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  •   It is an exciting time for E amp P projects in Africa but like global developments they face a number of challenges that need to be addressed to deliver the expected results The time it takes to start production the danger of cost overruns and the growing specter of sustainability compliance make it a complex picture A booming moment for Africa The pipeline of new projects on the continent looks strong In C te d Ivoire Eni made the Baleine discovery in deep water at the end of 2021 Following a successful well in July 2022 which confirmed the eastward extension of the field Eni is accelerating development and may sanction Phase 1 before the end of 2022 This will be C te d Ivoire s first significant project in decades In Namibia there were two giant discoveries in early 2022 that seem to be game changers the adjacent Shell s Graff and TotalEnergies Venus finds located deep in the Orange Basin TotalEnergies and Shell are speeding up assessment work a positive sign the two companies wouldn t do this if they didn t think they had something important In Angola Eni s Agogo project indicates that upstream activity is picking up after a few years of stagnation several projects are underway including TotalEnergies FPSO based Cameia Golfinho in Block 21 and a shallow water gas project deep operated by Eni The Italian Major is also moving forward with an innovative FAST LNG project in the shallow waters of Congo Brazzaville But it s not just the Majors that are moving forward with developments Africa focused independents are also key They include companies like Perenco which continues to expand in the region using its brownfields expertise to maximize the value of mature basins in Gabon Congo Cameroon and elsewhere VAALCO has ambitious growth plans focused on Gabon and Equatorial Guinea while BW Energy has been able to demonstrate strong operational capabilities with the Dussafu development in Gabon The company also has plans to replicate its winning strategy with the Kudu gas project off the coast of Namibia Accelerate developments now the industry mantra Delivering new projects on time and on budget is a big focus now for operators Production facilities like FPSOs are critical to achieving short cycle goals Operators like BW Energy have been successful in redeploying existing infrastructure in developments like Dussafu Eni also intends to redeploy an existing FPSO as part of its accelerated plans for Baleine But later phases of Baleine will require much larger FPSOs According to research by Welligence Energy Analytics it has taken an average of 50 months from FID to first oil for developments involving new build hulls on the mainland In the current climate companies are eager to shorten those lead times What we ve seen recently in Guyana is ExxonMobil using standardized FPSOs says Obo Idornigie vice president of sub Saharan Africa research at Welligence Instead of these FPSOs being bespoke vessels they are now standardized and will use hulls that have already been built to reduce the time from FID to first production Laser focus on costs Fast track projects are only part of the story Another major challenge now is the increasing pressure on the supply chain as activity increases During COVID most service providers reduced their workforce now the market is rising again demand is outstripping capacity This is a concern that everyone in the industry is talking about Idornigie added Are the construction of new wells the delivery of new facilities and other activities related to the upstream supply chain achieved without cost pressures In the context of African oil and gas it often revolves around reducing carbon emissions during production primarily the flaring and venting of gas from operations Are there opportunities for independents to work with technology providers to generate value from vacant land while reducing emissions adds Idornigie At the same time there is pressure to increase gas production for domestic consumption With the GOR oil and gas index rising in mature oil fields how do you reuse the gas that is flared into gas that could provide electricity host communities That s where that social license to operate starts to become an issue Find out more at Africa Oil Week A day long technical session at Africa Oil Week will focus on how to overcome the three challenges facing Africa s oil and gas sector Companies like Halliburton Baker Hughes Schlumberger BW Energy and Perenco will join Welligence Energy Analytics to share their experiences and explore the path to a profitable timely and sustainable future The AOW Technical Stream will investigate how industry can harness technology to manage what we call the three Cs cost cycle time and carbon reduction concludes Idornigie How can African projects be delivered efficiently with low costs shorter lead times and in a sustainable manner Africa Oil Week www Africa OilWeek com takes place in the heart of Cape Town at the Cape Town International Convention Center from October 3 7 2022 Book now https bit ly 3AuIn3S to lock in 2022 early bird savings
    Overcoming the technical challenges facing the future of oil and gas in Africa
      It is an exciting time for E amp P projects in Africa but like global developments they face a number of challenges that need to be addressed to deliver the expected results The time it takes to start production the danger of cost overruns and the growing specter of sustainability compliance make it a complex picture A booming moment for Africa The pipeline of new projects on the continent looks strong In C te d Ivoire Eni made the Baleine discovery in deep water at the end of 2021 Following a successful well in July 2022 which confirmed the eastward extension of the field Eni is accelerating development and may sanction Phase 1 before the end of 2022 This will be C te d Ivoire s first significant project in decades In Namibia there were two giant discoveries in early 2022 that seem to be game changers the adjacent Shell s Graff and TotalEnergies Venus finds located deep in the Orange Basin TotalEnergies and Shell are speeding up assessment work a positive sign the two companies wouldn t do this if they didn t think they had something important In Angola Eni s Agogo project indicates that upstream activity is picking up after a few years of stagnation several projects are underway including TotalEnergies FPSO based Cameia Golfinho in Block 21 and a shallow water gas project deep operated by Eni The Italian Major is also moving forward with an innovative FAST LNG project in the shallow waters of Congo Brazzaville But it s not just the Majors that are moving forward with developments Africa focused independents are also key They include companies like Perenco which continues to expand in the region using its brownfields expertise to maximize the value of mature basins in Gabon Congo Cameroon and elsewhere VAALCO has ambitious growth plans focused on Gabon and Equatorial Guinea while BW Energy has been able to demonstrate strong operational capabilities with the Dussafu development in Gabon The company also has plans to replicate its winning strategy with the Kudu gas project off the coast of Namibia Accelerate developments now the industry mantra Delivering new projects on time and on budget is a big focus now for operators Production facilities like FPSOs are critical to achieving short cycle goals Operators like BW Energy have been successful in redeploying existing infrastructure in developments like Dussafu Eni also intends to redeploy an existing FPSO as part of its accelerated plans for Baleine But later phases of Baleine will require much larger FPSOs According to research by Welligence Energy Analytics it has taken an average of 50 months from FID to first oil for developments involving new build hulls on the mainland In the current climate companies are eager to shorten those lead times What we ve seen recently in Guyana is ExxonMobil using standardized FPSOs says Obo Idornigie vice president of sub Saharan Africa research at Welligence Instead of these FPSOs being bespoke vessels they are now standardized and will use hulls that have already been built to reduce the time from FID to first production Laser focus on costs Fast track projects are only part of the story Another major challenge now is the increasing pressure on the supply chain as activity increases During COVID most service providers reduced their workforce now the market is rising again demand is outstripping capacity This is a concern that everyone in the industry is talking about Idornigie added Are the construction of new wells the delivery of new facilities and other activities related to the upstream supply chain achieved without cost pressures In the context of African oil and gas it often revolves around reducing carbon emissions during production primarily the flaring and venting of gas from operations Are there opportunities for independents to work with technology providers to generate value from vacant land while reducing emissions adds Idornigie At the same time there is pressure to increase gas production for domestic consumption With the GOR oil and gas index rising in mature oil fields how do you reuse the gas that is flared into gas that could provide electricity host communities That s where that social license to operate starts to become an issue Find out more at Africa Oil Week A day long technical session at Africa Oil Week will focus on how to overcome the three challenges facing Africa s oil and gas sector Companies like Halliburton Baker Hughes Schlumberger BW Energy and Perenco will join Welligence Energy Analytics to share their experiences and explore the path to a profitable timely and sustainable future The AOW Technical Stream will investigate how industry can harness technology to manage what we call the three Cs cost cycle time and carbon reduction concludes Idornigie How can African projects be delivered efficiently with low costs shorter lead times and in a sustainable manner Africa Oil Week www Africa OilWeek com takes place in the heart of Cape Town at the Cape Town International Convention Center from October 3 7 2022 Book now https bit ly 3AuIn3S to lock in 2022 early bird savings
    Overcoming the technical challenges facing the future of oil and gas in Africa
    Africa2 months ago

    Overcoming the technical challenges facing the future of oil and gas in Africa

    It is an exciting time for E&P projects in Africa, but like global developments they face a number of challenges that need to be addressed to deliver the expected results.

    The time it takes to start production, the danger of cost overruns, and the growing specter of sustainability compliance make it a complex picture.

    A booming moment for Africa The pipeline of new projects on the continent looks strong.

    In Côte d'Ivoire, Eni made the Baleine discovery in deep water at the end of 2021.

    Following a successful well in July 2022, which confirmed the eastward extension of the field, Eni is accelerating development and may sanction Phase 1 before the end of 2022 This will be Côte d'Ivoire's first significant project in decades.

    In Namibia, there were two giant discoveries in early 2022 that seem to be game changers: the adjacent Shell's Graff and TotalEnergies' Venus finds located deep in the Orange Basin.

    TotalEnergies and Shell are speeding up assessment work, a positive sign: the two companies wouldn't do this if they didn't think they had something important.

    In Angola, Eni's Agogo project indicates that upstream activity is picking up after a few years of stagnation: several projects are underway, including TotalEnergies' FPSO-based Cameia-Golfinho in Block 21 and a shallow-water gas project.

    deep operated by Eni. The Italian Major is also moving forward with an innovative FAST LNG project in the shallow waters of Congo Brazzaville.

    But it's not just the Majors that are moving forward with developments.

    Africa-focused independents are also key.

    They include companies like Perenco, which continues to expand in the region, using its brownfields expertise to maximize the value of mature basins in Gabon, Congo, Cameroon and elsewhere.

    VAALCO has ambitious growth plans focused on Gabon and Equatorial Guinea, while BW Energy has been able to demonstrate strong operational capabilities with the Dussafu development in Gabon.

    The company also has plans to replicate its winning strategy with the Kudu gas project off the coast of Namibia.

    Accelerate developments now the industry mantra Delivering new projects on time and on budget is a big focus now for operators.

    Production facilities like FPSOs are critical to achieving short cycle goals.

    Operators like BW Energy have been successful in redeploying existing infrastructure in developments like Dussafu.

    Eni also intends to redeploy an existing FPSO as part of its accelerated plans for Baleine.

    But later phases of Baleine will require much larger FPSOs. According to research by Welligence Energy Analytics, it has taken an average of 50 months from FID to first oil for developments involving new-build hulls on the mainland.

    In the current climate, companies are eager to shorten those lead times.

    "What we've seen recently in Guyana is ExxonMobil using standardized FPSOs," says Obo Idornigie, vice president of sub-Saharan Africa research at Welligence.

    “Instead of these FPSOs being bespoke vessels, they are now standardized and will use hulls that have already been built to reduce the time from FID to first production.” Laser focus on costs Fast track projects are only part of the story.

    Another major challenge now is the increasing pressure on the supply chain as activity increases.

    "During COVID most service providers reduced their workforce, now the market is rising again, demand is outstripping capacity."

    This is a concern that everyone in the industry is talking about, Idornigie added.

    Are the construction of new wells, the delivery of new facilities and other activities related to the upstream supply chain achieved without cost pressures?

    In the context of African oil and gas, it often revolves around reducing carbon emissions during production, primarily the flaring and venting of gas from operations.

    Are there opportunities for independents to work with technology providers to generate value from vacant land while reducing emissions?” adds Idornigie.

    "At the same time, there is pressure to increase gas production for domestic consumption.

    With the GOR (oil and gas index) rising in mature oil fields, how do you reuse the gas that is flared into gas that could provide electricity?

    host communities?

    That's where that social license to operate starts to become an issue."

    Find out more at Africa Oil Week A day-long technical session at Africa Oil Week will focus on how to overcome the three challenges facing Africa's oil and gas sector.

    Companies like Halliburton, Baker Hughes, Schlumberger, BW Energy and Perenco will join Welligence Energy Analytics to share their experiences and explore the path to a profitable, timely and sustainable future.

    "The AOW Technical Stream will investigate how industry can harness technology to manage what we call the three Cs: cost, cycle time, and carbon reduction," concludes Idornigie.

    “How can African projects be delivered efficiently, with low costs, shorter lead times and in a sustainable manner?” Africa Oil Week (www.Africa-OilWeek.com) takes place in the heart of Cape Town at the Cape Town International Convention Center from October 3-7, 2022.

    Book now (https://bit .ly/3AuIn3S) to lock in 2022 early bird savings.

  •   Following the recommendations of the Court of Appeal for the appointment of three special judges of appeal to hear the case of EEEL against Vijay Construction Pty Ltd the President of the Republic of Seychelles Mr Wavel Ramkalawan received the recommendations of the Appointments Authority Constitutional Courts CAA and has accordingly appointed Judge Winston Anderson as chairman of the panel and two other members Judge Carl Singh and Judge William Young to hear the case and make a final determination Justice Winston Anderson Chairman of the ad hoc appellate panel of judges is a judge of the Caribbean Court of Justice CCJ which is the highest court on civil constitutional and criminal appeals for four sovereign states Barbados Belize Dominica and Guiana He has been a CCJ Judge for twelve 12 years and is now the third longest serving Judge on the Court Justice William Young has served on the High Court the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of New Zealand Sir William is an Honorary Fellow of the Middle Temple and an Honorary Fellow of Gonville and Caius College Cambridge He has an honorary doctorate in law from the University of Canterbury Justice Carl Singh has served in the Supreme Court of Guyana followed by Chief Justice of Guyana and later in the Office of the Chancellor and Chief of the Guyana Judiciary He was also Professor and Head of the Department of Law at the University of Guyana
    Seychelles: Appointment of ad-hoc appellate judges
      Following the recommendations of the Court of Appeal for the appointment of three special judges of appeal to hear the case of EEEL against Vijay Construction Pty Ltd the President of the Republic of Seychelles Mr Wavel Ramkalawan received the recommendations of the Appointments Authority Constitutional Courts CAA and has accordingly appointed Judge Winston Anderson as chairman of the panel and two other members Judge Carl Singh and Judge William Young to hear the case and make a final determination Justice Winston Anderson Chairman of the ad hoc appellate panel of judges is a judge of the Caribbean Court of Justice CCJ which is the highest court on civil constitutional and criminal appeals for four sovereign states Barbados Belize Dominica and Guiana He has been a CCJ Judge for twelve 12 years and is now the third longest serving Judge on the Court Justice William Young has served on the High Court the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of New Zealand Sir William is an Honorary Fellow of the Middle Temple and an Honorary Fellow of Gonville and Caius College Cambridge He has an honorary doctorate in law from the University of Canterbury Justice Carl Singh has served in the Supreme Court of Guyana followed by Chief Justice of Guyana and later in the Office of the Chancellor and Chief of the Guyana Judiciary He was also Professor and Head of the Department of Law at the University of Guyana
    Seychelles: Appointment of ad-hoc appellate judges
    Africa2 months ago

    Seychelles: Appointment of ad-hoc appellate judges

    Following the recommendations of the Court of Appeal for the appointment of three special judges of appeal to hear the case of EEEL against Vijay Construction Pty Ltd, the President of the Republic of Seychelles, Mr. Wavel Ramkalawan, received the recommendations of the Appointments Authority Constitutional Courts (CAA) and has accordingly appointed Judge Winston Anderson as chairman of the panel and two other members, Judge Carl Singh and Judge William Young, to hear the case and make a final determination.

    Justice Winston Anderson (Chairman of the ad-hoc appellate panel of judges) is a judge of the Caribbean Court of Justice ("CCJ"), which is the highest court on civil, constitutional and criminal appeals for four sovereign states: Barbados, Belize, Dominica and Guiana.

    He has been a CCJ Judge for twelve (12) years and is now the third longest serving Judge on the Court.

    Justice William Young has served on the High Court, the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of New Zealand.

    Sir William is an Honorary Fellow of the Middle Temple and an Honorary Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.

    He has an honorary doctorate in law from the University of Canterbury.

    Justice Carl Singh has served in the Supreme Court of Guyana, followed by Chief Justice of Guyana, and later in the Office of the Chancellor and Chief of the Guyana Judiciary.

    He was also Professor and Head of the Department of Law at the University of Guyana.

  •   By NJ Ayuk CEO of the African Chamber of Energy Senegal and Mauritania could be described as rising stars in the energy industry After one major offshore discovery after another in the region between 2014 and 2017 it has become clear that the region has massive reserves of natural gas up to 1 13 trillion cubic meters tcm in proven reserves in Senegal and 28 3 billion cubic meters bcm in Mauritania There was a time in the not too distant past when the chances of Senegal and Mauritania fully capitalizing on their rich resources were not entirely certain The great African discoveries of oil and gas were greeted with hand wringing by Western countries and environmental organizations The general argument was that African countries were better off leaving their oil resources in the ground so that they would not contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and global warming International oil companies IOCs and investors were increasingly reluctant to support African oil projects But now world events have changed much of that During the last months of 2021 global demand for gas began to outstrip supply driving natural gas prices to record highs in Asia Europe and the US Russia s dependence on gas in response to its invasion of Ukraine The situation has become even more urgent for Europe in recent months Russia has responded to Europe s plans to gradually use less Russian gas with immediate reductions in gas deliveries As a result Western countries that once pressured African countries to give up their oil resources are now investing in African oil and gas projects They are interested in building African infrastructure They are focused on doing whatever they can to help meet your pressing gas needs I wouldn t describe the under supplied gas market or the suffering in Ukraine as opportunities but these situations have created a new reality for African countries with oil and gas reserves My advice to Senegal and Mauritania and the companies that have discovered oil there is to be aggressive in keeping their projects on schedule Natural gas and liquefied natural gas LNG projects are already in various stages of development in Senegal and Mauritania but it is imperative that stakeholders do all they can to push their projects forward They must avoid delays because it is impossible to know how long European countries will be willing to invest and promote these projects The reality is that while Senegal and Mauritania now have a better chance to capitalize on their gas for domestic needs to monetize gas and to grow and diversify their economies with gas their window to achieve those things has an invisible expiration date The African Chamber of Energy addresses this issue in its Petroleum Laws Benchmarking Report for Senegal and Mauritania to be published soon One of the report s key recommendations for government leaders and international oil companies IOCs in Senegal and Mauritania is to make it a priority to avoid project deadline delays We have already seen declines As our report points out projects in the region have already faced some obstacles Take a look at Greater Tortue Ahmeyim GTA the offshore LNG project on the Senegal Mauritania maritime border being developed by BP Kosmos Energy Senegal s national oil company Petrosen and the Societe Mauritanienne des Hydrocarbures SMHPM of Mauritania The project s floating liquefied natural gas FLNG project a Phase 1 development was initially scheduled to come online in 2022 Project partners now plan to complete Phase 1 in 2023 The initial delay was caused by the COVID 19 pandemic but the project also experienced a small timeline shift due to cost inflation which delayed completion of Phase 1 from Q1 2023 to Q3 GTA and the other projects in the region from the Yakaar Teranga LNG and power project to BP s BirAllah gas project off the coast of Mauritania must move forward As our report says Any delay in these projects that are already looking at from the late 2020s to the mid 2030s barring the launch of GTA FLNG Phase 1 may result in no can fully utilize the under supplied LNG market in the coming years It is also important to recognize that while European countries are doing their best to import natural gas from Africa they are working just as furiously to source gas from other regions of the world including the US Guyana Qatar and Azerbaijan As Stanley Reed wrote for The New York Times As Russia tightens its grip on natural gas supplies Europe is looking everywhere for energy to keep its economy running Coal fired power plants are being revived Billions are being spent on terminals to bring in liquefied natural gas much of it from shale fields in Texas Across Europe fears are growing that a Russian gas cutoff will force governments to ration fuel already companies to close factories measures that could put thousands of jobs at risk We must also remember that Europe also considers green energy sources as part of its energy solution Once again European leaders are looking to Africa to meet some of those needs in particular green hydrogen produced without fossil fuels which is a valuable opportunity But that doesn t mean we shouldn t recognize the urgency of helping Europe meet its natural gas needs while we still can To miss out on all that gas can do for Senegal and Mauritania in what it can do to help eradicate energy poverty build businesses and create jobs would be a heartbreaking loss We can do this I understand that some gas project delays like those caused by the pandemic are out of anyone s control But there are steps governments and companies can take to keep projects moving forward As I have made clear more than once the governments of Senegal and Mauritania are to be commended for all that they have done to create a positive environment for doing business in their countries Their tax policies were created specifically to attract IOCs and that was exactly what needed to be done With that said I would encourage oil and gas ministries to continue to find and eliminate bureaucracy and inefficiencies that may impede the progress of gas projects I am encouraged by the words of Moustapha Bechir Director General for Hydrocarbons at the Mauritanian Ministry of Petroleum Energy and Mines who has said that the ministry is working to optimize Phase 2 of the GTA FLNG project We are now remodeling Phase 2 to better fit the concept and to speed it up and maximize project economics Bechir said in 2021 As for the companies that have been exploring in Senegal and Mauritania those that are moving forward with projects gas and LNG have also made great strides I would simply encourage them to be proactive in recognizing situations that could interfere with project timelines so that they can be addressed as efficiently as possible I have told my employees and fellow African energy stakeholders that we still have work to do there is still much good we can achieve The same goes for the governments and companies of Senegal and Mauritania The region s natural gas really does have the power to benefit ordinary people It can make it possible for millions many for the first time to experience life with reliable electricity You can create business opportunities and empower people to make a good living And it can lay the foundation through industrialization and economic diversification for a pattern of long term growth and stability We simply need to move quickly and decisively to make these things happen
    Senegal and Mauritania must capitalize on their vast natural gas resources as quickly as possible (by NJ Ayuk)
      By NJ Ayuk CEO of the African Chamber of Energy Senegal and Mauritania could be described as rising stars in the energy industry After one major offshore discovery after another in the region between 2014 and 2017 it has become clear that the region has massive reserves of natural gas up to 1 13 trillion cubic meters tcm in proven reserves in Senegal and 28 3 billion cubic meters bcm in Mauritania There was a time in the not too distant past when the chances of Senegal and Mauritania fully capitalizing on their rich resources were not entirely certain The great African discoveries of oil and gas were greeted with hand wringing by Western countries and environmental organizations The general argument was that African countries were better off leaving their oil resources in the ground so that they would not contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and global warming International oil companies IOCs and investors were increasingly reluctant to support African oil projects But now world events have changed much of that During the last months of 2021 global demand for gas began to outstrip supply driving natural gas prices to record highs in Asia Europe and the US Russia s dependence on gas in response to its invasion of Ukraine The situation has become even more urgent for Europe in recent months Russia has responded to Europe s plans to gradually use less Russian gas with immediate reductions in gas deliveries As a result Western countries that once pressured African countries to give up their oil resources are now investing in African oil and gas projects They are interested in building African infrastructure They are focused on doing whatever they can to help meet your pressing gas needs I wouldn t describe the under supplied gas market or the suffering in Ukraine as opportunities but these situations have created a new reality for African countries with oil and gas reserves My advice to Senegal and Mauritania and the companies that have discovered oil there is to be aggressive in keeping their projects on schedule Natural gas and liquefied natural gas LNG projects are already in various stages of development in Senegal and Mauritania but it is imperative that stakeholders do all they can to push their projects forward They must avoid delays because it is impossible to know how long European countries will be willing to invest and promote these projects The reality is that while Senegal and Mauritania now have a better chance to capitalize on their gas for domestic needs to monetize gas and to grow and diversify their economies with gas their window to achieve those things has an invisible expiration date The African Chamber of Energy addresses this issue in its Petroleum Laws Benchmarking Report for Senegal and Mauritania to be published soon One of the report s key recommendations for government leaders and international oil companies IOCs in Senegal and Mauritania is to make it a priority to avoid project deadline delays We have already seen declines As our report points out projects in the region have already faced some obstacles Take a look at Greater Tortue Ahmeyim GTA the offshore LNG project on the Senegal Mauritania maritime border being developed by BP Kosmos Energy Senegal s national oil company Petrosen and the Societe Mauritanienne des Hydrocarbures SMHPM of Mauritania The project s floating liquefied natural gas FLNG project a Phase 1 development was initially scheduled to come online in 2022 Project partners now plan to complete Phase 1 in 2023 The initial delay was caused by the COVID 19 pandemic but the project also experienced a small timeline shift due to cost inflation which delayed completion of Phase 1 from Q1 2023 to Q3 GTA and the other projects in the region from the Yakaar Teranga LNG and power project to BP s BirAllah gas project off the coast of Mauritania must move forward As our report says Any delay in these projects that are already looking at from the late 2020s to the mid 2030s barring the launch of GTA FLNG Phase 1 may result in no can fully utilize the under supplied LNG market in the coming years It is also important to recognize that while European countries are doing their best to import natural gas from Africa they are working just as furiously to source gas from other regions of the world including the US Guyana Qatar and Azerbaijan As Stanley Reed wrote for The New York Times As Russia tightens its grip on natural gas supplies Europe is looking everywhere for energy to keep its economy running Coal fired power plants are being revived Billions are being spent on terminals to bring in liquefied natural gas much of it from shale fields in Texas Across Europe fears are growing that a Russian gas cutoff will force governments to ration fuel already companies to close factories measures that could put thousands of jobs at risk We must also remember that Europe also considers green energy sources as part of its energy solution Once again European leaders are looking to Africa to meet some of those needs in particular green hydrogen produced without fossil fuels which is a valuable opportunity But that doesn t mean we shouldn t recognize the urgency of helping Europe meet its natural gas needs while we still can To miss out on all that gas can do for Senegal and Mauritania in what it can do to help eradicate energy poverty build businesses and create jobs would be a heartbreaking loss We can do this I understand that some gas project delays like those caused by the pandemic are out of anyone s control But there are steps governments and companies can take to keep projects moving forward As I have made clear more than once the governments of Senegal and Mauritania are to be commended for all that they have done to create a positive environment for doing business in their countries Their tax policies were created specifically to attract IOCs and that was exactly what needed to be done With that said I would encourage oil and gas ministries to continue to find and eliminate bureaucracy and inefficiencies that may impede the progress of gas projects I am encouraged by the words of Moustapha Bechir Director General for Hydrocarbons at the Mauritanian Ministry of Petroleum Energy and Mines who has said that the ministry is working to optimize Phase 2 of the GTA FLNG project We are now remodeling Phase 2 to better fit the concept and to speed it up and maximize project economics Bechir said in 2021 As for the companies that have been exploring in Senegal and Mauritania those that are moving forward with projects gas and LNG have also made great strides I would simply encourage them to be proactive in recognizing situations that could interfere with project timelines so that they can be addressed as efficiently as possible I have told my employees and fellow African energy stakeholders that we still have work to do there is still much good we can achieve The same goes for the governments and companies of Senegal and Mauritania The region s natural gas really does have the power to benefit ordinary people It can make it possible for millions many for the first time to experience life with reliable electricity You can create business opportunities and empower people to make a good living And it can lay the foundation through industrialization and economic diversification for a pattern of long term growth and stability We simply need to move quickly and decisively to make these things happen
    Senegal and Mauritania must capitalize on their vast natural gas resources as quickly as possible (by NJ Ayuk)
    Africa2 months ago

    Senegal and Mauritania must capitalize on their vast natural gas resources as quickly as possible (by NJ Ayuk)

    By NJ Ayuk, CEO of the African Chamber of Energy Senegal and Mauritania could be described as rising stars in the energy industry.

    After one major offshore discovery after another in the region between 2014 and 2017, it has become clear that the region has massive reserves of natural gas: up to 1.13 trillion cubic meters (tcm) in proven reserves in Senegal and 28 .3 billion cubic meters (bcm) in Mauritania.

    There was a time in the not too distant past when the chances of Senegal and Mauritania fully capitalizing on their rich resources were not entirely certain.

    The great African discoveries of oil and gas were greeted with hand wringing by Western countries and environmental organizations.

    The general argument was that African countries were better off leaving their oil resources in the ground so that they would not contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and global warming.

    International oil companies (IOCs) and investors were increasingly reluctant to support African oil projects.

    But now, world events have changed much of that.

    During the last months of 2021, global demand for gas began to outstrip supply, driving natural gas prices to record highs in Asia, Europe and the US.

    Russia's dependence on gas in response to its invasion of Ukraine .

    The situation has become even more urgent for Europe in recent months: Russia has responded to Europe's plans to gradually use less Russian gas with immediate reductions in gas deliveries.

    As a result, Western countries that once pressured African countries to give up their oil resources are now investing in African oil and gas projects.

    They are interested in building African infrastructure.

    They are focused on doing whatever they can to help meet your pressing gas needs.

    I wouldn't describe the under-supplied gas market or the suffering in Ukraine as opportunities, but these situations have created a new reality for African countries with oil and gas reserves.

    My advice to Senegal and Mauritania, and the companies that have discovered oil there, is to be aggressive in keeping their projects on schedule.

    Natural gas and liquefied natural gas (LNG) projects are already in various stages of development in Senegal and Mauritania, but it is imperative that stakeholders do all they can to push their projects forward.

    They must avoid delays because it is impossible to know how long European countries will be willing to invest and promote these projects.

    The reality is that while Senegal and Mauritania now have a better chance to capitalize on their gas for domestic needs, to monetize gas, and to grow and diversify their economies with gas, their window to achieve those things has an invisible expiration date.

    The African Chamber of Energy addresses this issue in its Petroleum Laws - Benchmarking Report for Senegal and Mauritania, to be published soon.

    One of the report's key recommendations for government leaders and international oil companies (IOCs) in Senegal and Mauritania is to make it a priority to avoid project deadline delays.

    We have already seen declines As our report points out, projects in the region have already faced some obstacles.

    Take a look at Greater Tortue Ahmeyim (GTA), the offshore LNG project on the Senegal-Mauritania maritime border being developed by BP, Kosmos Energy, Senegal's national oil company Petrosen and the Societe Mauritanienne des Hydrocarbures (SMHPM) of Mauritania.

    The project's floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) project, a Phase 1 development, was initially scheduled to come online in 2022.

    Project partners now plan to complete Phase 1 in 2023.

    The initial delay was caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, but the project also experienced a small “timeline shift” due to cost inflation, which delayed completion of Phase 1 from Q1 2023 to Q3.

    GTA, and the other projects in the region, from the Yakaar-Teranga LNG and power project to BP's BirAllah gas project off the coast of Mauritania, must move forward.

    As our report says, “Any delay in these projects that are already looking at from the late 2020s to the mid 2030s (barring the launch of GTA FLNG Phase 1) may result in no can fully utilize the under-supplied LNG market in the coming years.” It is also important to recognize that while European countries are doing their best to import natural gas from Africa, they are working just as furiously to source gas from other regions of the world, including the US, Guyana, Qatar and Azerbaijan.

    As Stanley Reed wrote for The New York Times, “As Russia tightens its grip on natural gas supplies, Europe is looking everywhere for energy to keep its economy running.

    Coal-fired power plants are being revived.

    Billions are being spent on terminals to bring in liquefied natural gas, much of it from shale fields in Texas...

    Across Europe, fears are growing that a Russian gas cutoff will force governments to ration fuel already companies to close factories, measures that could put thousands of jobs at risk.” We must also remember that Europe also considers green energy sources as part of its energy solution.

    Once again, European leaders are looking to Africa to meet some of those needs, in particular green hydrogen (produced without fossil fuels), which is a valuable opportunity.

    But that doesn't mean we shouldn't recognize the urgency of helping Europe meet its natural gas needs while we still can.

    To miss out on all that gas can do for Senegal and Mauritania, in what it can do to help eradicate energy poverty, build businesses and create jobs, would be a heartbreaking loss.

    We can do this.

    I understand that some gas project delays, like those caused by the pandemic, are out of anyone's control.

    But there are steps governments and companies can take to keep projects moving forward.

    As I have made clear more than once, the governments of Senegal and Mauritania are to be commended for all that they have done to create a positive environment for doing business in their countries.

    Their tax policies were created specifically to attract IOCs, and that was exactly what needed to be done.

    With that said, I would encourage oil and gas ministries to continue to find and eliminate bureaucracy and inefficiencies that may impede the progress of gas projects.

    I am encouraged by the words of Moustapha Bechir, Director General for Hydrocarbons at the Mauritanian Ministry of Petroleum, Energy and Mines, who has said that the ministry is working to optimize Phase 2 of the GTA FLNG project.

    “We are now remodeling Phase 2 to better fit the concept and to speed it up and maximize project economics,” Bechir said in 2021.

    As for the companies that have been exploring in Senegal and Mauritania, those that are moving forward with projects gas and LNG, have also made great strides.

    I would simply encourage them to be proactive in recognizing situations that could interfere with project timelines so that they can be addressed as efficiently as possible.

    I have told my employees and fellow African energy stakeholders that we still have work to do, there is still much good we can achieve.

    The same goes for the governments and companies of Senegal and Mauritania.

    The region's natural gas really does have the power to benefit ordinary people.

    It can make it possible for millions, many for the first time, to experience life with reliable electricity.

    You can create business opportunities and empower people to make a good living.

    And it can lay the foundation, through industrialization and economic diversification, for a pattern of long-term growth and stability.

    We simply need to move quickly and decisively to make these things happen.

  •  Nigeria s table tennis team at the ongoing Commonwealth Games in Birmingham on Friday had a bright start in both the men s and women s team events The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the women s team of Offiong Edem Fatima Bello and Esther Oribamise defeated their St Vincent and the Grenadines counterparts 3 0 In their Group One fixture s doubles game the pair of Edem and Bello defeated Velox and Cumberbatch 3 0 11 6 11 2 11 5 In one of the fixture s singles game Oribamise beat Delpesche 3 0 also winning 11 2 11 3 11 2 The other singles game saw Edem dispatchin Cumberbatch 11 1 11 2 11 3 for another 3 0 routing of their opponents Meanwhile in another Group One fixture Singapore beat England 3 0 Group Two results show India beating South Africa 3 0 while Guyana also beat Fiji 3 0 In Group Three Australia beat Malaysia 3 0 while Mauritius beat Maldives 3 2 Matches in Group Four of the event saw Canada beating Uganda 3 0 just as Wales spanked Vanuatu 3 0 NAN reports that the Nigerian men team were also superlative as they whipped South Africa 3 0 in their Group Two fixture Ghana and Cyprus are their other group opponents In Group One of the event England beat Guyana 3 0 while India beat Barbados 3 0 in Group Three action NAN reports that competition continues in the event later on Friday in round robin fashion OLAL NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Bright start for Team Nigeria in table tennis at Commonwealth Games
     Nigeria s table tennis team at the ongoing Commonwealth Games in Birmingham on Friday had a bright start in both the men s and women s team events The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the women s team of Offiong Edem Fatima Bello and Esther Oribamise defeated their St Vincent and the Grenadines counterparts 3 0 In their Group One fixture s doubles game the pair of Edem and Bello defeated Velox and Cumberbatch 3 0 11 6 11 2 11 5 In one of the fixture s singles game Oribamise beat Delpesche 3 0 also winning 11 2 11 3 11 2 The other singles game saw Edem dispatchin Cumberbatch 11 1 11 2 11 3 for another 3 0 routing of their opponents Meanwhile in another Group One fixture Singapore beat England 3 0 Group Two results show India beating South Africa 3 0 while Guyana also beat Fiji 3 0 In Group Three Australia beat Malaysia 3 0 while Mauritius beat Maldives 3 2 Matches in Group Four of the event saw Canada beating Uganda 3 0 just as Wales spanked Vanuatu 3 0 NAN reports that the Nigerian men team were also superlative as they whipped South Africa 3 0 in their Group Two fixture Ghana and Cyprus are their other group opponents In Group One of the event England beat Guyana 3 0 while India beat Barbados 3 0 in Group Three action NAN reports that competition continues in the event later on Friday in round robin fashion OLAL NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Bright start for Team Nigeria in table tennis at Commonwealth Games
    General news2 months ago

    Bright start for Team Nigeria in table tennis at Commonwealth Games

    Nigeria’s table tennis team at the ongoing Commonwealth Games in Birmingham on Friday had a bright start in both the men’s and women’s team events.

    The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the women’s team of Offiong Edem, Fatima Bello and Esther Oribamise defeated their St. Vincent and the Grenadines counterparts 3-0.

    In their Group One fixture’s doubles game, the pair of Edem and Bello defeated Velox and Cumberbatch 3-0 (11-6 11-2 11-5).

    In one of the fixture’s singles game, Oribamise beat Delpesche 3-0 also, winning 11-2 11-3 11-2.

    The other singles game saw Edem dispatchin Cumberbatch 11-1 11-2 11-3 for another 3-0 routing of their opponents.

    Meanwhile, in another Group One fixture, Singapore beat England 3-0.

    Group Two results show India beating South Africa 3-0, while Guyana also beat Fiji 3-0.

    In Group Three, Australia beat Malaysia 3-0 while Mauritius beat Maldives 3-2.

    Matches in Group Four of the event saw Canada beating Uganda 3-0, just as Wales spanked Vanuatu 3-0.

    NAN reports that the Nigerian men team were also superlative as they whipped South Africa 3-0 in their Group Two fixture.

    Ghana and Cyprus are their other group opponents.

    In Group One of the event, England beat Guyana 3-0, while India beat Barbados 3-0 in Group Three action.

    NAN reports that competition continues in the event later on Friday in round-robin fashion.

    OLAL
    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   May has been a busy month for the Football for Schools programme After launching in Guam https fifa fans 3yKXXYH Guyana https fifa fans 3wrmel8 and Puerto Rico https fifa fans 39xOlWP it landed in Africa with the FIFA Foundation organizing a workshop in Djibouti from May 9 to 12 Held in a relaxed atmosphere the three day event comprised theoretical modules in the classroom and practical sessions in the field An official launch ceremony for the Football for Schools program was also held on the last day Participants included Ivory Coast women s national team coach and FIFA Legend Clementine Toure This is a fantastic opportunity for the youth of Djibouti said Toure Many young people do not have the opportunity to express themselves Playing soccer at school allows children to develop their team spirit It unites them allows them to share an experience and develop their self control Those are the very goals of Football for Schools Developed in collaboration with UNESCO the initiative seeks to contribute to the education development and empowerment of nearly 700 million children around the world It also strives to make soccer more accessible to boys and girls around the world by making soccer an integral part of the school system
    Video News Release: Djibouti Becomes the Second African Country to Benefit from FIFA Foundation’s Football for Schools Initiative
      May has been a busy month for the Football for Schools programme After launching in Guam https fifa fans 3yKXXYH Guyana https fifa fans 3wrmel8 and Puerto Rico https fifa fans 39xOlWP it landed in Africa with the FIFA Foundation organizing a workshop in Djibouti from May 9 to 12 Held in a relaxed atmosphere the three day event comprised theoretical modules in the classroom and practical sessions in the field An official launch ceremony for the Football for Schools program was also held on the last day Participants included Ivory Coast women s national team coach and FIFA Legend Clementine Toure This is a fantastic opportunity for the youth of Djibouti said Toure Many young people do not have the opportunity to express themselves Playing soccer at school allows children to develop their team spirit It unites them allows them to share an experience and develop their self control Those are the very goals of Football for Schools Developed in collaboration with UNESCO the initiative seeks to contribute to the education development and empowerment of nearly 700 million children around the world It also strives to make soccer more accessible to boys and girls around the world by making soccer an integral part of the school system
    Video News Release: Djibouti Becomes the Second African Country to Benefit from FIFA Foundation’s Football for Schools Initiative
    Africa5 months ago

    Video News Release: Djibouti Becomes the Second African Country to Benefit from FIFA Foundation’s Football for Schools Initiative

    May has been a busy month for the Football for Schools programme. After launching in Guam (https://fifa.fans/3yKXXYH), Guyana (https://fifa.fans/3wrmel8) and Puerto Rico (https://fifa.fans/39xOlWP), it landed in Africa, with the FIFA Foundation organizing a workshop in Djibouti from May 9 to 12.

    Held in a relaxed atmosphere, the three-day event comprised theoretical modules in the classroom and practical sessions in the field. An official launch ceremony for the Football for Schools program was also held on the last day. Participants included Ivory Coast women's national team coach and FIFA Legend Clementine Toure.

    “This is a fantastic opportunity for the youth of Djibouti,” said Toure. “Many young people do not have the opportunity to express themselves. Playing soccer at school allows children to develop their team spirit. It unites them, allows them to share an experience and develop their self-control”.

    Those are the very goals of Football for Schools. Developed in collaboration with UNESCO, the initiative seeks to contribute to the education, development and empowerment of nearly 700 million children around the world. It also strives to make soccer more accessible to boys and girls around the world by making soccer an integral part of the school system.

  •   May has been a busy month for the Football for Schools programme After launching in Guam https fifa fans 3yKXXYH Guyana https fifa fans 3wrmel8 and Puerto Rico https fifa fans 39xOlWP it landed in Africa with the FIFA Foundation organizing a workshop in Djibouti from May 9 to 12 Held in a relaxed atmosphere the three day event comprised theoretical modules in the classroom and practical sessions in the field An official launch ceremony for the Football for Schools program was also held on the last day Participants included Ivory Coast women s national team coach and FIFA Legend Clementine Toure This is a fantastic opportunity for the youth of Djibouti said Toure Many young people do not have the opportunity to express themselves Playing soccer at school allows children to develop their team spirit It unites them allows them to share an experience and develop their self control Those are the very goals of Football for Schools Developed in collaboration with UNESCO the initiative seeks to contribute to the education development and empowerment of nearly 700 million children around the world It also strives to make soccer more accessible to boys and girls around the world by making soccer an integral part of the school system Access B roll and dopesheet https bit ly 3FUCoGN
    B-roll Video Release: FIFA Football for Schools puts Football at the Heart of Social Development in Djibouti
      May has been a busy month for the Football for Schools programme After launching in Guam https fifa fans 3yKXXYH Guyana https fifa fans 3wrmel8 and Puerto Rico https fifa fans 39xOlWP it landed in Africa with the FIFA Foundation organizing a workshop in Djibouti from May 9 to 12 Held in a relaxed atmosphere the three day event comprised theoretical modules in the classroom and practical sessions in the field An official launch ceremony for the Football for Schools program was also held on the last day Participants included Ivory Coast women s national team coach and FIFA Legend Clementine Toure This is a fantastic opportunity for the youth of Djibouti said Toure Many young people do not have the opportunity to express themselves Playing soccer at school allows children to develop their team spirit It unites them allows them to share an experience and develop their self control Those are the very goals of Football for Schools Developed in collaboration with UNESCO the initiative seeks to contribute to the education development and empowerment of nearly 700 million children around the world It also strives to make soccer more accessible to boys and girls around the world by making soccer an integral part of the school system Access B roll and dopesheet https bit ly 3FUCoGN
    B-roll Video Release: FIFA Football for Schools puts Football at the Heart of Social Development in Djibouti
    Africa5 months ago

    B-roll Video Release: FIFA Football for Schools puts Football at the Heart of Social Development in Djibouti

    May has been a busy month for the Football for Schools programme. After launching in Guam (https://fifa.fans/3yKXXYH), Guyana (https://fifa.fans/3wrmel8) and Puerto Rico (https://fifa.fans/39xOlWP), it landed in Africa, with the FIFA Foundation organizing a workshop in Djibouti from May 9 to 12.

    Held in a relaxed atmosphere, the three-day event comprised theoretical modules in the classroom and practical sessions in the field. An official launch ceremony for the Football for Schools program was also held on the last day. Participants included Ivory Coast women's national team coach and FIFA Legend Clementine Toure.

    “This is a fantastic opportunity for the youth of Djibouti,” said Toure. “Many young people do not have the opportunity to express themselves. Playing soccer at school allows children to develop their team spirit. It unites them, allows them to share an experience and develop their self-control”.

    Those are the very goals of Football for Schools. Developed in collaboration with UNESCO, the initiative seeks to contribute to the education, development and empowerment of nearly 700 million children around the world. It also strives to make soccer more accessible to boys and girls around the world by making soccer an integral part of the school system.

    Access B-roll and dopesheet: https://bit.ly/3FUCoGN

  •   The Commonwealth Secretariat www TheCommonwealth org and the International Islamic Trade Finance Corporation ITFC www ITFC idb org have signed a Memorandum of Understanding MoU to collaborate in key areas of development Key areas of focus in the MoU include women s economic empowerment digital trade and e commerce private sector and small and medium enterprise development climate change and environmental protection capacity building for trade negotiations and trade finance The virtual signing ceremony took place during a high level bilateral meeting between the Commonwealth Secretary General Rt Hon Patricia Scotland QC and ITFC CEO Eng Hani Salem Sonbol At the signing ceremony Secretary General Scotland said Both the Commonwealth and the International Islamic Trade Finance Corporation share the goal of strengthening and supporting the economic and development aspirations of our member states Our collaboration will provide us with greater opportunities and better access to harness our collective ideas knowledge skills and combined financial resources to serve the development needs of our common members The six agreed areas of cooperation together with our combined defense and convening power can provide vital support for the recovery of our small and developing states which are the most vulnerable to global economic shocks ITFC CEO Ing Hani Salem Sonbol said Commenting on the signing Mr Hani Salem Sonbol ITFC Chief Executive Officer said really pleased to see that ITFC s partnership with the Commonwealth Secretariat is a partnership of action As we celebrate the signing of a new Memorandum of Understanding we are also making official the first two projects ready for implementation in Cameroon and Pakistan Recognizing the role of alliances in promoting trade development Mr Hani Salem Sonbol said At ITFC our goal is to work effectively with our partners to identify and offer the best solutions in all areas of trade finance and business development including taking advantage of opportunities manifested in emerging business issues such as digitalization agriculture technology and climate change to name a few There are twelve common member states between the two organizations showing significant common interest These countries include Cameroon Gambia Mozambique Nigeria Sierra Leone Uganda Guyana Bangladesh Pakistan Maldives Brunei and Malaysia A project highlighted in the MoU between the Commonwealth Secretariat and the ITFC includes a trade development project in Pakistan that improves the country s overall trade competitiveness by building the capacity of the Pakistan Ministry of Commerce and improving its overall trade negotiation skills Another agreed initiative is a digital boot camp to be held in Cameroon to support the government s e commerce strategy through capacity building programs that support women and SMEs Approximately 100 women owned SMEs are expected to benefit from this programme Through this collaboration the Commonwealth Secretariat and the ITFC aim to help create decent jobs increased trade and greener economies for the benefit of all but especially women and SMEs
    Commonwealth Signs MoU with the International Islamic Trade Finance Corporation
      The Commonwealth Secretariat www TheCommonwealth org and the International Islamic Trade Finance Corporation ITFC www ITFC idb org have signed a Memorandum of Understanding MoU to collaborate in key areas of development Key areas of focus in the MoU include women s economic empowerment digital trade and e commerce private sector and small and medium enterprise development climate change and environmental protection capacity building for trade negotiations and trade finance The virtual signing ceremony took place during a high level bilateral meeting between the Commonwealth Secretary General Rt Hon Patricia Scotland QC and ITFC CEO Eng Hani Salem Sonbol At the signing ceremony Secretary General Scotland said Both the Commonwealth and the International Islamic Trade Finance Corporation share the goal of strengthening and supporting the economic and development aspirations of our member states Our collaboration will provide us with greater opportunities and better access to harness our collective ideas knowledge skills and combined financial resources to serve the development needs of our common members The six agreed areas of cooperation together with our combined defense and convening power can provide vital support for the recovery of our small and developing states which are the most vulnerable to global economic shocks ITFC CEO Ing Hani Salem Sonbol said Commenting on the signing Mr Hani Salem Sonbol ITFC Chief Executive Officer said really pleased to see that ITFC s partnership with the Commonwealth Secretariat is a partnership of action As we celebrate the signing of a new Memorandum of Understanding we are also making official the first two projects ready for implementation in Cameroon and Pakistan Recognizing the role of alliances in promoting trade development Mr Hani Salem Sonbol said At ITFC our goal is to work effectively with our partners to identify and offer the best solutions in all areas of trade finance and business development including taking advantage of opportunities manifested in emerging business issues such as digitalization agriculture technology and climate change to name a few There are twelve common member states between the two organizations showing significant common interest These countries include Cameroon Gambia Mozambique Nigeria Sierra Leone Uganda Guyana Bangladesh Pakistan Maldives Brunei and Malaysia A project highlighted in the MoU between the Commonwealth Secretariat and the ITFC includes a trade development project in Pakistan that improves the country s overall trade competitiveness by building the capacity of the Pakistan Ministry of Commerce and improving its overall trade negotiation skills Another agreed initiative is a digital boot camp to be held in Cameroon to support the government s e commerce strategy through capacity building programs that support women and SMEs Approximately 100 women owned SMEs are expected to benefit from this programme Through this collaboration the Commonwealth Secretariat and the ITFC aim to help create decent jobs increased trade and greener economies for the benefit of all but especially women and SMEs
    Commonwealth Signs MoU with the International Islamic Trade Finance Corporation
    Africa5 months ago

    Commonwealth Signs MoU with the International Islamic Trade Finance Corporation

    The Commonwealth Secretariat (www.TheCommonwealth.org) and the International Islamic Trade Finance Corporation (ITFC) (www.ITFC-idb.org) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to collaborate in key areas of development.

    Key areas of focus in the MoU include women's economic empowerment, digital trade and e-commerce, private sector and small and medium enterprise development, climate change and environmental protection, capacity building for trade negotiations and trade finance.

    The virtual signing ceremony took place during a high-level bilateral meeting between the Commonwealth Secretary General, Rt Hon Patricia Scotland QC and ITFC CEO Eng Hani Salem Sonbol.

    At the signing ceremony, Secretary General Scotland said:

    “Both the Commonwealth and the International Islamic Trade Finance Corporation share the goal of strengthening and supporting the economic and development aspirations of our member states. Our collaboration will provide us with greater opportunities and better access to harness our collective ideas, knowledge, skills and combined financial resources to serve the development needs of our common members. The six agreed areas of cooperation, together with our combined defense and convening power, can provide vital support for the recovery of our small and developing states, which are the most vulnerable to global economic shocks.”

    ITFC CEO Ing. Hani Salem Sonbol said:

    Commenting on the signing, Mr. Hani Salem Sonbol, ITFC Chief Executive Officer, said "really pleased to see that ITFC's partnership with the Commonwealth Secretariat is a partnership of action. As we celebrate the signing of a new Memorandum of Understanding, we are also making official the first two projects ready for implementation in Cameroon and Pakistan”.

    Recognizing the role of alliances in promoting trade development, Mr. Hani Salem Sonbol said: "At ITFC, our goal is to work effectively with our partners to identify and offer the best solutions, in all areas of trade finance. and business development, including taking advantage of opportunities manifested in emerging business issues such as digitalization, agriculture technology and climate change, to name a few."

    There are twelve common member states between the two organizations, showing significant common interest. These countries include Cameroon, Gambia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Uganda, Guyana, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Maldives, Brunei, and Malaysia.

    A project highlighted in the MoU between the Commonwealth Secretariat and the ITFC includes a trade development project in Pakistan that improves the country's overall trade competitiveness by building the capacity of the Pakistan Ministry of Commerce and improving its overall trade negotiation skills.

    Another agreed initiative is a digital boot camp to be held in Cameroon to support the government's e-commerce strategy through capacity building programs that support women and SMEs. Approximately 100 women-owned SMEs are expected to benefit from this programme.

    Through this collaboration, the Commonwealth Secretariat and the ITFC aim to help create decent jobs, increased trade and greener economies for the benefit of all, but especially women and SMEs.

  •   Dr Irfaan Ali President of Guyana has assured that despite the global increase in energy costs his government will continue to fill the gap to ensure that the burden is not transferred to citizens He provided this assurance during the opening of a new well station at Lusig on the east coast of Demerara near Georgetown He said this will be done even though the price of fuel which is the main driver of energy production and treated water has risen 100 percent We told both entities Guyan Water Incorporated GWI and Guyana Power and Light GPL they are not going to increase The government will bear the extra expense and fill the gap This is how responsible government operates He pointed out that when GWI and GPL budgeted they did so with oil at 60 a barrel and not 125 The President added that it was his Government that eliminated the Value Added Tax on water for all categories of citizens reestablished the water subsidy for pensioners and reduced water rates in all categories one hundred percent There is no government at the world level and I say this categorically in this crisis that has moved in such directions The President said that his Government has been able to keep all public servants employed and even have new employment opportunities He said increases in salaries pensions and student funds have also been doled out even as the government embarks on a massive infrastructure transformation which is critically needed in Guyana Sometimes we take these things for granted because the government can be very responsive and accountable Ali said that more than half of the world s population will live in circumstances of water scarcity As such he noted the importance of the 141 million Guyanese dollar facility in Lusig which is expected to benefit 22 000 residents of Grassfield Lusig Pasture Lusig East Lusig West Andale and Courbane Park As we meet today 785 million people worldwide lack basic drinking water services 144 million people depend on surface water to carry out their daily lives Two billion people around the world use water that is contaminated in some way shape or form This pollution has caused and continues to cause many different types of disease This is the context in which we need to place this achievement He added that since his government took power 6 2 billion dollars have been spent in the water sector and in the next two years 11 billion dollars will be spent in this sector to guarantee better access to drinking water This spending he said would be used to ensure there is 100 percent access to good quality drinking water and efficient water supply along the coast and in riverside communities He also announced that the Government would be investing in more than 12 new water treatment plants throughout the country The President reiterated his Government s intention to fulfill the commitments made to citizens and families to build a resilient Guyana So as we take these small but important steps be assured of the government s continued investment in your lives the lives of your family and the life of your community public relations
    No increase in Guyana public utilities tariffs- President Ali
      Dr Irfaan Ali President of Guyana has assured that despite the global increase in energy costs his government will continue to fill the gap to ensure that the burden is not transferred to citizens He provided this assurance during the opening of a new well station at Lusig on the east coast of Demerara near Georgetown He said this will be done even though the price of fuel which is the main driver of energy production and treated water has risen 100 percent We told both entities Guyan Water Incorporated GWI and Guyana Power and Light GPL they are not going to increase The government will bear the extra expense and fill the gap This is how responsible government operates He pointed out that when GWI and GPL budgeted they did so with oil at 60 a barrel and not 125 The President added that it was his Government that eliminated the Value Added Tax on water for all categories of citizens reestablished the water subsidy for pensioners and reduced water rates in all categories one hundred percent There is no government at the world level and I say this categorically in this crisis that has moved in such directions The President said that his Government has been able to keep all public servants employed and even have new employment opportunities He said increases in salaries pensions and student funds have also been doled out even as the government embarks on a massive infrastructure transformation which is critically needed in Guyana Sometimes we take these things for granted because the government can be very responsive and accountable Ali said that more than half of the world s population will live in circumstances of water scarcity As such he noted the importance of the 141 million Guyanese dollar facility in Lusig which is expected to benefit 22 000 residents of Grassfield Lusig Pasture Lusig East Lusig West Andale and Courbane Park As we meet today 785 million people worldwide lack basic drinking water services 144 million people depend on surface water to carry out their daily lives Two billion people around the world use water that is contaminated in some way shape or form This pollution has caused and continues to cause many different types of disease This is the context in which we need to place this achievement He added that since his government took power 6 2 billion dollars have been spent in the water sector and in the next two years 11 billion dollars will be spent in this sector to guarantee better access to drinking water This spending he said would be used to ensure there is 100 percent access to good quality drinking water and efficient water supply along the coast and in riverside communities He also announced that the Government would be investing in more than 12 new water treatment plants throughout the country The President reiterated his Government s intention to fulfill the commitments made to citizens and families to build a resilient Guyana So as we take these small but important steps be assured of the government s continued investment in your lives the lives of your family and the life of your community public relations
    No increase in Guyana public utilities tariffs- President Ali
    Economy7 months ago

    No increase in Guyana public utilities tariffs- President Ali

    Dr. Irfaan Ali, President of Guyana, has assured that despite the global increase in energy costs, his government will continue to "fill the gap" to ensure that the burden is not transferred to citizens.

    He provided this assurance during the opening of a new well station at Lusig, on the east coast of Demerara, near Georgetown.

    He said this will be done even though the price of fuel, which is the main driver of energy production and treated water, has risen 100 percent.

    “We told both entities (Guyan Water Incorporated (GWI) and Guyana Power and Light (GPL), they are not going to increase.

    “The government will bear the extra expense and fill the gap. This is how responsible government operates.”

    He pointed out that when GWI and GPL budgeted, they did so with oil at $60 a barrel and not $125.

    The President added that it was his Government that eliminated the Value Added Tax on water for all categories of citizens, reestablished the water subsidy for pensioners and reduced water rates in all categories one hundred percent.

    "There is no government at the world level, and I say this categorically, in this crisis that has moved in such directions."

    The President said that his Government has been able to keep all public servants employed and even have new employment opportunities.

    He said increases in salaries, pensions and student funds have also been doled out, even as the government embarks on a massive infrastructure transformation, which is critically needed in Guyana.

    “Sometimes we take these things for granted because the government can be very responsive and accountable.”

    Ali said that more than half of the world's population will live in circumstances of water scarcity.

    As such, he noted the importance of the 141 million Guyanese dollar facility in Lusig, which is expected to benefit 22,000 residents of Grassfield, Lusig Pasture, Lusig East, Lusig West, Andale and Courbane Park.

    “As we meet today, 785 million people worldwide lack basic drinking water services. 144 million people depend on surface water to carry out their daily lives. Two billion people around the world use water that is contaminated in some way, shape or form.

    "This pollution has caused and continues to cause many different types of disease... This is the context in which we need to place this achievement."

    He added that since his government took power, 6.2 billion dollars have been spent in the water sector, and in the next two years 11 billion dollars will be spent in this sector to guarantee better access to drinking water.

    This spending, he said, would be used to ensure there is 100 percent access to good-quality drinking water and efficient water supply along the coast and in riverside communities.

    He also announced that the Government would be investing in more than 12 new water treatment plants throughout the country.

    The President reiterated his Government's intention to fulfill the commitments made to citizens and families to build a resilient Guyana.

    “So as we take these small but important steps, be assured of the government's continued investment in your lives, the lives of your family, and the life of your community.”

    public relations:

  •   President Irfaan Ali of Guyana says his government will hold a national consultation on the best options to deal with the rising cost of living with the intention of easing official hardships for Guyanese In a meeting with a cross section of stakeholders in Georgetown he said this would allow for open and frank discussions to address this multifaceted problem that we re facing He was addressing the global challenges brought about by the pandemic which are now a heightened crisis So as if COVID 19 wasn t enough the war in Ukraine came crashing down on us wiping out close to 40 of global wheat production driving the price of oil up to 126 a barrel driving up transportation costs and cutting off supplies Ali said the government was tackling the problems aggressively and examining the best approaches We have already started discussions and the government will continue to aggressively engage with a cross section of Guyanese and communities so that we can find the best possible approach We will listen to ideas we will listen to some of the related problems and then we will propose some policies He explained that almost 5 billion Guyanese dollars have been earmarked in the 2022 budget for various interventions aimed at easing the burden of rising cost of living Earlier this month the president said addressing cost of living issues was at the top of his administration s agenda and was being tackled head on Since taking office the Government has introduced several measures to put more disposable income in the pockets of Guyanese From the beginning the Value Added Tax VAT on water and electricity was eliminated There has also been a steady increase in old age pension and public assistance which in 2022 put 2 3 billion and 432 million in the pockets of Guyanese In addition the government reinstated the Because We Care cash grant and school uniform grant which amounts to 30 000 per child in public and private schools The government also cut the excise tax on fuel on several occasions in light of rising fuel prices We ve gotten it down to a point where I think it s at 10 so that s been done continuously without anyone asking he said public relations
    Guyana addressing rising cost of living- President Ali
      President Irfaan Ali of Guyana says his government will hold a national consultation on the best options to deal with the rising cost of living with the intention of easing official hardships for Guyanese In a meeting with a cross section of stakeholders in Georgetown he said this would allow for open and frank discussions to address this multifaceted problem that we re facing He was addressing the global challenges brought about by the pandemic which are now a heightened crisis So as if COVID 19 wasn t enough the war in Ukraine came crashing down on us wiping out close to 40 of global wheat production driving the price of oil up to 126 a barrel driving up transportation costs and cutting off supplies Ali said the government was tackling the problems aggressively and examining the best approaches We have already started discussions and the government will continue to aggressively engage with a cross section of Guyanese and communities so that we can find the best possible approach We will listen to ideas we will listen to some of the related problems and then we will propose some policies He explained that almost 5 billion Guyanese dollars have been earmarked in the 2022 budget for various interventions aimed at easing the burden of rising cost of living Earlier this month the president said addressing cost of living issues was at the top of his administration s agenda and was being tackled head on Since taking office the Government has introduced several measures to put more disposable income in the pockets of Guyanese From the beginning the Value Added Tax VAT on water and electricity was eliminated There has also been a steady increase in old age pension and public assistance which in 2022 put 2 3 billion and 432 million in the pockets of Guyanese In addition the government reinstated the Because We Care cash grant and school uniform grant which amounts to 30 000 per child in public and private schools The government also cut the excise tax on fuel on several occasions in light of rising fuel prices We ve gotten it down to a point where I think it s at 10 so that s been done continuously without anyone asking he said public relations
    Guyana addressing rising cost of living- President Ali
    Economy7 months ago

    Guyana addressing rising cost of living- President Ali

    President Irfaan Ali of Guyana says his government will hold a national consultation on the best options to deal with the rising cost of living, with the intention of easing official hardships for Guyanese.

    In a meeting with a cross-section of stakeholders in Georgetown, he said this would allow for open and frank discussions to address "this multifaceted problem that we're facing."

    He was addressing the global challenges brought about by the pandemic, which are now a heightened crisis.

    “So, as if COVID-19 wasn't enough, the war in Ukraine came crashing down on us, wiping out close to 40% of global wheat production, driving the price of oil up to $126 a barrel, driving up transportation costs and cutting off supplies.

    Ali said the government was tackling the problems "aggressively" and examining the best approaches.

    “We have already started discussions, and the government will continue to aggressively engage with a cross-section of Guyanese and communities so that we can find the best possible approach.

    “We will listen to ideas, we will listen to some of the related problems and then we will propose some policies.”

    He explained that almost 5 billion Guyanese dollars have been earmarked in the 2022 budget for various interventions aimed at easing the burden of rising cost of living.

    Earlier this month, the president said addressing cost-of-living issues was at the top of his administration's agenda and was being tackled head-on.

    Since taking office, the Government has introduced several measures to put more disposable income in the pockets of Guyanese.

    From the beginning, the Value Added Tax (VAT) on water and electricity was eliminated.

    There has also been a steady increase in old-age pension and public assistance, which in 2022 put $2.3 billion and $432 million in the pockets of Guyanese.

    In addition, the government reinstated the 'Because We Care' cash grant and school uniform grant, which amounts to $30,000 per child in public and private schools.

    The government also cut the excise tax on fuel on several occasions in light of rising fuel prices.

    "We've gotten it down to a point where I think it's at 10%...so that's been done continuously without anyone asking...," he said.

    public relations:

  •   As Namibia s second major discovery in recent weeks the Namibian oil and gas industry is poised to create an influx of new investment and local content opportunities for the country The African Energy Chamber EnergyChamber org met with Ian Cloke COO of Afentra to discuss the enormous potential of what Namibia s new era of hydrocarbon exploration and production could design for the country How will Namibia s growing oil and gas sector transform the country s economy Oil and gas development depending on the scale can lead to a transformation of a country s economy the generation of high skilled jobs incremental employment and other benefits particularly if there is the right focus on local content and the supply chain While oil and gas at scale can transform the national economy special attention must continue to be paid to upgrading existing sectors to ensure continued diversity in the economy While the local use of gas for power generation can have significant benefits and positive impacts on the local economy it is often more beneficial to export oil to maximize national revenue While in some specific cases local refining may be a positive this needs to be based on a comprehensive holistic view of the economy What will be the key to boosting oil production between now and 2025 Most deepwater greenfield oil projects take 6 8 years from discovery to first oil and many take much longer However there are some projects that have been delivered in around 4 years and these should be the template if you want to get value soon Africa has pioneered fast track discoveries the most significant being the Jubilee development in Ghana where following the Mahogany 1 discovery in 2007 Tullow and its partners Kosmos and Anadarko delivered this major deepwater development to the first oil in 3 years There are other examples of early delivery of the first oil such as the Ceiba development in Equatorial Guinea the Kuito development in Angola and more recently the prolific Liza development in Guyana delivered by Exxonmobil 4 1 2 years after discovery The key to delivering the Jubilee development on such a short schedule was the alignment of the strategic objectives of all stakeholders in particular the Government and major investors both the oil companies and their financial providers This led to an aligned and collaborative process to define and approve the overall development plan On the technical front there is a need to accept that development will proceed in parallel with discovery evaluation this may be perceived as increasing development risk but if properly managed within a collaborative group of partners it can help the evaluation process more efficient and profitable Furthermore it must be recognized that standardization rather than technical perfection can significantly improve the long term value outcome for all stakeholders Onshore in the Kavango Basin we are all watching with interest if the encouraging results of the first two wells found translate into oil discoveries that can be developed commercially using Namibia s excellent road and rail infrastructure The last two big discoveries on land in Uganda and Kenya have taken many years for their developments to be sanctioned due to a combination of many factors In the case of a commercial discovery in the Kavango Basin there is much to be learned from these two major oil discoveries To what extent will the development of Namibian oil and gas projects attract a broader range of operators and diversify the African exploration landscape Namibia already has the benefit of a large number of offshore players that have yet to be explored In the event that the Venus and Graaf discoveries are truly commercial and the government demonstrates support for the efficient delivery of the first oil this is likely to significantly improve the attractiveness as an investment destination The Kudu gas project could also be enabled by exporting gas from any deepwater project to shore Namibia has attracted a host of oil majors including Tullow Total GALP Shell ONGC and ExxonMobil How will Namibia s competitive oil exploration scene help the state owned Namibian National Petroleum Corporation NAMCOR take a position in shaping the country s prospects The development phase after discovery is very different from the initial phase of exploration Namcor and the Namibian government have done an excellent job of attracting exploration dollars in a competitive global exploration environment despite a historical lack of success They should reflect on the current environment for oil and gas investment and consider how they can also support their investors during the development and production phase If they can create a strategic alignment with the companies developing the discoveries this is likely to bring significant benefit and value to all stakeholders What must be done from a regulatory point of view to develop an oil and gas Ian While Namibia has a robust regulatory environment for oil and gas exploration it will need to be adopted to ensure it is appropriate for the development and production phase The implementation of this regulatory environment can and should take time to ensure that it is appropriate and durable Therefore it is important that government regulators and leading development companies agree on an interim path to ensure that first oil is not delayed and that the country reaps the economic benefits of the development and production phases This can be achieved as was the case in Ghana by companies self regulating through the application of appropriate standards applied in more mature regulatory environments of which there are many appropriate examples This self regulation applies not only to the technical environmental and safety aspects of development but also to areas such as local content and use of the local supply chain If companies proceed on this basis and national regulators take a flexible and pragmatic approach a world class regulatory environment can be developed in parallel with early oil and gas developments to the benefit of all stakeholders Namibia is positioning itself as a leader in the emerging green hydrogen market What role do you think hydrogen will play in Africa s energy transition Green hydrogen is still a very immature technology and could be a major future contributor to the Namibian economy However there are other areas with the energy transition that are much more mature such as solar and wind which could have a significant and positive impact on the economy and more importantly reduce energy poverty faster This combination of wind solar and hydrocarbon power could create a diverse and reliable energy supply that could further support the diversification of the Namibian economy and have an immediate positive economic impact This approach can complement the exploration of the potential of less mature opportunities such as green hydrogen
    Namibia’s new era of hydrocarbon exploration and production
      As Namibia s second major discovery in recent weeks the Namibian oil and gas industry is poised to create an influx of new investment and local content opportunities for the country The African Energy Chamber EnergyChamber org met with Ian Cloke COO of Afentra to discuss the enormous potential of what Namibia s new era of hydrocarbon exploration and production could design for the country How will Namibia s growing oil and gas sector transform the country s economy Oil and gas development depending on the scale can lead to a transformation of a country s economy the generation of high skilled jobs incremental employment and other benefits particularly if there is the right focus on local content and the supply chain While oil and gas at scale can transform the national economy special attention must continue to be paid to upgrading existing sectors to ensure continued diversity in the economy While the local use of gas for power generation can have significant benefits and positive impacts on the local economy it is often more beneficial to export oil to maximize national revenue While in some specific cases local refining may be a positive this needs to be based on a comprehensive holistic view of the economy What will be the key to boosting oil production between now and 2025 Most deepwater greenfield oil projects take 6 8 years from discovery to first oil and many take much longer However there are some projects that have been delivered in around 4 years and these should be the template if you want to get value soon Africa has pioneered fast track discoveries the most significant being the Jubilee development in Ghana where following the Mahogany 1 discovery in 2007 Tullow and its partners Kosmos and Anadarko delivered this major deepwater development to the first oil in 3 years There are other examples of early delivery of the first oil such as the Ceiba development in Equatorial Guinea the Kuito development in Angola and more recently the prolific Liza development in Guyana delivered by Exxonmobil 4 1 2 years after discovery The key to delivering the Jubilee development on such a short schedule was the alignment of the strategic objectives of all stakeholders in particular the Government and major investors both the oil companies and their financial providers This led to an aligned and collaborative process to define and approve the overall development plan On the technical front there is a need to accept that development will proceed in parallel with discovery evaluation this may be perceived as increasing development risk but if properly managed within a collaborative group of partners it can help the evaluation process more efficient and profitable Furthermore it must be recognized that standardization rather than technical perfection can significantly improve the long term value outcome for all stakeholders Onshore in the Kavango Basin we are all watching with interest if the encouraging results of the first two wells found translate into oil discoveries that can be developed commercially using Namibia s excellent road and rail infrastructure The last two big discoveries on land in Uganda and Kenya have taken many years for their developments to be sanctioned due to a combination of many factors In the case of a commercial discovery in the Kavango Basin there is much to be learned from these two major oil discoveries To what extent will the development of Namibian oil and gas projects attract a broader range of operators and diversify the African exploration landscape Namibia already has the benefit of a large number of offshore players that have yet to be explored In the event that the Venus and Graaf discoveries are truly commercial and the government demonstrates support for the efficient delivery of the first oil this is likely to significantly improve the attractiveness as an investment destination The Kudu gas project could also be enabled by exporting gas from any deepwater project to shore Namibia has attracted a host of oil majors including Tullow Total GALP Shell ONGC and ExxonMobil How will Namibia s competitive oil exploration scene help the state owned Namibian National Petroleum Corporation NAMCOR take a position in shaping the country s prospects The development phase after discovery is very different from the initial phase of exploration Namcor and the Namibian government have done an excellent job of attracting exploration dollars in a competitive global exploration environment despite a historical lack of success They should reflect on the current environment for oil and gas investment and consider how they can also support their investors during the development and production phase If they can create a strategic alignment with the companies developing the discoveries this is likely to bring significant benefit and value to all stakeholders What must be done from a regulatory point of view to develop an oil and gas Ian While Namibia has a robust regulatory environment for oil and gas exploration it will need to be adopted to ensure it is appropriate for the development and production phase The implementation of this regulatory environment can and should take time to ensure that it is appropriate and durable Therefore it is important that government regulators and leading development companies agree on an interim path to ensure that first oil is not delayed and that the country reaps the economic benefits of the development and production phases This can be achieved as was the case in Ghana by companies self regulating through the application of appropriate standards applied in more mature regulatory environments of which there are many appropriate examples This self regulation applies not only to the technical environmental and safety aspects of development but also to areas such as local content and use of the local supply chain If companies proceed on this basis and national regulators take a flexible and pragmatic approach a world class regulatory environment can be developed in parallel with early oil and gas developments to the benefit of all stakeholders Namibia is positioning itself as a leader in the emerging green hydrogen market What role do you think hydrogen will play in Africa s energy transition Green hydrogen is still a very immature technology and could be a major future contributor to the Namibian economy However there are other areas with the energy transition that are much more mature such as solar and wind which could have a significant and positive impact on the economy and more importantly reduce energy poverty faster This combination of wind solar and hydrocarbon power could create a diverse and reliable energy supply that could further support the diversification of the Namibian economy and have an immediate positive economic impact This approach can complement the exploration of the potential of less mature opportunities such as green hydrogen
    Namibia’s new era of hydrocarbon exploration and production
    Africa7 months ago

    Namibia’s new era of hydrocarbon exploration and production

    As Namibia's second major discovery in recent weeks, the Namibian oil and gas industry is poised to create an influx of new investment and local content opportunities for the country. The African Energy Chamber (EnergyChamber.org) met with Ian Cloke, COO of Afentra, to discuss the enormous potential of what Namibia's new era of hydrocarbon exploration and production could design for the country.

    How will Namibia's growing oil and gas sector transform the country's economy?

    Oil and gas development, depending on the scale, can lead to a transformation of a country's economy; the generation of high-skilled jobs, incremental employment and other benefits, particularly if there is the right focus on local content and the supply chain. While oil and gas at scale can transform the national economy, special attention must continue to be paid to upgrading existing sectors to ensure continued diversity in the economy.

    While the local use of gas for power generation can have significant benefits and positive impacts on the local economy, it is often more beneficial to export oil to maximize national revenue. While in some specific cases local refining may be a positive, this needs to be based on a comprehensive holistic view of the economy.

    What will be the key to boosting oil production between now and 2025?

    Most deepwater 'greenfield' oil projects take 6-8 years from discovery to first oil and many take much longer. However, there are some projects that have been delivered in around 4 years and these should be the template if you want to get value soon. Africa has pioneered "fast-track" discoveries, the most significant being the Jubilee development in Ghana, where following the Mahogany-1 discovery in 2007, Tullow and its partners Kosmos and Anadarko delivered this major deepwater development to the first oil in 3 ½ years. There are other examples of “early delivery” of the first oil, such as the Ceiba development in Equatorial Guinea, the Kuito development in Angola, and more recently the prolific Liza development in Guyana delivered by Exxonmobil 4 1/2 years after discovery.

    The key to delivering the Jubilee development on such a short schedule was the alignment of the strategic objectives of all stakeholders, in particular the Government and major investors, both the oil companies and their financial providers. This led to an aligned and collaborative process to define and approve the overall development plan. On the technical front, there is a need to accept that development will proceed in parallel with discovery evaluation, this may be perceived as increasing development risk, but if properly managed within a collaborative group of partners, it can help the evaluation process more efficient. and profitable. Furthermore, it must be recognized that standardization rather than technical perfection can significantly improve the long-term value outcome for all stakeholders.

    Onshore in the Kavango Basin, we are all watching with interest if the encouraging results of the first two wells found translate into oil discoveries that can be developed commercially using Namibia's excellent road and rail infrastructure. The last two big discoveries on land in Uganda and Kenya have taken many years for their developments to be sanctioned due to a combination of many factors. In the case of a commercial discovery in the Kavango Basin, there is much to be learned from these two major oil discoveries.

    To what extent will the development of Namibian oil and gas projects attract a broader range of operators and diversify the African exploration landscape?

    Namibia already has the benefit of a large number of offshore players that have yet to be explored. In the event that the Venus and Graaf discoveries are truly commercial, and the government demonstrates support for the efficient delivery of the first oil, this is likely to significantly improve the attractiveness as an investment destination. The Kudu gas project could also be enabled by exporting gas from any deepwater project to shore.

    Namibia has attracted a host of oil majors including Tullow, Total, GALP, Shell, ONGC and ExxonMobil. How will Namibia's competitive oil exploration scene help the state-owned Namibian National Petroleum Corporation (NAMCOR) take a position in shaping the country's prospects?

    The development phase, after discovery, is very different from the initial phase of exploration. Namcor and the Namibian government have done an excellent job of attracting "exploration dollars" in a competitive global exploration environment despite a historical lack of success. They should reflect on the current environment for oil and gas investment and consider how they can also support their investors during the development and production phase. If they can create a strategic alignment with the companies developing the discoveries, this is likely to bring significant benefit and value to all stakeholders.

    What must be done from a regulatory point of view to develop an oil and gas Ian?

    While Namibia has a robust regulatory environment for oil and gas exploration, it will need to be adopted to ensure it is appropriate for the development and production phase. The implementation of this regulatory environment can and should take time to ensure that it is appropriate and durable. Therefore, it is important that government regulators and leading development companies agree on an interim path to ensure that first oil is not delayed and that the country reaps the economic benefits of the development and production phases. This can be achieved, as was the case in Ghana, by companies self-regulating through the application of appropriate standards applied in more mature regulatory environments, of which there are many appropriate examples. This self-regulation applies not only to the technical, environmental, and safety aspects of development, but also to areas such as local content and use of the local supply chain. If companies proceed on this basis and national regulators take a flexible and pragmatic approach, a world-class regulatory environment can be developed in parallel with early oil and gas developments to the benefit of all stakeholders.

    Namibia is positioning itself as a leader in the emerging green hydrogen market. What role do you think hydrogen will play in Africa's energy transition?

    Green hydrogen is still a very immature technology and could be a major future contributor to the Namibian economy. However, there are other areas with the energy transition that are much more mature, such as solar and wind, which could have a significant and positive impact on the economy and, more importantly, reduce energy poverty faster. This combination of wind, solar and hydrocarbon power could create a diverse and reliable energy supply that could further support the diversification of the Namibian economy and have an immediate positive economic impact. This approach can complement the "exploration" of the potential of less mature opportunities, such as green hydrogen.