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  •   A new project launched today in Kampala by national authorities and international organizations aims to advance a more responsible artisanal gold mining sector across the country The five year planetGOLD Uganda project https www PlanetGOLD org Uganda is funded by the Global Environment Facility GEF https www theGEF org and implemented by the UN Environment Programme UNEP www UNEP org The planetGOLD Uganda project will be executed by the international non profit organization IMPACT https IMPACTTransform org in partnership with Uganda s National Environment Management Authority NEMA and the country s Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines DGSM The project will work together with local communities to reduce the use of mercury in artisanal and small scale gold mining the world s largest source of anthropogenic emissions of mercury pollution while improving the health and lives of local mining communities The Ugandan project is part of a global program similarly implemented in 23 countries The planetGOLD Uganda project plans to support 4 500 men and women at 11 mine sites in the country reducing mercury use by 15 tonnes over five years The project aims to reduce the use of mercury by supporting formalization of the artisanal gold mining sector and increasing access to finance This will lead to adoption of mercury free technologies and allow access to more responsible and traceable gold supply chains Artisanal gold mining is a critical source of livelihood for many in Uganda and an important opportunity for economic development Through the planetGOLD Uganda project miners will be introduced to solutions to the environmental and social challenges in the sector helping to transition toward more responsible gold mining practices said Ludovic Bernaudat Head of UNEP s GEF Chemicals and Waste Portfolio A virtual inaugural inception workshop on November 23 brought together Ugandan mining governance authorities and the technical services of the mining administration to introduce the key themes and priorities of the project According to the World Health Organization WHO https bit ly 2QfzkhL exposure to mercury even small amounts may have toxic effects on the nervous digestive and immune systems and on lungs kidneys skin and eyes as well as pose a threat to the development of the child https bit ly 3V1SdCc in utero and early in life In Uganda an estimated 90 percent of the country s gold production https bit ly 3i8zO8h is mined artisanally with over 31 000 miners in the artisanal gold sector While the quantities that miners are extracting and processing are very small the use of mercury is very common 73 percent of Uganda s artisanal gold is produced using mercury https bit ly 3ExiNvT resulting in more than 15 tonnes of mercury being released annually Mercury contaminates the soil water air and the equipment that is used It is highly toxic to miners and others who come in direct contact with it particularly when vaporized or among children and pregnant women Mercury emitted to the air can also circulate around the world and contaminate water fish and wildlife far from the mine from which it was released In 2019 Uganda ratified the Minamata Convention on Mercury https www MercuryConvention org We are eager to partner with the planetGOLD Uganda project to implement our commitments to reduce and eliminate the use of mercury in artisanal gold mining We look forward to introducing a cleaner more responsible and more prosperous artisanal mining sector that benefits both the people and the planet said Barirega Akankwasa PhD Executive Director of the National Environmental Management Authority NEMA With the growth of the artisanal mining sector over the past decade Uganda has had to reform its legislative approach to keep up with the changing context of the mining sector The Mining and Minerals Act 2022 provides the opportunity to support responsible development in the sector which includes gazetting of artisanal mine sites for easy management environmental stewardship improved health and safety at mine sites and elimination of hazardous chemicals such as mercury said Agnes Alaba Acting Director of the Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines DGSM
    Uganda Kicks-Off Project to Reduce Mercury Use in Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining
      A new project launched today in Kampala by national authorities and international organizations aims to advance a more responsible artisanal gold mining sector across the country The five year planetGOLD Uganda project https www PlanetGOLD org Uganda is funded by the Global Environment Facility GEF https www theGEF org and implemented by the UN Environment Programme UNEP www UNEP org The planetGOLD Uganda project will be executed by the international non profit organization IMPACT https IMPACTTransform org in partnership with Uganda s National Environment Management Authority NEMA and the country s Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines DGSM The project will work together with local communities to reduce the use of mercury in artisanal and small scale gold mining the world s largest source of anthropogenic emissions of mercury pollution while improving the health and lives of local mining communities The Ugandan project is part of a global program similarly implemented in 23 countries The planetGOLD Uganda project plans to support 4 500 men and women at 11 mine sites in the country reducing mercury use by 15 tonnes over five years The project aims to reduce the use of mercury by supporting formalization of the artisanal gold mining sector and increasing access to finance This will lead to adoption of mercury free technologies and allow access to more responsible and traceable gold supply chains Artisanal gold mining is a critical source of livelihood for many in Uganda and an important opportunity for economic development Through the planetGOLD Uganda project miners will be introduced to solutions to the environmental and social challenges in the sector helping to transition toward more responsible gold mining practices said Ludovic Bernaudat Head of UNEP s GEF Chemicals and Waste Portfolio A virtual inaugural inception workshop on November 23 brought together Ugandan mining governance authorities and the technical services of the mining administration to introduce the key themes and priorities of the project According to the World Health Organization WHO https bit ly 2QfzkhL exposure to mercury even small amounts may have toxic effects on the nervous digestive and immune systems and on lungs kidneys skin and eyes as well as pose a threat to the development of the child https bit ly 3V1SdCc in utero and early in life In Uganda an estimated 90 percent of the country s gold production https bit ly 3i8zO8h is mined artisanally with over 31 000 miners in the artisanal gold sector While the quantities that miners are extracting and processing are very small the use of mercury is very common 73 percent of Uganda s artisanal gold is produced using mercury https bit ly 3ExiNvT resulting in more than 15 tonnes of mercury being released annually Mercury contaminates the soil water air and the equipment that is used It is highly toxic to miners and others who come in direct contact with it particularly when vaporized or among children and pregnant women Mercury emitted to the air can also circulate around the world and contaminate water fish and wildlife far from the mine from which it was released In 2019 Uganda ratified the Minamata Convention on Mercury https www MercuryConvention org We are eager to partner with the planetGOLD Uganda project to implement our commitments to reduce and eliminate the use of mercury in artisanal gold mining We look forward to introducing a cleaner more responsible and more prosperous artisanal mining sector that benefits both the people and the planet said Barirega Akankwasa PhD Executive Director of the National Environmental Management Authority NEMA With the growth of the artisanal mining sector over the past decade Uganda has had to reform its legislative approach to keep up with the changing context of the mining sector The Mining and Minerals Act 2022 provides the opportunity to support responsible development in the sector which includes gazetting of artisanal mine sites for easy management environmental stewardship improved health and safety at mine sites and elimination of hazardous chemicals such as mercury said Agnes Alaba Acting Director of the Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines DGSM
    Uganda Kicks-Off Project to Reduce Mercury Use in Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining
    Africa2 weeks ago

    Uganda Kicks-Off Project to Reduce Mercury Use in Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining

    A new project launched today in Kampala by national authorities and international organizations aims to advance a more responsible artisanal gold mining sector across the country.

    The five-year planetGOLD Uganda project (https://www.PlanetGOLD.org/Uganda) is funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) (https://www.theGEF.org) and implemented by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) (www.UNEP.org).

    The planetGOLD Uganda project will be executed by the international non-profit organization, IMPACT (https://IMPACTTransform.org), in partnership with Uganda’s National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) and the country’s Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines (DGSM).

    The project will work together with local communities to reduce the use of mercury in artisanal and small-scale gold mining—the world’s largest source of anthropogenic emissions of mercury pollution— while improving the health and lives of local mining communities.

    The Ugandan project is part of a global program similarly implemented in 23 countries.

    The planetGOLD Uganda project plans to support 4,500 men and women at 11 mine sites in the country, reducing mercury use by 15 tonnes over five years.

    The project aims to reduce the use of mercury by supporting formalization of the artisanal gold mining sector and increasing access to finance.

    This will lead to adoption of mercury-free technologies and allow access to more responsible and traceable gold supply chains.

    “Artisanal gold mining is a critical source of livelihood for many in Uganda and an important opportunity for economic development.

    Through the planetGOLD Uganda project, miners will be introduced to solutions to the environmental and social challenges in the sector, helping to transition toward more responsible gold mining practices,” said Ludovic Bernaudat, Head of UNEP’s GEF Chemicals and Waste Portfolio.

    A virtual inaugural inception workshop on November 23 brought together Ugandan mining governance authorities and the technical services of the mining administration to introduce the key themes and priorities of the project.

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) (https://bit.ly/2QfzkhL), exposure to mercury – even small amounts – may have toxic effects on the nervous, digestive, and immune systems, and on lungs, kidneys, skin and eyes, as well as pose a threat to the development of the child (https://bit.ly/3V1SdCc) in utero and early in life.

    In Uganda, an estimated 90 percent of the country’s gold production (https://bit.ly/3i8zO8h) is mined artisanally, with over 31,000 miners in the artisanal gold sector.

    While the quantities that miners are extracting and processing are very small, the use of mercury is very common.

    73 percent of Uganda’s artisanal gold is produced using mercury (https://bit.ly/3ExiNvT) —resulting in more than 15 tonnes of mercury being released annually.

    Mercury contaminates the soil, water, air, and the equipment that is used.

    It is highly toxic to miners and others who come in direct contact with it—particularly when vaporized or among children and pregnant women.

    Mercury emitted to the air can also circulate around the world and contaminate water, fish, and wildlife far from the mine from which it was released.

    “In 2019, Uganda ratified the Minamata Convention on Mercury (https://www.MercuryConvention.org).

    We are eager to partner with the planetGOLD Uganda project to implement our commitments to reduce and eliminate the use of mercury in artisanal gold mining.

    We look forward to introducing a cleaner, more responsible, and more prosperous artisanal mining sector that benefits both the people and the planet,” said Barirega Akankwasa, PhD, Executive Director of the National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA).

    “With the growth of the artisanal mining sector over the past decade, Uganda has had to reform its legislative approach to keep up with the changing context of the mining sector.

    The Mining and Minerals Act 2022 provides the opportunity to support responsible development in the sector, which includes gazetting of artisanal mine sites for easy management, environmental stewardship, improved health and safety at mine sites, and elimination of hazardous chemicals such as mercury,” said Agnes Alaba, Acting Director of the Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines (DGSM).

     

  •   Launched today at the United Nations Climate Conference COP27 the Africa Minigrids Program AMP is a country led technical assistance program that supports countries to rapidly and cost effectively provide electricity and new development opportunities to some of Africa s poorest communities With funding led by the Global Environment Facility GEF and implemented by UNDP in partnership with national governments RMI founded as Rocky Mountain Institute and the African Development Bank AfDB the AMP s market transformation approach aims to help countries crowd in private investment to scale up and accelerate the deployment of renewable energy minigrids Minigrids are stand alone electricity networks that are typically not connected to the national electricity grid Solar battery minigrids hold great potential to boost electricity access in the AMP s 21 countries powering households key social services such as health centers and schools and businesses driving economic growth UNDP modelling estimates that minigrids will be the lowest cost approach to bring electricity to 265 million people in these countries by the year 2030 US 65 billion in new investments primarily from the private sector would be needed to realize the minigrid opportunity in such countries This is estimated to equate to the construction of 110 000 minigrids bringing electricity to more than 200 000 schools and clinics and more than 900 000 businesses We know that innovative policies technologies and business models to scale up existing solutions are needed to achieve SDG 7 on universal access to affordable and reliable energy business as usual won t do said Achim Steiner UNDP Administrator The AMP is UNDP s most ambitious electricity access program to date Its market transformation approach aims to deliver impact at the pace and scale needed to effectively help countries achieve the Sustainable Development Goals leaving no one behind Improving access to clean energy in remote areas has so many benefits it directly improves quality of life creates job opportunities particularly for women and also reduces carbon emissions added Carlos Manuel Rodriguez CEO and Chairperson of the GEF This is why the GEF is investing in energy access as part of our mission to invest in the planet I am thrilled to see the Africa Minigrids Program advance and look forward to sharing the lessons from its rollout across our partnership and in all the countries and communities we are supporting in the clean energy transition With a focus on various cost reduction levers AMP aims to support scale up investment by improving the financial viability of minigrids The program will work with countries to put in place the policies and regulations that enable large scale private investment durably creating the conditions for renewable energy minigrids to be deployed at scale Scaling up action to bring new sustainable development opportunities across Africa Access to energy is a precondition to socio economic development Yet half of the people living in sub Saharan Africa 568 million people don t have access to electricity effectively locking some of the world s most vulnerable communities in poverty The AMP aims to bring the development benefits of energy access to a wide array of communities across the continent by focusing on supporting productive uses of energy which supports socio economic development by enhancing the quality of sectors that require energy input such as agriculture healthcare education and small businesses We cannot achieve the Sustainable Development Goals without sustainable energy for all It is urgent to drastically scale up solutions that close the energy access gap We must address this blatant inequality said Ahunna Eziakonwa UN Assistant Secretary General and Regional Director for Africa at UNDP The AMP has the potential to be a game changer for millions of people in Africa Green minigrids are not only key to closing Africa s energy access gap they can also provide a critical impetus to socio economic development in rural areas boost climate resilience and displace carbon intensive fuel sources added Dr Daniel Schroth Director Department of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency African Development Bank We are therefore delighted to join the AMP partnership led by UNDP to deliver the much needed upstream work on minigrids and look forward to bringing the catalytic finance instruments of the African Development Bank and Sustainable Energy Fund for Africa to make these projects happen on the ground Building on a rich community of minigrid stakeholders together with our partners The AMP aims to complement activities supporting minigrid investment in Africa and has therefore identified three key areas of opportunities to focus on national dialogues to identify the best ways to deploy minigrids productive use of energy and digitalization for minigrids The 21 AMP countries represent a diverse set of African countries each with their own energy market specificities and development contexts large and smaller markets Anglophone Francophone and Lusophone countries small island developing states and countries in post crisis contexts The AMP aims to harness the diversity and richness of Africa s minigrids landscape said Jon Creyts CEO of RMI With RMI s Energy Transition Academy and our Africa team s long standing expertise in productive uses of energy we will create a powerful network that will replicate our think do scale approach on minigrids in areas lacking adequate energy access around the world The AMP is a key component of UNDP s pledge to mobilize partners through its Sustainable Energy Hub to enable 500 million additional people to have access to sustainable affordable reliable energy by 2025 AMP s implementation has already started with the launch of the Nigeria and Eswatini national projects in 2022 and will continue until 2027
    New Initiative to Transform Energy Markets, Bringing Electricity and New Development Opportunities, in over 20 African Countries
      Launched today at the United Nations Climate Conference COP27 the Africa Minigrids Program AMP is a country led technical assistance program that supports countries to rapidly and cost effectively provide electricity and new development opportunities to some of Africa s poorest communities With funding led by the Global Environment Facility GEF and implemented by UNDP in partnership with national governments RMI founded as Rocky Mountain Institute and the African Development Bank AfDB the AMP s market transformation approach aims to help countries crowd in private investment to scale up and accelerate the deployment of renewable energy minigrids Minigrids are stand alone electricity networks that are typically not connected to the national electricity grid Solar battery minigrids hold great potential to boost electricity access in the AMP s 21 countries powering households key social services such as health centers and schools and businesses driving economic growth UNDP modelling estimates that minigrids will be the lowest cost approach to bring electricity to 265 million people in these countries by the year 2030 US 65 billion in new investments primarily from the private sector would be needed to realize the minigrid opportunity in such countries This is estimated to equate to the construction of 110 000 minigrids bringing electricity to more than 200 000 schools and clinics and more than 900 000 businesses We know that innovative policies technologies and business models to scale up existing solutions are needed to achieve SDG 7 on universal access to affordable and reliable energy business as usual won t do said Achim Steiner UNDP Administrator The AMP is UNDP s most ambitious electricity access program to date Its market transformation approach aims to deliver impact at the pace and scale needed to effectively help countries achieve the Sustainable Development Goals leaving no one behind Improving access to clean energy in remote areas has so many benefits it directly improves quality of life creates job opportunities particularly for women and also reduces carbon emissions added Carlos Manuel Rodriguez CEO and Chairperson of the GEF This is why the GEF is investing in energy access as part of our mission to invest in the planet I am thrilled to see the Africa Minigrids Program advance and look forward to sharing the lessons from its rollout across our partnership and in all the countries and communities we are supporting in the clean energy transition With a focus on various cost reduction levers AMP aims to support scale up investment by improving the financial viability of minigrids The program will work with countries to put in place the policies and regulations that enable large scale private investment durably creating the conditions for renewable energy minigrids to be deployed at scale Scaling up action to bring new sustainable development opportunities across Africa Access to energy is a precondition to socio economic development Yet half of the people living in sub Saharan Africa 568 million people don t have access to electricity effectively locking some of the world s most vulnerable communities in poverty The AMP aims to bring the development benefits of energy access to a wide array of communities across the continent by focusing on supporting productive uses of energy which supports socio economic development by enhancing the quality of sectors that require energy input such as agriculture healthcare education and small businesses We cannot achieve the Sustainable Development Goals without sustainable energy for all It is urgent to drastically scale up solutions that close the energy access gap We must address this blatant inequality said Ahunna Eziakonwa UN Assistant Secretary General and Regional Director for Africa at UNDP The AMP has the potential to be a game changer for millions of people in Africa Green minigrids are not only key to closing Africa s energy access gap they can also provide a critical impetus to socio economic development in rural areas boost climate resilience and displace carbon intensive fuel sources added Dr Daniel Schroth Director Department of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency African Development Bank We are therefore delighted to join the AMP partnership led by UNDP to deliver the much needed upstream work on minigrids and look forward to bringing the catalytic finance instruments of the African Development Bank and Sustainable Energy Fund for Africa to make these projects happen on the ground Building on a rich community of minigrid stakeholders together with our partners The AMP aims to complement activities supporting minigrid investment in Africa and has therefore identified three key areas of opportunities to focus on national dialogues to identify the best ways to deploy minigrids productive use of energy and digitalization for minigrids The 21 AMP countries represent a diverse set of African countries each with their own energy market specificities and development contexts large and smaller markets Anglophone Francophone and Lusophone countries small island developing states and countries in post crisis contexts The AMP aims to harness the diversity and richness of Africa s minigrids landscape said Jon Creyts CEO of RMI With RMI s Energy Transition Academy and our Africa team s long standing expertise in productive uses of energy we will create a powerful network that will replicate our think do scale approach on minigrids in areas lacking adequate energy access around the world The AMP is a key component of UNDP s pledge to mobilize partners through its Sustainable Energy Hub to enable 500 million additional people to have access to sustainable affordable reliable energy by 2025 AMP s implementation has already started with the launch of the Nigeria and Eswatini national projects in 2022 and will continue until 2027
    New Initiative to Transform Energy Markets, Bringing Electricity and New Development Opportunities, in over 20 African Countries
    Africa3 weeks ago

    New Initiative to Transform Energy Markets, Bringing Electricity and New Development Opportunities, in over 20 African Countries

    Launched today at the United Nations Climate Conference COP27, the Africa Minigrids Program (AMP) is a country-led technical assistance program that supports countries to rapidly and cost-effectively provide electricity and new development opportunities to some of Africa’s poorest communities.

    With funding led by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), and implemented by UNDP in partnership with national governments, RMI (founded as Rocky Mountain Institute) and the African Development Bank (AfDB), the AMP’s market transformation approach aims to help countries crowd in private investment to scale up and accelerate the deployment of renewable energy minigrids.

    Minigrids are stand-alone electricity networks that are typically not connected to the national electricity grid.

    Solar-battery minigrids hold great potential to boost electricity access in the AMP’s 21 countries – powering households, key social services such as health centers and schools, and businesses, driving economic growth.

    UNDP modelling estimates that minigrids will be the lowest-cost approach to bring electricity to 265 million people in these countries by the year 2030.

    US$65 billion in new investments, primarily from the private sector, would be needed to realize the minigrid opportunity in such countries.

    This is estimated to equate to the construction of 110,000 minigrids, bringing electricity to more than 200,000 schools and clinics, and more than 900,000 businesses.

    “We know that innovative policies, technologies, and business models to scale up existing solutions are needed to achieve SDG 7 on universal access to affordable and reliable energy – business-as-usual won’t do,” said Achim Steiner, UNDP Administrator.

    “The AMP is UNDP’s most ambitious electricity access program to date.

    Its market transformation approach aims to deliver impact at the pace and scale needed to effectively help countries achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, leaving no-one behind.”“Improving access to clean energy in remote areas has so many benefits — it directly improves quality of life, creates job opportunities particularly for women, and also reduces carbon emissions,” added Carlos Manuel Rodriguez, CEO and Chairperson of the GEF.

    “This is why the GEF is investing in energy access as part of our mission to invest in the planet.

    I am thrilled to see the Africa Minigrids Program advance and look forward to sharing the lessons from its rollout across our partnership and in all the countries and communities we are supporting in the clean energy transition.”With a focus on various cost-reduction levers, AMP aims to support scale-up investment by improving the financial viability of minigrids.

    The program will work with countries to put in place the policies and regulations that enable large-scale private investment, durably creating the conditions for renewable energy minigrids to be deployed at scale.

    Scaling up action to bring new sustainable development opportunities across Africa Access to energy is a precondition to socio-economic development.

    Yet half of the people living in sub-Saharan Africa – 568 million people – don’t have access to electricity, effectively locking some of the world’s most vulnerable communities in poverty. 

    The AMP aims to bring the development benefits of energy access to a wide array of communities across the continent by focusing on supporting productive uses of energy, which supports socio-economic development by enhancing the quality of sectors that require energy input such as agriculture, healthcare, education, and small businesses.

    "We cannot achieve the Sustainable Development Goals without sustainable energy for all.

    It is urgent to drastically scale-up solutions that close the energy access gap.

    We must address this blatant inequality,” said Ahunna Eziakonwa, UN Assistant Secretary-General and Regional Director for Africa at UNDP.

    “The AMP has the potential to be a game changer for millions of people in Africa.”"Green minigrids are not only key to closing Africa’s energy access gap, they can also provide a critical impetus to socio-economic development in rural areas, boost climate resilience and displace carbon-intensive fuel sources,” added Dr Daniel Schroth, Director, Department of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency, African Development Bank. “We are therefore delighted to join the AMP partnership led by UNDP to deliver the much-needed upstream work on minigrids, and look forward to bringing the catalytic finance instruments of the African Development Bank and Sustainable Energy Fund for Africa to make these projects happen on the ground.”Building on a rich community of minigrid stakeholders together with our partnersThe AMP aims to complement activities supporting minigrid investment in Africa, and has therefore identified three key areas of opportunities to focus on: national dialogues to identify the best ways to deploy minigrids; productive use of energy, and digitalization for minigrids.

    The 21 AMP countries represent a diverse set of African countries, each with their own energy market specificities and development contexts: large and smaller markets; Anglophone, Francophone, and Lusophone countries; small island developing states; and countries in post-crisis contexts.

    “The AMP aims to harness the diversity and richness of Africa’s minigrids landscape”, said Jon Creyts, CEO of RMI.

    “With RMI’s Energy Transition Academy, and our Africa team’s long-standing expertise in productive uses of energy, we will create a powerful network that will replicate our think-do-scale approach on minigrids in areas lacking adequate energy access around the world.”The AMP is a key component of UNDP’s pledge to mobilize partners through its Sustainable Energy Hub to enable 500 million additional people to have access to sustainable, affordable, reliable energy by 2025.

    AMP’s implementation has already started with the launch of the Nigeria and Eswatini national projects in 2022 and will continue until 2027.

  •   In C te d Ivoire the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO celebrated in Niaga Sassandra department the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem through the Coastal Fisheries Initiative in West Africa IFC WA Dr Yacoub Issola of the Abidjan Convention coordinator of the mangrove component of the IPC AO project took this important opportunity to invite all localities with mangroves in C te d Ivoire to follow the successful model of the Ni ga people Unlike other towns in Sassandra Niaga is one of the towns that has managed to preserve its mangroves in their natural state due to their uses and customs For this reason we have chosen this town to host the first edition of the International Conservation Day of the Mangrove Ecosystem to encourage and show our gratitude to the local population for their efforts to protect this unique special and fragile ecosystem he said Mr Lamine Coulibaly Prefect of the Gb kl region Prefect of the Sassandra department invited the women of the region to contribute to the preservation of the mangroves by putting an end to the use of the mangroves for smoking fish In order to encourage the people of Nega to continue their efforts to conserve the mangrove and keep the town clean they received from the ICP AO project a large batch of 132 item maintenance equipment consisting of wheelbarrows dustbins boots rakes machetes and shovels worth an estimated CFAF 3 500 000 The donation was presented in the presence of many administrative authorities including the departmental director of the Ministry of Water and Forests who oversees mangrove management In 2000 2020 mangrove forests increased by 2 7 2 at project sites in Senegal while they decreased by 10 in C te d Ivoire On the sidelines of this official celebration a workshop on the restitution of various mangrove studies carried out by the IPC AO project was organized in the conference room at Sassandra Landing in the presence of some forty stakeholders including artisanal fishermen and women processors These studies conducted over the period 2000 2020 revealed that mangrove forests increased by 2 72 in IPC AO project sites in Senegal while they decreased by 10 in C te d Ivoire The studies also listed the factors of destruction such as agriculture with the expansion of export plantations infrastructure construction roads ports urbanization and especially logging for various uses including smoking of fish products If nothing is done to protect them all mangrove areas will disappear and with them all the biodiversity they contain with their ecosystem functions goods and services that they provide to local populations to C te d Ivoire and to humanity he said Dr Issola warned Mangrove forests are typical ecosystems of tropical and subtropical areas These ecosystems are vital for the conservation of various animal and plant species and in the fight against coastal erosion and climate change However they are one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world so steps are being taken to protect them The IPC AO project is funded by the Global Environment Facility GEF and is implemented in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Program UNEP through the Abidjan Convention
    Mangrove conservation in Côte d’Ivoire: the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) share a successful model in the village of Nega
      In C te d Ivoire the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO celebrated in Niaga Sassandra department the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem through the Coastal Fisheries Initiative in West Africa IFC WA Dr Yacoub Issola of the Abidjan Convention coordinator of the mangrove component of the IPC AO project took this important opportunity to invite all localities with mangroves in C te d Ivoire to follow the successful model of the Ni ga people Unlike other towns in Sassandra Niaga is one of the towns that has managed to preserve its mangroves in their natural state due to their uses and customs For this reason we have chosen this town to host the first edition of the International Conservation Day of the Mangrove Ecosystem to encourage and show our gratitude to the local population for their efforts to protect this unique special and fragile ecosystem he said Mr Lamine Coulibaly Prefect of the Gb kl region Prefect of the Sassandra department invited the women of the region to contribute to the preservation of the mangroves by putting an end to the use of the mangroves for smoking fish In order to encourage the people of Nega to continue their efforts to conserve the mangrove and keep the town clean they received from the ICP AO project a large batch of 132 item maintenance equipment consisting of wheelbarrows dustbins boots rakes machetes and shovels worth an estimated CFAF 3 500 000 The donation was presented in the presence of many administrative authorities including the departmental director of the Ministry of Water and Forests who oversees mangrove management In 2000 2020 mangrove forests increased by 2 7 2 at project sites in Senegal while they decreased by 10 in C te d Ivoire On the sidelines of this official celebration a workshop on the restitution of various mangrove studies carried out by the IPC AO project was organized in the conference room at Sassandra Landing in the presence of some forty stakeholders including artisanal fishermen and women processors These studies conducted over the period 2000 2020 revealed that mangrove forests increased by 2 72 in IPC AO project sites in Senegal while they decreased by 10 in C te d Ivoire The studies also listed the factors of destruction such as agriculture with the expansion of export plantations infrastructure construction roads ports urbanization and especially logging for various uses including smoking of fish products If nothing is done to protect them all mangrove areas will disappear and with them all the biodiversity they contain with their ecosystem functions goods and services that they provide to local populations to C te d Ivoire and to humanity he said Dr Issola warned Mangrove forests are typical ecosystems of tropical and subtropical areas These ecosystems are vital for the conservation of various animal and plant species and in the fight against coastal erosion and climate change However they are one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world so steps are being taken to protect them The IPC AO project is funded by the Global Environment Facility GEF and is implemented in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Program UNEP through the Abidjan Convention
    Mangrove conservation in Côte d’Ivoire: the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) share a successful model in the village of Nega
    Africa2 months ago

    Mangrove conservation in Côte d’Ivoire: the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) share a successful model in the village of Nega

    In Côte d'Ivoire, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) celebrated in Niaga, Sassandra department, the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem through the Coastal Fisheries Initiative in West Africa (IFC-WA).

    Dr. Yacoub Issola of the Abidjan Convention, coordinator of the mangrove component of the IPC-AO project, took this important opportunity to invite all localities with mangroves in Côte d'Ivoire to follow the successful model of the Niéga people.

    “Unlike other towns in Sassandra, Niaga is one of the towns that has managed to preserve its mangroves in their natural state due to their uses and customs.

    For this reason, we have chosen this town to host the first edition of the International Conservation Day. of the Mangrove Ecosystem to encourage and show our gratitude to the local population for their efforts to protect this unique, special and fragile ecosystem", he said.

    Mr. Lamine Coulibaly, Prefect of the Gbôklè region, Prefect of the Sassandra department, invited the women of the region to contribute to the preservation of the mangroves by putting an end to the use of the mangroves for smoking fish.In order to encourage the people of Nega to continue their efforts to conserve the mangrove and keep the town clean, they received from the ICP-AO project, a large batch of 132-item maintenance equipment consisting of wheelbarrows, dustbins, boots, rakes, machetes and shovels worth an estimated CFAF 3,500,000.

    The donation was presented in the presence of many administrative authorities, including the departmental director of the Ministry of Water and Forests, who oversees mangrove management In 2000-2020, mangrove forests increased by 2.7 2% at project sites in Senegal, while they decreased by 10% in Côte d'Ivoire.

    On the sidelines of this official celebration, a workshop on the restitution of various mangrove studies carried out by the IPC-AO project was organized in the conference room at Sassandra Landing in the presence of some forty stakeholders, including artisanal fishermen and women.

    processors These studies, conducted over the period 2000-2020, revealed that mangrove forests increased by 2.72% in IPC-AO project sites in Senegal, while they decreased by 10% in Côte d'Ivoire.

    The studies also listed the factors of destruction such as agriculture with the expansion of export plantations, infrastructure construction (roads, ports), urbanization, and especially logging for various uses, including smoking of fish products.

    “If nothing is done to protect them, all mangrove areas will disappear, and with them all the biodiversity they contain with their ecosystem functions, goods and services that they provide to local populations, to Côte d'Ivoire and to humanity,” he said.

    Dr. Issola warned.

    Mangrove forests are typical ecosystems of tropical and subtropical areas.

    These ecosystems are vital for the conservation of various animal and plant species and in the fight against coastal erosion and climate change.

    However, they are one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world, so steps are being taken to protect them.

    The IPC-AO project is funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and is implemented in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) through the Abidjan Convention.

  •   The African Development Bank Group www AfDB org has provided new funding for two major ongoing projects in Cameroon the Kribi Port and Industrial Area Access Roads Development Project PARZIK https bit ly 3E0Ijex and the Improved Sustainable Drainage and Sanitation Project of the City of Yaound PCADY https bit ly 3E0Is1z The Director General for Central Africa of the African Development Bank Serge N Guessan and Alamine Ousman Mey Minister of Economy Planning and Regional Development of Cameroon signed the loan agreements for both projects on September 20 2022 in Yaound PARZIK will receive 40 million following a previous tranche of 114 million The Bank s board of directors approved the follow on loan on June 22 2022 PARZIK aims to facilitate road traffic between the cities of Edea and Kribi which has a deep water port The project which will also increase road safety involves the rehabilitation of the badly deteriorated 110 km road that links the towns The highway will also be expanded to reach Equatorial Guinea and connect the two countries In addition a bridge will be built over the Ntem River to strengthen the national and trans African corridors such as Douala Kribi Bata Kribi Yaound Bangui and Kribi Yaound N Djamena The second loan will go to the PCADY project a large scale operation launched in 2013 to reduce the floods that hit the Cameroonian capital each year and also improve stormwater management sanitation and public hygiene With the new loan of nearly 33 5 million Yaound will continue to address residual flooding in the city center including Kennedy Avenue A flood control pond will be built and solid waste management will be improved As in the two previous phases of the program a series of facilities playgrounds and green spaces are planned This new phase of the PCADY project will also benefit from an 8 million grant from the Global Environment Facility GEF This will be used to finance design studies for the planned Ongot landfill in Yaound as well as construction in the Ngomb district of Douala of a treatment center for special and or hazardous industrial waste I thank you for the boost our cooperation has just received under your leadership The fulfillment of these two operations is the result of their efforts together with that of their staff who together with ours formed a dynamic and committed team dedicated to achieving the development objectives of our country Minister Mey said during the ceremony signing ceremony which he attended together with other members of the Government For the African Development Bank Group these two operations bring the volume of its active portfolio in Cameroon to almost 2 billion euros divided into 25 operations said N Guessan of the African Development Bank He added The transport sector alone represents 51 6 of the portfolio or more than 1 billion demonstrating the leadership role of the African Development Bank Group in financing the transport sector in the country and the subregion
    Cameroon: new funds from the African Development Bank to develop the port sector and sustainable urban sanitation
      The African Development Bank Group www AfDB org has provided new funding for two major ongoing projects in Cameroon the Kribi Port and Industrial Area Access Roads Development Project PARZIK https bit ly 3E0Ijex and the Improved Sustainable Drainage and Sanitation Project of the City of Yaound PCADY https bit ly 3E0Is1z The Director General for Central Africa of the African Development Bank Serge N Guessan and Alamine Ousman Mey Minister of Economy Planning and Regional Development of Cameroon signed the loan agreements for both projects on September 20 2022 in Yaound PARZIK will receive 40 million following a previous tranche of 114 million The Bank s board of directors approved the follow on loan on June 22 2022 PARZIK aims to facilitate road traffic between the cities of Edea and Kribi which has a deep water port The project which will also increase road safety involves the rehabilitation of the badly deteriorated 110 km road that links the towns The highway will also be expanded to reach Equatorial Guinea and connect the two countries In addition a bridge will be built over the Ntem River to strengthen the national and trans African corridors such as Douala Kribi Bata Kribi Yaound Bangui and Kribi Yaound N Djamena The second loan will go to the PCADY project a large scale operation launched in 2013 to reduce the floods that hit the Cameroonian capital each year and also improve stormwater management sanitation and public hygiene With the new loan of nearly 33 5 million Yaound will continue to address residual flooding in the city center including Kennedy Avenue A flood control pond will be built and solid waste management will be improved As in the two previous phases of the program a series of facilities playgrounds and green spaces are planned This new phase of the PCADY project will also benefit from an 8 million grant from the Global Environment Facility GEF This will be used to finance design studies for the planned Ongot landfill in Yaound as well as construction in the Ngomb district of Douala of a treatment center for special and or hazardous industrial waste I thank you for the boost our cooperation has just received under your leadership The fulfillment of these two operations is the result of their efforts together with that of their staff who together with ours formed a dynamic and committed team dedicated to achieving the development objectives of our country Minister Mey said during the ceremony signing ceremony which he attended together with other members of the Government For the African Development Bank Group these two operations bring the volume of its active portfolio in Cameroon to almost 2 billion euros divided into 25 operations said N Guessan of the African Development Bank He added The transport sector alone represents 51 6 of the portfolio or more than 1 billion demonstrating the leadership role of the African Development Bank Group in financing the transport sector in the country and the subregion
    Cameroon: new funds from the African Development Bank to develop the port sector and sustainable urban sanitation
    Africa2 months ago

    Cameroon: new funds from the African Development Bank to develop the port sector and sustainable urban sanitation

    The African Development Bank Group (www.AfDB.org) has provided new funding for two major ongoing projects in Cameroon: the Kribi Port and Industrial Area Access Roads Development Project (PARZIK) (https:// bit.ly/3E0Ijex) and the Improved Sustainable Drainage and Sanitation Project of the City of Yaoundé (PCADY) (https://bit.ly/3E0Is1z).

    The Director General for Central Africa of the African Development Bank, Serge N'Guessan, and Alamine Ousman Mey, Minister of Economy, Planning and Regional Development of Cameroon, signed the loan agreements for both projects on September 20, 2022 in Yaoundé.

    PARZIK will receive €40 million, following a previous tranche of €114 million.

    The Bank's board of directors approved the follow-on loan on June 22, 2022.

    PARZIK aims to facilitate road traffic between the cities of Edea and Kribi, which has a deep-water port.

    The project, which will also increase road safety, involves the rehabilitation of the badly deteriorated 110 km road that links the towns.

    The highway will also be expanded to reach Equatorial Guinea and connect the two countries.

    In addition, a bridge will be built over the Ntem River to strengthen the national and trans-African corridors such as Douala-Kribi-Bata, Kribi-Yaoundé-Bangui and Kribi-Yaoundé-N'Djamena.

    The second loan will go to the PCADY project, a large-scale operation launched in 2013 to reduce the floods that hit the Cameroonian capital each year and also improve stormwater management, sanitation and public hygiene.

    With the new loan of nearly €33.5 million, Yaoundé will continue to address residual flooding in the city center, including Kennedy Avenue.

    A flood control pond will be built and solid waste management will be improved.

    As in the two previous phases of the program, a series of facilities, playgrounds and green spaces are planned.

    This new phase of the PCADY project will also benefit from an $8 million grant from the Global Environment Facility (GEF).

    This will be used to finance design studies for the planned Ongot landfill in Yaoundé, as well as construction in the Ngombé district of Douala.

    of a treatment center for special and/or hazardous industrial waste.

    “I thank you for the boost our cooperation has just received under your leadership.

    The fulfillment of these two operations is the result of their efforts, together with that of their staff who, together with ours, formed a dynamic and committed team, dedicated to achieving the development objectives of our country," Minister Mey said during the ceremony.

    signing ceremony, which he attended together with other members of the Government.

    "For the African Development Bank Group, these two operations bring the volume of its active portfolio in Cameroon to almost 2 billion euros, divided into 25 operations," said N'Guessan, of the African Development Bank. He added: "The transport sector alone represents 51.6% of the portfolio, or more than €1 billion, demonstrating the leadership role of the African Development Bank Group in financing the transport sector in the country and the subregion".

  •   The Board of Directors of the African Development Bank Group https www AfDB org approved a concessional investment of USD 20 million to support the second phase of the Covid 19 Off Grid Recovery Platform CRP 19 https bit ly 3qXLziV The CRP is a blended finance initiative to unlock private capital for energy access companies to mitigate the negative impacts of the pandemic while promoting access to clean electricity and ensuring a green economic recovery The Sustainable Energy Facility for Africa SEFA https bit ly 37jYAtS a multi donor fund administered by the African Development Bank will provide 7 million in financing for the expansion the remaining 13 million will come from the Global Environment Facility GEF https www theGEF org a multilateral environmental fund The second phase will help create an additional 70 million in financing for the energy access sector to cushion the lingering impacts of the pandemic on supply chains inflation the rising cost of capital and the effects of the conflict in Ukraine Alix Graham Off Grid Energy Access Fund Leader said With concessional financing from SEFA under CRP the Off Grid Energy Access Fund was able to offer affordable financing solutions in markets such as Malawi and Sierra Leone who helped companies to reduce the impact of increased currency volatility and increased logistics costs He described CRP as a partnership between the private and development sectors that offered innovative financial solutions without distorting the market or crowding out private capital The Off Grid Energy Access Fund is managed by Lion s Head Global Partners one of three fund managers that jointly anchored Phase I of the Covid 19 Off Grid Recovery Platform The other two are Triple Jump https TripleJump eu and Social Investment Managers and Advisors https SIMAfunds com Mark van Doesburgh deputy director of sustainable energy at Triple Jump said We appreciate the continued support provided by the African Development Bank to accelerate progress towards SDG 7 The concessional financing provided under Phase II of the CRP comes at a critical time for early stage energy access companies that continue to be affected by Covid 19 and enables the Energy Entrepreneurs Growth Fund https bit ly 3f6oQ1s to free up flexible financing in the sector at a time when venture capital is increasingly scarce Through CRP s partners energy access companies can access a wide range of flexible debt financing solutions at more affordable terms To date more than 50 million in soft financing has been approved for 12 energy access companies that are commercializing and implementing solar home systems mini grids and commercial and industrial solar irrigation solutions Thanks to this strong partnership we have been able to mobilize more than 140 million of patient capital to mitigate the unprecedented challenges facing the energy access industry in recent years and protect progress towards universal access in Africa said Jo o Duarte Cunha manager of the Renewable Energy Funds Division in charge of SEFA at the African Development Bank
    The African Development Bank’s Global Environment Facility and Sustainable Energy Facility for Africa (SEFA) provide million to expand Covid-19 off-grid recovery platform
      The Board of Directors of the African Development Bank Group https www AfDB org approved a concessional investment of USD 20 million to support the second phase of the Covid 19 Off Grid Recovery Platform CRP 19 https bit ly 3qXLziV The CRP is a blended finance initiative to unlock private capital for energy access companies to mitigate the negative impacts of the pandemic while promoting access to clean electricity and ensuring a green economic recovery The Sustainable Energy Facility for Africa SEFA https bit ly 37jYAtS a multi donor fund administered by the African Development Bank will provide 7 million in financing for the expansion the remaining 13 million will come from the Global Environment Facility GEF https www theGEF org a multilateral environmental fund The second phase will help create an additional 70 million in financing for the energy access sector to cushion the lingering impacts of the pandemic on supply chains inflation the rising cost of capital and the effects of the conflict in Ukraine Alix Graham Off Grid Energy Access Fund Leader said With concessional financing from SEFA under CRP the Off Grid Energy Access Fund was able to offer affordable financing solutions in markets such as Malawi and Sierra Leone who helped companies to reduce the impact of increased currency volatility and increased logistics costs He described CRP as a partnership between the private and development sectors that offered innovative financial solutions without distorting the market or crowding out private capital The Off Grid Energy Access Fund is managed by Lion s Head Global Partners one of three fund managers that jointly anchored Phase I of the Covid 19 Off Grid Recovery Platform The other two are Triple Jump https TripleJump eu and Social Investment Managers and Advisors https SIMAfunds com Mark van Doesburgh deputy director of sustainable energy at Triple Jump said We appreciate the continued support provided by the African Development Bank to accelerate progress towards SDG 7 The concessional financing provided under Phase II of the CRP comes at a critical time for early stage energy access companies that continue to be affected by Covid 19 and enables the Energy Entrepreneurs Growth Fund https bit ly 3f6oQ1s to free up flexible financing in the sector at a time when venture capital is increasingly scarce Through CRP s partners energy access companies can access a wide range of flexible debt financing solutions at more affordable terms To date more than 50 million in soft financing has been approved for 12 energy access companies that are commercializing and implementing solar home systems mini grids and commercial and industrial solar irrigation solutions Thanks to this strong partnership we have been able to mobilize more than 140 million of patient capital to mitigate the unprecedented challenges facing the energy access industry in recent years and protect progress towards universal access in Africa said Jo o Duarte Cunha manager of the Renewable Energy Funds Division in charge of SEFA at the African Development Bank
    The African Development Bank’s Global Environment Facility and Sustainable Energy Facility for Africa (SEFA) provide million to expand Covid-19 off-grid recovery platform
    Africa3 months ago

    The African Development Bank’s Global Environment Facility and Sustainable Energy Facility for Africa (SEFA) provide $20 million to expand Covid-19 off-grid recovery platform

    The Board of Directors of the African Development Bank Group (https://www.AfDB.org) approved a concessional investment of USD 20 million to support the second phase of the Covid-19 Off Grid Recovery Platform (CRP).

    19 (https:/ /bit.ly/3qXLziV).

    The CRP is a blended finance initiative to unlock private capital for energy access companies to mitigate the negative impacts of the pandemic while promoting access to clean electricity and ensuring a green economic recovery.

    The Sustainable Energy Facility for Africa (SEFA) (https://bit.ly/37jYAtS), a multi-donor fund administered by the African Development Bank, will provide $7 million in financing for the expansion; the remaining $13 million will come from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) (https://www.theGEF.org), a multilateral environmental fund.

    The second phase will help create an additional $70 million in financing for the energy access sector to cushion the lingering impacts of the pandemic on supply chains, inflation, the rising cost of capital, and the effects of the conflict in Ukraine.

    Alix Graham, Off-Grid Energy Access Fund Leader, said: “With concessional financing from SEFA under CRP, the Off-Grid Energy Access Fund was able to offer affordable financing solutions in markets such as Malawi and Sierra Leone who helped companies.

    to reduce the impact of increased currency volatility and increased logistics costs.” He described CRP as a partnership between the private and development sectors that offered innovative financial solutions without distorting the market or crowding out private capital.

    The Off-Grid Energy Access Fund is managed by Lion's Head Global Partners, one of three fund managers that jointly anchored Phase I of the Covid-19 Off-Grid Recovery Platform.

    The other two are Triple Jump (https://TripleJump.eu) and Social Investment Managers and Advisors (https://SIMAfunds.com) Mark van Doesburgh, deputy director of sustainable energy at Triple Jump, said: “We appreciate the continued support provided by the African Development Bank to accelerate progress towards SDG 7.

    The concessional financing provided under Phase II of the CRP comes at a critical time for early-stage energy access companies that continue to be affected by Covid -19 and enables the Energy Entrepreneurs Growth Fund (https://bit.ly/3f6oQ1s) to free up flexible financing in the sector at a time when venture capital is increasingly scarce.” Through CRP's partners, energy access companies can access a wide range of flexible debt financing solutions at more affordable terms.

    To date, more than $50 million in soft financing has been approved for 12 energy access companies that are commercializing and implementing solar home systems, mini-grids, and commercial and industrial solar irrigation solutions.

    "Thanks to this strong partnership, we have been able to mobilize more than $140 million of patient capital to mitigate the unprecedented challenges facing the energy access industry in recent years and protect progress towards universal access in Africa," said João Duarte Cunha, manager.

    of the Renewable Energy Funds Division in charge of SEFA at the African Development Bank.

  •   Malaria remains a public health threat in Zimbabwe with more than half the population at risk of malaria annually Despite the progress made malaria still accounts for about 40 of outpatient care in moderate to high transmission districts especially during the peak transmission period Zimbabwe has adopted several chemical based vector control measures to reduce malaria However there has been increasing evidence of resistance to chemical based malaria vector interventions This has necessitated the call for alternative non chemical based innovations for vector control such as home screening Recent studies have shown that home screening significantly reduces the number of mosquitoes entering homes in several African countries However it is still necessary to quantify the impact that home screening has on the prevention and reduction effect of malaria in different countries From now on Zimbabwe is among six southern African countries in the WHO AFRO region where studies on demonstrating the effectiveness of diversified environmentally sound and sustainable interventions and strengthening national capacity for innovative implementation of integrated vector management IVM for disease prevention and control is being implemented The study is known as the AFRO II Project which is funded by the Global Environment Facility GEF through UNEP and WHO AFRO The project supports the implementation of the UNEP roadmap for the development of alternatives to DDT dichloro diphenyl trichloroethane approved by the seventh meeting of the Conference of the Parties COP7 of the Stockholm Convention in May 2015 The The goal of the roadmap is to make available locally safe effective affordable and environmentally sound alternatives for a sustainable transition away from DDT The Afro II project study in Zimbabwe covers Districts 27 Monyoroka Resettlement Area and 28 Triangle in Chiredzi District Masvingo Province The project consists of protecting houses by installing wire mesh screens on windows doors eaves and other openings to prevent the entry of mosquitoes To initiate the project the Ministry of Health and Child Care MoHCC with the support of WHO carried out a household enumeration a knowledge attitudes and practices KAP survey on malaria and an insecticide susceptibility mapping within the target community in the project district The KAP survey conducted in May 2021 aimed to assess the local community s awareness and appreciation of malaria the disease causes transmission vectors current interventions and treatment Speaking on the sidelines of a project field visit in Chiredzi Mr Wilson Chauke MoHCC National Vector Control Officer pointed out how the AFRO II Project did not replace existing control measures but added to existing mechanisms prevention and control of malaria Zimbabwe is currently using chemical based vector control interventions and the AFRO II project will assess the effectiveness of home screening a non chemical based intervention You know that chemicals have an environmental impact that must be avoided at all costs said Mr Chuake If this project is successful we hope to have an additional intervention that is environmentally friendly added Mr Chauke Covering doors windows and any other openings with screens and closing any remaining gaps with mortar is simple and effective Keeping mosquitoes out of homes not only prevents the transmission of malaria but also other tropical diseases such as dengue fever filariasis or Rift Valley fever In addition to protecting all household members while indoors netting is also an environmentally friendly intervention as well as a more cost effective and long lasting option compared to using mosquito nets alone Home screening has been successfully tested in Gambia and Tanzania and found to significantly reduce malaria transmission It is also beneficial because it is environmentally friendly and not prone to developing resistance to mosquitoes Again it encourages community participation and ownership says Casper Tarumbwa coordinator of WHO s AFRO II project in Zimbabwe The results of the AFRO II Project are expected to help overcome challenges such as reliance on chemical based malaria vector interventions that are prone to resistance Lack of human and technical resources and inadequate capacity for the implementation of policies related to the safe production and use of insecticides The multisectoral approach to project implementation will also enhance collaboration between health and other relevant sectors regarding development projects that impact health After the preliminary activities described above the project moved to the next stage where the first selection phase of 400 houses began on July 25 2022 and will last until August 5 2022 When the selection is complete assessments to determine if there is a reduction in mosquitoes entering homes a decrease in the number of new malaria cases and acceptance by the community
    Zimbabwe tests non-chemical-based malaria prevention measures in Chiredzi
      Malaria remains a public health threat in Zimbabwe with more than half the population at risk of malaria annually Despite the progress made malaria still accounts for about 40 of outpatient care in moderate to high transmission districts especially during the peak transmission period Zimbabwe has adopted several chemical based vector control measures to reduce malaria However there has been increasing evidence of resistance to chemical based malaria vector interventions This has necessitated the call for alternative non chemical based innovations for vector control such as home screening Recent studies have shown that home screening significantly reduces the number of mosquitoes entering homes in several African countries However it is still necessary to quantify the impact that home screening has on the prevention and reduction effect of malaria in different countries From now on Zimbabwe is among six southern African countries in the WHO AFRO region where studies on demonstrating the effectiveness of diversified environmentally sound and sustainable interventions and strengthening national capacity for innovative implementation of integrated vector management IVM for disease prevention and control is being implemented The study is known as the AFRO II Project which is funded by the Global Environment Facility GEF through UNEP and WHO AFRO The project supports the implementation of the UNEP roadmap for the development of alternatives to DDT dichloro diphenyl trichloroethane approved by the seventh meeting of the Conference of the Parties COP7 of the Stockholm Convention in May 2015 The The goal of the roadmap is to make available locally safe effective affordable and environmentally sound alternatives for a sustainable transition away from DDT The Afro II project study in Zimbabwe covers Districts 27 Monyoroka Resettlement Area and 28 Triangle in Chiredzi District Masvingo Province The project consists of protecting houses by installing wire mesh screens on windows doors eaves and other openings to prevent the entry of mosquitoes To initiate the project the Ministry of Health and Child Care MoHCC with the support of WHO carried out a household enumeration a knowledge attitudes and practices KAP survey on malaria and an insecticide susceptibility mapping within the target community in the project district The KAP survey conducted in May 2021 aimed to assess the local community s awareness and appreciation of malaria the disease causes transmission vectors current interventions and treatment Speaking on the sidelines of a project field visit in Chiredzi Mr Wilson Chauke MoHCC National Vector Control Officer pointed out how the AFRO II Project did not replace existing control measures but added to existing mechanisms prevention and control of malaria Zimbabwe is currently using chemical based vector control interventions and the AFRO II project will assess the effectiveness of home screening a non chemical based intervention You know that chemicals have an environmental impact that must be avoided at all costs said Mr Chuake If this project is successful we hope to have an additional intervention that is environmentally friendly added Mr Chauke Covering doors windows and any other openings with screens and closing any remaining gaps with mortar is simple and effective Keeping mosquitoes out of homes not only prevents the transmission of malaria but also other tropical diseases such as dengue fever filariasis or Rift Valley fever In addition to protecting all household members while indoors netting is also an environmentally friendly intervention as well as a more cost effective and long lasting option compared to using mosquito nets alone Home screening has been successfully tested in Gambia and Tanzania and found to significantly reduce malaria transmission It is also beneficial because it is environmentally friendly and not prone to developing resistance to mosquitoes Again it encourages community participation and ownership says Casper Tarumbwa coordinator of WHO s AFRO II project in Zimbabwe The results of the AFRO II Project are expected to help overcome challenges such as reliance on chemical based malaria vector interventions that are prone to resistance Lack of human and technical resources and inadequate capacity for the implementation of policies related to the safe production and use of insecticides The multisectoral approach to project implementation will also enhance collaboration between health and other relevant sectors regarding development projects that impact health After the preliminary activities described above the project moved to the next stage where the first selection phase of 400 houses began on July 25 2022 and will last until August 5 2022 When the selection is complete assessments to determine if there is a reduction in mosquitoes entering homes a decrease in the number of new malaria cases and acceptance by the community
    Zimbabwe tests non-chemical-based malaria prevention measures in Chiredzi
    Africa4 months ago

    Zimbabwe tests non-chemical-based malaria prevention measures in Chiredzi

    Malaria remains a public health threat in Zimbabwe, with more than half the population at risk of malaria annually.

    Despite the progress made, malaria still accounts for about 40% of outpatient care in moderate to high transmission districts, especially during the peak transmission period.

    Zimbabwe has adopted several chemical-based vector control measures to reduce malaria.

    However, there has been increasing evidence of resistance to chemical-based malaria vector interventions.

    This has necessitated the call for alternative non-chemical-based innovations for vector control, such as home screening.

    Recent studies have shown that home screening significantly reduces the number of mosquitoes entering homes in several African countries.

    However, it is still necessary to quantify the impact that home screening has on the prevention and reduction effect of malaria in different countries.

    From now on, Zimbabwe is among six southern African countries in the WHO AFRO region where studies on demonstrating the effectiveness of diversified, environmentally sound and sustainable interventions, and strengthening national capacity for innovative implementation of integrated vector management (IVM) for disease prevention and control is being implemented.

    The study is known as the AFRO II Project, which is funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) through UNEP and WHO-AFRO.

    The project supports the implementation of the UNEP roadmap for the development of alternatives to DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane) approved by the seventh meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP7) of the Stockholm Convention in May 2015.

    The The goal of the roadmap is to make available locally safe, effective, affordable, and environmentally sound alternatives for a sustainable transition away from DDT.

    The Afro II project study in Zimbabwe covers Districts 27 (Monyoroka Resettlement Area) and 28 (Triangle) in Chiredzi District, Masvingo Province.

    The project consists of protecting houses by installing wire mesh screens on windows, doors, eaves and other openings to prevent the entry of mosquitoes.

    To initiate the project, the Ministry of Health and Child Care (MoHCC) with the support of WHO carried out a household enumeration, a knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) survey on malaria and an insecticide susceptibility mapping within the target community in the project district.

    The KAP survey conducted in May 2021 aimed to assess the local community's awareness and appreciation of malaria (the disease, causes, transmission, vectors, current interventions and treatment).

    Speaking on the sidelines of a project field visit in Chiredzi, Mr. Wilson Chauke, MoHCC, National Vector Control Officer, pointed out how the AFRO II Project did not replace existing control measures, but added to existing mechanisms.

    prevention and control of malaria.

    “Zimbabwe is currently using chemical-based vector control interventions and the AFRO II project will assess the effectiveness of home screening, a non-chemical-based intervention.

    You know that chemicals have an environmental impact that must be avoided at all costs,” said Mr. Chuake.

    “If this project is successful, we hope to have an additional intervention that is environmentally friendly,” added Mr. Chauke.

    Covering doors, windows, and any other openings with screens and closing any remaining gaps with mortar is simple and effective.

    Keeping mosquitoes out of homes not only prevents the transmission of malaria, but also other tropical diseases such as dengue fever, filariasis or Rift Valley fever.

    In addition to protecting all household members while indoors, netting is also an environmentally friendly intervention, as well as a more cost-effective and long-lasting option compared to using mosquito nets alone.

    “Home screening has been successfully tested in Gambia and Tanzania and found to significantly reduce malaria transmission.

    It is also beneficial because it is environmentally friendly and not prone to developing resistance to mosquitoes.

    Again, it encourages community participation and ownership,” says Casper Tarumbwa, coordinator of WHO's AFRO II project in Zimbabwe.

    The results of the AFRO II Project are expected to help overcome challenges such as reliance on chemical-based malaria vector interventions that are prone to resistance.

    Lack of human and technical resources, and inadequate capacity for the implementation of policies related to the safe production and use of insecticides.

    The multisectoral approach to project implementation will also enhance collaboration between health and other relevant sectors regarding development projects that impact health.

    After the preliminary activities described above, the project moved to the next stage, where the first selection phase of 400 houses began on July 25, 2022 and will last until August 5, 2022.

    When the selection is complete, assessments to determine if there is a reduction in mosquitoes entering homes, a decrease in the number of new malaria cases, and acceptance by the community.

  •  The UN Development Programme has commended Nigerian Government s efforts in promoting climate resilience agriculture and enhancing food security This was the thrust at the Close Out Event of the Resilient Food Security Programme of the Global Environment Facility GEF project in Abuja on Thursday UNDP Deputy Resident Coordinator Mr Lealem Dinku said the GEF project had laid the foundation for climate change response in the country through the development of national food security policy and institutional structures The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the 5 year project was implemented in seven states of Adamawa Gombe Nasarawa Benue Jigawa Kano and Katsina Dinku noted that with sustainability recurring food security situations would be addressed in a transformative manner for capacity of women communities and institutions in the country He said the impact of climate change was widespread and felt through persistent droughts extreme heat flooding and erratic rain patterns among others Under this project great results have been achieved so far in tackling food insecurity in Nigeria More than 90 000 direct jobs and 800 000 indirect jobs has been created through various livelihood and income generating activities Moreover more than 50 000 women have been empowered through the project s climate smart agriculture and livelihood interventions with both on farm and off farm income generating activities And through the land restoration efforts over 100 hectares of degraded and soil erosion land has been restored he said Representative of the Federal Ministry of Agriculture Mrs Iyabo Mustapha said climate change had impacted food systems in the country in immeasurable measure Mustapha said through the GEF project the capacity of smallholder farmers was built on climate resilience agriculture saying this had also promoted food security in the country While commending the UNDP on the partnership Mustapha stressed the need for benefiting states to sustain successes recorded Mr Mohammed Tukur GEF National Project Coordinator said the Resilient Food Security Programme had proven to be very effective in boosting the adaptability of small holder farmers in managing climate change He said the project had lifted many people out of poverty and ensured food security linking successes to lessons from the Integrated Approach Pilot IAP theme The Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development is appreciative of the ongoing support and dedication of all the RFS partners and state project teams as they collaborate with local communities to take action against land degradation and face long term solutions to food security in Nigeria Tukur said Hajiya Salamatu Garba Executive Director Women Farmers Advancement Network said the project had reflected that with climate resilience programmes and policies Nigeria could meet its food security targets sustainably According to her there is need for sustaining the gains of the programme through community ownership Garba also said implementing agencies ought to sustain the gender aspects of the project saying women empowerment means all round development We must think of how to manage scalability and sustainability of the project there is need for extension workers to hand them over to peer leaders and communities she said NewsSourceCredit NAN
    UNDP commends Nigeria on Climate Smart Agric
     The UN Development Programme has commended Nigerian Government s efforts in promoting climate resilience agriculture and enhancing food security This was the thrust at the Close Out Event of the Resilient Food Security Programme of the Global Environment Facility GEF project in Abuja on Thursday UNDP Deputy Resident Coordinator Mr Lealem Dinku said the GEF project had laid the foundation for climate change response in the country through the development of national food security policy and institutional structures The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the 5 year project was implemented in seven states of Adamawa Gombe Nasarawa Benue Jigawa Kano and Katsina Dinku noted that with sustainability recurring food security situations would be addressed in a transformative manner for capacity of women communities and institutions in the country He said the impact of climate change was widespread and felt through persistent droughts extreme heat flooding and erratic rain patterns among others Under this project great results have been achieved so far in tackling food insecurity in Nigeria More than 90 000 direct jobs and 800 000 indirect jobs has been created through various livelihood and income generating activities Moreover more than 50 000 women have been empowered through the project s climate smart agriculture and livelihood interventions with both on farm and off farm income generating activities And through the land restoration efforts over 100 hectares of degraded and soil erosion land has been restored he said Representative of the Federal Ministry of Agriculture Mrs Iyabo Mustapha said climate change had impacted food systems in the country in immeasurable measure Mustapha said through the GEF project the capacity of smallholder farmers was built on climate resilience agriculture saying this had also promoted food security in the country While commending the UNDP on the partnership Mustapha stressed the need for benefiting states to sustain successes recorded Mr Mohammed Tukur GEF National Project Coordinator said the Resilient Food Security Programme had proven to be very effective in boosting the adaptability of small holder farmers in managing climate change He said the project had lifted many people out of poverty and ensured food security linking successes to lessons from the Integrated Approach Pilot IAP theme The Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development is appreciative of the ongoing support and dedication of all the RFS partners and state project teams as they collaborate with local communities to take action against land degradation and face long term solutions to food security in Nigeria Tukur said Hajiya Salamatu Garba Executive Director Women Farmers Advancement Network said the project had reflected that with climate resilience programmes and policies Nigeria could meet its food security targets sustainably According to her there is need for sustaining the gains of the programme through community ownership Garba also said implementing agencies ought to sustain the gender aspects of the project saying women empowerment means all round development We must think of how to manage scalability and sustainability of the project there is need for extension workers to hand them over to peer leaders and communities she said NewsSourceCredit NAN
    UNDP commends Nigeria on Climate Smart Agric
    General news4 months ago

    UNDP commends Nigeria on Climate Smart Agric

    The UN Development Programme has commended Nigerian Government’s efforts in promoting climate resilience agriculture and enhancing food security.

    This was the thrust at the Close-Out Event of the Resilient Food Security Programme of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project in Abuja on Thursday.

    UNDP Deputy Resident Coordinator, Mr Lealem Dinku, said the GEF project had laid the foundation for climate change response in the country through the development of national food security policy and institutional structures.

    The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the 5-year project was implemented in seven states of Adamawa, Gombe, Nasarawa, Benue, Jigawa, Kano and Katsina.

    Dinku noted that with sustainability, recurring food security situations would be addressed in a transformative manner for capacity of women, communities and institutions in the country.

    He said the impact of climate change was widespread and felt through persistent droughts, extreme heat, flooding and erratic rain patterns, among others.

    “Under this project, great results have been achieved so-far in tackling food insecurity in Nigeria.

    More than 90,000 direct jobs and 800,000 indirect jobs has been created through various livelihood and income generating activities.

    “Moreover, more than 50,000 women have been empowered through the project’s climate-smart agriculture and livelihood interventions with both on-farm and off-farm income generating activities.

    “And through the land restoration efforts, over 100 hectares of degraded and soil erosion land has been restored,” he said.

    Representative of the Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Mrs Iyabo Mustapha, said climate change had impacted food systems in the country in immeasurable measure.

    Mustapha said through the GEF project, the capacity of smallholder farmers was built on climate resilience agriculture, saying this had also promoted food security in the country.

    While commending the UNDP on the partnership, Mustapha stressed the need for benefiting states to sustain successes recorded.

    Mr Mohammed Tukur, GEF National Project Coordinator, said the Resilient Food Security Programme had proven to be very effective in boosting the adaptability of small-holder farmers in managing climate change.

    He said the project had lifted many people out of poverty and ensured food security, linking successes to lessons from the Integrated Approach Pilot (IAP) theme.

    “The Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development is appreciative of the ongoing support and dedication of all the RFS partners and state project teams as they collaborate with local communities to take action against land degradation and face long-term solutions to food security in Nigeria,’’ Tukur said.

    Hajiya Salamatu Garba, Executive Director, Women Farmers Advancement Network, said the project had reflected that, with climate-resilience programmes and policies, Nigeria could meet its food security targets sustainably.

    According to her, there is need for sustaining the gains of the programme through community ownership.

    Garba also said implementing agencies ought to sustain the gender aspects of the project, saying women empowerment means all-round development.

    “We must think of how to manage scalability and sustainability of the project, there is need for extension workers to hand them over to peer leaders and communities,’’ she said.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  BirdLife International has called for the increased push for the safeguarding of protected and conserved areas at the IUCN Africa Protected Areas Congress APAC in Kigali Rwanda The congress the first gathering of stakeholders focussing on protected areas brought together more than 2400 participants from 53 African countries to deliberate on the role of Protected and Conserved Areas PCAs in nature conservation protecting Africa s wildlife delivering vital ecosystem services promoting sustainable development while safeguarding cultural heritage Africa has about 6 km2 of PCAs which provide food and water security erosion and flood control disease control climate regulation carbon sequestration and a host of other critical ecosystem services which underpin human welfare and wellbeing However these PCAs are grossly underfunded According to the IUCN Africa suffers a shortfall of 80 90 on available funding for PCAs management At the congress there have been calls for the development of a fund dubbed A Pan African Conservation Trust A PACT to help mobilize resources for the conservation of Africa s PCAs in addition to leveraging on other funding instruments including the Global Environment Facility GEF and Nature Africa programme This inaugural APAC is an opportunity for stakeholders to link up and work in a coordinated manner to ensure resources and efforts go to the right places and for the priority efforts For example the discussion around investing in Key Biodiversity Areas identified as conservation priorities using standard criteria is a good starting point In addition the lessons shared regarding various innovative financing mechanisms discussed in the congress provide good opportunities The BirdLife Partnership is working is supporting the management of various protected areas and communities around them an example being the Gola Landscape in Liberia and Sierra Leone explains Paul Kariuki Ndang ang a Interim Regional Director for BirdLife International Africa With the planet facing loss of 83 of animal species and 50 of plant species occasioned by human activities the role of protected areas must be emphasized and the BirdLife Partnership in Africa is championing In Southern Africa for instance where BirdLife and partners are working to save vultures whose populations have declined by up to 97 more than one million hectares of Vulture Safe Zones VSZs have been established Linked to this is the conservation of Key Biodiversity Areas KBAs which contribute significantly to the global persistence of biodiversity across terrestrial freshwater coastal and marine ecosystems Under the Post 2020 Global Biodiversity Framework GBF currently under negotiations one of the key aspects championed is the effective management of a scaled up system of protected areas covering 30 of the planet s land and ocean areas by 2030 which focus on KBAs and other areas of importance for biodiversity Indigenous People and Local Communities IPLCs play a prominent role in the conservation of PCAs IPLCs are critical partners in helping achieve ecosystem protection conservation and restoration By working with Partners and local communities through our local to global approach we have demonstrated significant conservation success which can be replicated in protected areas across the continent by putting people at the heart of conservation In West Africa MAVA Foundation partnering with BirdLife International has made significant contribution to the conservation of protected areas in West Africa which is home to critical habitats for endangered marine species and helped conserve priority coastal habitats promote sustainable fisheries through minimising bycatch while strengthening local communities capacities to address conservation MAVA has been key in empowering the BirdLife Africa Partnership in the region We now have ten BirdLife partners in ten West African counties In addition we have a strong team of experts within the Secretariat for West Africa split into 3 offices in Dakar Accra and Sao Tom With a cross cutting strategy for the conservation of birds and biodiversity for the benefit of nature and people we have an advanced and diverse projects portfolio for the region Informed and innovative relying on tools proven to be efficient such as the Important Bird Areas our Partners are involved in the protection of marine coastal and terrestrial landscapes For instance Nature Communaut s D veloppement NCD is supporting the co management approach of the Tocc Tocc wetlands Community Reserve in North Senegal The Society for Conservation of Nature in Liberia SCNL and Conservation Society of Sierra Leone CSSL are co managing the transboundary Gola Forest landscape between Liberia and Sierra Leone Biosfera is supporting designation of new Marine Protected Areas MPAs in Cabo Verde In Nigeria the Nigerian Conservation Foundation NCF established the Lekki Conservation Centre in 1990 to serve as a biodiversity conservation and environment education centre in the country Further the BirdLife secretariat is co managing the Ob Natural Parks of S o Tom and Pr ncipe APAC has been an extraordinary opportunity to share our experience and put our actions into perspective as we thank our financial partners and in particular the MAVA foundation for entrusting us explains Jean Baptiste Deffontaines Head of West Africa sub regional office at BirdLife International A key outcome of APAC which concludes today is the Kigali Call To Action which calls for the identification recognition and empowerment of all custodians of nature in Africa including IPLCs women youth working with governments civil society and private actors to lead the way in conserving Africa s rich biodiversity through protected and conserved areas Further the Call to Action underlines the need for more public and private financial investment in the conservation of protected and conserved areas while championing the role of PCAs as nature based solutions to tackle the twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss
    BirdLife Calls for Increased Efforts to Protect Conserved Areas in Africa
     BirdLife International has called for the increased push for the safeguarding of protected and conserved areas at the IUCN Africa Protected Areas Congress APAC in Kigali Rwanda The congress the first gathering of stakeholders focussing on protected areas brought together more than 2400 participants from 53 African countries to deliberate on the role of Protected and Conserved Areas PCAs in nature conservation protecting Africa s wildlife delivering vital ecosystem services promoting sustainable development while safeguarding cultural heritage Africa has about 6 km2 of PCAs which provide food and water security erosion and flood control disease control climate regulation carbon sequestration and a host of other critical ecosystem services which underpin human welfare and wellbeing However these PCAs are grossly underfunded According to the IUCN Africa suffers a shortfall of 80 90 on available funding for PCAs management At the congress there have been calls for the development of a fund dubbed A Pan African Conservation Trust A PACT to help mobilize resources for the conservation of Africa s PCAs in addition to leveraging on other funding instruments including the Global Environment Facility GEF and Nature Africa programme This inaugural APAC is an opportunity for stakeholders to link up and work in a coordinated manner to ensure resources and efforts go to the right places and for the priority efforts For example the discussion around investing in Key Biodiversity Areas identified as conservation priorities using standard criteria is a good starting point In addition the lessons shared regarding various innovative financing mechanisms discussed in the congress provide good opportunities The BirdLife Partnership is working is supporting the management of various protected areas and communities around them an example being the Gola Landscape in Liberia and Sierra Leone explains Paul Kariuki Ndang ang a Interim Regional Director for BirdLife International Africa With the planet facing loss of 83 of animal species and 50 of plant species occasioned by human activities the role of protected areas must be emphasized and the BirdLife Partnership in Africa is championing In Southern Africa for instance where BirdLife and partners are working to save vultures whose populations have declined by up to 97 more than one million hectares of Vulture Safe Zones VSZs have been established Linked to this is the conservation of Key Biodiversity Areas KBAs which contribute significantly to the global persistence of biodiversity across terrestrial freshwater coastal and marine ecosystems Under the Post 2020 Global Biodiversity Framework GBF currently under negotiations one of the key aspects championed is the effective management of a scaled up system of protected areas covering 30 of the planet s land and ocean areas by 2030 which focus on KBAs and other areas of importance for biodiversity Indigenous People and Local Communities IPLCs play a prominent role in the conservation of PCAs IPLCs are critical partners in helping achieve ecosystem protection conservation and restoration By working with Partners and local communities through our local to global approach we have demonstrated significant conservation success which can be replicated in protected areas across the continent by putting people at the heart of conservation In West Africa MAVA Foundation partnering with BirdLife International has made significant contribution to the conservation of protected areas in West Africa which is home to critical habitats for endangered marine species and helped conserve priority coastal habitats promote sustainable fisheries through minimising bycatch while strengthening local communities capacities to address conservation MAVA has been key in empowering the BirdLife Africa Partnership in the region We now have ten BirdLife partners in ten West African counties In addition we have a strong team of experts within the Secretariat for West Africa split into 3 offices in Dakar Accra and Sao Tom With a cross cutting strategy for the conservation of birds and biodiversity for the benefit of nature and people we have an advanced and diverse projects portfolio for the region Informed and innovative relying on tools proven to be efficient such as the Important Bird Areas our Partners are involved in the protection of marine coastal and terrestrial landscapes For instance Nature Communaut s D veloppement NCD is supporting the co management approach of the Tocc Tocc wetlands Community Reserve in North Senegal The Society for Conservation of Nature in Liberia SCNL and Conservation Society of Sierra Leone CSSL are co managing the transboundary Gola Forest landscape between Liberia and Sierra Leone Biosfera is supporting designation of new Marine Protected Areas MPAs in Cabo Verde In Nigeria the Nigerian Conservation Foundation NCF established the Lekki Conservation Centre in 1990 to serve as a biodiversity conservation and environment education centre in the country Further the BirdLife secretariat is co managing the Ob Natural Parks of S o Tom and Pr ncipe APAC has been an extraordinary opportunity to share our experience and put our actions into perspective as we thank our financial partners and in particular the MAVA foundation for entrusting us explains Jean Baptiste Deffontaines Head of West Africa sub regional office at BirdLife International A key outcome of APAC which concludes today is the Kigali Call To Action which calls for the identification recognition and empowerment of all custodians of nature in Africa including IPLCs women youth working with governments civil society and private actors to lead the way in conserving Africa s rich biodiversity through protected and conserved areas Further the Call to Action underlines the need for more public and private financial investment in the conservation of protected and conserved areas while championing the role of PCAs as nature based solutions to tackle the twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss
    BirdLife Calls for Increased Efforts to Protect Conserved Areas in Africa
    Africa5 months ago

    BirdLife Calls for Increased Efforts to Protect Conserved Areas in Africa

    BirdLife International has called for the increased push for the safeguarding of protected and conserved areas at the IUCN Africa Protected Areas Congress (APAC) in Kigali, Rwanda.The congress – the first gathering of stakeholders focussing on protected areas brought together more than 2400 participants from 53 African countries to deliberate on the role of Protected and Conserved Areas (PCAs) in nature conservation, protecting Africa’s wildlife, delivering vital ecosystem services, promoting sustainable development while safeguarding cultural heritage.Africa has about 6 km2 of PCAs which provide food and water security, erosion and flood control, disease control, climate regulation, carbon sequestration and a host of other critical ecosystem services which underpin human welfare and wellbeing. However, these PCAs are grossly underfunded According to the IUCN, Africa suffers a shortfall of 80% - 90% on available funding for PCAs management.At the congress, there have been calls for the development of a fund dubbed A Pan-African Conservation Trust (A-PACT) to help mobilize resources for the conservation of Africa’s PCAs, in addition to leveraging on other funding instruments including the Global Environment Facility (GEF), and Nature Africa programme.“This inaugural APAC is an opportunity for stakeholders to link up and work in a coordinated manner to ensure resources and efforts go to the right places and for the priority efforts.For example, the discussion around investing in Key Biodiversity Areas identified as conservation priorities using standard criteria is a good starting point. In addition, the lessons shared regarding various innovative financing mechanisms discussed in the congress provide good opportunities.The BirdLife Partnership is working is supporting the management of various protected areas and communities around them, an example being the Gola Landscape in Liberia and Sierra Leone”, explains Paul Kariuki Ndang’ang’a, Interim Regional Director for BirdLife International, Africa.With the planet facing loss of 83% of animal species and 50% of plant species occasioned by human activities, the role of protected areas must be emphasized, and the BirdLife Partnership in Africa is championing In Southern Africa, for instance where BirdLife and partners are working to save vultures whose populations have declined by up to 97%, more than one million hectares of Vulture Safe Zones (VSZs) have been established.Linked to this is the conservation of Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs) which contribute significantly to the global persistence of biodiversity across terrestrial, freshwater, coastal and marine ecosystems. Under the Post 2020 Global Biodiversity Framework (GBF) currently under negotiations, one of the key aspects championed is the effective management of a scaled-up system of protected areas covering 30% of the planet’s land and ocean areas by 2030, which focus on KBAs and other areas of importance for biodiversity.Indigenous People and Local Communities (IPLCs), play a prominent role in the conservation of PCAs. IPLCs are critical partners in helping achieve ecosystem protection, conservation, and restoration. By working with Partners and local communities through our ’local to global’ approach, we have demonstrated significant conservation success, which can be replicated in protected areas across the continent, by putting people at the heart of conservation.In West Africa, MAVA Foundation, partnering with BirdLife International has made significant contribution to the conservation of protected areas in West Africa, which is home to critical habitats for endangered marine species and helped conserve priority coastal habitats, promote sustainable fisheries through minimising bycatch while strengthening local communities’ capacities to address conservation.“MAVA has been key in empowering the BirdLife Africa Partnership in the region. We now have ten BirdLife partners in ten West African counties. In addition, we have a strong team of experts within the Secretariat for West Africa, split into 3 offices – in Dakar, Accra, and Sao Tomé. With a cross-cutting strategy for the conservation of birds and biodiversity, for the benefit of nature and people, we have an advanced and diverse projects portfolio for the region.Informed and innovative, relying on tools proven to be efficient, such as the Important Bird Areas, our Partners are involved in the protection of marine, coastal, and terrestrial landscapes. For instance, Nature-Communautés-Développement (NCD) is supporting the co-management approach of the Tocc-Tocc wetlands Community Reserve in North Senegal. The Society for Conservation of Nature in Liberia (SCNL) and Conservation Society of Sierra Leone (CSSL) are co-managing the transboundary Gola Forest landscape, between Liberia and Sierra Leone.Biosfera is supporting designation of new Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in Cabo Verde. In Nigeria, the Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF) established the Lekki Conservation Centre in 1990 to serve as a biodiversity conservation and environment education centre in the country.Further, the BirdLife secretariat is co-managing the Obô Natural Parks of São Tomé and Príncipe. APAC has been an extraordinary opportunity to share our experience and put our actions into perspective, as we thank our financial partners, and in particular the MAVA foundation, for entrusting us”, explains Jean-Baptiste Deffontaines, Head of West Africa sub-regional office at BirdLife International.A key outcome of APAC, which concludes today, is the Kigali Call To Action, which calls for the identification, recognition and empowerment of all custodians of nature in Africa , including IPLCs’, women, youth, working with governments, civil society, and private actors to lead the way in conserving Africa’s rich biodiversity through protected and conserved areas.Further, the Call to Action, underlines the need for more public and private financial investment in the conservation of protected and conserved areas, while championing the role of PCAs as nature-based solutions to tackle the twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss.

  •   I see changes in the lives of people where the project has been implemented and the testimonies of the farmers themselves are a confirmation MASERU Lesotho October 19 2021 APO Group His Majesty King Letsie III of Lesotho FAO Special Goodwill Ambassador for Nutrition visited several project sites in Mafeteng and Thaba Tseka districts of Lesotho where the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations agriculture FAO implements activities aimed at restoring ecosystem services and improving food and nutritional security I am satisfied with the work of FAO in the communities I see changes in the lives of the people where the project has been implemented and the testimonies of the farmers themselves confirm this Better nutrition has improved relationships in households I hope that the achievements of the project can extend to the whole country said King Letsie III I am proud to have a privileged relationship with the FAO The project Building Capacity for Adaptation to Climate Change through Support for Integrated Watershed Management in Lesotho was funded by the Global Environment Facility GEF through the Least Countries Fund advances The project strengthened adaptation to climate change through better management of watersheds Implemented since 2015 it has promoted the protection of land and water resources through an integrated approach and has strengthened and diversified the livelihoods of the most vulnerable people so that they can better respond to the impacts of climate change It has benefited local communities in the most vulnerable livelihood zones by rehabilitating their rangelands and water sources and making them achieve a notable and gradual improvement in their production systems particularly in vegetable production family As a result communities produce sufficient fodder and have access to water for both their livestock and their household Nutrition improved and they were supported to engage in other income generating activities to diversify their livelihoods During the visit King Letsie III inaugurated water storage tanks and animal watering points built as part of the project to facilitate access to water for communities and their livestock owners He praised FAO s work in improving the lives of communities and urged communities to sustain the gains Using water to reduce vulnerability Lesotho faces fragile and considerably degraded soils and endangered vegetation Farmers depend on rainfall for food production and for their livestock FAO has built infrastructure to help vulnerable communities access water through simple and appropriate water harvesting technologies such as groundwater dams rooftop water tanks water dams land and watering points for animals Farmers now have access to water to grow fodder for their livestock which has improved productivity Rangeland conservation has helped recharge the water and the watersheds have enough water for livestock and households We now have healthy sources We have been trained to manage the rangelands including removing the invasive shrubs that have supplanted the growth of desirable and palatable herb species said Serobanyane Matete head of Linakeng village in Thaba Tseka Better nutrition for healthy households Beneficiary households received chicken rabbits pigs and various varieties of vegetables to improve the household food composition We have been trained to grow various varieties of vegetables in keyhole gardens and under shade netting all year round Our families now have a balanced diet eggs meat and vegetables Conflicts in households have reduced considerably said Mamokeretla Sebeta from Matlatseng village in Thaba Tseka Our husbands and young people no longer want to move to urban areas to look for work because the project has introduced us to more profitable income generating activities she added With the aim of reducing the burden on the environment farmers have been equipped with the skills to engage in other income generating activities such as beekeeping Beekeepers received essential equipment used in their work such as beehives protective gear a swarm catcher with a telescopic handle smokers drainage screens a bee brush and honey extractors The project also strengthened the technical capacities of staff and institutions at the national and district level in sustainable land and water management and climate change resilient livelihood strategies The 4 year project worked with partners in the country including the Ministry of Forests Rangelands and Soil Conservation the Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security the Ministry of Energy and Meteorology Ministry of Water Affairs Ministry of Local Government and Chiefdom Ministry of Environment and National University of Lesotho
    “I see changes in people’s lives”: King Letsie III of Lesotho hails FAO’s work in Lesotho
      I see changes in the lives of people where the project has been implemented and the testimonies of the farmers themselves are a confirmation MASERU Lesotho October 19 2021 APO Group His Majesty King Letsie III of Lesotho FAO Special Goodwill Ambassador for Nutrition visited several project sites in Mafeteng and Thaba Tseka districts of Lesotho where the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations agriculture FAO implements activities aimed at restoring ecosystem services and improving food and nutritional security I am satisfied with the work of FAO in the communities I see changes in the lives of the people where the project has been implemented and the testimonies of the farmers themselves confirm this Better nutrition has improved relationships in households I hope that the achievements of the project can extend to the whole country said King Letsie III I am proud to have a privileged relationship with the FAO The project Building Capacity for Adaptation to Climate Change through Support for Integrated Watershed Management in Lesotho was funded by the Global Environment Facility GEF through the Least Countries Fund advances The project strengthened adaptation to climate change through better management of watersheds Implemented since 2015 it has promoted the protection of land and water resources through an integrated approach and has strengthened and diversified the livelihoods of the most vulnerable people so that they can better respond to the impacts of climate change It has benefited local communities in the most vulnerable livelihood zones by rehabilitating their rangelands and water sources and making them achieve a notable and gradual improvement in their production systems particularly in vegetable production family As a result communities produce sufficient fodder and have access to water for both their livestock and their household Nutrition improved and they were supported to engage in other income generating activities to diversify their livelihoods During the visit King Letsie III inaugurated water storage tanks and animal watering points built as part of the project to facilitate access to water for communities and their livestock owners He praised FAO s work in improving the lives of communities and urged communities to sustain the gains Using water to reduce vulnerability Lesotho faces fragile and considerably degraded soils and endangered vegetation Farmers depend on rainfall for food production and for their livestock FAO has built infrastructure to help vulnerable communities access water through simple and appropriate water harvesting technologies such as groundwater dams rooftop water tanks water dams land and watering points for animals Farmers now have access to water to grow fodder for their livestock which has improved productivity Rangeland conservation has helped recharge the water and the watersheds have enough water for livestock and households We now have healthy sources We have been trained to manage the rangelands including removing the invasive shrubs that have supplanted the growth of desirable and palatable herb species said Serobanyane Matete head of Linakeng village in Thaba Tseka Better nutrition for healthy households Beneficiary households received chicken rabbits pigs and various varieties of vegetables to improve the household food composition We have been trained to grow various varieties of vegetables in keyhole gardens and under shade netting all year round Our families now have a balanced diet eggs meat and vegetables Conflicts in households have reduced considerably said Mamokeretla Sebeta from Matlatseng village in Thaba Tseka Our husbands and young people no longer want to move to urban areas to look for work because the project has introduced us to more profitable income generating activities she added With the aim of reducing the burden on the environment farmers have been equipped with the skills to engage in other income generating activities such as beekeeping Beekeepers received essential equipment used in their work such as beehives protective gear a swarm catcher with a telescopic handle smokers drainage screens a bee brush and honey extractors The project also strengthened the technical capacities of staff and institutions at the national and district level in sustainable land and water management and climate change resilient livelihood strategies The 4 year project worked with partners in the country including the Ministry of Forests Rangelands and Soil Conservation the Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security the Ministry of Energy and Meteorology Ministry of Water Affairs Ministry of Local Government and Chiefdom Ministry of Environment and National University of Lesotho
    “I see changes in people’s lives”: King Letsie III of Lesotho hails FAO’s work in Lesotho
    Africa1 year ago

    “I see changes in people’s lives”: King Letsie III of Lesotho hails FAO’s work in Lesotho

    I see changes in the lives of people where the project has been implemented, and the testimonies of the farmers themselves are a confirmation

    MASERU, Lesotho, October 19, 2021 / APO Group / -

    His Majesty King Letsie III of Lesotho, FAO Special Goodwill Ambassador for Nutrition, visited several project sites in Mafeteng and Thaba-Tseka districts of Lesotho, where the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations agriculture (FAO) implements activities aimed at restoring ecosystem services and improving food. and nutritional security.

    “I am satisfied with the work of FAO in the communities. I see changes in the lives of the people where the project has been implemented, and the testimonies of the farmers themselves confirm this. Better nutrition has improved relationships in households. I hope that the achievements of the project can extend to the whole country, ”said King Letsie III. "I am proud to have a privileged relationship with the FAO"

    The project “Building Capacity for Adaptation to Climate Change through Support for Integrated Watershed Management in Lesotho” was funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) through the Least Countries Fund. advances.

    The project strengthened adaptation to climate change through better management of watersheds. Implemented since 2015, it has promoted the protection of land and water resources through an integrated approach, and has strengthened and diversified the livelihoods of the most vulnerable people so that they can better respond to the impacts of climate change. .

    It has benefited local communities in the most vulnerable livelihood zones by rehabilitating their rangelands and water sources, and making them achieve a notable and gradual improvement in their production systems, particularly in vegetable production. family. As a result, communities produce sufficient fodder and have access to water for both their livestock and their household. Nutrition improved and they were supported to engage in other income-generating activities to diversify their livelihoods.

    During the visit, King Letsie III inaugurated water storage tanks and animal watering points built as part of the project to facilitate access to water for communities and their livestock owners . He praised FAO's work in improving the lives of communities and urged communities to sustain the gains.

    Using water to reduce vulnerability

    Lesotho faces fragile and considerably degraded soils and endangered vegetation. Farmers depend on rainfall for food production and for their livestock. FAO has built infrastructure to help vulnerable communities access water through simple and appropriate water harvesting technologies such as groundwater dams, rooftop water tanks, water dams land and watering points for animals.

    Farmers now have access to water to grow fodder for their livestock, which has improved productivity.

    “Rangeland conservation has helped recharge the water, and the watersheds have enough water for livestock and households. We now have healthy sources. We have been trained to manage the rangelands, including removing the invasive shrubs that have supplanted the growth of desirable and palatable herb species, ”said Serobanyane Matete, head of Linakeng village in Thaba-Tseka.

    Better nutrition for healthy households

    Beneficiary households received chicken, rabbits, pigs and various varieties of vegetables to improve the household food composition.

    “We have been trained to grow various varieties of vegetables in keyhole gardens and under shade netting all year round. Our families now have a balanced diet - eggs, meat and vegetables. Conflicts in households have reduced considerably, ”said 'Mamokeretla Sebeta from Matlatseng village in Thaba-Tseka. “Our husbands and young people no longer want to move to urban areas to look for work because the project has introduced us to more profitable income-generating activities,” she added.

    With the aim of reducing the burden on the environment, farmers have been equipped with the skills to engage in other income-generating activities such as beekeeping. Beekeepers received essential equipment used in their work such as beehives, protective gear, a swarm catcher with a telescopic handle, smokers, drainage screens, a bee brush and honey extractors.

    The project also strengthened the technical capacities of staff and institutions at the national and district level in sustainable land and water management and climate change resilient livelihood strategies.

    The 4-year project worked with partners in the country, including the Ministry of Forests, Rangelands and Soil Conservation, the Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security, the Ministry of Energy and Meteorology, Ministry of Water Affairs, Ministry of Local Government and Chiefdom, Ministry of Environment. , and National University of Lesotho.

  •   As we enter the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration projects like this one in Mauritania are essential to tackle climate change and achieve sustainable development goals NAIROBI Kenya October 18 2021 APO Group Mauritania s battle against advancing desertification which has damaged ecosystems and endangered species received a timely boost with the announcement that 200 000 hectares will be turned into a protected area to support biodiversity in the country The new project implemented by the United Nations Environment Program UNEP and supported by the Global Environment Facility GEF will create a new protected area in the district of Adrar a former crossroads of merchants medieval salt and dates known for its striking desert landscapes and the fortified towns of Chinguetti and Oudane classified as World Heritage by UNESCO This latest initiative will complement the Great Green Wall a pan African initiative that stretches 8 000 kilometers across 11 countries including Mauritania The Great Green Wall which is the first beacon of the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration will combat desertification and drought with the planting of new trees to restore degraded land in total more than 100 million hectares will be restored The restored lands are expected to sequester 250 million tonnes of carbon and create 10 million new green jobs As we move into the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration projects like this one in Mauritania are critical to tackling climate change and achieving sustainable development goals said Doreen Robinson Head of Ecosystem Restoration biodiversity at Land at UNEP While restoration projects are not quick fixes they bring real lasting change create jobs and help fight climate change The new protected area will provide a conservation corridor that will link the key biodiversity area of El Ghall ou ya to the Guelb Er Richat nature reserve in central Mauritania Experts say the restoration of 200 000 hectares in Adrar is a crucial step for a region plagued by climate change This development is important not only for the conservation of Mauritania s biodiversity with a substantial increase in the coverage of national terrestrial protected areas but also for our indigenous nomadic communities who face relentless food and nutrition crises caused by change climate and low agricultural productivity said Mohamed Yahya Ould Lafdal technical advisor to the Mauritanian government for cooperation and partnership and operational focal point of the GEF This project also represents an achievement in environmental governance and ecological restoration of hyper arid zones in northern Mauritania and should stimulate several indicators that have been put in place within the framework of the United Nations Convention on Biodiversity he added Globally much progress has been made to protect and conserve land but much remains to be done The UNEP Protected Planet Report a biennial publication that provides an update on the status of Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 shows that since 2010 22 5 million km2 16 64 of inland terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and 28 1 million km2 7 74 of coastal water and ocean ecosystems are in documented protected and conserved areas This is an increase of over 21 km2 42 However work remains to be done because less than 8 of the land is both protected and connected As we enter the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration projects like this one in Mauritania are essential to tackle climate change and achieve sustainable development goals Doreen Robinson Land Biodiversity Officer at UNEP Eye of the Sahara Guelb er Richat or he of the Sahara is a distinctive land mass with concentric circles of blue and gold was once mistakenly considered to be the impact crater of a meteorite but it is now believed that it is the remains of an eroded magma dome It is of considerable cultural geological and environmental significance nationally and globally It is also a refuge for a variety of animals including the bighorn sheep a type of bighorn sheep and several other IUCN Red List species such as the addax and the dama gazelle both of which are critically endangered extinction and the vulnerable dorcas gazelle El Ghall ou ya located at the other end of the proposed new protected area is a permanent source of water on which both nomadic herders and a large number of birds and animals many of them vulnerable depend need water to thrive The fantastic leadership shown by the Mauritanian government in working with UNEP and GEF to develop these arid and sadly neglected areas will have enormous benefits for people and the environment said Adamou Bouhari project manager for the project The Adrar Protected Area is being created as part of the Integrated Management of Protected Areas in Arid Regions of Mauritania IMPADRA project To learn more about IMPADRA and UNEP s work on biodiversity and land degradation contact johan robinson unep org The United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration 2021 2030 led by the United Nations Environment Program the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and partners such as the Africa Restoration initiative 100 the World Landscapes Forum and the International Union for Conservation of Nature covers both terrestrial coastal and marine ecosystems A global call to action it will bring together political support scientific research and financial might to massively scale up restoration Help us shape the Decade
    New protected area protects Mauritania’s quicksand
      As we enter the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration projects like this one in Mauritania are essential to tackle climate change and achieve sustainable development goals NAIROBI Kenya October 18 2021 APO Group Mauritania s battle against advancing desertification which has damaged ecosystems and endangered species received a timely boost with the announcement that 200 000 hectares will be turned into a protected area to support biodiversity in the country The new project implemented by the United Nations Environment Program UNEP and supported by the Global Environment Facility GEF will create a new protected area in the district of Adrar a former crossroads of merchants medieval salt and dates known for its striking desert landscapes and the fortified towns of Chinguetti and Oudane classified as World Heritage by UNESCO This latest initiative will complement the Great Green Wall a pan African initiative that stretches 8 000 kilometers across 11 countries including Mauritania The Great Green Wall which is the first beacon of the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration will combat desertification and drought with the planting of new trees to restore degraded land in total more than 100 million hectares will be restored The restored lands are expected to sequester 250 million tonnes of carbon and create 10 million new green jobs As we move into the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration projects like this one in Mauritania are critical to tackling climate change and achieving sustainable development goals said Doreen Robinson Head of Ecosystem Restoration biodiversity at Land at UNEP While restoration projects are not quick fixes they bring real lasting change create jobs and help fight climate change The new protected area will provide a conservation corridor that will link the key biodiversity area of El Ghall ou ya to the Guelb Er Richat nature reserve in central Mauritania Experts say the restoration of 200 000 hectares in Adrar is a crucial step for a region plagued by climate change This development is important not only for the conservation of Mauritania s biodiversity with a substantial increase in the coverage of national terrestrial protected areas but also for our indigenous nomadic communities who face relentless food and nutrition crises caused by change climate and low agricultural productivity said Mohamed Yahya Ould Lafdal technical advisor to the Mauritanian government for cooperation and partnership and operational focal point of the GEF This project also represents an achievement in environmental governance and ecological restoration of hyper arid zones in northern Mauritania and should stimulate several indicators that have been put in place within the framework of the United Nations Convention on Biodiversity he added Globally much progress has been made to protect and conserve land but much remains to be done The UNEP Protected Planet Report a biennial publication that provides an update on the status of Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 shows that since 2010 22 5 million km2 16 64 of inland terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and 28 1 million km2 7 74 of coastal water and ocean ecosystems are in documented protected and conserved areas This is an increase of over 21 km2 42 However work remains to be done because less than 8 of the land is both protected and connected As we enter the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration projects like this one in Mauritania are essential to tackle climate change and achieve sustainable development goals Doreen Robinson Land Biodiversity Officer at UNEP Eye of the Sahara Guelb er Richat or he of the Sahara is a distinctive land mass with concentric circles of blue and gold was once mistakenly considered to be the impact crater of a meteorite but it is now believed that it is the remains of an eroded magma dome It is of considerable cultural geological and environmental significance nationally and globally It is also a refuge for a variety of animals including the bighorn sheep a type of bighorn sheep and several other IUCN Red List species such as the addax and the dama gazelle both of which are critically endangered extinction and the vulnerable dorcas gazelle El Ghall ou ya located at the other end of the proposed new protected area is a permanent source of water on which both nomadic herders and a large number of birds and animals many of them vulnerable depend need water to thrive The fantastic leadership shown by the Mauritanian government in working with UNEP and GEF to develop these arid and sadly neglected areas will have enormous benefits for people and the environment said Adamou Bouhari project manager for the project The Adrar Protected Area is being created as part of the Integrated Management of Protected Areas in Arid Regions of Mauritania IMPADRA project To learn more about IMPADRA and UNEP s work on biodiversity and land degradation contact johan robinson unep org The United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration 2021 2030 led by the United Nations Environment Program the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and partners such as the Africa Restoration initiative 100 the World Landscapes Forum and the International Union for Conservation of Nature covers both terrestrial coastal and marine ecosystems A global call to action it will bring together political support scientific research and financial might to massively scale up restoration Help us shape the Decade
    New protected area protects Mauritania’s quicksand
    Africa1 year ago

    New protected area protects Mauritania’s quicksand

    As we enter the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration, projects like this one in Mauritania are essential to tackle climate change and achieve sustainable development goals.

    NAIROBI, Kenya, October 18, 2021 / APO Group / -

    Mauritania's battle against advancing desertification, which has damaged ecosystems and endangered species, received a timely boost with the announcement that 200,000 hectares will be turned into a protected area to support biodiversity in the country.

    The new project, implemented by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and supported by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), will create a new protected area in the district of Adrar, a former crossroads of merchants. medieval salt and dates, known for its striking desert landscapes and the fortified towns of Chinguetti and Oudane, classified as World Heritage by UNESCO.

    This latest initiative will complement the Great Green Wall, a pan-African initiative that stretches 8,000 kilometers across 11 countries, including Mauritania. The Great Green Wall, which is the first beacon of the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration, will combat desertification and drought with the planting of new trees to restore degraded land - in total more than 100 million hectares will be restored. The restored lands are expected to sequester 250 million tonnes of carbon and create 10 million new green jobs.

    “As we move into the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration, projects like this one in Mauritania are critical to tackling climate change and achieving sustainable development goals,” said Doreen Robinson, Head of Ecosystem Restoration. biodiversity at Land at UNEP. “While restoration projects are not quick fixes, they bring real lasting change, create jobs and help fight climate change. "

    The new protected area will provide a conservation corridor that will link the key biodiversity area of ​​El Ghallâouîya to the Guelb Er Richat nature reserve in central Mauritania. Experts say the restoration of 200,000 hectares in Adrar is a crucial step for a region plagued by climate change.

    "This development is important not only for the conservation of Mauritania's biodiversity with a substantial increase in the coverage of national terrestrial protected areas, but also for our indigenous nomadic communities who face relentless food and nutrition crises caused by change. climate and low agricultural productivity, ”said Mohamed Yahya. Ould Lafdal, technical advisor to the Mauritanian government for cooperation and partnership and operational focal point of the GEF.

    "This project also represents an achievement in environmental governance and ecological restoration of hyper arid zones in northern Mauritania, and should stimulate several indicators that have been put in place within the framework of the United Nations Convention on Biodiversity", he added.

    Globally, much progress has been made to protect and conserve land, but much remains to be done. The UNEP Protected Planet Report, a biennial publication that provides an update on the status of Aichi Biodiversity Target 11, shows that since 2010, 22.5 million km2 (16.64%) of inland terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and 28.1 million km2 (7.74%) of coastal water and ocean ecosystems are in documented protected and conserved areas. This is an increase of over 21 km2 (42%). However, work remains to be done because less than 8% of the land is both protected and connected.

    As we enter the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration, projects like this one in Mauritania are essential to tackle climate change and achieve sustainable development goals.

    Doreen Robinson, Land Biodiversity Officer at UNEP

    Eye of the Sahara

    Guelb er Richat - or "he of the Sahara" - is a distinctive land mass, with concentric circles of blue and gold, was once mistakenly considered to be the impact crater of a meteorite, but it is now believed that it is the remains of an eroded magma. dome. It is of considerable cultural, geological and environmental significance nationally and globally. It is also a refuge for a variety of animals, including the bighorn sheep, a type of bighorn sheep, and several other IUCN Red List species, such as the addax and the dama gazelle, both of which are critically endangered. extinction - and the vulnerable dorcas gazelle.

    El Ghallâouîya, located at the other end of the proposed new protected area, is a permanent source of water on which both nomadic herders and a large number of birds and animals, many of them vulnerable, depend. need water to thrive.

    “The fantastic leadership shown by the Mauritanian government in working with UNEP and GEF to develop these arid and sadly neglected areas will have enormous benefits for people and the environment,” said Adamou Bouhari, project manager for the project. .

    The Adrar Protected Area is being created as part of the Integrated Management of Protected Areas in Arid Regions of Mauritania (IMPADRA) project. To learn more about IMPADRA and UNEP's work on biodiversity and land degradation, contact johan.robinson@unep.org.

    The United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration 2021-2030, led by the United Nations Environment Program, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and partners such as the Africa Restoration initiative 100, the World Landscapes Forum and the International Union for Conservation of Nature, covers both terrestrial, coastal and marine ecosystems. A global call to action, it will bring together political support, scientific research and financial might to massively scale up restoration. Help us shape the Decade.

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