and Nigeria host operational research reactors and are planning the commissioning of commercial plants over the coming decade But while nuclear plants offer a cleaner alternative to hydrocarbon power production they are expensive and particularly in politically less stable economies the investment risks for projects are high Once brought online nuclear power requires steady maintenance from skilled technicians over long lifespans which again increases the costs of delivering nuclear power safely Here small modular reactors SMRs http bit ly 3AvJOPb at about a third of the size of the typical plants currently in use in most places may offer a viable alternative SMRs are safer to operate and use substantially less water a particularly attractive feature in arid climes According to the Organisation for Economic Co operation and Development OECD state owned enterprises SOEs in the energy sector worldwide are involved in over 50 percent of global existing and planned fossil fired power generation Often holding a monopoly over a country s power generation and transmission these entities are critical in leading Africa s transition Yet public utility companies including South Africa s Eskom the DRC s Soci t Nationale d lectricit as well as the Tanzania Electric Supply Company to name a few have become severely hampered by aging infrastructure mismanagement corruption and debt And despite government promises of change private investors in the renewable sector have been hesitant to embed with power SOEs This caution is warranted as overestimating the political will and avenues for change could prove foul in a political context where the regulatory landscape is complex private public partnerships PPPs are challenging and community expectations for power delivery are high Local partners play a key part in navigating this space making getting into bed with the wrong stakeholders a key risk particularly amid weak governance These challenges are likely to be only aggravated by the more severe climate consequences for Africa In addition to the direct consequences of a warming planet and more unpredictable weather patterns climate change also acts as a conflict threat multiplier Competition over increasingly scarce resources such as water or arable land both of which are potentially threatened by climate change is already contributing to http bit ly 3AxuXnd a range of conflicts on the continent The war in the Tigray region of Ethiopia the proliferation of terrorist groups in countries around Lake Chad and conflict across Sahel have all been linked http bit ly 3TRAtb5 to changes in their respective environments driven by climate change Studies have shown http bit ly 3TSw3kr that conflict risk increases by 10 to 20 percent with each 0 5 C of global warming The consequences of climate change on communities are exacerbated where governance poor infrastructure and services and socio economic challenges already exist While the effect is not universal Africa s disproportionate vulnerability to the effects of climate change means there is an acute need for sustainable and unique remedies to its energy needs Navigating Africa s energy transition be it for those directly involved or operators keen to build the resilience of their businesses that plug into the energy picture will now more than ever require an innate understanding of the interplay between the commercial the political and the social But with the needs great the opportunities for investing in an inevitable transition are ample
    Conference of the Parties (COP27): Africa’s time to shine?
      Described as the African COP the recently concluded COP27 held in Egypt s Sharm el Sheikh region 6 18 November was set to shine a spotlight on Africa s role in the energy transition Africa finds itself in a unique position when it comes to the climate crisis Despite being responsible for only three to seven percent http bit ly 3V4bhiO of global greenhouse gas emissions estimates vary Africa is likely to be at the forefront of the extreme weather consequences Africa s susceptibility to the impacts of climate change will herald significant challenges in the coming years in both human and economic terms With agriculture accounting for some 23 percent of total GDP in sub Saharan Africa both increasing water scarcity and unpredictable flooding for instance will destabilise agricultural markets and negatively affect economic growth At the same time the continent s energy needs are growing Sub Saharan Africa s population is expected to reach 2 2 billion by 2050 http bit ly 3VgJn2W and with only 67 percent of the population http bit ly 3ENYrjr with access to electricity currently or rather 600 million people without http bit ly 3hWXvQH governments will need to produce more energy more quickly With this top of mind the governments of Democratic Republic of Congo Ghana Kenya Nigeria and others under the Kigali Communique http bit ly 3US0jgI and Gas Exporting Countries Forum GECF are eager to bring gas under the umbrella of transition fuels committing to replacing this with renewables in the longer term African countries sitting on major oil and gas reserves http bit ly 3Vcdg4v including Nigeria 206 53 tfc Senegal 120 tfc Mozambique 100 tcf Tanzania 57 54 tfc and others are seeking to leverage the price boom and lure investors Yet with institutions such as the International Energy Agency IEA cautioning investors against funding new oil gas and coal supply projects in the weeks leading up to the conference and climate activists hopeful that conference stakeholders would take a hard stance on the continent s gas ambitions the conference was going to offer little in the way of concrete solutions Furthermore the developed world s renewed commitments to the USD 100 billion earmarked to help the developing world in its transition and to adapt to the impact of extreme climates did little to reduce growing mistrust that developed countries will pay their fair share having failed to meet these targets thus far But beyond the challenges in securing the financing to support the transition how feasible is an energy transition in Africa really Despite the urgency to address both the impacts and drivers of climate change on the continent most African countries are positioned differently to those in the global north to shift to renewable or transition energy production There are various challenges that relate to energy production distribution and access which will only be exacerbated by the dual impact of a growing population and increased industrialisation And crucially the percentage of the population in sub Saharan Africa currently with access to electricity is the lowest of any developing region Opportunities green er The continent has several options available to steer away from heavily polluting coal or oil but much like investments into the traditional energy sector there are limitations not least concerns over adequate infrastructure political will and the upfront investment required to get the transition right Solar In many parts of the continent sunlight is in ample supply A recent report http bit ly 3tJNDfO estimates that Africa has 60 percent of the best solar resources globally yet only a tiny proportion of this capacity is currently being tapped the entire continent s installed solar capacity is estimated to be half that of the UK http bit ly 3ENRwqe Compared to other renewables solar is relatively easy to install even in remote locations and small scale solutions can provide off grid power both at the individual household or community levels While pay as you go or power purchase agreement models for solar are being introduced across the continent to get around the relatively high upfront costs of installation solar cannot offer a complete solution For one photovoltaic panels rely on sunshine to operate meaning they have a much smaller capacity factor http bit ly 3Asz8k7 than other power generation methods that offer more consistent output And second while the technology is constantly developing and getting more efficient solar requires large areas for installation capital investment and remains reliant on increasingly in demand battery minerals Gas Ghana s deputy minister of oil Mohammed Amin Adam recently spoke http bit ly 3AwBA9m about the need for gas to be part of Africa s transition from more carbon intensive fuels such as coal lest it risk falling victim to the transition curse of revenue losses He further warned of a more cautious investment approach to hydrocarbon exploitation The International Energy Agency s Africa Energy Outlook 2022 https bit ly 3tJNDfO report estimates there are some 5 000 billion cubic meters of discovered but untapped natural gas resources on the continent The emissions impact of using these reserves would be minimal to the global greenhouse gas total but there is some debate http bit ly 3V0RykA as to whether gas presents a more attractive long term investment than renewables particularly given the infrastructural challenges inherent in expanding the user base of gas in more rural areas Nuclear Currently only one African country South Africa produces nuclear power commercially There is no shortage of uranium on the continent with Namibia and Niger among the top six global uranium producers http bit ly 3UUeUYW Several African countries including Algeria Ghana Morocco and Nigeria host operational research reactors and are planning the commissioning of commercial plants over the coming decade But while nuclear plants offer a cleaner alternative to hydrocarbon power production they are expensive and particularly in politically less stable economies the investment risks for projects are high Once brought online nuclear power requires steady maintenance from skilled technicians over long lifespans which again increases the costs of delivering nuclear power safely Here small modular reactors SMRs http bit ly 3AvJOPb at about a third of the size of the typical plants currently in use in most places may offer a viable alternative SMRs are safer to operate and use substantially less water a particularly attractive feature in arid climes According to the Organisation for Economic Co operation and Development OECD state owned enterprises SOEs in the energy sector worldwide are involved in over 50 percent of global existing and planned fossil fired power generation Often holding a monopoly over a country s power generation and transmission these entities are critical in leading Africa s transition Yet public utility companies including South Africa s Eskom the DRC s Soci t Nationale d lectricit as well as the Tanzania Electric Supply Company to name a few have become severely hampered by aging infrastructure mismanagement corruption and debt And despite government promises of change private investors in the renewable sector have been hesitant to embed with power SOEs This caution is warranted as overestimating the political will and avenues for change could prove foul in a political context where the regulatory landscape is complex private public partnerships PPPs are challenging and community expectations for power delivery are high Local partners play a key part in navigating this space making getting into bed with the wrong stakeholders a key risk particularly amid weak governance These challenges are likely to be only aggravated by the more severe climate consequences for Africa In addition to the direct consequences of a warming planet and more unpredictable weather patterns climate change also acts as a conflict threat multiplier Competition over increasingly scarce resources such as water or arable land both of which are potentially threatened by climate change is already contributing to http bit ly 3AxuXnd a range of conflicts on the continent The war in the Tigray region of Ethiopia the proliferation of terrorist groups in countries around Lake Chad and conflict across Sahel have all been linked http bit ly 3TRAtb5 to changes in their respective environments driven by climate change Studies have shown http bit ly 3TSw3kr that conflict risk increases by 10 to 20 percent with each 0 5 C of global warming The consequences of climate change on communities are exacerbated where governance poor infrastructure and services and socio economic challenges already exist While the effect is not universal Africa s disproportionate vulnerability to the effects of climate change means there is an acute need for sustainable and unique remedies to its energy needs Navigating Africa s energy transition be it for those directly involved or operators keen to build the resilience of their businesses that plug into the energy picture will now more than ever require an innate understanding of the interplay between the commercial the political and the social But with the needs great the opportunities for investing in an inevitable transition are ample
    Conference of the Parties (COP27): Africa’s time to shine?
    Africa2 months ago

    Conference of the Parties (COP27): Africa’s time to shine?

    Described as the ‘African COP’, the recently concluded COP27 held in Egypt’s Sharm el Sheikh region (6 - 18 November) was set to shine a spotlight on Africa’s role in the energy transition.

    Africa finds itself in a unique position when it comes to the climate crisis.

    Despite being responsible for only three to seven percent (http://bit.ly/3V4bhiO) of global greenhouse gas emissions (estimates vary), Africa is likely to be at the forefront of the extreme weather consequences.

    Africa’s susceptibility to the impacts of climate change will herald significant challenges in the coming years, in both human and economic terms.

    With agriculture accounting for some 23 percent of total GDP in sub-Saharan Africa, both increasing water scarcity and unpredictable flooding, for instance, will destabilise agricultural markets, and negatively affect economic growth.

    At the same time, the continent’s energy needs are growing.

    Sub-Saharan Africa’s population is expected to reach 2.2 billion by  2050 (http://bit.ly/3VgJn2W) and with only 67 percent of the population (http://bit.ly/3ENYrjr) with access to electricity currently – or rather 600 million people without (http://bit.ly/3hWXvQH), governments will need to produce more energy more quickly.

    With this top of mind, the governments of Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and others under the Kigali Communique  (http://bit.ly/3US0jgI) and Gas Exporting Countries Forum (GECF) are eager to bring gas under the umbrella of transition fuels, committing to replacing this with renewables in the longer term.

    African countries sitting on major oil and gas reserves (http://bit.ly/3Vcdg4v), including Nigeria (206.53 tfc), Senegal (120 tfc), Mozambique (100 tcf), Tanzania (57.54 tfc) and others, are seeking to leverage the price boom and lure investors.

    Yet, with institutions such as the International Energy Agency (IEA) cautioning investors against funding new oil, gas and coal supply projects in the weeks leading up to the conference, and climate activists hopeful that conference stakeholders would take a hard stance on the continent’s gas ambitions, the conference was going to offer little in the way of concrete solutions.

    Furthermore, the developed world’s renewed commitments to the USD 100 billion earmarked to help the developing world in its transition and to adapt to the impact of extreme climates did little to reduce growing mistrust that developed countries will pay their fair share, having failed to meet these targets thus far.

    But beyond the challenges in securing the financing to support the transition, how feasible is an energy transition in Africa, really?

    Despite the urgency to address both the impacts and drivers of climate change on the continent, most African countries are positioned differently to those in the global north to shift to renewable or transition energy production.

    There are various challenges that relate to energy production, distribution, and access, which will only be exacerbated by the dual impact of a growing population and increased industrialisation.

    And crucially, the percentage of the population in sub-Saharan Africa currently with access to electricity is the lowest of any developing region.

    Opportunities green(er) The continent has several options available to steer away from heavily polluting coal or oil, but much like investments into the traditional energy sector, there are limitations, not least concerns over adequate infrastructure, political will, and the upfront investment required to get the transition right.

    Solar.

    In many parts of the continent, sunlight is in ample supply.

    A recent report (http://bit.ly/3tJNDfO) estimates that Africa has 60 percent of the best solar resources globally, yet only a tiny proportion of this capacity is currently being tapped: the entire continent’s installed solar capacity is estimated to be half that of the UK (http://bit.ly/3ENRwqe).

    Compared to other renewables, solar is relatively easy to install even in remote locations, and small-scale solutions can provide off-grid power both at the individual household or community levels.

    While pay-as-you-go or power purchase agreement models for solar are being introduced across the continent to get around the relatively high upfront costs of installation, solar cannot offer a complete solution.

    For one, photovoltaic panels rely on sunshine to operate, meaning they have a much smaller capacity factor (http://bit.ly/3Asz8k7)  than other power generation methods that offer more consistent output.

    And second, while the technology is constantly developing and getting more efficient, solar requires large areas for installation, capital investment and remains reliant on increasingly in-demand battery minerals.

    Gas. Ghana’s deputy minister of oil, Mohammed Amin Adam, recently spoke (http://bit.ly/3AwBA9m) about the need for gas to be part of Africa’s transition from more carbon intensive fuels such as coal, lest it risk falling victim to  “the transition curse” of revenue losses.

    He further warned of a more cautious investment approach to hydrocarbon exploitation.

    The International Energy Agency’s Africa Energy Outlook 2022 (https://bit.ly/3tJNDfO) report estimates there are some 5,000 billion cubic meters of discovered but untapped natural gas resources on the continent.

    The emissions impact of using these reserves would be minimal to the global greenhouse gas total, but there is some debate (http://bit.ly/3V0RykA) as to whether gas presents a more attractive long-term investment than renewables, particularly given the infrastructural challenges inherent in expanding the user base of gas in more rural areas.

    Nuclear.

    Currently only one African country, South Africa, produces nuclear power commercially.

    There is no shortage of uranium on the continent, with Namibia and Niger among the top six global uranium producers (http://bit.ly/3UUeUYW).

    Several African countries, including Algeria, Ghana, Morocco and Nigeria host operational research reactors, and are planning the commissioning of commercial plants over the coming decade.

    But while nuclear plants offer a cleaner alternative to hydrocarbon power production, they are expensive, and particularly in politically less stable economies the investment risks for projects are high.

    Once brought online, nuclear power requires steady maintenance from skilled technicians over long lifespans, which again increases the costs of delivering nuclear power safely.

    Here, small modular reactors (SMRs) (http://bit.ly/3AvJOPb), at about a third of the size of the typical plants currently in use in most places may offer a viable alternative.

    SMRs are safer to operate and use substantially less water – a particularly attractive feature in arid climes.

    According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in the energy sector worldwide are involved in over 50 percent of global existing and planned fossil-fired power generation.

    Often holding a monopoly over a country’s power generation and transmission, these entities are critical in leading Africa’s transition.

    Yet, public utility companies including South Africa’s Eskom, the DRC’s Société Nationale d'Électricité, as well as the Tanzania Electric Supply Company to name a few, have become severely hampered by aging infrastructure, mismanagement, corruption, and debt.

    And despite government promises of change, private investors in the renewable sector have been hesitant to embed with power SOEs. This caution is warranted, as overestimating the political will and avenues for change could prove foul in a political context where the regulatory landscape is complex, private-public partnerships (PPPs) are challenging and community expectations for power delivery are high.

    Local partners play a key part in navigating this space making getting into bed with the wrong stakeholders a key risk, particularly amid weak governance.

    These challenges are likely to be only aggravated by the more severe climate consequences for Africa.

    In addition to the direct consequences of a warming planet and more unpredictable weather patterns, climate change also acts as a “conflict threat multiplier”.

    Competition over increasingly scarce resources such as water or arable land, both of which are potentially threatened by climate change, is already contributing to (http://bit.ly/3AxuXnd) a range of conflicts on the continent.

    The war in the Tigray region of Ethiopia, the proliferation of terrorist groups in countries around Lake Chad, and conflict across Sahel have all been linked (http://bit.ly/3TRAtb5) to changes in their respective environments driven by climate change.

     Studies have shown (http://bit.ly/3TSw3kr) that conflict risk increases by 10 to 20 percent with each 0.5°C of global warming.

    The consequences of climate change on communities are exacerbated where governance, poor infrastructure and services and socio-economic challenges already exist.

    While the effect is not universal, Africa’s disproportionate vulnerability to the effects of climate change means there is an acute need for sustainable and unique remedies to its energy needs.

    Navigating Africa’s energy transition, be it for those directly involved or operators keen to build the resilience of their businesses that plug into the energy picture, will now more than ever require an innate understanding of the interplay between the commercial, the political and the social.

    But, with the needs great, the opportunities for investing in an inevitable transition are ample.

  •   Climate activists from across sub Saharan Africa gathered this morning in response to the dash for fossil fuels by African leaders at COP27 African leaders have used COP27 the African COP to undermine the goals of the Paris Agreement by pushing for more fossil fuel deals at the expense of people and the continent Beyond voicing collective demands on an agreement for a dedicated finance facility for Loss and Damage under the UNFCCC at COP27 and asking richer nations to deliver on their climate pledges for adaptation and mitigation African delegations have used the conference to embrace the new scramble for oil and gas in the continent International pan African and national civil society organisations and activists are dismayed at the threat of locking communities and economies in more oil and gas production for decades to come African leaders actions fly in the face of warnings by the International Panel on Climate Change IPCC http bit ly 3GkFYfr that existing fossil fuel infrastructure was already sufficient to breach the 1 5c limit and by the International Energy Agency IEA http bit ly 3X8UcWy that no new oil and gas fields approved for development are compatible with the pathway to a 1 5c For any meaningful outcome to be achieved in Egypt delegates must listen to the people of Africa not the fossil fuel sector and collectively commit to a phase out of all fossil fuels and reflect this commitment in the cover decision as well as agree to the establishment of a Loss and Damage Finance Facility In advance of the official close of the climate negotiations in Sharm el Sheikh African activists spoke put at a press conference pledging their concerted resistance to further fossil fuel expansion on the continent Barbra Kangwana Safe Lamu and Climate activist from Kenya The Kenyan government proposed a coal plant at Lamu a UNESCO world heritage site in the name of boosting the national electricity supply back in 2019 Trying to fathom the damage that would have happened to the small coastal town left us restless The locals were given the false hope of getting jobs at the plant The glaring truth is you cannot claim to feed a population you are killing slowly We raised our voices lobbied signed petitions went to court and eventually the people won This is a clear case of failing systems when systems fail the people rise Patience Nabukalu Stop EACOP and Fridays for Future activist from Uganda EACOP the East African crude oil pipeline French Chinese project is a clear example of colonial exploitation in Africa and across the global south with 1444km running from Uganda to Tanzania it would become the longest heated oil pipeline in the world releasing 34 million metric tons of CO2 emissions per year substantially adding to the climate breakdown EACOP is not going to develop our country peoples land was taken leaving many homeless and poor and critical ecosystems and biodiversity at risk of oil spills such as lake Victoria rivers National Parks animals and birds as well as aquatic life We remain hopeful and vigilant as banks and insurers like Standard Bank Deutsche Bank and Lloyds have withdrawn their support for EACOP We will continue to resist until everyone involved abandons it completely We resist for our people and their land and heritage Mbong Akiy Head of Communication for Greenpeace Africa The fossil fuel industry has degraded our people our lands our oceans and our air Enough is enough No matter how many deals they sign no matter how many bribes they pay or how fancy the suits they wear we shall wait for them in our communities we will wait for them on the frontlines We will not stop until we see a complete transition to clean renewable energy that is guaranteed to take millions of Africans out of energy poverty Our lands will not be a playground for greedy polluters who seek to make billions at our expense In South Africa we have won against big oil we sent Shell packing and we will send them all packing again Dean Bhekumuzi Bhebhe campaign lead at Powershift Africa The new dash for gas is an elaborate excuse fueled by a dangerous capitalist utopian dream that seeks to justify the continued use of fossil fuels in Africa Fossil gas production does absolutely nothing in addressing the continent s climate emergency and if adopted will stop Africa from leapfrogging towards a renewable and clean energy future We pledge to continue pushing for The Africa We Want beyond COP27 Kentebe Ebiaridor Environmental Rights Campaigner and Niger Delta Activist Fossi gas must be left in the ground and climate funding should be used for public good through community owned and controlled decentralised energy We have seen the devastation that oil has caused to our people in the Niger Delta and we are glad that they are now winning in the courts to get reparations The fossil fuel industry needs to understand that these communities will not stop For every destruction they cause they will pay Bonaventure Bondo DRC Coordinator Youth Movement for the Protection of the environment We expect concrete and urgent climate action from COP27 For our well being and the well being of our planet we demand the Congolese government end the sacrifice of our forests and peatlands for drilling oil
    We Will Win Again: African Activists Promise Resistance at Home to Oil-And-Gas Touting Leaders
      Climate activists from across sub Saharan Africa gathered this morning in response to the dash for fossil fuels by African leaders at COP27 African leaders have used COP27 the African COP to undermine the goals of the Paris Agreement by pushing for more fossil fuel deals at the expense of people and the continent Beyond voicing collective demands on an agreement for a dedicated finance facility for Loss and Damage under the UNFCCC at COP27 and asking richer nations to deliver on their climate pledges for adaptation and mitigation African delegations have used the conference to embrace the new scramble for oil and gas in the continent International pan African and national civil society organisations and activists are dismayed at the threat of locking communities and economies in more oil and gas production for decades to come African leaders actions fly in the face of warnings by the International Panel on Climate Change IPCC http bit ly 3GkFYfr that existing fossil fuel infrastructure was already sufficient to breach the 1 5c limit and by the International Energy Agency IEA http bit ly 3X8UcWy that no new oil and gas fields approved for development are compatible with the pathway to a 1 5c For any meaningful outcome to be achieved in Egypt delegates must listen to the people of Africa not the fossil fuel sector and collectively commit to a phase out of all fossil fuels and reflect this commitment in the cover decision as well as agree to the establishment of a Loss and Damage Finance Facility In advance of the official close of the climate negotiations in Sharm el Sheikh African activists spoke put at a press conference pledging their concerted resistance to further fossil fuel expansion on the continent Barbra Kangwana Safe Lamu and Climate activist from Kenya The Kenyan government proposed a coal plant at Lamu a UNESCO world heritage site in the name of boosting the national electricity supply back in 2019 Trying to fathom the damage that would have happened to the small coastal town left us restless The locals were given the false hope of getting jobs at the plant The glaring truth is you cannot claim to feed a population you are killing slowly We raised our voices lobbied signed petitions went to court and eventually the people won This is a clear case of failing systems when systems fail the people rise Patience Nabukalu Stop EACOP and Fridays for Future activist from Uganda EACOP the East African crude oil pipeline French Chinese project is a clear example of colonial exploitation in Africa and across the global south with 1444km running from Uganda to Tanzania it would become the longest heated oil pipeline in the world releasing 34 million metric tons of CO2 emissions per year substantially adding to the climate breakdown EACOP is not going to develop our country peoples land was taken leaving many homeless and poor and critical ecosystems and biodiversity at risk of oil spills such as lake Victoria rivers National Parks animals and birds as well as aquatic life We remain hopeful and vigilant as banks and insurers like Standard Bank Deutsche Bank and Lloyds have withdrawn their support for EACOP We will continue to resist until everyone involved abandons it completely We resist for our people and their land and heritage Mbong Akiy Head of Communication for Greenpeace Africa The fossil fuel industry has degraded our people our lands our oceans and our air Enough is enough No matter how many deals they sign no matter how many bribes they pay or how fancy the suits they wear we shall wait for them in our communities we will wait for them on the frontlines We will not stop until we see a complete transition to clean renewable energy that is guaranteed to take millions of Africans out of energy poverty Our lands will not be a playground for greedy polluters who seek to make billions at our expense In South Africa we have won against big oil we sent Shell packing and we will send them all packing again Dean Bhekumuzi Bhebhe campaign lead at Powershift Africa The new dash for gas is an elaborate excuse fueled by a dangerous capitalist utopian dream that seeks to justify the continued use of fossil fuels in Africa Fossil gas production does absolutely nothing in addressing the continent s climate emergency and if adopted will stop Africa from leapfrogging towards a renewable and clean energy future We pledge to continue pushing for The Africa We Want beyond COP27 Kentebe Ebiaridor Environmental Rights Campaigner and Niger Delta Activist Fossi gas must be left in the ground and climate funding should be used for public good through community owned and controlled decentralised energy We have seen the devastation that oil has caused to our people in the Niger Delta and we are glad that they are now winning in the courts to get reparations The fossil fuel industry needs to understand that these communities will not stop For every destruction they cause they will pay Bonaventure Bondo DRC Coordinator Youth Movement for the Protection of the environment We expect concrete and urgent climate action from COP27 For our well being and the well being of our planet we demand the Congolese government end the sacrifice of our forests and peatlands for drilling oil
    We Will Win Again: African Activists Promise Resistance at Home to Oil-And-Gas Touting Leaders
    Africa2 months ago

    We Will Win Again: African Activists Promise Resistance at Home to Oil-And-Gas Touting Leaders

    Climate activists from across sub-Saharan Africa gathered this morning in response to the dash for fossil fuels by African leaders at COP27. 

    African leaders have used COP27 – “the African COP” – to undermine the goals of the Paris Agreement by pushing for more fossil fuel deals at the expense of people and the continent. 

    Beyond voicing collective demands on an agreement for a dedicated finance facility for Loss and Damage under the UNFCCC at COP27 and asking richer nations to deliver on their climate pledges for adaptation and mitigation, African delegations have used the conference to embrace the new scramble for oil and gas in the continent. 

    International, pan-African and national civil society organisations and activists are dismayed at the threat of locking communities and economies in more oil and gas production for decades to come.

    African leaders’ actions fly in the face of warnings by the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (http://bit.ly/3GkFYfr) that existing fossil fuel infrastructure was already sufficient to breach the 1.5c limit and by the International Energy Agency (IEA) (http://bit.ly/3X8UcWy) that no new oil and gas fields approved for development are compatible with the pathway to a 1.5c.

    For any meaningful outcome to be achieved in Egypt, delegates must listen to the people of Africa – not the fossil fuel sector, and collectively commit to a phase out of all fossil fuels and reflect this commitment in the cover decision, as well as agree to the establishment of a Loss and Damage Finance Facility.

    In advance of the official close of the climate negotiations in Sharm el-Sheikh, African activists spoke put at a press conference pledging their concerted resistance to further fossil fuel expansion on the continent: Barbra Kangwana, Safe Lamu and Climate activist from Kenya  “The Kenyan government proposed a coal plant at Lamu, a UNESCO world heritage site, in the name of boosting the national electricity supply back in 2019.

    Trying to fathom the damage that would have happened to the small coastal town left us restless.

    The locals were given the false hope of getting jobs at the plant.

    The glaring truth is, you cannot claim to feed a population you are killing slowly.

    We raised our voices, lobbied, signed petitions, went to court, and eventually the people won.

    This is a clear case of failing systems – when systems fail, the people rise.”  Patience Nabukalu, Stop EACOP and Fridays for Future activist from Uganda  “EACOP, the East African crude oil pipeline French-Chinese project is a clear example of colonial exploitation in Africa and across the global south, with 1444km running from Uganda to Tanzania - it would become the longest heated oil pipeline in the world, releasing 34 million metric tons of CO2 emissions per year, substantially adding to the climate breakdown.” “EACOP is not going to develop our country: peoples’ land was taken, leaving many homeless and poor and critical ecosystems and biodiversity at risk of oil spills such as lake Victoria, rivers, National Parks, animals and birds, as well as aquatic life.” “We remain hopeful and vigilant as banks and insurers like Standard Bank, Deutsche Bank and Lloyds have withdrawn their support for EACOP.

    We will continue to resist until everyone involved abandons it completely.

    We resist for our people and their land and heritage.” Mbong Akiy, Head of Communication for Greenpeace Africa: “The fossil fuel industry has degraded our people, our lands, our oceans and our air.

    Enough is enough.

    No matter how many deals they sign, no matter how many bribes they pay, or how fancy the suits they wear: we shall wait for them in our communities, we will wait for them on the frontlines. 

    We will not stop until we see a complete transition to clean, renewable energy that is guaranteed to take millions of Africans out of energy poverty.

    Our lands will not be a playground for greedy polluters who seek to make billions at our expense.

    In South Africa we have won against big oil, we sent Shell packing, and we will send them all packing again” Dean Bhekumuzi Bhebhe, campaign lead at Powershift Africa: “The new dash for gas is an elaborate excuse fueled by a dangerous capitalist-utopian dream that seeks to justify the continued use of fossil fuels in Africa.

    Fossil gas production does absolutely nothing in addressing the continent's climate emergency and if adopted will stop Africa from leapfrogging towards a renewable and clean energy future.

    We pledge to continue pushing for The Africa We Want beyond COP27.” Kentebe Ebiaridor, Environmental Rights Campaigner and Niger Delta Activist: “Fossi gas must be left in the ground and climate funding should be used for public good through community owned and controlled, decentralised energy.

    We have seen the devastation that oil has caused to our people in the Niger Delta and we are glad that they are now winning in the courts to get reparations.

    The fossil fuel industry needs to understand that these communities will not stop.

    For every destruction they cause, they will pay.

    Bonaventure Bondo, DRC Coordinator Youth Movement for the Protection of the environment  "We expect concrete and urgent climate action from COP27.

    For our well being and the well-being of our planet, we demand the Congolese government end the sacrifice of our forests and peatlands for drilling oil”.

  •   As the European Union EU restructures its plans for energy security in light of changing geopolitical realities the Africa Europe Round Table organized on the first day of the African Energy Week 2022 https www AECWeek com in Cape Town Addressed the role of the African continent in advancing the global energy revolution and providing energy security to Europe Roundtable speakers included the Hon Gwede Mantashe Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy of South Africa Ing Fuad Mosa General Supervisor of Local Content Risk and Crisis Management Ministry of Energy of Saudi Arabia Rebecca Enonchong founder and CEO of AppsTech Nangula Uaandja CEO of the Namibian Investment Promotion Development Board Mary Burce Warlick Deputy Executive Director of the International Energy Agency IEA and Anja Casper Berretta Head of Energy Security and Climate Change in Sub Saharan Africa Konrad Adenauer Foundation The panel was moderated by Eleni Giokos CNN anchor and correspondent We rely heavily on coal generation Renewable energies now supply only about 10 of the energy in South Africa But the first problem we have is the polarized energy debate which does not achieve solutions We must make the transition but we must be very practical in our transition began the Hon Gwede Mantashe Minister for Mineral Resources and Energy South Africa on the current state of the energy mix We believe that the new energy mix will have it all coal oil gas renewable energies All kinds of energy creation will continue added Mr Fuad Mosa General Supervisor for Local Content Risk and Crisis Management at the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Energy The world is blessed with resources and our ultimate goal is to secure the right volumes of power at the right price In Saudi Arabia we will continue to accelerate oil and its role in the global energy mix while natural gas and renewables must also expand To date African oil producers have largely exported crude oil to China with some exceptions of North African producers exporting to Europe However the current sanctions against Russian gas and the ongoing war in Ukraine have revived interest in African hydrocarbon and renewable energy projects which could generate billions of new investments in emerging energy markets such as Namibia South Africa Uganda Kenya Mozambique and Tanzania In Namibia there have been recent discoveries of oil and gas said Nangula Uaandja executive director of the Namibian Investment Promotion Development Board At the same time we are one of the few countries where renewable energy can be produced at relatively low prices How can we produce energy at lower rates so that we can export to Europe It is definitely possible to use countries like Namibia where our carbon emissions are already some of the lowest in the region From a European perspective for a long time the acute need for energy access was not so dominant said Anja Casper Berretta Director of Energy Security and Climate Change in Sub Saharan Africa Konrad Adenauer Foundation However in Africa you cannot have a discussion about the energy transition in countries where more than half of the population does not have access to electricity So energy security comes from a very different angle How do we ensure energy security Diversification is a key component Since the Russian invasion of Ukraine there has been a more practical approach to finding pragmatic solutions to the current crisis Making energy trade between Africa and Europe a reality even later will depend on ensuring the availability of financial solutions for energy infrastructure development Before the outbreak of the conflict between Russia and Ukraine a growing number of multilateral financial institutions had reduced or completely eliminated their support for fossil fuels in accordance with the Paris Agreement and climate concerns Now the African continent will need to strengthen ties with the West and its associated financial institutions to forge global energy partnerships and ensure energy security and project stability Unlocking financing for investment is crucial to addressing not only the clean energy transition but also the energy access issue said Mary Burce Warlick Deputy Executive Director of the IEA Our estimates show that to achieve universal access to electricity by 2030 90 million would need to gain access on average every day between now and 2030 This will require an investment of 25 billion It is not impossible but it will require a clear policy and commitment and a more flexible funding approach On the financing side we also have to think about venture capital added Rebecca Enonchong founder and CEO of AppsTech Much of the venture capital that goes into energy projects doesn t go to local entrepreneurs A few years ago a famous startup in Nairobi raised about 260 million for pay as you go solar panels and it failed because no one knew how to repair and maintain them We have to look at where the capital is going Does it go to local founders who understand the local ecosystem and the needs of the people and generate wealth In South Africa we have not encountered the problem of lack of funding contrasted HE Minister Mantashe A lot of money is being invested in renewable energy The problem is that the money that goes into renewables doesn t compensate us for what we lose by exiting existing sectors When coal funding stops and flows to renewables the ability to help the same number of people is unmatched They are not apples and apples You get less power from more megawatts of renewables For Africa new investments could be critical to capitalize on untapped hydrocarbon reserves left amid energy transition and green lending behavior According to Rystad Energy renewed European interest in African gas could boost African production from 260 billion cubic meters per day in 2022 to almost 500 billion cubic meters by the end of the 2030s
    The Africa-Europe roundtable addresses the energy transition and world trade at the African Energy Week (AEW) 2022
      As the European Union EU restructures its plans for energy security in light of changing geopolitical realities the Africa Europe Round Table organized on the first day of the African Energy Week 2022 https www AECWeek com in Cape Town Addressed the role of the African continent in advancing the global energy revolution and providing energy security to Europe Roundtable speakers included the Hon Gwede Mantashe Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy of South Africa Ing Fuad Mosa General Supervisor of Local Content Risk and Crisis Management Ministry of Energy of Saudi Arabia Rebecca Enonchong founder and CEO of AppsTech Nangula Uaandja CEO of the Namibian Investment Promotion Development Board Mary Burce Warlick Deputy Executive Director of the International Energy Agency IEA and Anja Casper Berretta Head of Energy Security and Climate Change in Sub Saharan Africa Konrad Adenauer Foundation The panel was moderated by Eleni Giokos CNN anchor and correspondent We rely heavily on coal generation Renewable energies now supply only about 10 of the energy in South Africa But the first problem we have is the polarized energy debate which does not achieve solutions We must make the transition but we must be very practical in our transition began the Hon Gwede Mantashe Minister for Mineral Resources and Energy South Africa on the current state of the energy mix We believe that the new energy mix will have it all coal oil gas renewable energies All kinds of energy creation will continue added Mr Fuad Mosa General Supervisor for Local Content Risk and Crisis Management at the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Energy The world is blessed with resources and our ultimate goal is to secure the right volumes of power at the right price In Saudi Arabia we will continue to accelerate oil and its role in the global energy mix while natural gas and renewables must also expand To date African oil producers have largely exported crude oil to China with some exceptions of North African producers exporting to Europe However the current sanctions against Russian gas and the ongoing war in Ukraine have revived interest in African hydrocarbon and renewable energy projects which could generate billions of new investments in emerging energy markets such as Namibia South Africa Uganda Kenya Mozambique and Tanzania In Namibia there have been recent discoveries of oil and gas said Nangula Uaandja executive director of the Namibian Investment Promotion Development Board At the same time we are one of the few countries where renewable energy can be produced at relatively low prices How can we produce energy at lower rates so that we can export to Europe It is definitely possible to use countries like Namibia where our carbon emissions are already some of the lowest in the region From a European perspective for a long time the acute need for energy access was not so dominant said Anja Casper Berretta Director of Energy Security and Climate Change in Sub Saharan Africa Konrad Adenauer Foundation However in Africa you cannot have a discussion about the energy transition in countries where more than half of the population does not have access to electricity So energy security comes from a very different angle How do we ensure energy security Diversification is a key component Since the Russian invasion of Ukraine there has been a more practical approach to finding pragmatic solutions to the current crisis Making energy trade between Africa and Europe a reality even later will depend on ensuring the availability of financial solutions for energy infrastructure development Before the outbreak of the conflict between Russia and Ukraine a growing number of multilateral financial institutions had reduced or completely eliminated their support for fossil fuels in accordance with the Paris Agreement and climate concerns Now the African continent will need to strengthen ties with the West and its associated financial institutions to forge global energy partnerships and ensure energy security and project stability Unlocking financing for investment is crucial to addressing not only the clean energy transition but also the energy access issue said Mary Burce Warlick Deputy Executive Director of the IEA Our estimates show that to achieve universal access to electricity by 2030 90 million would need to gain access on average every day between now and 2030 This will require an investment of 25 billion It is not impossible but it will require a clear policy and commitment and a more flexible funding approach On the financing side we also have to think about venture capital added Rebecca Enonchong founder and CEO of AppsTech Much of the venture capital that goes into energy projects doesn t go to local entrepreneurs A few years ago a famous startup in Nairobi raised about 260 million for pay as you go solar panels and it failed because no one knew how to repair and maintain them We have to look at where the capital is going Does it go to local founders who understand the local ecosystem and the needs of the people and generate wealth In South Africa we have not encountered the problem of lack of funding contrasted HE Minister Mantashe A lot of money is being invested in renewable energy The problem is that the money that goes into renewables doesn t compensate us for what we lose by exiting existing sectors When coal funding stops and flows to renewables the ability to help the same number of people is unmatched They are not apples and apples You get less power from more megawatts of renewables For Africa new investments could be critical to capitalize on untapped hydrocarbon reserves left amid energy transition and green lending behavior According to Rystad Energy renewed European interest in African gas could boost African production from 260 billion cubic meters per day in 2022 to almost 500 billion cubic meters by the end of the 2030s
    The Africa-Europe roundtable addresses the energy transition and world trade at the African Energy Week (AEW) 2022
    Africa3 months ago

    The Africa-Europe roundtable addresses the energy transition and world trade at the African Energy Week (AEW) 2022

    As the European Union (EU) restructures its plans for energy security in light of changing geopolitical realities, the Africa-Europe Round Table, organized on the first day of the African Energy Week 2022 (https://www.AECWeek .com/) in Cape Town: Addressed the role of the African continent in advancing the global energy revolution and providing energy security to Europe.

    Roundtable speakers included the Hon. Gwede Mantashe, Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy of South Africa; Ing. Fuad Mosa, General Supervisor of Local Content, Risk and Crisis Management, Ministry of Energy of Saudi Arabia; Rebecca Enonchong, founder and CEO of AppsTech; Nangula Uaandja, CEO of the Namibian Investment Promotion Development Board; Mary Burce Warlick, Deputy Executive Director of the International Energy Agency (IEA); and Anja Casper-Berretta, Head of Energy Security and Climate Change in Sub-Saharan Africa, Konrad Adenauer Foundation.

    The panel was moderated by Eleni Giokos, CNN anchor and correspondent.

    “We rely heavily on coal generation.

    Renewable energies now supply only about 10% of the energy in South Africa.

    But the first problem we have is the polarized energy debate, which does not achieve solutions.

    We must make the transition, but we must be very practical in our transition”, began the Hon. Gwede Mantashe, Minister for Mineral Resources and Energy, South Africa, on the current state of the energy mix.

    “We believe that the new energy mix will have it all: coal, oil, gas, renewable energies.

    All kinds of energy creation will continue,” added Mr. Fuad Mosa, General Supervisor for Local Content, Risk and Crisis Management at the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Energy.

    “The world is blessed with resources and our ultimate goal is to secure the right volumes of power at the right price.

    In Saudi Arabia, we will continue to accelerate oil and its role in the global energy mix, while natural gas and renewables must also expand."

    To date, African oil producers have largely exported crude oil to China, with some exceptions of North African producers exporting to Europe.

    However, the current sanctions against Russian gas and the ongoing war in Ukraine have revived interest in African hydrocarbon and renewable energy projects, which could generate billions of new investments in emerging energy markets such as Namibia, South Africa , Uganda, Kenya, Mozambique and Tanzania.

    .

    “In Namibia, there have been recent discoveries of oil and gas,” said Nangula Uaandja, executive director of the Namibian Investment Promotion Development Board.

    “At the same time, we are one of the few countries where renewable energy can be produced at relatively low prices.

    How can we produce energy at lower rates so that we can export to Europe?

    It is definitely possible to use countries like Namibia, where our carbon emissions are already some of the lowest in the region.” "From a European perspective, for a long time, the acute need for energy access was not so dominant," said Anja Casper-Berretta, Director of Energy Security and Climate Change in Sub-Saharan Africa, Konrad Adenauer Foundation.

    “However, in Africa, you cannot have a discussion about the energy transition in countries where more than half of the population does not have access to electricity.

    So energy security comes from a very different angle.

    How do we ensure energy security?

    Diversification is a key component.

    Since the Russian invasion of Ukraine, there has been a more practical approach to finding pragmatic solutions to the current crisis.” Making energy trade between Africa and Europe a reality, even later, will depend on ensuring the availability of financial solutions for energy infrastructure development.

    Before the outbreak of the conflict between Russia and Ukraine, a growing number of multilateral financial institutions had reduced or completely eliminated their support for fossil fuels, in accordance with the Paris Agreement and climate concerns.

    Now the African continent will need to strengthen ties with the West and its associated financial institutions to forge global energy partnerships and ensure energy security and project stability.

    “Unlocking financing for investment is crucial to addressing not only the clean energy transition, but also the energy access issue,” said Mary Burce Warlick, Deputy Executive Director of the IEA.

    “Our estimates show that to achieve universal access to electricity by 2030, 90 million would need to gain access on average every day between now and 2030.

    This will require an investment of $25 billion.

    It is not impossible, but it will require a clear policy and commitment and a more flexible funding approach.” “On the financing side, we also have to think about venture capital,” added Rebecca Enonchong, founder and CEO of AppsTech. “Much of the venture capital that goes into energy projects doesn't go to local entrepreneurs.

    A few years ago, a famous startup in Nairobi raised about $260 million for pay-as-you-go solar panels, and it failed, because no one knew how to repair and maintain them.

    We have to look at where the capital is going.

    Does it go to local founders who understand the local ecosystem and the needs of the people and generate wealth?” “In South Africa, we have not encountered the problem of lack of funding”, contrasted HE Minister Mantashe.

    “A lot of money is being invested in renewable energy.

    The problem is that the money that goes into renewables doesn't compensate us for what we lose by exiting existing sectors.

    When coal funding stops and flows to renewables, the ability to help the same number of people is unmatched.

    They are not apples and apples.

    You get less power from more megawatts of renewables.” For Africa, new investments could be critical to capitalize on untapped hydrocarbon reserves left amid energy transition and green lending behavior.

    According to Rystad Energy, renewed European interest in African gas could boost African production from 260 billion cubic meters per day in 2022 to almost 500 billion cubic meters by the end of the 2030s.

  •  The head of the International Energy Agency IEA has warned of possible problems for the refilling of gas storage facilities in Europe before the winter months between 2023 and 2024 IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol made his views known to the Italian Newspaper La Repubblica in an interview published on Tuesday Our estimates tell us that by February 2023 the stock levels will drop from 90 per cent to between 20 per cent and 20 per cent saying the big question Europe will face will be how to get stocks back up to between 80 per cent and 90 per cent in 2023 According to the Turkish economist the fact that energy deliveries are still coming from Moscow and that China is importing less liquefied gas than expected has helped to fill Europe s reserves this year The director said that in 2023 the Chinese economy could strengthen again and Beijing could demand more gas which would cause a price increase for the Europeans Birol said he would not be expecting any major disruptions or blackouts in the approaching winter as storage facilities were currently about 90 per cent full He said that the gas might last until February or March 2023 if there is no significant disruption to supplies However should there be any serious disruption energy solidarity between European countries would be essential Birol warned NewsSourceCredit NAN
    IEA warns against  gas storage problems
     The head of the International Energy Agency IEA has warned of possible problems for the refilling of gas storage facilities in Europe before the winter months between 2023 and 2024 IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol made his views known to the Italian Newspaper La Repubblica in an interview published on Tuesday Our estimates tell us that by February 2023 the stock levels will drop from 90 per cent to between 20 per cent and 20 per cent saying the big question Europe will face will be how to get stocks back up to between 80 per cent and 90 per cent in 2023 According to the Turkish economist the fact that energy deliveries are still coming from Moscow and that China is importing less liquefied gas than expected has helped to fill Europe s reserves this year The director said that in 2023 the Chinese economy could strengthen again and Beijing could demand more gas which would cause a price increase for the Europeans Birol said he would not be expecting any major disruptions or blackouts in the approaching winter as storage facilities were currently about 90 per cent full He said that the gas might last until February or March 2023 if there is no significant disruption to supplies However should there be any serious disruption energy solidarity between European countries would be essential Birol warned NewsSourceCredit NAN
    IEA warns against  gas storage problems
    Foreign4 months ago

    IEA warns against  gas storage problems

    The head of the International Energy Agency (IEA) has warned of possible problems for the refilling of gas storage facilities in Europe before the winter months between 2023 and 2024. IEA Executive Director, Fatih Birol, made his views known to the Italian Newspaper `La Repubblica’ in an interview published on Tuesday.

    “Our estimates tell us that by February 2023, the stock levels will drop from 90 per cent to between 20 per cent  and  20 per cent,’’ saying the big question Europe will face will be how to get stocks back up to between 80 per cent and  90 per cent in 2023. According to the Turkish economist, the fact that energy deliveries are still coming from Moscow and that China is  importing less liquefied gas than expected  has helped to fill Europe’s reserves this year.

    The director said that in 2023, the Chinese economy could strengthen again and Beijing could demand more gas, which would cause a price increase for the Europeans.

    Birol said he would not be expecting  any major disruptions or blackouts in the approaching winter, as storage facilities were  currently about 90 per cent full.

    He said that the gas might  last until February or March 2023 if there is no “significant disruption to supplies”.

    However, should there be any serious disruption, “energy solidarity” between European countries would be essential, Birol warned.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   Mary Burce Warlick Deputy Executive Director of the International Energy Agency IEA will be coming to Cape Town to attend and participate in the African Energy Week AEW conference and exhibition https AECWeek com Africa s event for the oil and gas sector that will take place from 18 to 21 October Under the theme Exploring and investing in Africa s energy future while driving an enabling environment AEW 2022 will feature Mary Burce Warlick in high level panel discussions where the industry executive will shape serious conversations about Africa s energy future and how the continent can better develop its entire resource base to make energy poverty history by 2030 Represent an autonomous intergovernmental organization that provides to governments and industry players online policy recommendations and analysis With current market trends Warlick s participation and presence at AEW 2022 will be crucial in driving the dialogue around energy today market trends and policies their impact on African energy developments and how Africa can address industry challenges seize opportunities and accelerate and maximize resource exploitation to drive industrialization and ensure energy security With significant experience in the extractive and energy industries having served as a board member of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative and the IEA between 2014 and 2017 Warlick is well positioned to drive dialogue on how Africa can address disruptions in its hydrocarbon industry by leveraging a combination of local practices and cooperation with global partners in innovation financing research and infrastructure development to accelerate energy market expansion Warlick has held a variety of senior leadership positions within the energy industry including Acting Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary US Department of State Bureau of Energy Resources where drove the department s energy diplomacy initiatives and she promoted energy security energy access and governance around the world as well as in Africa A recipient of the US Secretary of State s Professional Achievement Award Public Outreach Award and Exceptional Public Service Medal Warlick is well positioned to shape AEW 2022 conversations on how Africa can respond to policies related to the global energy transition while developing tailor made its own roadmap for transitioning to clean energy sources while driving socio economic growth The Chamber is proud to host Mary Burce Warlick at AEW 2022 where the industry leader will present the IEA s latest energy market findings and forecasts to African policymakers industry players and global partners We believe that global institutions such as the IEA will be crucial in helping the African continent to maximize the exploitation of all its energy resources including oil gas hydrogen and renewable energies by providing best practices to align policies with the changing dynamics of the energy market as well as facilitating better cooperation with global partners in research and technological development says NJ Ayuk CEO of the African Energy Chamber AEC Warlick will participate in several AEW 2022 forums focused on how the African continent can attract the investments needed to drive development across the energy value chain With AEW 2022 striving to make energy poverty history across the African continent by 2030 the event will see Warlick participate in high level meetings and networking sessions to enhance the dialogue on Africa s energy future
    International Energy Agency (IEA) Deputy Executive Director Mary Burce Warlick to drive discussions on investment and energy transition at African Energy Week (AEW) 2022
      Mary Burce Warlick Deputy Executive Director of the International Energy Agency IEA will be coming to Cape Town to attend and participate in the African Energy Week AEW conference and exhibition https AECWeek com Africa s event for the oil and gas sector that will take place from 18 to 21 October Under the theme Exploring and investing in Africa s energy future while driving an enabling environment AEW 2022 will feature Mary Burce Warlick in high level panel discussions where the industry executive will shape serious conversations about Africa s energy future and how the continent can better develop its entire resource base to make energy poverty history by 2030 Represent an autonomous intergovernmental organization that provides to governments and industry players online policy recommendations and analysis With current market trends Warlick s participation and presence at AEW 2022 will be crucial in driving the dialogue around energy today market trends and policies their impact on African energy developments and how Africa can address industry challenges seize opportunities and accelerate and maximize resource exploitation to drive industrialization and ensure energy security With significant experience in the extractive and energy industries having served as a board member of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative and the IEA between 2014 and 2017 Warlick is well positioned to drive dialogue on how Africa can address disruptions in its hydrocarbon industry by leveraging a combination of local practices and cooperation with global partners in innovation financing research and infrastructure development to accelerate energy market expansion Warlick has held a variety of senior leadership positions within the energy industry including Acting Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary US Department of State Bureau of Energy Resources where drove the department s energy diplomacy initiatives and she promoted energy security energy access and governance around the world as well as in Africa A recipient of the US Secretary of State s Professional Achievement Award Public Outreach Award and Exceptional Public Service Medal Warlick is well positioned to shape AEW 2022 conversations on how Africa can respond to policies related to the global energy transition while developing tailor made its own roadmap for transitioning to clean energy sources while driving socio economic growth The Chamber is proud to host Mary Burce Warlick at AEW 2022 where the industry leader will present the IEA s latest energy market findings and forecasts to African policymakers industry players and global partners We believe that global institutions such as the IEA will be crucial in helping the African continent to maximize the exploitation of all its energy resources including oil gas hydrogen and renewable energies by providing best practices to align policies with the changing dynamics of the energy market as well as facilitating better cooperation with global partners in research and technological development says NJ Ayuk CEO of the African Energy Chamber AEC Warlick will participate in several AEW 2022 forums focused on how the African continent can attract the investments needed to drive development across the energy value chain With AEW 2022 striving to make energy poverty history across the African continent by 2030 the event will see Warlick participate in high level meetings and networking sessions to enhance the dialogue on Africa s energy future
    International Energy Agency (IEA) Deputy Executive Director Mary Burce Warlick to drive discussions on investment and energy transition at African Energy Week (AEW) 2022
    Africa4 months ago

    International Energy Agency (IEA) Deputy Executive Director Mary Burce Warlick to drive discussions on investment and energy transition at African Energy Week (AEW) 2022

    Mary Burce Warlick, Deputy Executive Director of the International Energy Agency (IEA), will be coming to Cape Town to attend and participate in the African Energy Week (AEW) conference and exhibition (https://AECWeek.com/) – Africa's event for the oil and gas sector that will take place from 18 to 21 October.

    Under the theme "Exploring and investing in Africa's energy future while driving an enabling environment," AEW 2022 will feature Mary Burce Warlick in high-level panel discussions.

    where the industry executive will shape serious conversations about Africa's energy future and how the continent can better develop its entire resource base to make energy poverty history by 2030.

    Represent an autonomous intergovernmental organization that provides to governments and industry players online policy recommendations and analysis With current market trends, Warlick's participation and presence at AEW 2022 will be crucial in driving the dialogue around energy today.

    market trends and policies, their impact on African energy developments and how Africa can address industry challenges, seize opportunities and accelerate and maximize resource exploitation to drive industrialization and ensure energy security.

    With significant experience in the extractive and energy industries, having served as a board member of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative and the IEA between 2014 and 2017, Warlick is well positioned to drive dialogue on how Africa can address disruptions in its hydrocarbon industry by leveraging a combination of local practices and cooperation with global partners in innovation, financing, research, and infrastructure development to accelerate energy market expansion.

    Warlick has held a variety of senior leadership positions within the energy industry, including Acting Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, US Department of State Bureau of Energy Resources, where drove the department's energy diplomacy initiatives.

    and she promoted energy security, energy access, and governance around the world, as well as in Africa.

    A recipient of the US Secretary of State's Professional Achievement Award, Public Outreach Award and Exceptional Public Service Medal, Warlick is well positioned to shape AEW 2022 conversations on how Africa can respond.

    to policies related to the global energy transition while developing tailor-made.

    its own roadmap for transitioning to clean energy sources while driving socio-economic growth.

    “The Chamber is proud to host Mary Burce Warlick at AEW 2022, where the industry leader will present the IEA's latest energy market findings and forecasts to African policymakers, industry players and global partners.

    We believe that global institutions such as the IEA will be crucial in helping the African continent to maximize the exploitation of all its energy resources, including oil, gas, hydrogen and renewable energies, by providing best practices to align policies with the changing dynamics of the energy market, as well as facilitating better cooperation with global partners in research and technological development”, says NJ Ayuk, CEO of the African Energy Chamber (AEC).

    Warlick will participate in several AEW 2022 forums focused on how the African continent can attract the investments needed to drive development across the energy value chain.

    With AEW 2022 striving to make energy poverty history across the African continent by 2030, the event will see Warlick participate in high-level meetings and networking sessions to enhance the dialogue on Africa's energy future.

  •   Ministers and government officials from several African countries discussed the potential of nuclear power to support sustainable development and the transition to clean and reliable energy as the IAEA launched a new publication on climate change and nuclear power at a side event during the 66th IAEA General Conference This day The event Supporting the energy transition in Africa presented the 2022 edition of Climate Change and Nuclear Energy which is updated every two years and provides a wealth of technical information and data on the benefits of nuclear energy to contribute to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 This year s publication features a chapter on nuclear power in Africa on which IAEA Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi held an extensive discussion with representatives from Egypt Ghana Kenya and South Africa at today s event Everywhere I listen to this global conversation about energy security climate change and nuclear power and whether it s due to changing circumstances climate or security needs it s pretty clear that nuclear power now has a place in the table Grossi said What I like about this discussion is that there is no discussion without Africa Africans have told themselves we need to contribute and we need our own specific analysis of how this nuclear jewel will be used for African economies According to the new publication around 600 million people and 10 million small businesses in Africa do not have a reliable source of electricity and increasingly connection to a national grid is no guarantee of electricity supply Blackouts are becoming more frequent and in sub Saharan Africa the World Bank reports that nearly 80 percent of businesses experience blackouts Meanwhile Africa s energy demand is increasing twice as fast as the global average largely driven by urban population growth In this context several African countries are exploring the possibility of adding nuclear power to its energy mix and Egypt recently began construction on its first nuclear power plant The only nuclear operator on the continent with two reactors totaling almost 2 000 MWe is considering the long term operation of the Koeberg nuclear power plant and the expansion of its nuclear power programme Egypt the host of the upcoming UN climate summit or COP27 in November recently broke ground on the first of four 1 200 MWe reactors it plans to build at El Dabaa on the Mediterranean coast Egypt opted for nuclear power because it provides a constant source of energy that lasts for decades said Mohamed H El Molla Egypt s Resident Representative to the IAEA Through its Milestone Approach the IAEA supports some 30 countries in Africa and around the world called new nuclear countries in their efforts to develop the infrastructure necessary for a safe secure and sustainable nuclear power programme Ghana has been working with the Agency for a number of years including an IAEA led Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review INIR mission in 2017 Ghana is looking to introduce nuclear power to provide the necessary diversity of baseload to ensure the energy security for our future demands said Kwaku Afriyie Minister of Environment Science Technology and Innovation of Ghana Our hydroelectric potential is almost exhausted so our interest in nuclear energy is to make sure we have energy for our transition and development While 40 percent of Ghana s energy comes from hydropower it accounts for 17 percent of all electricity generation in Africa and rising according to the International Energy Agency IEA In countries such as Uganda Zambia and Malawi the share of hydroelectric generation exceeds 80 percent Hydropower is low carbon and goes a long way toward meeting net zero emissions commitments but as weather patterns change so does the availability and reliability of water supplies And Africa is particularly vulnerable to these changes The IEA predicts that in the Democratic Republic of the Congo Morocco Zambia and Zimbabwe climate change will cause a significant decrease in hydropower capacity by the end of the century Many other nations will experience unpredictable fluctuations in their hydroelectric supply If electricity demand continues to grow and climate change causes less hydropower production countries will be able to secure baseload electricity only through fossil fuel sources or nuclear power But according to the World Bank the public finances of developing African countries have worsened amid the COVID pandemic leaving many unable to finance large infrastructure projects on their own That means international funding will be vital said Henri Paillere Chief of the IAEA s Economic Studies and Planning Section which produces the biannual publication Establishing special economic zones with tailored economic regulations built around reliable local infrastructure would be one way to attract foreign investment Such zones could then serve as clean energy hubs that would benefit surrounding communities and act as catalysts for energy transitions on a national scale New technologies such as small modular reactors SMRs with lower start up costs and easier financing than traditional reactors may provide an option and better suit the small power grids found in many African countries participants heard As countries in Africa consider or embark on nuclear power Mr Grossi emphasized that they would have the Agency s full support The IAEA will be with you every step of the way he said
    New International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) publication on climate change and nuclear power highlights Africa’s potential
      Ministers and government officials from several African countries discussed the potential of nuclear power to support sustainable development and the transition to clean and reliable energy as the IAEA launched a new publication on climate change and nuclear power at a side event during the 66th IAEA General Conference This day The event Supporting the energy transition in Africa presented the 2022 edition of Climate Change and Nuclear Energy which is updated every two years and provides a wealth of technical information and data on the benefits of nuclear energy to contribute to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 This year s publication features a chapter on nuclear power in Africa on which IAEA Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi held an extensive discussion with representatives from Egypt Ghana Kenya and South Africa at today s event Everywhere I listen to this global conversation about energy security climate change and nuclear power and whether it s due to changing circumstances climate or security needs it s pretty clear that nuclear power now has a place in the table Grossi said What I like about this discussion is that there is no discussion without Africa Africans have told themselves we need to contribute and we need our own specific analysis of how this nuclear jewel will be used for African economies According to the new publication around 600 million people and 10 million small businesses in Africa do not have a reliable source of electricity and increasingly connection to a national grid is no guarantee of electricity supply Blackouts are becoming more frequent and in sub Saharan Africa the World Bank reports that nearly 80 percent of businesses experience blackouts Meanwhile Africa s energy demand is increasing twice as fast as the global average largely driven by urban population growth In this context several African countries are exploring the possibility of adding nuclear power to its energy mix and Egypt recently began construction on its first nuclear power plant The only nuclear operator on the continent with two reactors totaling almost 2 000 MWe is considering the long term operation of the Koeberg nuclear power plant and the expansion of its nuclear power programme Egypt the host of the upcoming UN climate summit or COP27 in November recently broke ground on the first of four 1 200 MWe reactors it plans to build at El Dabaa on the Mediterranean coast Egypt opted for nuclear power because it provides a constant source of energy that lasts for decades said Mohamed H El Molla Egypt s Resident Representative to the IAEA Through its Milestone Approach the IAEA supports some 30 countries in Africa and around the world called new nuclear countries in their efforts to develop the infrastructure necessary for a safe secure and sustainable nuclear power programme Ghana has been working with the Agency for a number of years including an IAEA led Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review INIR mission in 2017 Ghana is looking to introduce nuclear power to provide the necessary diversity of baseload to ensure the energy security for our future demands said Kwaku Afriyie Minister of Environment Science Technology and Innovation of Ghana Our hydroelectric potential is almost exhausted so our interest in nuclear energy is to make sure we have energy for our transition and development While 40 percent of Ghana s energy comes from hydropower it accounts for 17 percent of all electricity generation in Africa and rising according to the International Energy Agency IEA In countries such as Uganda Zambia and Malawi the share of hydroelectric generation exceeds 80 percent Hydropower is low carbon and goes a long way toward meeting net zero emissions commitments but as weather patterns change so does the availability and reliability of water supplies And Africa is particularly vulnerable to these changes The IEA predicts that in the Democratic Republic of the Congo Morocco Zambia and Zimbabwe climate change will cause a significant decrease in hydropower capacity by the end of the century Many other nations will experience unpredictable fluctuations in their hydroelectric supply If electricity demand continues to grow and climate change causes less hydropower production countries will be able to secure baseload electricity only through fossil fuel sources or nuclear power But according to the World Bank the public finances of developing African countries have worsened amid the COVID pandemic leaving many unable to finance large infrastructure projects on their own That means international funding will be vital said Henri Paillere Chief of the IAEA s Economic Studies and Planning Section which produces the biannual publication Establishing special economic zones with tailored economic regulations built around reliable local infrastructure would be one way to attract foreign investment Such zones could then serve as clean energy hubs that would benefit surrounding communities and act as catalysts for energy transitions on a national scale New technologies such as small modular reactors SMRs with lower start up costs and easier financing than traditional reactors may provide an option and better suit the small power grids found in many African countries participants heard As countries in Africa consider or embark on nuclear power Mr Grossi emphasized that they would have the Agency s full support The IAEA will be with you every step of the way he said
    New International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) publication on climate change and nuclear power highlights Africa’s potential
    Africa4 months ago

    New International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) publication on climate change and nuclear power highlights Africa’s potential

    Ministers and government officials from several African countries discussed the potential of nuclear power to support sustainable development and the transition to clean and reliable energy as the IAEA launched a new publication on climate change and nuclear power at a side event during the 66th IAEA General Conference.

    This day.

    The event, "Supporting the energy transition in Africa", presented the 2022 edition of Climate Change and Nuclear Energy, which is updated every two years and provides a wealth of technical information and data on the benefits of nuclear energy to contribute to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

    This year's publication features a chapter on nuclear power in Africa, on which IAEA Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi held an extensive discussion with representatives from Egypt, Ghana, Kenya and South Africa at today's event.

    "Everywhere I listen to this global conversation about energy security, climate change and nuclear power, and whether it's due to changing circumstances, climate or security needs, it's pretty clear that nuclear power now has a place in the table," Grossi said.

    .

    "What I like about this discussion is that there is no discussion without Africa.

    Africans have told themselves [...] 'we need to contribute, and we need our own specific analysis of how this nuclear jewel will be used for African economies.'" According to the new publication, around 600 million people and 10 million small businesses in Africa do not have a reliable source of electricity , and increasingly, connection to a national grid is no guarantee of electricity supply Blackouts are becoming more frequent, and in sub-Saharan Africa, the World Bank reports that nearly 80 percent of businesses experience blackouts Meanwhile, Africa's energy demand is increasing twice as fast as the global average, largely driven by urban population growth.In this context, several African countries are exploring the possibility of adding nuclear power to its energy mix, and Egypt recently began construction on its first nuclear power plant.

    The only nuclear operator on the continent with two reactors totaling almost 2,000 MWe, is considering the long-term operation of the Koeberg nuclear power plant and the expansion of its nuclear power programme.

    Egypt, the host of the upcoming UN climate summit, or COP27, in November, recently broke ground on the first of four 1,200 MWe reactors it plans to build at El-Dabaa on the Mediterranean coast.

    “Egypt opted for nuclear power because it provides a constant source of energy that lasts for decades,” said Mohamed H.

    El Molla, Egypt's Resident Representative to the IAEA.

    Through its Milestone Approach, the IAEA supports some 30 countries in Africa and around the world called new nuclear countries in their efforts to develop the infrastructure necessary for a safe, secure and sustainable nuclear power programme.

    Ghana has been working with the Agency for a number of years, including an IAEA-led Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) mission in 2017.

    “Ghana is looking to introduce nuclear power to provide the necessary diversity of baseload to ensure the energy security for our future demands.

    ”, said Kwaku Afriyie, Minister of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation of Ghana.

    "Our hydroelectric potential is almost exhausted, so our interest in nuclear energy is to make sure we have energy for our transition and development."

    While 40 percent of Ghana's energy comes from hydropower, it accounts for 17 percent of all electricity generation in Africa and rising, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA).

    In countries such as Uganda, Zambia, and Malawi, the share of hydroelectric generation exceeds 80 percent.

    Hydropower is low-carbon and goes a long way toward meeting net-zero emissions commitments, but as weather patterns change, so does the availability and reliability of water supplies.

    And Africa is particularly vulnerable to these changes.

    The IEA predicts that in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Morocco, Zambia and Zimbabwe, climate change will cause a significant decrease in hydropower capacity by the end of the century.

    Many other nations will experience unpredictable fluctuations in their hydroelectric supply.

    If electricity demand continues to grow and climate change causes less hydropower production, countries will be able to secure baseload electricity only through fossil fuel sources or nuclear power.

    But according to the World Bank, the public finances of developing African countries have worsened amid the COVID pandemic, leaving many unable to finance large infrastructure projects on their own.

    "That means international funding will be vital," said Henri Paillere, Chief of the IAEA's Economic Studies and Planning Section, which produces the biannual publication.

    “Establishing special economic zones with tailored economic regulations built around reliable local infrastructure would be one way to attract foreign investment.

    Such zones could then serve as clean energy hubs that would benefit surrounding communities and act as catalysts for energy transitions on a national scale.” New technologies, such as small modular reactors (SMRs), with lower start-up costs and easier financing than traditional reactors, may provide an option and better suit the small power grids found in many African countries, participants heard.

    .

    As countries in Africa consider or embark on nuclear power, Mr. Grossi emphasized that they would have the Agency's full support.

    "The IAEA will be with you every step of the way," he said.

  •   By Princy Mthombeni founder of the YouTube channel Africa4Nuclear https bit ly 3qfLQxt Reality has shown how much the world depends on natural sources gas coal wood wind etc Access to affordable reliable and sustainable energy Electricity remains a vital ingredient for economic and social development and a necessity for human well being Added to that is the need to generate electricity from sources that emit zero or negligible carbon emissions To meet these and other goals several African countries such as Nigeria Ghana Kenya and Uganda are now considering nuclear power as part of their electricity generation mix and are at different stages of establishing their respective regulatory frameworks and policies for the development of new nuclear power plants NPP Energy is the foundation of the South African economy generating around 15 of GDP The volume of electricity production in South Africa reaches 20240 GWh as of March 2022 Being the center of the unified energy system of southern Africa this country produces 2 3 of the total electricity of the continent and ranks 20th in the world in terms of its consumption The main component of South Africa s energy sector is coal 90 of South Africa s electricity supply is produced from coal South Africa is one of the countries that is highly dependent on coal with other energy sources such as nuclear and renewables contributing a small amount According to an International Energy Agency IEA 1 about 600 million people in Africa lack access to electricity Estimates show that around 530 million people will remain without electricity in 2030 This means that annual gains in access to electricity would have to triple to reach universal access by 2030 Experts define nuclear energy as the best solution for the African problems so far taking into account that its important advantage is to produce clean electricity continuously Most nuclear power plants generate electricity 90 of the time in a given year working 24 hours a day This makes nuclear power a very reliable and constant source of energy Pandora s Promise is a 2013 documentary on the nuclear energy debate directed by Robert Stone whom I am privileged to have met virtually in 2016 while attending the World Nuclear University Summer Institute in Canada In today s world this film could not be more relevant as it clearly answers the questions that concern modern Africans The documentary is aimed at a public audience unfamiliar with nuclear technology The documentary sets out to think the unthinkable and ask the unquestionable should we learn to stop worrying and love nuclear energy The title comes from the ancient Greek myth of Pandora who unleashed numerous evils on the world but as the film s tagline recalls At the bottom of the box she found hope The documentary begins with brilliant scenes from the nuclear plant protests The chosen green members in the documentary take us individually through their journeys of how and why they changed their minds about nuclear power as well as denying some all too common misconceptions The documentary also heavily emphasized the potential of fast reactors and the recycling of spent fuel Dynamic visual representations are used in the documentary to help explain complex technologies The film sheds light on nuclear power its history and potential as the technology develops It sheds light on the bias of the big fossil fuel companies against nuclear power and the fact that despite the market entry of renewables global coal use continues to rise Hopes for a global agreement on timely reductions in carbon emissions to reduce the risk of a global environmental catastrophe appear to be wishful thinking and this is most vividly demonstrated by what is happening globally where some countries in Europe are reopening its coal fired power plants while others are increasing their use of coal Stone tells the personal stories of environmentalists and energy experts who have gone from being fierce opponents of nuclear power to being its staunch supporters risking their careers and reputations in the process Pandora s Promise illustrates the journey of several prominent environmentalists who have changed their views on nuclear power These environmentalists protested against nuclear power plants in the 1970s and 1980s but now speak in favor of nuclear power as a green electricity source that has a role to play in decarbonizing economies while providing energy security The film features several notable people including Stewart Brand Gwyneth Cravens Mark Lynas Richard Rhodes and Michael Shellenberger They and other respected environmental activists authors and experts appear throughout the film and explain why they recently began to reconsider their earlier rejection of nuclear power Director Robert Stone hopes the documentary can change the way people think about nuclear power and even make them question why they were against it in the first place The film should reflect my own journey said Mr Stone So Pandora s Promise traces the emerging faith of various environmentalists in the promise of nuclear power Mr Stone said that he is focusing on the issue of nuclear power Convinced that global warming is an imminent danger and that wind and solar power could never supply enough energy to power the planet he investigated the downsides of nuclear power and concluded that concerns about waste and meltdown were overblown In Pandora s Promise Stone is based on archives of old interviews materials and computer animations The central argument of the film is that nuclear energy which still faces historical opposition from environmentalists is a relatively safe and clean source of energy that can help mitigate the serious problem of anthropogenic global warming Other arguments are reminders of the great threat of climate change and the toxic effects of coal In Pandora s Promise green energy advocates argue that nuclear power may actually be safer cleaner and greener than many other energy sources The director argues that nuclear power is a hugely efficient and relatively clean source of energy that is now vitally needed as billions of people in emerging economies such as India China and Brazil struggle with energy poverty Furthermore he indicates that wind turbines and solar panels do not meet even a fraction of urgent needs Solar power cannot work at night wind power is often inefficient at certain times of the year when winds are low hydroelectric power produces limited electricity during dry seasons This makes nuclear power unique because it is clean and always available without depending on weather patterns according to Stone Robert Stone makes one more claim that nuclear power is second only to wind turbines in terms of safety Many more people die for example from air pollution from burning coal according to the film Even the manufacture of solar panels which are apparently quite toxic is more lethal The research carried out by Our World in Data referring to the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC shows that coal oil and natural gas are the most insecure and least clean sources of electricity for the environment ambient Modern renewable energy and nuclear power are not only safer but also cleaner than fossil fuels The long term impact of these energy sources on climate change needs to be taken into account The safest sources for us today are the same sources that have the least impact on the environment Mortality rates per unit of energy measured as deaths per terawatt hour of energy production for coal are 24 6 deaths while for gas 2 8 deaths There is another indicator greenhouse gas emissions per unit of energy which is measured in CO2 equivalent emissions per gigawatt hour of electricity over the life cycle of the power plant Natural gas reaches the indicator of 490 tons and coal 820 tons At the same time nuclear energy exceeds these two types of energy sources coal and gas in both indicators 0 07 deaths from accidents and air pollution and 3 tons of greenhouse gas emissions per unit of energy According to Dominique Gilbert a founding member of the South African Coalition Against Nuclear Power the country has done little to study the effects of nuclear power on surrounding communities or to educate the public Gilbert further raises concerns about the issue of radiation that you can t see or touch or smell While such concerns about radiation exposure have been around the world for decades some experts for example Aishwarya Saxena or Abigail Sah believe that nuclear fuel actually poses fewer health risks than coal So another argument the movie makes is that radiation itself while certainly dangerous is not the demon it s been painted to be Robert Stone s film is an effort to demonstrate nuclear power s proven potential to deliver relatively safe clean baseload power to complement unreliable renewables like wind and solar Many experts agree Of all the energy sources out there nuclear has proven to be the safest and it s quite amazing how many misconceptions there have been about this by the public That absolute scare tactics have been developed said Kelvin Kemm a nuclear physicist and executive director of Nuclear Africa Pandora s Promise asks if the technology some people fear most could save our planet from climate catastrophe while providing the energy needed to lift billions of people in developing countries out of poverty This is an excellent movie to help rekindle the dialogue on nuclear power and watching it may make you re examine your position hopefully objectively if you are anti nuclear 1 https bit ly 3RF01aX
    Pandora’s Promise: A Film That Destroys “Nuclear” Stereotypes (By Princy Mthombeni)
      By Princy Mthombeni founder of the YouTube channel Africa4Nuclear https bit ly 3qfLQxt Reality has shown how much the world depends on natural sources gas coal wood wind etc Access to affordable reliable and sustainable energy Electricity remains a vital ingredient for economic and social development and a necessity for human well being Added to that is the need to generate electricity from sources that emit zero or negligible carbon emissions To meet these and other goals several African countries such as Nigeria Ghana Kenya and Uganda are now considering nuclear power as part of their electricity generation mix and are at different stages of establishing their respective regulatory frameworks and policies for the development of new nuclear power plants NPP Energy is the foundation of the South African economy generating around 15 of GDP The volume of electricity production in South Africa reaches 20240 GWh as of March 2022 Being the center of the unified energy system of southern Africa this country produces 2 3 of the total electricity of the continent and ranks 20th in the world in terms of its consumption The main component of South Africa s energy sector is coal 90 of South Africa s electricity supply is produced from coal South Africa is one of the countries that is highly dependent on coal with other energy sources such as nuclear and renewables contributing a small amount According to an International Energy Agency IEA 1 about 600 million people in Africa lack access to electricity Estimates show that around 530 million people will remain without electricity in 2030 This means that annual gains in access to electricity would have to triple to reach universal access by 2030 Experts define nuclear energy as the best solution for the African problems so far taking into account that its important advantage is to produce clean electricity continuously Most nuclear power plants generate electricity 90 of the time in a given year working 24 hours a day This makes nuclear power a very reliable and constant source of energy Pandora s Promise is a 2013 documentary on the nuclear energy debate directed by Robert Stone whom I am privileged to have met virtually in 2016 while attending the World Nuclear University Summer Institute in Canada In today s world this film could not be more relevant as it clearly answers the questions that concern modern Africans The documentary is aimed at a public audience unfamiliar with nuclear technology The documentary sets out to think the unthinkable and ask the unquestionable should we learn to stop worrying and love nuclear energy The title comes from the ancient Greek myth of Pandora who unleashed numerous evils on the world but as the film s tagline recalls At the bottom of the box she found hope The documentary begins with brilliant scenes from the nuclear plant protests The chosen green members in the documentary take us individually through their journeys of how and why they changed their minds about nuclear power as well as denying some all too common misconceptions The documentary also heavily emphasized the potential of fast reactors and the recycling of spent fuel Dynamic visual representations are used in the documentary to help explain complex technologies The film sheds light on nuclear power its history and potential as the technology develops It sheds light on the bias of the big fossil fuel companies against nuclear power and the fact that despite the market entry of renewables global coal use continues to rise Hopes for a global agreement on timely reductions in carbon emissions to reduce the risk of a global environmental catastrophe appear to be wishful thinking and this is most vividly demonstrated by what is happening globally where some countries in Europe are reopening its coal fired power plants while others are increasing their use of coal Stone tells the personal stories of environmentalists and energy experts who have gone from being fierce opponents of nuclear power to being its staunch supporters risking their careers and reputations in the process Pandora s Promise illustrates the journey of several prominent environmentalists who have changed their views on nuclear power These environmentalists protested against nuclear power plants in the 1970s and 1980s but now speak in favor of nuclear power as a green electricity source that has a role to play in decarbonizing economies while providing energy security The film features several notable people including Stewart Brand Gwyneth Cravens Mark Lynas Richard Rhodes and Michael Shellenberger They and other respected environmental activists authors and experts appear throughout the film and explain why they recently began to reconsider their earlier rejection of nuclear power Director Robert Stone hopes the documentary can change the way people think about nuclear power and even make them question why they were against it in the first place The film should reflect my own journey said Mr Stone So Pandora s Promise traces the emerging faith of various environmentalists in the promise of nuclear power Mr Stone said that he is focusing on the issue of nuclear power Convinced that global warming is an imminent danger and that wind and solar power could never supply enough energy to power the planet he investigated the downsides of nuclear power and concluded that concerns about waste and meltdown were overblown In Pandora s Promise Stone is based on archives of old interviews materials and computer animations The central argument of the film is that nuclear energy which still faces historical opposition from environmentalists is a relatively safe and clean source of energy that can help mitigate the serious problem of anthropogenic global warming Other arguments are reminders of the great threat of climate change and the toxic effects of coal In Pandora s Promise green energy advocates argue that nuclear power may actually be safer cleaner and greener than many other energy sources The director argues that nuclear power is a hugely efficient and relatively clean source of energy that is now vitally needed as billions of people in emerging economies such as India China and Brazil struggle with energy poverty Furthermore he indicates that wind turbines and solar panels do not meet even a fraction of urgent needs Solar power cannot work at night wind power is often inefficient at certain times of the year when winds are low hydroelectric power produces limited electricity during dry seasons This makes nuclear power unique because it is clean and always available without depending on weather patterns according to Stone Robert Stone makes one more claim that nuclear power is second only to wind turbines in terms of safety Many more people die for example from air pollution from burning coal according to the film Even the manufacture of solar panels which are apparently quite toxic is more lethal The research carried out by Our World in Data referring to the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC shows that coal oil and natural gas are the most insecure and least clean sources of electricity for the environment ambient Modern renewable energy and nuclear power are not only safer but also cleaner than fossil fuels The long term impact of these energy sources on climate change needs to be taken into account The safest sources for us today are the same sources that have the least impact on the environment Mortality rates per unit of energy measured as deaths per terawatt hour of energy production for coal are 24 6 deaths while for gas 2 8 deaths There is another indicator greenhouse gas emissions per unit of energy which is measured in CO2 equivalent emissions per gigawatt hour of electricity over the life cycle of the power plant Natural gas reaches the indicator of 490 tons and coal 820 tons At the same time nuclear energy exceeds these two types of energy sources coal and gas in both indicators 0 07 deaths from accidents and air pollution and 3 tons of greenhouse gas emissions per unit of energy According to Dominique Gilbert a founding member of the South African Coalition Against Nuclear Power the country has done little to study the effects of nuclear power on surrounding communities or to educate the public Gilbert further raises concerns about the issue of radiation that you can t see or touch or smell While such concerns about radiation exposure have been around the world for decades some experts for example Aishwarya Saxena or Abigail Sah believe that nuclear fuel actually poses fewer health risks than coal So another argument the movie makes is that radiation itself while certainly dangerous is not the demon it s been painted to be Robert Stone s film is an effort to demonstrate nuclear power s proven potential to deliver relatively safe clean baseload power to complement unreliable renewables like wind and solar Many experts agree Of all the energy sources out there nuclear has proven to be the safest and it s quite amazing how many misconceptions there have been about this by the public That absolute scare tactics have been developed said Kelvin Kemm a nuclear physicist and executive director of Nuclear Africa Pandora s Promise asks if the technology some people fear most could save our planet from climate catastrophe while providing the energy needed to lift billions of people in developing countries out of poverty This is an excellent movie to help rekindle the dialogue on nuclear power and watching it may make you re examine your position hopefully objectively if you are anti nuclear 1 https bit ly 3RF01aX
    Pandora’s Promise: A Film That Destroys “Nuclear” Stereotypes (By Princy Mthombeni)
    Africa5 months ago

    Pandora’s Promise: A Film That Destroys “Nuclear” Stereotypes (By Princy Mthombeni)

    By Princy Mthombeni, founder of the YouTube channel Africa4Nuclear (https://bit.ly/3qfLQxt) Reality has shown how much the world depends on natural sources: gas, coal, wood, wind, etc.

    Access to affordable, reliable and sustainable energy Electricity remains a vital ingredient for economic and social development, and a necessity for human well-being.

    Added to that is the need to generate electricity from sources that emit zero or negligible carbon emissions.

    To meet these and other goals, several African countries, such as Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya and Uganda, are now considering nuclear power as part of their electricity generation mix and are at different stages of establishing their respective regulatory frameworks.

    and policies for the development of new nuclear power plants (NPP).

    Energy is the foundation of the South African economy, generating around 15% of GDP.

    The volume of electricity production in South Africa reaches 20240 GWh (as of March 2022).

    Being the center of the unified energy system of southern Africa, this country produces 2/3 of the total electricity of the continent and ranks 20th in the world in terms of its consumption.

    The main component of South Africa's energy sector is coal.

    90% of South Africa's electricity supply is produced from coal.

    South Africa is one of the countries that is highly dependent on coal, with other energy sources such as nuclear and renewables contributing a small amount.

    According to an International Energy Agency (IEA) [1], about 600 million people in Africa lack access to electricity.

    Estimates show that around 530 million people will remain without electricity in 2030.

    This means that annual gains in access to electricity would have to triple to reach universal access by 2030.

    Experts define nuclear energy as the best solution for the African problems so far.

    , taking into account that its important advantage is to produce clean electricity continuously.

    Most nuclear power plants generate electricity 90% of the time in a given year, working 24 hours a day.

    This makes nuclear power a very reliable and constant source of energy.

    Pandora's Promise is a 2013 documentary on the nuclear energy debate, directed by Robert Stone, whom I am privileged to have met virtually in 2016 while attending the World Nuclear University Summer Institute in Canada.

    In today's world, this film could not be more relevant as it clearly answers the questions that concern modern Africans.

    The documentary is aimed at a public audience unfamiliar with nuclear technology.

    The documentary sets out to think the unthinkable and ask the unquestionable: should we learn to stop worrying and love nuclear energy?

    The title comes from the ancient Greek myth of Pandora, who unleashed numerous evils on the world, but as the film's tagline recalls: "At the bottom of the box, she found hope."

    The documentary begins with brilliant scenes from the nuclear plant protests.

    The chosen green members in the documentary take us individually through their journeys of how and why they changed their minds about nuclear power, as well as denying some all-too-common misconceptions.

    The documentary also heavily emphasized the potential of fast reactors and the recycling of spent fuel.

    Dynamic visual representations are used in the documentary to help explain complex technologies.

    The film sheds light on nuclear power, its history and potential as the technology develops.

    It sheds light on the bias of the big fossil fuel companies against nuclear power and the fact that, despite the market entry of renewables, global coal use continues to rise.

    Hopes for a global agreement on timely reductions in carbon emissions to reduce the risk of a global environmental catastrophe appear to be wishful thinking and this is most vividly demonstrated by what is happening globally, where some countries in Europe are reopening its coal-fired power plants.

    while others are increasing their use of coal.

    Stone tells the personal stories of environmentalists and energy experts who have gone from being fierce opponents of nuclear power to being its staunch supporters, risking their careers and reputations in the process.

    Pandora's Promise illustrates the journey of several prominent environmentalists who have changed their views on nuclear power.

    These environmentalists protested against nuclear power plants in the 1970s and 1980s, but now speak in favor of nuclear power as a "green" electricity source that has a role to play in decarbonizing economies while providing energy security.

    .

    The film features several notable people including Stewart Brand, Gwyneth Cravens, Mark Lynas, Richard Rhodes, and Michael Shellenberger.

    They and other respected environmental activists, authors, and experts appear throughout the film and explain why they recently began to reconsider their earlier rejection of nuclear power.

    Director Robert Stone hopes the documentary can change the way people think about nuclear power and even make them question why they were against it in the first place.

    "The film should reflect my own journey," said Mr. Stone.

    So "Pandora's Promise" traces the emerging faith of various environmentalists in the promise of nuclear power.

    Mr. Stone said that he is "focusing on the issue of nuclear power."

    Convinced that global warming is an imminent danger and that wind and solar power could never supply enough energy to power the planet, he investigated the downsides of nuclear power and concluded that concerns about waste and meltdown were overblown.

    In Pandora's Promise Stone is based on archives of old interviews, materials, and computer animations.

    The central argument of the film is that nuclear energy, which still faces historical opposition from environmentalists, is a relatively safe and clean source of energy that can help mitigate the serious problem of anthropogenic global warming.

    Other arguments are reminders of the great threat of climate change and the toxic effects of coal.

    In Pandora's Promise, green energy advocates argue that nuclear power may actually be safer, cleaner, and greener than many other energy sources.

    The director argues that nuclear power is a hugely efficient and relatively clean source of energy that is now vitally needed as billions of people in emerging economies such as India, China and Brazil struggle with energy poverty.

    Furthermore, he indicates that wind turbines and solar panels do not meet even a fraction of urgent needs.

    Solar power cannot work at night; wind power is often inefficient at certain times of the year when winds are low; hydroelectric power produces limited electricity during dry seasons.

    This makes nuclear power unique because it is clean and always available without depending on weather patterns, according to Stone.

    Robert Stone makes one more claim: that nuclear power is second only to wind turbines in terms of safety.

    Many more people die, for example, from air pollution from burning coal, according to the film.

    Even the manufacture of solar panels, which are apparently quite toxic, is more lethal.

    The research carried out by "Our World in Data" referring to the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) shows that coal, oil and natural gas are the most insecure and least clean sources of electricity for the environment ambient.

    Modern renewable energy and nuclear power are not only safer but also cleaner than fossil fuels.

    The long-term impact of these energy sources on climate change needs to be taken into account.

    The safest sources for us today are the same sources that have the least impact on the environment.

    Mortality rates per unit of energy (measured as deaths per terawatt-hour of energy production) for coal are 24.6 deaths, while for gas, 2.8 deaths.

    There is another indicator: greenhouse gas emissions per unit of energy, which is measured in CO2 equivalent emissions per gigawatt-hour of electricity over the life cycle of the power plant.

    Natural gas reaches the indicator of 490 tons, and coal - 820 tons.

    At the same time, nuclear energy exceeds these two types of energy sources, coal and gas, in both indicators: 0.07 deaths from accidents and air pollution and 3 tons of greenhouse gas emissions per unit of energy According to Dominique Gilbert, a founding member of the South African Coalition Against Nuclear Power, the country has done little to study the effects of nuclear power on surrounding communities or to educate the public.

    Gilbert further raises concerns about the issue of radiation that you can't see or touch or smell.

    While such concerns about radiation exposure have been around the world for decades, some experts, for example Aishwarya Saxena or Abigail Sah, believe that nuclear fuel actually poses fewer health risks than coal.

    So another argument the movie makes is that radiation itself, while certainly dangerous, is not the demon it's been painted to be.

    Robert Stone's film is an effort to demonstrate nuclear power's proven potential to deliver relatively safe, clean baseload power to complement unreliable renewables like wind and solar.

    Many experts agree.

    “Of all the energy sources out there, nuclear has proven to be the safest, and it's quite amazing how many misconceptions there have been about this by the public.

    That absolute scare tactics have been developed,” said Kelvin Kemm, a nuclear physicist and executive director of Nuclear Africa.

    Pandora's Promise asks if the technology some people fear most could save our planet from climate catastrophe while providing the energy needed to lift billions of people in developing countries out of poverty.

    This is an excellent movie to help rekindle the dialogue on nuclear power and watching it may make you re-examine your position, hopefully objectively if you are anti-nuclear.

    [1] https://bit.ly/3RF01aX

  •   By NJ Ayuk Executive Chairman African Energy Chamber www EnergyChamber org African countries are not the only ones refusing to accept global pressure to accelerate their transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources such as solar wind and hydrogen power In May 2021 the International Energy Agency IEA issued a report Net Zero by 2050 A Roadmap for the Global Energy Sector calling for a halt to oil and gas exploration worldwide by the end of the year That dramatic move the IEA argued was the global energy sector s only hope of achieving net zero emissions ensuring that the amount of greenhouse gases emitted into the atmosphere equals the amount removed by 2050 a goal outlined in the Paris Climate Agreement While some have supported the IEA recommendation several oil and gas producing nations have strongly and unapologetically rejected it Deputy Director for International Affairs at Japan s Ministry of Economy Trade and Industry METI Akihisa Matsuda told Reuters his government had no plans to immediately halt investments in oil gas and coal The report provides a suggestion on how the world can reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050 but it is not necessarily in line with Japanese government policy Matsuda said Japan needs to protect its energy security including a stable supply of electricity so we will balance this with our goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2050 Norwegian Oil Minister Tina Bru also opposed the IEA recommendations It won t happen if Norway stops production Bru said It would just move to other countries and then we wouldn t move forward This is a complex global problem that requires many solutions And in the Philippines Energy Secretary Alfonso Cusi said the rush to cut funding for oil gas and coal would set back the Philippines aspiration to join the ranks of upper middle income countries one of these positions and I only wish that Africa s oil and gas producing nations receive the same consideration when African leaders express similar views regarding Africa s shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy
    The race to renewable energy is about to bring Africa to a standstill (by NJ Ayuk)
      By NJ Ayuk Executive Chairman African Energy Chamber www EnergyChamber org African countries are not the only ones refusing to accept global pressure to accelerate their transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources such as solar wind and hydrogen power In May 2021 the International Energy Agency IEA issued a report Net Zero by 2050 A Roadmap for the Global Energy Sector calling for a halt to oil and gas exploration worldwide by the end of the year That dramatic move the IEA argued was the global energy sector s only hope of achieving net zero emissions ensuring that the amount of greenhouse gases emitted into the atmosphere equals the amount removed by 2050 a goal outlined in the Paris Climate Agreement While some have supported the IEA recommendation several oil and gas producing nations have strongly and unapologetically rejected it Deputy Director for International Affairs at Japan s Ministry of Economy Trade and Industry METI Akihisa Matsuda told Reuters his government had no plans to immediately halt investments in oil gas and coal The report provides a suggestion on how the world can reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050 but it is not necessarily in line with Japanese government policy Matsuda said Japan needs to protect its energy security including a stable supply of electricity so we will balance this with our goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2050 Norwegian Oil Minister Tina Bru also opposed the IEA recommendations It won t happen if Norway stops production Bru said It would just move to other countries and then we wouldn t move forward This is a complex global problem that requires many solutions And in the Philippines Energy Secretary Alfonso Cusi said the rush to cut funding for oil gas and coal would set back the Philippines aspiration to join the ranks of upper middle income countries one of these positions and I only wish that Africa s oil and gas producing nations receive the same consideration when African leaders express similar views regarding Africa s shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy
    The race to renewable energy is about to bring Africa to a standstill (by NJ Ayuk)
    Africa5 months ago

    The race to renewable energy is about to bring Africa to a standstill (by NJ Ayuk)

    By NJ Ayuk, Executive Chairman, African Energy Chamber (www.EnergyChamber.org).

    African countries are not the only ones refusing to accept global pressure to accelerate their transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources such as solar, wind and hydrogen power.

    In May 2021, the International Energy Agency (IEA) issued a report, "Net Zero by 2050: A Roadmap for the Global Energy Sector", calling for a halt to oil and gas exploration worldwide by the end of the year.

    That dramatic move, the IEA argued, was the global energy sector's only hope of achieving net-zero emissions (ensuring that the amount of greenhouse gases emitted into the atmosphere equals the amount removed) by 2050, a goal outlined in the Paris Climate Agreement.

    .

    While some have supported the IEA recommendation, several oil and gas producing nations have strongly and unapologetically rejected it.

    Deputy Director for International Affairs at Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Akihisa Matsuda, told Reuters his government had no plans to immediately halt investments in oil, gas and coal.

    "The report provides a suggestion on how the world can reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050, but it is not necessarily in line with Japanese government policy," Matsuda said.

    "Japan needs to protect its energy security, including a stable supply of electricity, so we will balance this with our goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2050."

    Norwegian Oil Minister Tina Bru also opposed the IEA recommendations: "It won't happen if Norway stops production," Bru said.

    "It would just move to other countries and then we wouldn't move forward.

    This is a complex global problem that requires many solutions."

    And in the Philippines, Energy Secretary Alfonso Cusi said the rush to cut funding for oil, gas and coal "would set back the Philippines' aspiration to join the ranks of upper-middle-income countries."

    one of these positions and I only wish that Africa's oil and gas producing nations receive the same consideration when African leaders express similar views regarding Africa's shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy.

  •   By NJ Ayuk CEO of the African Energy Chamber www EnergyChamber org In the months since the European Union declared that it would reduce its dependence on Russian oil following that country s invasion of Ukraine much has been said about the new opportunities this moment is creating for Africa s natural gas industry I myself have been part of that conversation and stand by my past statements Africa s capabilities are considerable as the African Energy Chamber AEC makes clear in our Q2 2022 State of Africa Energy Report What s more certain developments within Europe are putting African natural gas producers in a stronger position than before with respect to being able to fight for and win larger market share Quite simply there are gaps in the European gas market that did not exist in the past gaps that urgently need to be filled The existence of these gaps means that there is now more room for African gas than ever before particularly liquefied natural gas which is easy to store and transport As our report notes 50 of the 2022 25 cumulative gas flows from Africa s top 10 producers are expected to be exported as LNG And interest in African LNG is not likely to be a momentary problem In the future new technologies and changing geopolitical conditions should make it easier for African producers to maintain their market share in Europe In short things are changing More market space right now For decades Russia was the EU s largest single supplier of gas supplying at least a quarter to a third of its total consumption According to data from the International Energy Agency IEA the figure was even higher in 2021 when it supplied 155 000 million cubic meters bcm of gas equivalent to 45 of total imports and 40 of total consumption The numbers for 2022 will surely be different The volume of Russian gas entering European markets began to decline significantly soon after the start of the war in Ukraine In April 2022 the share of Russian gas in total EU imports was reported to be 31 up from 45 in April 2021 There is no reason to believe that the figure has increased since then as that April was the last month Russia was willing to accept payments from most EU customers in US dollars or euros instead of using special ruble denominated accounts that are subject to sanctions Indeed since Russia s new payment requirement took effect European customers have had to learn to live with abrupt cuts or reductions in pipeline gas deliveries with their Russian supplier Gazprom citing payment difficulties or lack of resolution of technical problems as reasons for outages Since the end of April such outages have occurred in Poland and Bulgaria in Finland in Germany and in all other countries served by the Nord Stream I network cuts occur before the end of the year and no one knows exactly how much they will affect the total volume of Russian gas shipments to Europe The result however is that in 2022 the volume of gas delivered is likely to be slightly lower than the 2021 figure of 155 bcm And that s where African gas starts to come into the picture If the EU doesn t have enough Russian gas this year it will have to make up the shortfall elsewhere in order to make it through the upcoming heating season And in part it has been trying to do so by importing more LNG from established large scale producers such as the US and Qatar The EU has also been buying more LNG from small producers like Peru But it also reached gas producing states in Africa Italy for example has negotiated the purchase of additional gas from Algeria in 2022 and is also looking to buy more gas from Egypt and Angola in the short term More market space for years to come And European buyers are not just treating African gas as a quick fix but as something to fill the gap for now Italy expects Algeria to continue supplying additional volumes beyond 2022 and is also in talks with Angola Egypt and the Republic of Congo about broader deals Germany is looking to cement ties with Senegal in light of that country s future gas production which is on track to start next year The EU has signed a trilateral memorandum of understanding MoU with Israel and Egypt in the hope of boosting future gas imports from the Eastern Mediterranean region In addition the EU has sent Matthew Baldwin the European Commission s deputy director general for energy to Nigeria to discuss the possibility of increasing gas supplies Baldwin who heads the EU Energy Platform Task Force EPTF created in May 2022 to help reduce Europe s dependence on Russian oil and gas was enthusiastic about Nigeria s contribution to supply EU gas company in an exclusive interview with Premium Times He noted that the West African country already accounted for 14 of EU LNG imports suggested the figure could rise to 30 or more in the long run and described Nigeria as a supplier that European gas buyers they can count We need more gas from Nigeria as a result of the terrible war of aggression that Russia has mounted against Ukraine Baldwin declared We can no longer count on gas coming from the Russian Federation and we want to build a new partnership with countries like Nigeria with whom we already have a well established partnership to get more gas and LNG from you on good commercial terms The window of opportunity will remain open It is somewhat tempting to greet these statements with skepticism given that the EU has talked about diversifying gas supplies for more than 20 years and has done relatively little to make that diversification a reality Yes Brussels has supported initiatives such as the Southern Gas Corridor SGC which began delivering gas from Azerbaijan to Italy in 2020 However in the time it took to carry out that project Gazprom managed to plan a bigger gas pipeline across the Black Sea South Stream scrap that plan come up with a plan for another bigger oil pipeline TurkStream and then execute that plan all while working on an even bigger undersea pipeline to Germany Nord Stream 2 However I think such skepticism would be misplaced at this point The EU no longer works in a context where the benefits of supply diversification are theoretical and abstract now it is a concrete and immediate matter For political reasons the EU wants to deny Russia access to revenue from gas sales and strip it of its status as a normal trading partner For practical reasons European gas buyers need to find a way to make up for missing supplies in Russia And for both political and practical reasons Brussels wants to deny Moscow the opportunity to continue using gas supplies as a blunt instrument with which to threaten Europe in the future The change will not be immediate It will take time to lower Russia s profile in the EU s energy mix But the process of supply reduction is underway and has already opened up new opportunities for African gas producers to gain market share in Europe I expect those opportunities to last beyond the short term as the EU tries to establish a new mix of gas suppliers to replace Russia in the coming years I also hope that emerging gas producers in Africa will take advantage of new LNG technologies such as Fast LNG modular solutions offered by New Fortress Energy NFE a US based company to meet European gas demand With these technologies they won t have to wait as long or spend as much money to start producing the LNG that European consumers are clamoring to buy They can start in two years or less instead of waiting five years or more as is common with more conventional land projects Between these new technologies and the EU s new political stance the African gas sector is likely to look very different in a few years I encourage you to read the 2022 State of Energy in Africa Report Q2 2022 and find out more for yourself
    African liquefied natural gas (LNG) makes sense for Europe, now and in the future (by NJ Ayuk)
      By NJ Ayuk CEO of the African Energy Chamber www EnergyChamber org In the months since the European Union declared that it would reduce its dependence on Russian oil following that country s invasion of Ukraine much has been said about the new opportunities this moment is creating for Africa s natural gas industry I myself have been part of that conversation and stand by my past statements Africa s capabilities are considerable as the African Energy Chamber AEC makes clear in our Q2 2022 State of Africa Energy Report What s more certain developments within Europe are putting African natural gas producers in a stronger position than before with respect to being able to fight for and win larger market share Quite simply there are gaps in the European gas market that did not exist in the past gaps that urgently need to be filled The existence of these gaps means that there is now more room for African gas than ever before particularly liquefied natural gas which is easy to store and transport As our report notes 50 of the 2022 25 cumulative gas flows from Africa s top 10 producers are expected to be exported as LNG And interest in African LNG is not likely to be a momentary problem In the future new technologies and changing geopolitical conditions should make it easier for African producers to maintain their market share in Europe In short things are changing More market space right now For decades Russia was the EU s largest single supplier of gas supplying at least a quarter to a third of its total consumption According to data from the International Energy Agency IEA the figure was even higher in 2021 when it supplied 155 000 million cubic meters bcm of gas equivalent to 45 of total imports and 40 of total consumption The numbers for 2022 will surely be different The volume of Russian gas entering European markets began to decline significantly soon after the start of the war in Ukraine In April 2022 the share of Russian gas in total EU imports was reported to be 31 up from 45 in April 2021 There is no reason to believe that the figure has increased since then as that April was the last month Russia was willing to accept payments from most EU customers in US dollars or euros instead of using special ruble denominated accounts that are subject to sanctions Indeed since Russia s new payment requirement took effect European customers have had to learn to live with abrupt cuts or reductions in pipeline gas deliveries with their Russian supplier Gazprom citing payment difficulties or lack of resolution of technical problems as reasons for outages Since the end of April such outages have occurred in Poland and Bulgaria in Finland in Germany and in all other countries served by the Nord Stream I network cuts occur before the end of the year and no one knows exactly how much they will affect the total volume of Russian gas shipments to Europe The result however is that in 2022 the volume of gas delivered is likely to be slightly lower than the 2021 figure of 155 bcm And that s where African gas starts to come into the picture If the EU doesn t have enough Russian gas this year it will have to make up the shortfall elsewhere in order to make it through the upcoming heating season And in part it has been trying to do so by importing more LNG from established large scale producers such as the US and Qatar The EU has also been buying more LNG from small producers like Peru But it also reached gas producing states in Africa Italy for example has negotiated the purchase of additional gas from Algeria in 2022 and is also looking to buy more gas from Egypt and Angola in the short term More market space for years to come And European buyers are not just treating African gas as a quick fix but as something to fill the gap for now Italy expects Algeria to continue supplying additional volumes beyond 2022 and is also in talks with Angola Egypt and the Republic of Congo about broader deals Germany is looking to cement ties with Senegal in light of that country s future gas production which is on track to start next year The EU has signed a trilateral memorandum of understanding MoU with Israel and Egypt in the hope of boosting future gas imports from the Eastern Mediterranean region In addition the EU has sent Matthew Baldwin the European Commission s deputy director general for energy to Nigeria to discuss the possibility of increasing gas supplies Baldwin who heads the EU Energy Platform Task Force EPTF created in May 2022 to help reduce Europe s dependence on Russian oil and gas was enthusiastic about Nigeria s contribution to supply EU gas company in an exclusive interview with Premium Times He noted that the West African country already accounted for 14 of EU LNG imports suggested the figure could rise to 30 or more in the long run and described Nigeria as a supplier that European gas buyers they can count We need more gas from Nigeria as a result of the terrible war of aggression that Russia has mounted against Ukraine Baldwin declared We can no longer count on gas coming from the Russian Federation and we want to build a new partnership with countries like Nigeria with whom we already have a well established partnership to get more gas and LNG from you on good commercial terms The window of opportunity will remain open It is somewhat tempting to greet these statements with skepticism given that the EU has talked about diversifying gas supplies for more than 20 years and has done relatively little to make that diversification a reality Yes Brussels has supported initiatives such as the Southern Gas Corridor SGC which began delivering gas from Azerbaijan to Italy in 2020 However in the time it took to carry out that project Gazprom managed to plan a bigger gas pipeline across the Black Sea South Stream scrap that plan come up with a plan for another bigger oil pipeline TurkStream and then execute that plan all while working on an even bigger undersea pipeline to Germany Nord Stream 2 However I think such skepticism would be misplaced at this point The EU no longer works in a context where the benefits of supply diversification are theoretical and abstract now it is a concrete and immediate matter For political reasons the EU wants to deny Russia access to revenue from gas sales and strip it of its status as a normal trading partner For practical reasons European gas buyers need to find a way to make up for missing supplies in Russia And for both political and practical reasons Brussels wants to deny Moscow the opportunity to continue using gas supplies as a blunt instrument with which to threaten Europe in the future The change will not be immediate It will take time to lower Russia s profile in the EU s energy mix But the process of supply reduction is underway and has already opened up new opportunities for African gas producers to gain market share in Europe I expect those opportunities to last beyond the short term as the EU tries to establish a new mix of gas suppliers to replace Russia in the coming years I also hope that emerging gas producers in Africa will take advantage of new LNG technologies such as Fast LNG modular solutions offered by New Fortress Energy NFE a US based company to meet European gas demand With these technologies they won t have to wait as long or spend as much money to start producing the LNG that European consumers are clamoring to buy They can start in two years or less instead of waiting five years or more as is common with more conventional land projects Between these new technologies and the EU s new political stance the African gas sector is likely to look very different in a few years I encourage you to read the 2022 State of Energy in Africa Report Q2 2022 and find out more for yourself
    African liquefied natural gas (LNG) makes sense for Europe, now and in the future (by NJ Ayuk)
    Africa5 months ago

    African liquefied natural gas (LNG) makes sense for Europe, now and in the future (by NJ Ayuk)

    By NJ Ayuk, CEO of the African Energy Chamber (www.EnergyChamber.org) In the months since the European Union declared that it would reduce its dependence on Russian oil following that country's invasion of Ukraine, much has been said about the new opportunities.

    this moment is creating for Africa's natural gas industry.

    I myself have been part of that conversation and stand by my past statements.

    Africa's capabilities are considerable, as the African Energy Chamber (AEC) makes clear in our Q2 2022 State of Africa Energy Report.

    What's more, certain developments within Europe are putting African natural gas producers in a stronger position than before with respect to being able to fight for and win larger market share.

    Quite simply, there are gaps in the European gas market that did not exist in the past, gaps that urgently need to be filled.

    The existence of these gaps means that there is now more room for African gas than ever before, particularly liquefied natural gas, which is easy to store and transport.

    As our report notes, 50% of the 2022-25 cumulative gas flows from Africa's top 10 producers are expected to be exported as LNG.

    And interest in African LNG is not likely to be a momentary problem.

    In the future, new technologies and changing geopolitical conditions should make it easier for African producers to maintain their market share in Europe.

    In short, things are changing.

    More market space right now For decades, Russia was the EU's largest single supplier of gas, supplying at least a quarter to a third of its total consumption.

    According to data from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the figure was even higher in 2021, when it supplied 155,000 million cubic meters (bcm) of gas, equivalent to 45% of total imports and 40% of total consumption.

    The numbers for 2022 will surely be different.

    The volume of Russian gas entering European markets began to decline significantly soon after the start of the war in Ukraine.

    In April 2022, the share of Russian gas in total EU imports was reported to be 31%, up from 45% in April 2021.

    There is no reason to believe that the figure has increased since then, as that April was the last month Russia was willing to accept payments from most EU customers in US dollars or euros instead of using special ruble-denominated accounts that are subject to sanctions.

    Indeed, since Russia's new payment requirement took effect, European customers have had to learn to live with abrupt cuts or reductions in pipeline gas deliveries, with their Russian supplier Gazprom citing payment difficulties or lack of resolution of technical problems as reasons for outages Since the end of April, such outages have occurred in Poland and Bulgaria, in Finland, in Germany and in all other countries served by the Nord Stream I network.

    cuts occur before the end of the year, and no one knows exactly how much they will affect the total volume of Russian gas shipments to Europe.

    The result, however, is that in 2022 the volume of gas delivered is likely to be slightly lower than the 2021 figure of 155 bcm.

    And that's where African gas starts to come into the picture.

    If the EU doesn't have enough Russian gas this year, it will have to make up the shortfall elsewhere in order to make it through the upcoming heating season.

    And in part, it has been trying to do so by importing more LNG from established large-scale producers such as the US and Qatar.

    The EU has also been buying more LNG from small producers like Peru. But it also reached gas-producing states in Africa.

    Italy, for example, has negotiated the purchase of additional gas from Algeria in 2022 and is also looking to buy more gas from Egypt and Angola in the short term.

    More market space for years to come And European buyers are not just treating African gas as a quick fix, but as something to fill the gap for now.

    Italy expects Algeria to continue supplying additional volumes beyond 2022, and is also in talks with Angola, Egypt and the Republic of Congo about broader deals.

    Germany is looking to cement ties with Senegal in light of that country's future gas production, which is on track to start next year.

    The EU has signed a trilateral memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Israel and Egypt in the hope of boosting future gas imports from the Eastern Mediterranean region.

    In addition, the EU has sent Matthew Baldwin, the European Commission's deputy director-general for energy, to Nigeria to discuss the possibility of increasing gas supplies.

    Baldwin, who heads the EU Energy Platform Task Force (EPTF), created in May 2022 to help reduce Europe's dependence on Russian oil and gas, was enthusiastic about Nigeria's contribution to supply.

    EU gas company in an exclusive interview with Premium Times.

    He noted that the West African country already accounted for 14% of EU LNG imports, suggested the figure could rise to 30% or more in the long run, and described Nigeria as a supplier that European gas buyers they can count.

    “We need more gas from Nigeria as a result of the terrible war of aggression that Russia has mounted against Ukraine,” Baldwin declared.

    "We can no longer count on gas coming from the Russian Federation, and we want to build a new partnership with countries like Nigeria with whom we already have a well-established partnership to get more gas and LNG from you on good commercial terms."

    The window of opportunity will remain open It is somewhat tempting to greet these statements with skepticism, given that the EU has talked about diversifying gas supplies for more than 20 years and has done relatively little to make that diversification a reality.

    Yes, Brussels has supported initiatives such as the Southern Gas Corridor (SGC), which began delivering gas from Azerbaijan to Italy in 2020.

    However, in the time it took to carry out that project, Gazprom managed to plan a bigger gas pipeline across the Black Sea (South Stream), scrap that plan, come up with a plan for another bigger oil pipeline (TurkStream), and then execute that plan, all while working on an even bigger undersea pipeline to Germany , Nord Stream 2.

    However, I think such skepticism would be misplaced at this point.

    The EU no longer works in a context where the benefits of supply diversification are theoretical and abstract; now it is a concrete and immediate matter.

    For political reasons, the EU wants to deny Russia access to revenue from gas sales and strip it of its status as a normal trading partner.

    For practical reasons, European gas buyers need to find a way to make up for missing supplies in Russia.

    And for both political and practical reasons, Brussels wants to deny Moscow the opportunity to continue using gas supplies as a blunt instrument with which to threaten Europe in the future.

    The change will not be immediate.

    It will take time to lower Russia's profile in the EU's energy mix.

    But the process of supply reduction is underway and has already opened up new opportunities for African gas producers to gain market share in Europe.

    I expect those opportunities to last beyond the short term, as the EU tries to establish a new mix of gas suppliers to replace Russia in the coming years.

    I also hope that emerging gas producers in Africa will take advantage of new LNG technologies, such as Fast LNG modular solutions offered by New Fortress Energy (NFE), a US-based company, to meet European gas demand.

    With these technologies, they won't have to wait as long or spend as much money to start producing the LNG that European consumers are clamoring to buy.

    They can start in two years or less, instead of waiting five years or more, as is common with more conventional land projects.

    Between these new technologies and the EU's new political stance, the African gas sector is likely to look very different in a few years.

    I encourage you to read the 2022 State of Energy in Africa Report Q2 2022 and find out more for yourself.

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