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  •   Assessing Nigeria s foreign policy evolution since independence Assessing Nigeria s foreign policy evolution since independence President Muhammad Buhari By Mark Longyen News Agency of Nigeria Analysts are of the view that since gaining political independence from Britain on Oct 1 1960 Nigeria s foreign policy has evolved under different past administrations with notable consistency of Africa as its centerpiece They note that since independence Nigeria s foreign policy has been conducted by successive governments in a manner that demonstrated varying distinctive priorities and style within a broad conceptual framework without a marked departure at any point from its Afro centric focus Many are of the view that the nation s foreign policy implementation its decision making and direction have by and large been deliberately anchored formulated tailored and predicated by its policy architects on the basis of the nation s overall national interest and Africa centeredness The predominant preoccupation of Nigeria s foreign policy in the immediate two post independence decades for instance they say was African solidarity the decolonisation of all African countries that were still under colonial rule and the war against Apartheid in South Africa among others In all of these Nigeria clearly demonstrated exemplary leadership in Africa and its status as the Giant of Africa by using multiple platforms of multilateral organisations of which she is a member to pursue her foreign policy aims goals and objectives with astonishing results While the Afrocentric focus forms the inner core of the nation s foreign policy experts are of consensus view that Nigeria s membership and involvement in global organisations constitutes the outer core of the nation s foreign policy focus To this end they say Nigeria played an active role in the formation in 1963 of the defunct Organisation of African Unity OAU now Africa Union AU and also in the formation of the sub regional economic bloc the Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS in 1975 which has its permanent headquarters in Abuja Nigeria s capital They also note that the outer core focus of Nigeria s foreign policy has over the past 62 years ensured that she pursued her national interests through her active involvement in the affairs of international organisations or playing key roles in their affairs Similarly upon becoming an independent nation state Nigeria joined the British Commonwealth of Nations the Non Aligned Movement NAM the United Nations UN and its multiple agencies globally where she played and is still playing key roles in their activities Nigeria has continued to pursue such foreign policy interests through her membership of and participation in global organisations like the UN the Commonwealth the defunct OAU now AU and the Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS with tremendous successes Prof W A Fawole a foreign policy analyst and professor of International Relations Obafemi Awolowo University Ile Ife while reinforcing the Afrocentric stance of Nigeria s foreign policy said that no significant change had taken place to warrant any school of thought that there has been a shift from Afrocentricism According to him 62 years since independence the conduct of Nigeria s foreign policy has been in such a manner that it continues to play a leading and stabilising role on the continent of Africa All in all Nigeria s Afrocentric bend remains President Buhari was made the continent s anti corruption leader because of the reputation he had sustained over the decades But what needs to be understood is that virtually all the issues that stood Nigeria out in the past that is opposition to apartheid decolonisation African unity etc have all been settled and now replaced with new ones Overall I think domestic circumstances like pervasive insecurity separatist agitations weakening economic capacity collapsing naira official corruption have combined to vitiate a dynamic foreign policy he said Prof Fawole however noted that Nigeria s recent showing at the African Union was less than stellar as it lost a high profile election to the most pivotal organ of the AU by putting forward the wrong candidate although it was later able to regain composure Corroborating Fawole s view Associate Prof Efem Ubi Director of Research Nigerian Institute of International Affairs NIIA noted that since independence to date Nigeria has continued to focus on its Africa centered foreign policy According to him when Buhari came to power over seven years ago he set out to once again take Nigeria s leading position in Africa He said that this was done with some form of successes even though minimal especially in the efforts towards stemming the scourge of terrorism and other forms of insecurity in Nigeria He said This is showcased in the role that Nigeria under Buhari and other ECOWAS member states played in upholding with sacrosanct democracy in Africa to resolve The Gambia s election crisis the coup crisis in Mali and other places etc President Buhari immediately on assumption of office visited different nations ranging from Nigeria s immediate neighbors the West African sub region and the continent at large to harness international concerted efforts towards mitigating the challenges of terrorism Buhari started well by getting the affected neighbouring countries Niger Republic Cameroon and Chad to put more efforts through the Multinational Joint Task Force MNJTF to tackle the problem and his approach initially yielded fruits The NIIA Director of Research described Nigeria s foreign policy under the current dispensation as a tripartite foreign policy posture which revolves around three thematic issues namely the fight against corruption insecurity and economic development He argued that Nigeria under the current administration has exceedingly upheld Nigeria s foreign policy tenets irrespective of the odds adding that Buhari did not after all inherit a rosy and healthy nation in 2015 On his part Dr Salami Olawale of the Department of History and Diplomatic Studies Olabisi Onabanjo University Ago Iwoye Ogun State however sees economic diplomacy which was popularised by the Babangida military regime in 1988 as the major lynchpin of Nigeria s foreign policy Olawale noted that in spite of the lofty intentions of economic diplomacy under the Babangida administration the global response to Nigeria s economic diplomacy was not as enthusiastic as the Nigerian government had envisaged He attributed the shortcomings of the administration s economic diplomacy to the inconsistent and incoherent domestic policies lack of infrastructural facilities and insincerity in government circles leading to massive corruption in high places In the face of these problems the attitude of foreign investors was not surprising as various global investors had to re design their strategies in the face of rampaging globalisation The new economic diplomacy was also expected to encourage Nigerian business groups to shop for partners and then invest more both at home and abroad but this was not to be as they preferred just like their friends in governments to own property in choice areas of western countries Even the state sponsored attempt through the Nigerian National Petroluem Corporation NNPC to shop around the world for petroleum related investment outlets did not produce significant results he said Olawale therefore concluded that the failure of the Nigerian state in all ramifications and the conspiracy and hostility of the international environment combined to frustrate the lofty ideas contained in Babangida s economic diplomacy He however said that for the Nigerian state to fully realise its great potentials for the benefit of the people the managers of the country should have a change of attitude and put Nigeria first in all respects The government at all levels and individuals should be fully involved in the fight against corruption which has become a malignant tumour in the medulla of an average Nigerian At the level of the economy the government should encourage the industrial class and not the merchant class to produce more goods at home as it is on their shoulders that the realisation of government s international economic objectives rest It is in search of relevance in the international environment and in the continuation of the actualisation of its Afrocentric policy that Nigeria leading other West African states ventured into the Liberian crisis to build peace and restore democratic governance he added Although it was in June 1988 that economic diplomacy was officially adopted as a major plank of Nigeria s foreign policy Nigeria s contemporary foreign policy under the Buhari administration also adopted it 30 years after Since 1960 successive Nigerian governments have demonstrated an appreciation of the linkage between the country s foreign policy and economic circumstances hence in the first 25 years after independence that is from 1960 to 1985 there were overlapping patterns or strands of strategies that emerged in the history of Nigeria s economic diplomacy In officially adopting economic diplomacy as a major plank in its foreign policy initiatives the Buhari administration unveiled the National Economic Diplomacy Initiative NEDI in 2018 which underscores the continuity and consistency in Nigeria s foreign policy Ubi is of the view that the economic diplomacy initiative of the Buhari administration emerged in response to the inherited daunting domestic socio economic challenges before the country He said NEDI was also designed to leverage on Nigeria s bilateral and multilateral trade engagements with other countries to accelerate domestic growth and development It was also informed by the need to realise the lofty targets of regional economic integration as embellished in the ideals of the African Continental Free Trade Area agreement AFCFTA Nigeria s signing of AFCFTA which is projected to become the world s second largest free trade area is a remarkable stride in Nigeria s contemporary foreign policy s economic diplomacy AFCFTA provides opportunities to exploit new frontiers and reach larger markets with Nigerian exports of manufactured goods and services The cornerstone of AFCFTA is the promotion of industrialization sustained growth and development in Africa It is projected to boost intra African trade stimulate investment and innovation foster structural transformation and improve food security AFCFTA is also projected to enhance economic growth and export diversification and rationalise the overlapping trade regimes of the main regional economic communities Nigeria has also signed a number of bilateral agreements and memoranda of understanding with some African and non African countries aimed at strengthening its relations with them and driving Foreign Direct Investment FDI to the country Nigeria s Minister of Foreign Affairs Mr Geoffrey Onyeama summed up Nigeria s contemporary foreign policy when he spoke with journalists on the sidelines of the just concluded 77th Session of the UN General Assembly UNGA in New York According to the minister Nigeria is now highly respected and appreciated by the international community due to the repositioning of the country as a bastion of democracy by President Buhari in the past seven years We have been able to gain respect for Nigeria and secure Nigeria s place as an important partner and player at the multilateral level In seven years President Buhari has showcased Nigeria as a champion of good governance and an important partner in the African sub region and beyond We have been praised for the role we played in ensuring that democracy survived in The Gambia as well as in pushing for peace in the West African sub region We have been successful in areas such as getting through resolutions of the UN on illicit financial flows which we could not achieve for many years the minister said We have been seen as a champion for nuclear disarmament and a nuclear free world because we were very active in those areas During this period we have been at the forefront of actions to push for global justice and peace advocating justice for the oppressed in the world The centrepiece of the event for us was the national statement by the president which was very well received he said Onyeama explained that President Buhari touched on sensitive national regional and global issues when he addressed the UN General Assembly He disclosed that the country s delegation had a good mix of bilateral meetings with other countries as well as engaged with the private sector Analysts are therefore of the view that Nigeria s foreign policy as conducted by successive administrations since independence in 1960 has been consistently dominated by an enduring Afrocentric focus as well as the benefits of economic diplomacy to achieve the country s overall national interest s aims goals and objectives NANFeatures If used please credit the News Agency of Nigeria NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Assessing Nigeria’s foreign policy evolution since independence
      Assessing Nigeria s foreign policy evolution since independence Assessing Nigeria s foreign policy evolution since independence President Muhammad Buhari By Mark Longyen News Agency of Nigeria Analysts are of the view that since gaining political independence from Britain on Oct 1 1960 Nigeria s foreign policy has evolved under different past administrations with notable consistency of Africa as its centerpiece They note that since independence Nigeria s foreign policy has been conducted by successive governments in a manner that demonstrated varying distinctive priorities and style within a broad conceptual framework without a marked departure at any point from its Afro centric focus Many are of the view that the nation s foreign policy implementation its decision making and direction have by and large been deliberately anchored formulated tailored and predicated by its policy architects on the basis of the nation s overall national interest and Africa centeredness The predominant preoccupation of Nigeria s foreign policy in the immediate two post independence decades for instance they say was African solidarity the decolonisation of all African countries that were still under colonial rule and the war against Apartheid in South Africa among others In all of these Nigeria clearly demonstrated exemplary leadership in Africa and its status as the Giant of Africa by using multiple platforms of multilateral organisations of which she is a member to pursue her foreign policy aims goals and objectives with astonishing results While the Afrocentric focus forms the inner core of the nation s foreign policy experts are of consensus view that Nigeria s membership and involvement in global organisations constitutes the outer core of the nation s foreign policy focus To this end they say Nigeria played an active role in the formation in 1963 of the defunct Organisation of African Unity OAU now Africa Union AU and also in the formation of the sub regional economic bloc the Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS in 1975 which has its permanent headquarters in Abuja Nigeria s capital They also note that the outer core focus of Nigeria s foreign policy has over the past 62 years ensured that she pursued her national interests through her active involvement in the affairs of international organisations or playing key roles in their affairs Similarly upon becoming an independent nation state Nigeria joined the British Commonwealth of Nations the Non Aligned Movement NAM the United Nations UN and its multiple agencies globally where she played and is still playing key roles in their activities Nigeria has continued to pursue such foreign policy interests through her membership of and participation in global organisations like the UN the Commonwealth the defunct OAU now AU and the Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS with tremendous successes Prof W A Fawole a foreign policy analyst and professor of International Relations Obafemi Awolowo University Ile Ife while reinforcing the Afrocentric stance of Nigeria s foreign policy said that no significant change had taken place to warrant any school of thought that there has been a shift from Afrocentricism According to him 62 years since independence the conduct of Nigeria s foreign policy has been in such a manner that it continues to play a leading and stabilising role on the continent of Africa All in all Nigeria s Afrocentric bend remains President Buhari was made the continent s anti corruption leader because of the reputation he had sustained over the decades But what needs to be understood is that virtually all the issues that stood Nigeria out in the past that is opposition to apartheid decolonisation African unity etc have all been settled and now replaced with new ones Overall I think domestic circumstances like pervasive insecurity separatist agitations weakening economic capacity collapsing naira official corruption have combined to vitiate a dynamic foreign policy he said Prof Fawole however noted that Nigeria s recent showing at the African Union was less than stellar as it lost a high profile election to the most pivotal organ of the AU by putting forward the wrong candidate although it was later able to regain composure Corroborating Fawole s view Associate Prof Efem Ubi Director of Research Nigerian Institute of International Affairs NIIA noted that since independence to date Nigeria has continued to focus on its Africa centered foreign policy According to him when Buhari came to power over seven years ago he set out to once again take Nigeria s leading position in Africa He said that this was done with some form of successes even though minimal especially in the efforts towards stemming the scourge of terrorism and other forms of insecurity in Nigeria He said This is showcased in the role that Nigeria under Buhari and other ECOWAS member states played in upholding with sacrosanct democracy in Africa to resolve The Gambia s election crisis the coup crisis in Mali and other places etc President Buhari immediately on assumption of office visited different nations ranging from Nigeria s immediate neighbors the West African sub region and the continent at large to harness international concerted efforts towards mitigating the challenges of terrorism Buhari started well by getting the affected neighbouring countries Niger Republic Cameroon and Chad to put more efforts through the Multinational Joint Task Force MNJTF to tackle the problem and his approach initially yielded fruits The NIIA Director of Research described Nigeria s foreign policy under the current dispensation as a tripartite foreign policy posture which revolves around three thematic issues namely the fight against corruption insecurity and economic development He argued that Nigeria under the current administration has exceedingly upheld Nigeria s foreign policy tenets irrespective of the odds adding that Buhari did not after all inherit a rosy and healthy nation in 2015 On his part Dr Salami Olawale of the Department of History and Diplomatic Studies Olabisi Onabanjo University Ago Iwoye Ogun State however sees economic diplomacy which was popularised by the Babangida military regime in 1988 as the major lynchpin of Nigeria s foreign policy Olawale noted that in spite of the lofty intentions of economic diplomacy under the Babangida administration the global response to Nigeria s economic diplomacy was not as enthusiastic as the Nigerian government had envisaged He attributed the shortcomings of the administration s economic diplomacy to the inconsistent and incoherent domestic policies lack of infrastructural facilities and insincerity in government circles leading to massive corruption in high places In the face of these problems the attitude of foreign investors was not surprising as various global investors had to re design their strategies in the face of rampaging globalisation The new economic diplomacy was also expected to encourage Nigerian business groups to shop for partners and then invest more both at home and abroad but this was not to be as they preferred just like their friends in governments to own property in choice areas of western countries Even the state sponsored attempt through the Nigerian National Petroluem Corporation NNPC to shop around the world for petroleum related investment outlets did not produce significant results he said Olawale therefore concluded that the failure of the Nigerian state in all ramifications and the conspiracy and hostility of the international environment combined to frustrate the lofty ideas contained in Babangida s economic diplomacy He however said that for the Nigerian state to fully realise its great potentials for the benefit of the people the managers of the country should have a change of attitude and put Nigeria first in all respects The government at all levels and individuals should be fully involved in the fight against corruption which has become a malignant tumour in the medulla of an average Nigerian At the level of the economy the government should encourage the industrial class and not the merchant class to produce more goods at home as it is on their shoulders that the realisation of government s international economic objectives rest It is in search of relevance in the international environment and in the continuation of the actualisation of its Afrocentric policy that Nigeria leading other West African states ventured into the Liberian crisis to build peace and restore democratic governance he added Although it was in June 1988 that economic diplomacy was officially adopted as a major plank of Nigeria s foreign policy Nigeria s contemporary foreign policy under the Buhari administration also adopted it 30 years after Since 1960 successive Nigerian governments have demonstrated an appreciation of the linkage between the country s foreign policy and economic circumstances hence in the first 25 years after independence that is from 1960 to 1985 there were overlapping patterns or strands of strategies that emerged in the history of Nigeria s economic diplomacy In officially adopting economic diplomacy as a major plank in its foreign policy initiatives the Buhari administration unveiled the National Economic Diplomacy Initiative NEDI in 2018 which underscores the continuity and consistency in Nigeria s foreign policy Ubi is of the view that the economic diplomacy initiative of the Buhari administration emerged in response to the inherited daunting domestic socio economic challenges before the country He said NEDI was also designed to leverage on Nigeria s bilateral and multilateral trade engagements with other countries to accelerate domestic growth and development It was also informed by the need to realise the lofty targets of regional economic integration as embellished in the ideals of the African Continental Free Trade Area agreement AFCFTA Nigeria s signing of AFCFTA which is projected to become the world s second largest free trade area is a remarkable stride in Nigeria s contemporary foreign policy s economic diplomacy AFCFTA provides opportunities to exploit new frontiers and reach larger markets with Nigerian exports of manufactured goods and services The cornerstone of AFCFTA is the promotion of industrialization sustained growth and development in Africa It is projected to boost intra African trade stimulate investment and innovation foster structural transformation and improve food security AFCFTA is also projected to enhance economic growth and export diversification and rationalise the overlapping trade regimes of the main regional economic communities Nigeria has also signed a number of bilateral agreements and memoranda of understanding with some African and non African countries aimed at strengthening its relations with them and driving Foreign Direct Investment FDI to the country Nigeria s Minister of Foreign Affairs Mr Geoffrey Onyeama summed up Nigeria s contemporary foreign policy when he spoke with journalists on the sidelines of the just concluded 77th Session of the UN General Assembly UNGA in New York According to the minister Nigeria is now highly respected and appreciated by the international community due to the repositioning of the country as a bastion of democracy by President Buhari in the past seven years We have been able to gain respect for Nigeria and secure Nigeria s place as an important partner and player at the multilateral level In seven years President Buhari has showcased Nigeria as a champion of good governance and an important partner in the African sub region and beyond We have been praised for the role we played in ensuring that democracy survived in The Gambia as well as in pushing for peace in the West African sub region We have been successful in areas such as getting through resolutions of the UN on illicit financial flows which we could not achieve for many years the minister said We have been seen as a champion for nuclear disarmament and a nuclear free world because we were very active in those areas During this period we have been at the forefront of actions to push for global justice and peace advocating justice for the oppressed in the world The centrepiece of the event for us was the national statement by the president which was very well received he said Onyeama explained that President Buhari touched on sensitive national regional and global issues when he addressed the UN General Assembly He disclosed that the country s delegation had a good mix of bilateral meetings with other countries as well as engaged with the private sector Analysts are therefore of the view that Nigeria s foreign policy as conducted by successive administrations since independence in 1960 has been consistently dominated by an enduring Afrocentric focus as well as the benefits of economic diplomacy to achieve the country s overall national interest s aims goals and objectives NANFeatures If used please credit the News Agency of Nigeria NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Assessing Nigeria’s foreign policy evolution since independence
    Features17 mins ago

    Assessing Nigeria’s foreign policy evolution since independence

    Assessing Nigeria’s foreign policy evolution since independence Assessing Nigeria’s foreign policy evolution since independencePresident Muhammad Buhari By Mark Longyen, News Agency of Nigeria Analysts are of the view that since gaining political independence from Britain on Oct. 1, 1960, Nigeria’s foreign policy has evolved under different past administrations with notable consistency of Africa as its centerpiece.

    They note that, since independence, Nigeria’s foreign policy has been conducted  by successive governments in a manner that demonstrated varying distinctive priorities and style within a broad conceptual framework, without a marked departure at any point from its Afro-centric focus.

    Many are of the view that the nation’s foreign policy implementation, its decision making and direction have, by and large, been deliberately anchored, formulated, tailored, and predicated by its policy architects on the basis of the nation’s overall national interest and Africa centeredness.

    The predominant preoccupation of Nigeria’s foreign policy in the immediate two post-independence decades, for instance, they say, was African solidarity, the decolonisation of all African countries that were still under colonial rule, and the war against Apartheid in South Africa, among others.

    In all of these, Nigeria clearly demonstrated exemplary leadership in Africa and its status as the Giant  of Africa, by using multiple platforms of multilateral organisations, of which she is  a member to pursue her foreign policy aims, goals and objectives – with astonishing results.

    While the Afrocentric focus forms the inner core of the nation’s foreign policy, experts are of consensus view that Nigeria’s membership and involvement in global organisations constitutes the outer core of the nation’s foreign policy focus.

    To this end, they say, Nigeria played an active role in the formation in 1963 of the defunct Organisation of African Unity, OAU, now Africa Union (AU) and also in the formation of the sub-regional economic bloc, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in 1975, which has its permanent headquarters in Abuja, Nigeria’s capital.

    They also note that the outer core focus of Nigeria’s foreign policy has over the past 62 years ensured that she pursued her national interests through her active involvement in the affairs of international organisations or playing key roles in  their affairs.

    Similarly, upon becoming an independent nation-state, Nigeria joined the British Commonwealth of Nations, the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM), the United Nations (UN), and its multiple agencies globally, where she played, and is still playing key roles in their activities.

    Nigeria has continued to pursue such foreign policy interests through her membership of, and participation in, global organisations like the UN,  the Commonwealth, the defunct OAU (now AU) and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) with tremendous successes.

    Prof. W.

    A Fawole, a foreign policy analyst and professor of International Relations, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, while reinforcing the Afrocentric stance of Nigeria’s foreign policy, said that no significant change had taken place to warrant any school of thought that there has been a shift from Afrocentricism.

    According to him, 62 years since independence, the conduct of Nigeria’s foreign policy has been in such a manner that it continues to play a leading and stabilising role on the continent of Africa.

    “All in all, Nigeria’s Afrocentric bend remains.

    “President Buhari was made the continent’s anti-corruption leader because of the reputation he had sustained over the decades.

    “But what needs to be understood is that virtually all the issues that stood Nigeria out in the past, that is, opposition to apartheid, decolonisation, African unity, etc.

    ,  have all been settled and now replaced with new ones.

    “Overall, I think domestic circumstances like pervasive insecurity, separatist agitations, weakening economic capacity, collapsing naira, official corruption have combined to vitiate a dynamic foreign policy,” he said.

    Prof Fawole, however, noted that Nigeria’s recent showing at the African Union was less than stellar as it lost a high-profile election to the most pivotal organ of the AU by putting forward the wrong candidate, although it was later able to regain composure.

    Corroborating Fawole’s view, Associate Prof. Efem Ubi, Director of Research, Nigerian Institute of International Affairs, (NIIA) noted that since independence to date, Nigeria has continued to focus on its Africa-centered foreign policy.

    According to him, when Buhari came to power over seven years ago, he set out to once again take Nigeria’s leading position in Africa.

    He said that this was done with some form of successes, even though minimal, especially in the efforts towards stemming the scourge of terrorism and other forms of insecurity in Nigeria.

    He said, “This is showcased in the role that Nigeria under Buhari and other ECOWAS member states played in upholding with sacrosanct, democracy in Africa to resolve The Gambia’s election crisis, the coup crisis in Mali and other places, etc.

    “President Buhari immediately on assumption of office visited different nations ranging from Nigeria’s immediate neighbors, the West African sub-region,and the continent at large, to harness international concerted efforts towards mitigating the challenges of terrorism.

    “Buhari started well by getting the affected neighbouring countries, Niger Republic, Cameroon and Chad to put more efforts through the Multinational Joint Task Force (MNJTF) to tackle the problem and his approach initially yielded fruits.

    ” The  NIIA Director of Research described Nigeria’s foreign policy under the current dispensation as a tripartite foreign, policy posture, which revolves around three thematic issues; namely, the fight against corruption, insecurity, and economic development.

    He argued that Nigeria under the current administration has exceedingly upheld Nigeria’s foreign policy tenets, irrespective of the odds, adding that Buhari did not after all inherit a rosy and healthy nation in 2015. On his part, Dr Salami Olawale of the Department of History and Diplomatic Studies, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Ogun State, however, sees economic diplomacy, which was popularised by the Babangida military regime in 1988 as the major lynchpin of Nigeria’s foreign policy.

    Olawale noted that, in spite of the lofty intentions of economic diplomacy under the Babangida administration, the global response to Nigeria’s economic diplomacy was not as enthusiastic as the Nigerian government had envisaged.

    He attributed the shortcomings of the administration’s economic diplomacy to the inconsistent and incoherent domestic policies, lack of infrastructural facilities and insincerity in government circles, leading to massive corruption in high places.

    “In the face of these problems, the attitude of foreign investors was not surprising, as various global investors had to re-design their strategies in the face of rampaging globalisation.

    “The ‘new’ economic diplomacy was also expected to encourage Nigerian business groups to shop for partners and then invest more both at home and abroad, but this was not to be, as they preferred, just like their friends in governments, to own property in choice areas of western countries.

    “Even the state sponsored attempt, through the Nigerian National Petroluem Corporation (NNPC), to shop around the world for petroleum-related investment outlets, did not produce significant results,” he said.

    Olawale, therefore, concluded that the failure of the Nigerian state in all ramifications and the conspiracy and hostility of the international environment, combined to frustrate the lofty ideas contained in Babangida’s economic diplomacy.

    He, however, said that for the Nigerian state to fully realise its great potentials for the benefit of the people, the managers of the country should have a change of attitude and put ‘Nigeria first’ in all respects.

    “The government at all levels and individuals should be fully involved in the fight against corruption, which has become a malignant tumour in the medulla of an average Nigerian.

    “At the level of the economy, the government should encourage the industrial class and not the merchant class, to produce more goods at home, as it is on their shoulders that the realisation of government’s international economic objectives rest.

    “It is in search of relevance in the international environment and in the continuation of the actualisation of its Afrocentric policy, that Nigeria, leading other West African states, ventured into the Liberian crisis, to build peace and restore democratic governance,” he added.

    Although it was in June 1988 that economic diplomacy was officially adopted as a major plank of Nigeria’s foreign policy, Nigeria’s contemporary foreign policy under the Buhari administration also adopted it 30 years after.

    Since 1960, successive Nigerian governments have demonstrated an appreciation of the linkage between the country’s foreign policy and economic circumstances, hence, in the first 25 years after independence, that is, from 1960 to 1985, there were overlapping patterns or strands of strategies that emerged in the history of Nigeria’s economic diplomacy In officially adopting economic diplomacy as a major plank in its foreign policy initiatives, the Buhari administration unveiled the National Economic Diplomacy Initiative (NEDI) in 2018, which underscores the continuity and consistency in Nigeria’s foreign policy.

    Ubi is of the view that the economic diplomacy initiative of the Buhari administration emerged in response to the inherited daunting domestic socio- economic challenges before the country.

    He said NEDI was also designed to leverage on Nigeria’s bilateral and multilateral trade engagements with other countries to accelerate domestic growth and development.

    It was also informed by the need to realise the lofty targets of regional economic integration as embellished in the ideals of the African Continental Free Trade Area agreement, AFCFTA.

    Nigeria’s signing of AFCFTA, which is projected to become the world’s second largest free trade area is a remarkable stride in Nigeria’s contemporary foreign policy’s economic diplomacy.

    AFCFTA provides opportunities to exploit new frontiers and reach larger markets with Nigerian exports of manufactured goods and services.

    The cornerstone of AFCFTA is the promotion of industrialization, sustained growth and development in Africa.

    It is projected to boost intra-African trade, stimulate investment and innovation, foster structural transformation, and improve food security.

    AFCFTA is also projected to enhance economic growth and export diversification, and rationalise the overlapping trade regimes of the main regional economic communities.

    Nigeria has also signed a number of bilateral agreements and memoranda of understanding with some African and non-African countries aimed at strengthening its relations with them and driving Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) to the country.

    Nigeria’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr Geoffrey Onyeama, summed up Nigeria’s contemporary foreign policy when he spoke with journalists on the sidelines of the just concluded 77th Session of the UN General Assembly (UNGA) in New York. According to the minister, Nigeria is now highly respected and appreciated by the international community due to the repositioning of the country “as a bastion of democracy” by President Buhari in the past seven years.

    “We have been able to gain respect for Nigeria and secure Nigeria’s place as an important partner and player at the multilateral level.

    “In seven years, President Buhari has showcased Nigeria as a champion of good governance and an important partner in the African sub-region and beyond.

    “We have been praised for the role we played in ensuring that democracy survived in The Gambia as well as in pushing for peace in the West African sub-region.

    “We have been successful in areas, such as getting through resolutions of the UN on illicit financial flows, which we could not achieve for many years,” the minister said.

    “We have been seen as a champion for nuclear disarmament and a nuclear-free world because we were very active in those areas.

    “During this period, we have been at the forefront of actions to push for global justice and peace, advocating justice for the oppressed in the world.

    “The centrepiece of the event for us was the national statement by the president, which was very well received,” he said.

    Onyeama explained that President Buhari touched on sensitive national, regional and global issues when he addressed the UN General Assembly.

    He disclosed that the country’s delegation had a good mix of bilateral meetings with other countries, as well as engaged with the private sector.

    Analysts are, therefore, of the view that Nigeria’s foreign policy as conducted by successive administrations since independence in 1960, has been consistently dominated by an enduring Afrocentric focus, as well as the benefits of economic diplomacy to achieve the country’s overall  national interest’s aims, goals and objectives.

    (NANFeatures) If used please credit the News Agency of Nigeria
    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   Nigeria 62 Nigerian Military s evolution from Frontier Force to giant Nigeria 62 Nigerian Military s evolution from Frontier Force to giant By Sumaila Ogbaje News Agency of Nigeria The Armed Forces of any nation represents its strength courage and sovereignty It is also a symbol of unity It defends and maintains nations territorial integrity national symbols and cohesion in their countries The Armed Forces of Nigeria AFN was established 159 years ago and has evolved through different stages With a force of no fewer than 223 000 active personnel today the Nigerian military is one of the largest uniformed combat services in Africa According to the latest Global Firepower index the Nigerian armed forces are the fourth most powerful military in Africa and ranked 35th globally The history of the Nigerian military dates back to 1863 when Lt Glover of the Royal Navy selected 18 indigenes from the northern part of present day Nigeria and organised them into a local force known as the Glover Hausas Glover then governor of Lagos used the group to mount punitive expedition into Lagos hinterland and to protect British trade routes around Lagos In 1865 the Glover Hausa became a regular force with the name Hausa Constabulary The West African Frontier Force the official progenitor of the Nigerian Army was a multi battalion field force It was established by the British Colonial Office in 1900 to protect the West African Colonies of Great Britain namely Nigeria Gold Coast Ghana Sierra Leone and The Gambia The Nigerian Navy on the other hand owes its origin to the Nigerian Marine Formed in 1914 after the amalgamation of the then Northern and Southern Nigeria protectorates the Nigerian Marine as it became known after 1914 was a quasi military organisation This Force later expanded to become the Southern Nigerian Marine in 1893 In July 1959 the Nigerian Naval Force transformed into a full fledged Navy as Queen Elizabeth II granted it permission to use the title Royal Nigerian Navy The title was changed to the Nigerian Navy in 1963 after Nigeria became a republic In 1960 when Nigeria became independent the Nigeria Military Force NMF became known as the Royal Nigerian Army RNA When Nigeria became a republic the RNA changed to the Nigerian Army In the same year the Army changed its uniform rank structure and instruments from those of Royal West African Frontier Force RWAFF to new ones including green khaki uniform The Nigerian Air Force NAF was officially established by a statutory Act of Parliament in April 1964 to achieve a full complement of the military defence system of the Federal Republic of Nigeria on sea air and ground Its birth sought to ensure a fast versatile mobility of the Armed Forces provide close support for the ground based and sea borne forces in all phases of operations among others Today the Nigerian military face a number of internal security challenges which undermine stability within the nation and the sub Sahara region as a whole Some of these threats include the ongoing conflict against the terrorist groups Boko Haram and Islamic State West Africa Province ISWAP in North Eastern part of the country The military has waged this war since July 2009 There is also the recent menace of banditry kidnapping and violent crisis in the North West and farmers herders clashes in the North Central and other parts of the country Another group that has tested the resolve of the military is the Southeast based Indigenous People of Biafra IPOB and pipeline vandals and oil thieves in the Niger Delta region To meet these and other challenges posed by the dynamics in national and international security the Nigerian Armed Forces have committed to a number of wide ranging modernisation programmes These includes the acquisition of new armoured vehicles modern combat aircraft such as the Tucano and aerial reconnaissance drones and the refurbishing of naval vessels which had suffered prolonged period of poor or minimal maintenance The war against terrorism in the north east has largely been won with routine attacks of the insurgents now a rarity During a recent visit to Maiduguri Borno State President Muhammdu Buhari applauded the military for the success in the war against Boko Haram and ISWP Your collective efforts have resulted in the relative peace being enjoyed in the region today Under my watch the Armed Forces of Nigeria have been provided a firm strategy and clear sense of direction to safeguard the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the country Buhari said The success story of the military operation has not gone unnoticed among the people of the area The Northern Youth Network Convener Malam Abdulrahman Ahmed at a recent news conference commended them for restoring sanity in the area The Biafra war of 1966 1970 was the greatest test the Nigerian military It emerged from the battle with its head held high having fought gallantly to stop the secession quest of the self declared Republic of Biafra In his 2022 New Year Message the Chief of Defence Staff Gen Lucky Irabor commended the sacrifices of the military in keeping the country united and safe In retrospect the end of 2021 affords the AFN unique opportunity to remember the sacrifices of its men and women who work in extreme conditions in trenches in fields The work in far flung places away from the comfort of their loved ones to keep Nigerians safe and secure he said On the international scene the Nigerian contingent have played and continued to play active role in both the United Nations UN peacekeeping operations The Nigerian military has also been involved in African Union AU and Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS missions in Africa Notable among these operations are the ECOMOG missions in Liberia and Sierra Leone in the 1990s The Minister of Defence retired Maj Gen Bashir Magashi said that Nigeria had contributed over 100 000 peacekeepers in over 40 peacekeeping missions in Africa and across the globe since 1960 He spoke at Joint World Press Conference on Tackling Insecurity in Nigeria organised by the Ministry of Information and Culture recently One area political and security experts overall the military has performed excellently except its incursion into politics which started with the 1966 coup led by Maj Kaduna Nzeogwu Some have argued that the military intervened to been to stabilise the polity and restore sanity into the polity After the coup the subsequent counter coups and interruption of democratic governance totaling over decades the military returned Nigeria to civilian rule in 1999 though The Chief of Army Staff Lt Gen Farouk Yahaha says to hit higher heights in regional and global operations the military personnel must remain professional and apolitical I want to enjoin all formation and unit commanders on the need to be vigilant and aware of all situations through constant monitoring They should also ensure proactive solution to situations he said in Abuja at the closing session of the 2022 Chief of Army Staff 3rd quarter conference NANFeatures If used please credit the writer and News Agency of Nigeria NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Nigeria @62: Nigerian Military’s evolution from Frontier Force to giant
      Nigeria 62 Nigerian Military s evolution from Frontier Force to giant Nigeria 62 Nigerian Military s evolution from Frontier Force to giant By Sumaila Ogbaje News Agency of Nigeria The Armed Forces of any nation represents its strength courage and sovereignty It is also a symbol of unity It defends and maintains nations territorial integrity national symbols and cohesion in their countries The Armed Forces of Nigeria AFN was established 159 years ago and has evolved through different stages With a force of no fewer than 223 000 active personnel today the Nigerian military is one of the largest uniformed combat services in Africa According to the latest Global Firepower index the Nigerian armed forces are the fourth most powerful military in Africa and ranked 35th globally The history of the Nigerian military dates back to 1863 when Lt Glover of the Royal Navy selected 18 indigenes from the northern part of present day Nigeria and organised them into a local force known as the Glover Hausas Glover then governor of Lagos used the group to mount punitive expedition into Lagos hinterland and to protect British trade routes around Lagos In 1865 the Glover Hausa became a regular force with the name Hausa Constabulary The West African Frontier Force the official progenitor of the Nigerian Army was a multi battalion field force It was established by the British Colonial Office in 1900 to protect the West African Colonies of Great Britain namely Nigeria Gold Coast Ghana Sierra Leone and The Gambia The Nigerian Navy on the other hand owes its origin to the Nigerian Marine Formed in 1914 after the amalgamation of the then Northern and Southern Nigeria protectorates the Nigerian Marine as it became known after 1914 was a quasi military organisation This Force later expanded to become the Southern Nigerian Marine in 1893 In July 1959 the Nigerian Naval Force transformed into a full fledged Navy as Queen Elizabeth II granted it permission to use the title Royal Nigerian Navy The title was changed to the Nigerian Navy in 1963 after Nigeria became a republic In 1960 when Nigeria became independent the Nigeria Military Force NMF became known as the Royal Nigerian Army RNA When Nigeria became a republic the RNA changed to the Nigerian Army In the same year the Army changed its uniform rank structure and instruments from those of Royal West African Frontier Force RWAFF to new ones including green khaki uniform The Nigerian Air Force NAF was officially established by a statutory Act of Parliament in April 1964 to achieve a full complement of the military defence system of the Federal Republic of Nigeria on sea air and ground Its birth sought to ensure a fast versatile mobility of the Armed Forces provide close support for the ground based and sea borne forces in all phases of operations among others Today the Nigerian military face a number of internal security challenges which undermine stability within the nation and the sub Sahara region as a whole Some of these threats include the ongoing conflict against the terrorist groups Boko Haram and Islamic State West Africa Province ISWAP in North Eastern part of the country The military has waged this war since July 2009 There is also the recent menace of banditry kidnapping and violent crisis in the North West and farmers herders clashes in the North Central and other parts of the country Another group that has tested the resolve of the military is the Southeast based Indigenous People of Biafra IPOB and pipeline vandals and oil thieves in the Niger Delta region To meet these and other challenges posed by the dynamics in national and international security the Nigerian Armed Forces have committed to a number of wide ranging modernisation programmes These includes the acquisition of new armoured vehicles modern combat aircraft such as the Tucano and aerial reconnaissance drones and the refurbishing of naval vessels which had suffered prolonged period of poor or minimal maintenance The war against terrorism in the north east has largely been won with routine attacks of the insurgents now a rarity During a recent visit to Maiduguri Borno State President Muhammdu Buhari applauded the military for the success in the war against Boko Haram and ISWP Your collective efforts have resulted in the relative peace being enjoyed in the region today Under my watch the Armed Forces of Nigeria have been provided a firm strategy and clear sense of direction to safeguard the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the country Buhari said The success story of the military operation has not gone unnoticed among the people of the area The Northern Youth Network Convener Malam Abdulrahman Ahmed at a recent news conference commended them for restoring sanity in the area The Biafra war of 1966 1970 was the greatest test the Nigerian military It emerged from the battle with its head held high having fought gallantly to stop the secession quest of the self declared Republic of Biafra In his 2022 New Year Message the Chief of Defence Staff Gen Lucky Irabor commended the sacrifices of the military in keeping the country united and safe In retrospect the end of 2021 affords the AFN unique opportunity to remember the sacrifices of its men and women who work in extreme conditions in trenches in fields The work in far flung places away from the comfort of their loved ones to keep Nigerians safe and secure he said On the international scene the Nigerian contingent have played and continued to play active role in both the United Nations UN peacekeeping operations The Nigerian military has also been involved in African Union AU and Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS missions in Africa Notable among these operations are the ECOMOG missions in Liberia and Sierra Leone in the 1990s The Minister of Defence retired Maj Gen Bashir Magashi said that Nigeria had contributed over 100 000 peacekeepers in over 40 peacekeeping missions in Africa and across the globe since 1960 He spoke at Joint World Press Conference on Tackling Insecurity in Nigeria organised by the Ministry of Information and Culture recently One area political and security experts overall the military has performed excellently except its incursion into politics which started with the 1966 coup led by Maj Kaduna Nzeogwu Some have argued that the military intervened to been to stabilise the polity and restore sanity into the polity After the coup the subsequent counter coups and interruption of democratic governance totaling over decades the military returned Nigeria to civilian rule in 1999 though The Chief of Army Staff Lt Gen Farouk Yahaha says to hit higher heights in regional and global operations the military personnel must remain professional and apolitical I want to enjoin all formation and unit commanders on the need to be vigilant and aware of all situations through constant monitoring They should also ensure proactive solution to situations he said in Abuja at the closing session of the 2022 Chief of Army Staff 3rd quarter conference NANFeatures If used please credit the writer and News Agency of Nigeria NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Nigeria @62: Nigerian Military’s evolution from Frontier Force to giant
    Features5 hours ago

    Nigeria @62: Nigerian Military’s evolution from Frontier Force to giant

    Nigeria @62: Nigerian Military’s evolution from Frontier Force to giant Nigeria @62: Nigerian Military’s evolution from Frontier Force to giant By Sumaila Ogbaje, News Agency of Nigeria The Armed Forces of any nation represents its strength, courage and sovereignty.

    It is also a symbol of unity.

    It defends and maintains nations’ territorial integrity, national symbols and cohesion in their countries.

    The Armed Forces of Nigeria (AFN) was established 159 years ago and has evolved through different stages.

    With a force of no fewer than 223,000 active personnel today, the Nigerian military is one of the largest uniformed combat services in Africa.

    According to the latest Global Firepower index, the Nigerian armed forces are the fourth most powerful military in Africa, and ranked 35th globally.

    The history of the Nigerian military dates back to 1863, when Lt. Glover of the Royal Navy selected 18 indigenes from the northern part of present day Nigeria and organised them into a local force, known as the “Glover Hausas”.

    Glover, then governor of Lagos used the group to mount punitive expedition into Lagos hinterland and to protect British trade routes around Lagos.

    In 1865, the “Glover Hausa” became a regular force with the name “Hausa Constabulary”.

    The West African Frontier Force, the official progenitor of the Nigerian Army was a multi-battalion field force.

    It was established by the British Colonial Office in 1900 to protect the West African Colonies of Great Britain, namely: Nigeria, Gold Coast (Ghana), Sierra Leone and The Gambia.

    The Nigerian Navy on the other hand, owes its origin to the Nigerian Marine.

    Formed in 1914 after the amalgamation of the then Northern and Southern Nigeria protectorates, the Nigerian Marine, as it became known after 1914, was a quasi-military organisation.

    This Force later expanded to become the Southern Nigerian Marine in 1893. In July 1959 the Nigerian Naval Force transformed into a full-fledged Navy as Queen Elizabeth II granted it permission to use the title `Royal Nigerian Navy`.

    The title was changed to the Nigerian Navy in 1963 after Nigeria became a republic.

    In 1960, when Nigeria became independent, the Nigeria Military Force (NMF) became known as the Royal Nigerian Army (RNA).

    When Nigeria became a republic, the RNA changed to the Nigerian Army. In the same year, the Army changed its uniform, rank structure and instruments from those of Royal West African Frontier Force (RWAFF) to new ones including green khaki uniform.

    The Nigerian Air Force (NAF) was officially established by a statutory Act of Parliament in April 1964 to achieve a full complement of the military defence system of the Federal Republic of Nigeria on sea, air and ground;.

    Its birth sought to ensure a fast versatile mobility of the Armed Forces; provide close support for the ground-based and sea borne forces in all phases of operations, among others.

    Today, the Nigerian military face a number of internal security challenges which undermine stability within the nation and the sub-Sahara region as a whole.

    Some of these threats include the ongoing conflict against the terrorist groups, Boko Haram and Islamic State West Africa Province (ISWAP) in North Eastern part of the country.

    The military has waged this war since July 2009. There is also the recent menace of banditry, kidnapping and violent crisis in the North West and farmers-herders clashes in the North Central and other parts of the country.

    Another group that has tested the resolve of the military is the Southeast-based Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB); and pipeline vandals and oil thieves in the Niger Delta region.

    To meet these and other challenges posed by the dynamics in national and international security, the Nigerian Armed Forces have committed to a number of wide-ranging modernisation programmes.

    These includes the acquisition of new armoured vehicles, modern combat aircraft such as the Tucano and aerial reconnaissance drones, and the refurbishing of naval vessels which had suffered prolonged period of poor or minimal maintenance.

    The war against terrorism in the north east has largely been won, with routine attacks of the insurgents now a rarity.

    During a recent visit to Maiduguri, Borno State, President Muhammdu Buhari applauded the military for the success in the war against Boko Haram and ISWP.

    “Your collective efforts have resulted in the relative peace being enjoyed in the region today.

    “Under my watch, the Armed Forces of Nigeria have been provided a firm strategy and clear sense of direction to safeguard the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the country”, Buhari said.

    The success story of the military operation has not gone unnoticed among the people of the area.

    The Northern Youth Network, Convener, Malam Abdulrahman Ahmed at a recent news conference commended them for restoring sanity in the area.

    The Biafra war of 1966-1970 was the greatest test the Nigerian military.

    It emerged from the battle with its head held high, having fought gallantly to stop the secession quest of the self-declared Republic of Biafra.

    In his 2022 New Year Message, the Chief of Defence Staff, Gen. Lucky Irabor commended the sacrifices of the military in keeping the country united and safe.

    “In-retrospect, the end of 2021 affords the AFN unique opportunity to remember the sacrifices of its men and women who work in extreme conditions in trenches, in fields.

    “The work in far-flung places away from the comfort of their loved ones to keep Nigerians safe and secure”, he said.

    On the international scene, the Nigerian contingent have played and continued to play active role in both the United Nations (UN) peacekeeping operations.

    The Nigerian military has also been involved in African Union (AU) and Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) missions in Africa.

    Notable among these operations are the ECOMOG missions in Liberia and Sierra Leone in the 1990s.

    The Minister of Defence, retired Maj.-Gen. Bashir Magashi, said that Nigeria had contributed over 100,000 peacekeepers in over 40 peacekeeping missions in Africa and across the globe since 1960. He spoke at Joint World Press Conference on Tackling Insecurity in Nigeria organised by the Ministry of Information and Culture recently.

    One area political and security experts overall, the military has performed excellently, except its incursion into politics which started with the 1966 coup led by Maj. Kaduna  Nzeogwu.

    Some have argued that the military intervened to been to stabilise the polity and restore sanity into the polity.

    After the coup, the subsequent counter coups and interruption of democratic governance totaling over decades, the military returned Nigeria to civilian rule in 1999, though The Chief of Army Staff, Lt.-Gen. Farouk Yahaha, says to hit higher heights in regional and global operations, the military personnel must remain professional and apolitical.

    “I want to enjoin all formation and unit commanders on the need to be vigilant and aware of all situations through constant monitoring.

    “They should also ensure proactive solution to situations,” he said in Abuja at the closing session of the 2022 Chief of Army Staff 3rd quarter conference.  

    (NANFeatures) **If used please credit the writer and News Agency of Nigeria
    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  Some Members of the ECOWAS Parliament have bemoaned the restriction of its powers by the ECOWAS Commission which have limited them to exercising their mandates They made this known on Friday during Parliament s High level Seminar in Lome Togo with the theme Application of the power of the Parliament in light of the restructuring of the ECOWAS Commission This is also as experts charged Parliament on exercising its Parliamentary Powers The Member of Parliament insisted it was imperative for the Parliament to start executing its powers as enshrined in its Supplementary Act which indicates the powers of the ECOWAS Parliament to include a law making role among other functions Sen Ali Ndume representing Nigeria at the ECOWAS Parliament said that it is worrisome to discuss the enhancement of Parliament s power when these powers have been overly restricted It is odd to discuss the powers of the parliament at this point I think we need to look at the whole process and ensure that it is worth it The powers of the Parliament have been overly subdued and if we are going to be what we are then we should be what we are The ECOWAS Parliament is so much important now most especially as we have a lot of challenges bedevilling the sub region hence we need to start working and not to start talking of power enhancement We should do the right thing and doing the right thing should not be personal we can be in the position today and tomorrow someone else take over Going forward this seminar should provide an opportunity for us to look at the document that we are currently using it is not the issue of enhancement but the issue of amendment One of our problems is the Commission and we can t expect them to correct it the Parliament Legal Director should be made to handle this Acts and then we should have other MPs to look at the law and jointly amend it Ndume said Mr Stephen Zargo a lawmaker from Liberia said that Articles 7 and 9 of the ECOWAS Parliament Acts give parliament an enhanced power but the power has not been well utilised We are arguing because you need leadership to make it happen if the Act gives us the power we are crying because we have a leadership deficit Zargo said Hon Fatoumatta Njai from the Gambia however called for the strengthening of the legal department of the ECOWAS Parliament As a Parliament our Legal Department must be strengthened it should be a directorate and not a department We should have started on the implementation on how to use our enhanced power and without a strong directorate we cannot achieve this course Njai said said Preceding the reactions from the lawmakers were presentations and recommendations by experts which includes the ECOWAS Commission s Legal Director Daniel Lago and the Legal Adviser of the ECOWAS Parliament Isatou Njia The experts spoke on the operationalisation of the new institutional Reforms and on Exercising Parliamentary Powers Bodo in his presentation charged Parliament with the establishment of a Groups in other to deepen their powers Isatou in her presentation noted that it is left to Parliament to take control and fully implement the provisions of the Supplementary Act This she said can be achieved by developing necessary guidelines in conjunction with implementing institutions and agencies of the Community Concluding the session Speaker of the ECOWAS Parliament Sidie Tunis agreed to the call of the MPs and added that their concerns have long been pondered by individuals and he feels more pain over these issues raised Listening to what we have all been yearning for I think this is the beginning now we have an opportunity to come up with an outcome document with the support of the Director of Legal Affairs Because at the end of the day even in the Commission he is the one to respond to this issue The Director of Legal affairs is for all institutions now that we have him here working with our own legal adviser I really hope we can come up with a document at the end of this seminar Because it is so timely with everything that is happening in this region trust me it is the MPs that can do the job not technocrats but those MPs must have the powers Tunis said NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Ndume, ECOWAS lawmakers regret subdued powers of Parliament by Commission
     Some Members of the ECOWAS Parliament have bemoaned the restriction of its powers by the ECOWAS Commission which have limited them to exercising their mandates They made this known on Friday during Parliament s High level Seminar in Lome Togo with the theme Application of the power of the Parliament in light of the restructuring of the ECOWAS Commission This is also as experts charged Parliament on exercising its Parliamentary Powers The Member of Parliament insisted it was imperative for the Parliament to start executing its powers as enshrined in its Supplementary Act which indicates the powers of the ECOWAS Parliament to include a law making role among other functions Sen Ali Ndume representing Nigeria at the ECOWAS Parliament said that it is worrisome to discuss the enhancement of Parliament s power when these powers have been overly restricted It is odd to discuss the powers of the parliament at this point I think we need to look at the whole process and ensure that it is worth it The powers of the Parliament have been overly subdued and if we are going to be what we are then we should be what we are The ECOWAS Parliament is so much important now most especially as we have a lot of challenges bedevilling the sub region hence we need to start working and not to start talking of power enhancement We should do the right thing and doing the right thing should not be personal we can be in the position today and tomorrow someone else take over Going forward this seminar should provide an opportunity for us to look at the document that we are currently using it is not the issue of enhancement but the issue of amendment One of our problems is the Commission and we can t expect them to correct it the Parliament Legal Director should be made to handle this Acts and then we should have other MPs to look at the law and jointly amend it Ndume said Mr Stephen Zargo a lawmaker from Liberia said that Articles 7 and 9 of the ECOWAS Parliament Acts give parliament an enhanced power but the power has not been well utilised We are arguing because you need leadership to make it happen if the Act gives us the power we are crying because we have a leadership deficit Zargo said Hon Fatoumatta Njai from the Gambia however called for the strengthening of the legal department of the ECOWAS Parliament As a Parliament our Legal Department must be strengthened it should be a directorate and not a department We should have started on the implementation on how to use our enhanced power and without a strong directorate we cannot achieve this course Njai said said Preceding the reactions from the lawmakers were presentations and recommendations by experts which includes the ECOWAS Commission s Legal Director Daniel Lago and the Legal Adviser of the ECOWAS Parliament Isatou Njia The experts spoke on the operationalisation of the new institutional Reforms and on Exercising Parliamentary Powers Bodo in his presentation charged Parliament with the establishment of a Groups in other to deepen their powers Isatou in her presentation noted that it is left to Parliament to take control and fully implement the provisions of the Supplementary Act This she said can be achieved by developing necessary guidelines in conjunction with implementing institutions and agencies of the Community Concluding the session Speaker of the ECOWAS Parliament Sidie Tunis agreed to the call of the MPs and added that their concerns have long been pondered by individuals and he feels more pain over these issues raised Listening to what we have all been yearning for I think this is the beginning now we have an opportunity to come up with an outcome document with the support of the Director of Legal Affairs Because at the end of the day even in the Commission he is the one to respond to this issue The Director of Legal affairs is for all institutions now that we have him here working with our own legal adviser I really hope we can come up with a document at the end of this seminar Because it is so timely with everything that is happening in this region trust me it is the MPs that can do the job not technocrats but those MPs must have the powers Tunis said NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Ndume, ECOWAS lawmakers regret subdued powers of Parliament by Commission
    Foreign1 day ago

    Ndume, ECOWAS lawmakers regret subdued powers of Parliament by Commission

    Some Members of the ECOWAS Parliament have bemoaned the restriction of its powers by the ECOWAS Commission which have limited them to exercising their mandates.

    They made this known on Friday during Parliament’s High-level Seminar in Lome, Togo with the theme “Application of the power of the Parliament in light of the restructuring of the ECOWAS Commission”.

    This is also as experts charged Parliament on exercising its Parliamentary Powers.

    The Member of Parliament insisted it was imperative for the Parliament to start executing its powers as enshrined in its Supplementary Act which indicates the powers of the ECOWAS Parliament to include a law-making role among other functions.

    Sen. Ali Ndume, representing Nigeria at the ECOWAS Parliament said that  it is worrisome to discuss the enhancement of Parliament’s power when these powers have been overly restricted.

    “It is odd to discuss the powers of the parliament at this point, I think we need to look at the whole process and ensure that it is worth it.

    “The powers of the Parliament have been overly subdued, and if we are going to be what we are then we should be what we are.

    “The ECOWAS Parliament is so much important now most especially as we have a lot of challenges bedevilling the sub-region, hence we need to start working and not to start talking of power enhancement; “We should do the right thing, and doing the right thing should not be personal, we can be in the position today and tomorrow someone else take over.

    “Going forward, this seminar should provide an opportunity for us to look at the document that we are currently using, it is not the issue of enhancement, but the issue of amendment; “One of our problems is the Commission, and we can’t expect them to correct it, the Parliament Legal Director should be made to handle this Acts, and then we should have other MPs to look at the law and jointly amend it”, Ndume said.

    Mr Stephen Zargo a lawmaker from Liberia said that Articles 7 and 9 of the ECOWAS Parliament Acts give parliament an enhanced power, but the power has not been well utilised.

    “We are arguing because you need leadership to make it happen if the Act gives us the power, we are crying because we have a leadership deficit,” Zargo said.

    Hon. Fatoumatta Njai from the Gambia however called for the strengthening of the legal department of the ECOWAS Parliament.

    “As a Parliament, our Legal Department must be strengthened, it should be a directorate and not a department.

    “We should have started on the implementation on how to use our enhanced power and without a strong directorate, we cannot achieve this course” Njai said said.

    Preceding the reactions from the lawmakers were presentations and recommendations by experts which includes; the ECOWAS Commission’s Legal Director, Daniel Lago, and the Legal Adviser of the ECOWAS Parliament, Isatou Njia. The experts spoke on the operationalisation of the new institutional Reforms and on Exercising Parliamentary Powers.

    Bodo in his presentation charged Parliament with the establishment of a Groups in other to deepen their powers.

    Isatou in her presentation noted that it is left to Parliament to take control and fully implement the provisions of the Supplementary Act. This she said can be achieved by developing necessary guidelines in conjunction with implementing institutions and agencies of the Community.

    Concluding the session, Speaker of the ECOWAS Parliament, Sidie Tunis agreed to the call of the MPs and added that their concerns have long been pondered by individuals and he feels more pain over these issues raised.

    “Listening to what we have all been yearning for, I think this is the beginning, now we have an opportunity to come up with an outcome document with the support of the Director of Legal Affairs.

    “Because at the end of the day even in the Commission he is the one to respond to this issue.

    “The Director of Legal affairs is for all institutions, now that we have him here working with our own legal adviser, I really hope we can come up with a document at the end of this seminar .

    “Because it is so timely with everything that is happening in this region, trust me it is the MPs that can do the job, not technocrats, but those MPs must have the powers,” Tunis said.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   Former President Goodluck Jonathan has called on all candidates in the 2023 general elections to strive to make their campaigns issue based clean and violence free Jonathan made the call in his virtual goodwill message read on Thursday in Abuja at the signing of the first National Peace Accord on the 2023 general elections which was attended by presidential candidates and their parties He also urged candidates their promoters and supporters to exercise restraint and to run their campaigns based on issues that affected Nigerians We are at a critical stage in our national life where we have no choice but to promote national cohesion love and hope in order to make the desired progress We cannot afford to continue to play politics of bitterness and division along ethnic and religious lines This is because such kind of politics portends great danger to our unity growth and the sustenance of our democracy We have to be mindful of the destructive impact of hate speech fake news and mindless propaganda especially in a clime where the fabric of unity and stability still needs to be strengthened I charge the candidates their promoters and supporters to exercise restraint and seek to run their campaigns based on issues that affect our people They should by all means avoid needless attacks on personalities and use of abusive language for those are the elements that cause chaos and crisis during elections Jonathan said He said that the task of ensuring peaceful elections in 2023 was our collective responsibility Jonathan said that it behoved on the candidates and the leaders of the various parties to lead the process for peaceful elections in the country He said that political stability and growth of democracy in any country were usually measured by the quality of elections In this regard we expect our democracy to be consolidated in such a way that our electoral processes will be seen to record incremental progress at the end of every election cycle Unfortunately this has not been the case as there are signs of inconsistencies with the progress we make in our elections As citizens of this great country we all have the responsibility to redirect our steps strive to work harder and do the right things to avoid the stagnation of our democracy Jonathan urged Nigeria to raise the bar in credible and transparent elections by ensuring that the country electoral processes were peaceful free and fair Since I left office in 2015 I have been involved in the process of promoting democracy across Africa My experience as an election observer having led observation missions to many countries is that many African countries are working hard to improve their elections and deepen the roots of democracy in their land Many of us will recall that elections held recently in Kenya Ghana and The Gambia and I am pleased that peaceful outcomes were recorded in those countries In 2023 I expect our country to raise the bar for credible and transparent elections by ensuring that our electoral processes are peaceful free and fair he said NewsSourceCredit NAN
    2023: Let your campaigns be issues-based, Jonathan implores politicians
      Former President Goodluck Jonathan has called on all candidates in the 2023 general elections to strive to make their campaigns issue based clean and violence free Jonathan made the call in his virtual goodwill message read on Thursday in Abuja at the signing of the first National Peace Accord on the 2023 general elections which was attended by presidential candidates and their parties He also urged candidates their promoters and supporters to exercise restraint and to run their campaigns based on issues that affected Nigerians We are at a critical stage in our national life where we have no choice but to promote national cohesion love and hope in order to make the desired progress We cannot afford to continue to play politics of bitterness and division along ethnic and religious lines This is because such kind of politics portends great danger to our unity growth and the sustenance of our democracy We have to be mindful of the destructive impact of hate speech fake news and mindless propaganda especially in a clime where the fabric of unity and stability still needs to be strengthened I charge the candidates their promoters and supporters to exercise restraint and seek to run their campaigns based on issues that affect our people They should by all means avoid needless attacks on personalities and use of abusive language for those are the elements that cause chaos and crisis during elections Jonathan said He said that the task of ensuring peaceful elections in 2023 was our collective responsibility Jonathan said that it behoved on the candidates and the leaders of the various parties to lead the process for peaceful elections in the country He said that political stability and growth of democracy in any country were usually measured by the quality of elections In this regard we expect our democracy to be consolidated in such a way that our electoral processes will be seen to record incremental progress at the end of every election cycle Unfortunately this has not been the case as there are signs of inconsistencies with the progress we make in our elections As citizens of this great country we all have the responsibility to redirect our steps strive to work harder and do the right things to avoid the stagnation of our democracy Jonathan urged Nigeria to raise the bar in credible and transparent elections by ensuring that the country electoral processes were peaceful free and fair Since I left office in 2015 I have been involved in the process of promoting democracy across Africa My experience as an election observer having led observation missions to many countries is that many African countries are working hard to improve their elections and deepen the roots of democracy in their land Many of us will recall that elections held recently in Kenya Ghana and The Gambia and I am pleased that peaceful outcomes were recorded in those countries In 2023 I expect our country to raise the bar for credible and transparent elections by ensuring that our electoral processes are peaceful free and fair he said NewsSourceCredit NAN
    2023: Let your campaigns be issues-based, Jonathan implores politicians
    General news1 day ago

    2023: Let your campaigns be issues-based, Jonathan implores politicians

     Former President Goodluck Jonathan has called on all candidates in the 2023 general elections to strive to make their campaigns issue-based, clean and violence-free.

    Jonathan made the call in his virtual goodwill message read on Thursday in Abuja at the signing of the first National Peace Accord on the 2023 general elections which was attended by presidential candidates and their parties.

    He also urged candidates, their promoters and supporters to exercise restraint and to run their campaigns based on issues that affected Nigerians.

    “We are at a critical stage in our national life where we have no choice but to promote national cohesion, love and hope in order to make the desired progress.

    “We cannot afford to continue to play politics of bitterness and division along ethnic and religious lines.

    This is because such kind of politics portends great danger to our unity, growth and the sustenance of our democracy.

    “We have to be mindful of the destructive impact of hate speech, fake news and mindless propaganda, especially in a clime where the fabric of unity and stability still needs to be strengthened.

    “I charge the candidates, their promoters and supporters to exercise restraint and seek to run their campaigns based on issues that affect our people.

    “They should, by all means, avoid needless attacks on personalities and use of abusive language for those are the elements that cause chaos and crisis during elections,’’ Jonathan said.

    He said that the task of ensuring peaceful elections in 2023 was our collective responsibility.

    Jonathan said that it behoved on the candidates and the leaders of the various parties to lead the process for peaceful elections in the country.

    He said that political stability and growth of democracy in any country were usually measured by the quality of elections.

    “In this regard, we expect our democracy to be consolidated in such a way that our electoral processes will be seen to record incremental progress at the end of every election cycle.

    “Unfortunately, this has not been the case, as there are signs of inconsistencies with the progress we make in our elections.

    “As citizens of this great country, we all have the responsibility to redirect our steps, strive to work harder and do the right things to avoid the stagnation of our democracy.

    ’’ Jonathan urged Nigeria to raise the bar in credible and transparent elections by ensuring that the country electoral processes were peaceful, free and fair.

    “Since I left office in 2015, I have been involved in the process of promoting democracy across Africa.

    “My experience as an election observer, having led observation missions to many countries, is that many African countries are working hard to improve their elections and deepen the roots of democracy in their land.

    “Many of us will recall that elections held recently in Kenya, Ghana and The Gambia and I am pleased that peaceful outcomes were recorded in those countries.

    “ In 2023, I expect our country to raise the bar for credible and transparent elections by ensuring that our electoral processes are peaceful, free and fair.

    “ he said. 


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   In response to the situation of thousands of migrants stranded in Niger the Commission of the Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS deployed a high level humanitarian mission in Niamey The mission is led by Prof Fatou Sow Sarr ECOWAS Commissioner for Human Development and Social Affairs and is expected to draw up an appropriate recovery and reintegration plan for the migrants The team made up of ECOWAS experts and representatives of the most affected member states Guinea Nigeria Mali Senegal Ivory Coast Niger Burkina Faso Liberia Gambia Sierra Leone and Benin has been in Niamey since on September 26 2022 with the support of the International Office for Migration IOM The mission s activities began on Tuesday September 27 with a visit to the Agadez migrant center followed by a meeting in Agadez Governorate with the authorities in charge of the vast region of northern Niger along the borders with Algeria Chad Libya and Mali which is facing a massive flow of migrants expelled from Algeria and Libya to a lesser extent During the visit to the IOM led center in Agadez Prof Fatou Sow Sarr accompanied by HE N dri Guillaume Gnamien ECOWAS Resident Representative in Niger held talks with Niger s Minister of Health Mr Illiassou Mainassara and the Governor of Agadez Region Mr Magagi Maman Dada who also came to learn about the conditions of stay of migrants served by the United Nations agency specializing in migration issues The mission s program also includes a two day roundtable to take place on 28 29 September 2022 between ECOWAS representatives of the most affected Member States IOM and the Nigerien authorities to share points of view and discuss sustainable and effective strategies to ensure adequate care for migrants in Niger as well as their return and reintegration in their country of origin In her opening speech Professor Fatou Sow Sarr expressed concern about the number of women and young children among the migrants and the number of people who lost their lives during their attempt to migrate or during their expulsion from Algeria or Libya She praised the efforts of IOM which is working with the Nigerien authorities to receive the migrants and repatriate them to their respective countries The ECOWAS Commission stands ready to support member states in addressing the challenges related to the irregular migration of citizens from the region concluded Prof Fatou Sow Sarr Speaking at the opening ceremony Niger s Minister for Humanitarian Action and Disaster Management Mr Magagi Laouan welcomed the efforts of ECOWAS and its technical and financial partners in particular IOM for their support in management of the migration crisis in the West African region as well as its support to Niger in the care of migrants It should be noted that Commissioner Fatou Sow Sarr and HE N dri Guillaume Gnamien attended the opening of the round table on the financing of Niger s national migration policy 2020 2035 and its first five year action plan chaired by HE Ouhoumoudou Mahamadou Prime Minister of Niger on the morning of Wednesday September 28 2022 At the end of their mission in Niger the experts and representatives of the Member States present in Niger will draw up an action plan and make recommendations to the ECOWAS authorities Member States and partners in order to propose adequate solutions in the short medium and long term for the proper management of transit migration in Niger
    The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and its partners come together to find a lasting solution to the plight of migrants stranded in Niger
      In response to the situation of thousands of migrants stranded in Niger the Commission of the Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS deployed a high level humanitarian mission in Niamey The mission is led by Prof Fatou Sow Sarr ECOWAS Commissioner for Human Development and Social Affairs and is expected to draw up an appropriate recovery and reintegration plan for the migrants The team made up of ECOWAS experts and representatives of the most affected member states Guinea Nigeria Mali Senegal Ivory Coast Niger Burkina Faso Liberia Gambia Sierra Leone and Benin has been in Niamey since on September 26 2022 with the support of the International Office for Migration IOM The mission s activities began on Tuesday September 27 with a visit to the Agadez migrant center followed by a meeting in Agadez Governorate with the authorities in charge of the vast region of northern Niger along the borders with Algeria Chad Libya and Mali which is facing a massive flow of migrants expelled from Algeria and Libya to a lesser extent During the visit to the IOM led center in Agadez Prof Fatou Sow Sarr accompanied by HE N dri Guillaume Gnamien ECOWAS Resident Representative in Niger held talks with Niger s Minister of Health Mr Illiassou Mainassara and the Governor of Agadez Region Mr Magagi Maman Dada who also came to learn about the conditions of stay of migrants served by the United Nations agency specializing in migration issues The mission s program also includes a two day roundtable to take place on 28 29 September 2022 between ECOWAS representatives of the most affected Member States IOM and the Nigerien authorities to share points of view and discuss sustainable and effective strategies to ensure adequate care for migrants in Niger as well as their return and reintegration in their country of origin In her opening speech Professor Fatou Sow Sarr expressed concern about the number of women and young children among the migrants and the number of people who lost their lives during their attempt to migrate or during their expulsion from Algeria or Libya She praised the efforts of IOM which is working with the Nigerien authorities to receive the migrants and repatriate them to their respective countries The ECOWAS Commission stands ready to support member states in addressing the challenges related to the irregular migration of citizens from the region concluded Prof Fatou Sow Sarr Speaking at the opening ceremony Niger s Minister for Humanitarian Action and Disaster Management Mr Magagi Laouan welcomed the efforts of ECOWAS and its technical and financial partners in particular IOM for their support in management of the migration crisis in the West African region as well as its support to Niger in the care of migrants It should be noted that Commissioner Fatou Sow Sarr and HE N dri Guillaume Gnamien attended the opening of the round table on the financing of Niger s national migration policy 2020 2035 and its first five year action plan chaired by HE Ouhoumoudou Mahamadou Prime Minister of Niger on the morning of Wednesday September 28 2022 At the end of their mission in Niger the experts and representatives of the Member States present in Niger will draw up an action plan and make recommendations to the ECOWAS authorities Member States and partners in order to propose adequate solutions in the short medium and long term for the proper management of transit migration in Niger
    The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and its partners come together to find a lasting solution to the plight of migrants stranded in Niger
    Africa2 days ago

    The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and its partners come together to find a lasting solution to the plight of migrants stranded in Niger

    In response to the situation of thousands of migrants stranded in Niger, the Commission of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) deployed a high-level humanitarian mission in Niamey.

    The mission is led by Prof. Fatou Sow Sarr, ECOWAS Commissioner for Human Development and Social Affairs, and is expected to draw up an appropriate recovery and reintegration plan for the migrants.

    The team, made up of ECOWAS experts and representatives of the most affected member states (Guinea, Nigeria, Mali, Senegal, Ivory Coast, Niger, Burkina Faso, Liberia, Gambia, Sierra Leone and Benin), has been in Niamey since on September 26, 2022, with the support of the International Office for Migration (IOM).

    The mission's activities began on Tuesday, September 27, with a visit to the Agadez migrant center, followed by a meeting in Agadez Governorate with the authorities in charge of the vast region of northern Niger along the borders with Algeria, Chad, Libya and Mali, which is facing a massive flow of migrants expelled from Algeria and Libya to a lesser extent.

    During the visit to the IOM-led center in Agadez, Prof. Fatou Sow Sarr accompanied by HE N'dri Guillaume Gnamien, ECOWAS Resident Representative in Niger, held talks with Niger's Minister of Health, Mr. Illiassou Mainassara and the Governor of Agadez.

    Region, Mr. Magagi Maman Dada, who also came to learn about the conditions of stay of migrants served by the United Nations agency specializing in migration issues.

    The mission's program also includes a two-day roundtable, to take place on 28-29 September 2022, between ECOWAS, representatives of the most affected Member States, IOM and the Nigerien authorities to share points of view and discuss sustainable and effective strategies to ensure adequate care for migrants in Niger, as well as their return and reintegration in their country of origin.

    In her opening speech, Professor Fatou Sow Sarr expressed concern about the number of women and young children among the migrants and the number of people who lost their lives during their attempt to migrate or during their expulsion from Algeria or Libya.

    She praised the efforts of IOM, which is working with the Nigerien authorities to receive the migrants and repatriate them to their respective countries.

    “The ECOWAS Commission stands ready to support member states in addressing the challenges related to the irregular migration of citizens from the region,” concluded Prof. Fatou Sow Sarr. Speaking at the opening ceremony, Niger's Minister for Humanitarian Action and Disaster Management, Mr. Magagi Laouan, welcomed the efforts of ECOWAS and its technical and financial partners, in particular IOM, for their support in management of the migration crisis in the West African region.

    as well as its support to Niger in the care of migrants.

    It should be noted that Commissioner Fatou Sow Sarr and HE N'dri Guillaume Gnamien attended the opening of the round table on the financing of Niger's national migration policy 2020-2035 and its first five-year action plan, chaired by HE Ouhoumoudou Mahamadou, Prime Minister of Niger, on the morning of Wednesday, September 28, 2022.

    At the end of their mission in Niger, the experts and representatives of the Member States present in Niger will draw up an action plan and make recommendations to the ECOWAS authorities, Member States and partners in order to propose adequate solutions in the short, medium and long term for the proper management of transit migration in Niger.

  •   As Mercy Ships www MercyShips Africa marks 30 years of service to the continent providing free surgical care training and support from its hospital ships to local development projects in Africa its Africa Office Director Dr Pierre M Pele calls for continuous vigilance and tireless pursuit of efforts to improve the level of health of African populations Life expectancy in Africa has increased by 10 years since 2000 as a result of interventions such as the implementation of the Millennium 2000 2015 and the successful commitments made by national governments under the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs 2015 2030 Working to serve the greatest number of people in a sustainable manner having a people centered vision and planning for greater investment in health as part of national development programs together with good democratic governance stability and economic growth have also positively influenced health indicators across the continent We absolutely must celebrate these positive results however we must be cautious and avoid complacency because this positive news is a tree that hides the forest says Dr M Pele A third of clinical conditions in Africa require surgical obstetric and anesthetic care and yet there is less than one surgical specialist per 100 000 population making surgery a particularly neglected component of health systems in Africa It is a critical area where a lot of improvement is needed While much of the world is looking to the latest technologies to improve its clinical care we say there is still a lot of work to be done in Africa to increase the number of qualified specialized and dedicated doctors and nurses as well Access to quality safe and affordable surgical obstetric and anesthetic care is a luxury in most African countries and especially for the poorest populations The challenge of equity and the integration of surgical and anesthetic care in national health systems are prerequisites for achieving Universal Health Coverage in Africa Preliminary results of research conducted by Mercy Ships in 602 district hospitals in 32 sub Saharan African countries as part of the organization s engagement with African governments national and international partners and health experts revealed an alarming situation that requires action at all countries The goal of this research and the political commitment it fosters is to increase investment in improving surgical obstetric and anesthetic care systems by 2030 to achieve Universal Health Coverage When you understand that one in four district hospitals for example do not have water or electricity and only one in twenty five have an Internet connection in this century of computerization it helps you identify the areas where improvement is most needed done says Dr M Pele This is why initiatives like baseline assessment are so important The survey is helping national leadership identify gaps in areas such as infrastructure human resources service delivery information management finance impact of Covid 19 on surgery governance and leadership as well as pediatric surgery The survey findings confirm the need for infrastructure investment continuing education and surgical support in Africa and highlight the value and urgent need for Mercy Ships work in collaboration with African nations It is a topic that Dr M Pele addressed in his recent op ed entitled Health in Africa the tree that hides the forest https bit ly 3dNLY4r and which he discussed with the Commissioner of the African Union for Education Science Technology and Innovation HE Prof Mohamed Belhocine who granted him an audience on September 7 2022 in Addis Ababa Ethiopia He also shared his thoughts with key stakeholders during his recent visit to Europe As a decisive step towards advancing political dialogue on ways to strengthen health systems within AU member countries the results of the survey will be delivered to the African Union Commission by the end of the year It is hoped that it will prompt other member countries to join the six African states Cameroon Comoros Congo Gambia Guinea Bissau and Senegal that have adopted the Dakar Declaration The Declaration may be ambitious but it offers hope of filling the health care gap for most of Africa s populations Mercy Ship s wish is that all African leaders governments and partners commit to the necessary financial investment to develop concrete actions to improve the health of the continent s populations especially the poorest
    Committed partnerships are the best way to ensure all Africans have access to life-saving surgical procedures
      As Mercy Ships www MercyShips Africa marks 30 years of service to the continent providing free surgical care training and support from its hospital ships to local development projects in Africa its Africa Office Director Dr Pierre M Pele calls for continuous vigilance and tireless pursuit of efforts to improve the level of health of African populations Life expectancy in Africa has increased by 10 years since 2000 as a result of interventions such as the implementation of the Millennium 2000 2015 and the successful commitments made by national governments under the Sustainable Development Goals SDGs 2015 2030 Working to serve the greatest number of people in a sustainable manner having a people centered vision and planning for greater investment in health as part of national development programs together with good democratic governance stability and economic growth have also positively influenced health indicators across the continent We absolutely must celebrate these positive results however we must be cautious and avoid complacency because this positive news is a tree that hides the forest says Dr M Pele A third of clinical conditions in Africa require surgical obstetric and anesthetic care and yet there is less than one surgical specialist per 100 000 population making surgery a particularly neglected component of health systems in Africa It is a critical area where a lot of improvement is needed While much of the world is looking to the latest technologies to improve its clinical care we say there is still a lot of work to be done in Africa to increase the number of qualified specialized and dedicated doctors and nurses as well Access to quality safe and affordable surgical obstetric and anesthetic care is a luxury in most African countries and especially for the poorest populations The challenge of equity and the integration of surgical and anesthetic care in national health systems are prerequisites for achieving Universal Health Coverage in Africa Preliminary results of research conducted by Mercy Ships in 602 district hospitals in 32 sub Saharan African countries as part of the organization s engagement with African governments national and international partners and health experts revealed an alarming situation that requires action at all countries The goal of this research and the political commitment it fosters is to increase investment in improving surgical obstetric and anesthetic care systems by 2030 to achieve Universal Health Coverage When you understand that one in four district hospitals for example do not have water or electricity and only one in twenty five have an Internet connection in this century of computerization it helps you identify the areas where improvement is most needed done says Dr M Pele This is why initiatives like baseline assessment are so important The survey is helping national leadership identify gaps in areas such as infrastructure human resources service delivery information management finance impact of Covid 19 on surgery governance and leadership as well as pediatric surgery The survey findings confirm the need for infrastructure investment continuing education and surgical support in Africa and highlight the value and urgent need for Mercy Ships work in collaboration with African nations It is a topic that Dr M Pele addressed in his recent op ed entitled Health in Africa the tree that hides the forest https bit ly 3dNLY4r and which he discussed with the Commissioner of the African Union for Education Science Technology and Innovation HE Prof Mohamed Belhocine who granted him an audience on September 7 2022 in Addis Ababa Ethiopia He also shared his thoughts with key stakeholders during his recent visit to Europe As a decisive step towards advancing political dialogue on ways to strengthen health systems within AU member countries the results of the survey will be delivered to the African Union Commission by the end of the year It is hoped that it will prompt other member countries to join the six African states Cameroon Comoros Congo Gambia Guinea Bissau and Senegal that have adopted the Dakar Declaration The Declaration may be ambitious but it offers hope of filling the health care gap for most of Africa s populations Mercy Ship s wish is that all African leaders governments and partners commit to the necessary financial investment to develop concrete actions to improve the health of the continent s populations especially the poorest
    Committed partnerships are the best way to ensure all Africans have access to life-saving surgical procedures
    Africa3 days ago

    Committed partnerships are the best way to ensure all Africans have access to life-saving surgical procedures

    As Mercy Ships (www.MercyShips.Africa) marks 30 years of service to the continent, providing free surgical care, training and support from its hospital ships to local development projects in Africa, its Africa Office Director, Dr. Pierre M'Pele calls for continuous vigilance and tireless pursuit of efforts to improve the level of health of African populations.

    Life expectancy in Africa has increased by 10 years since 2000, as a result of interventions such as the implementation of the Millennium 2000-2015 and the successful commitments made by national governments under the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 2015-2030.

    Working to serve the greatest number of people in a sustainable manner, having a people-centered vision and planning for greater investment in health as part of national development programs, together with good democratic governance, stability and economic growth have also positively influenced health.

    indicators across the continent.

    "We absolutely must celebrate these positive results, however, we must be cautious and avoid complacency, because this positive news is a tree that hides the forest," says Dr. M'Pele. “A third of clinical conditions in Africa require surgical, obstetric and anesthetic care, and yet there is less than one surgical specialist per 100,000 population, making surgery a particularly neglected component of health systems in Africa.

    .

    It is a critical area where a lot of improvement is needed.

    While much of the world is looking to the latest technologies to improve its clinical care, we say there is still a lot of work to be done in Africa to increase the number of qualified, specialized and dedicated doctors and nurses as well.” Access to quality, safe and affordable surgical, obstetric and anesthetic care is a luxury in most African countries, and especially for the poorest populations.

    The challenge of equity and the integration of surgical and anesthetic care in national health systems are prerequisites for achieving Universal Health Coverage in Africa.

    Preliminary results of research conducted by Mercy Ships in 602 district hospitals in 32 sub-Saharan African countries as part of the organization's engagement with African governments, national and international partners, and health experts revealed an alarming situation that requires action at all countries.

    “The goal of this research, and the political commitment it fosters, is to increase investment in improving surgical, obstetric and anesthetic care systems by 2030 to achieve Universal Health Coverage.

    When you understand that one in four district hospitals, for example, do not have water or electricity, and only one in twenty-five have an Internet connection in this century of computerization, it helps you identify the areas where improvement is most needed.

    done,” says Dr. M'Pele. This is why initiatives like baseline assessment are so important.

    The survey is helping national leadership identify gaps in areas such as infrastructure, human resources, service delivery, information management, finance, impact of Covid-19 on surgery, governance and leadership, as well as pediatric surgery.

    The survey findings confirm the need for infrastructure investment, continuing education and surgical support in Africa, and highlight the value and urgent need for Mercy Ships' work in collaboration with African nations.

    It is a topic that Dr. M'Pele addressed in his recent op-ed entitled “Health in Africa: the tree that hides the forest” (https://bit.ly/3dNLY4r), and which he discussed with the Commissioner of the African Union for Education, Science, Technology and Innovation, HE Prof. Mohamed Belhocine, who granted him an audience on September 7, 2022 in Addis-Ababa, Ethiopia.

    He also shared his thoughts with key stakeholders during his recent visit to Europe.

    As a decisive step towards advancing political dialogue on ways to strengthen health systems within AU member countries, the results of the survey will be delivered to the African Union Commission by the end of the year.

    It is hoped that it will prompt other member countries to join the six African states (Cameroon, Comoros, Congo, Gambia, Guinea Bissau and Senegal) that have adopted the Dakar Declaration.

    The Declaration may be ambitious, but it offers hope of filling the health care gap for most of Africa's populations.

    Mercy Ship's wish is that all African leaders, governments and partners commit to the necessary financial investment to develop concrete actions to improve the health of the continent's populations, especially the poorest.

  •   Por Pierre M Pel Director Mercy Ships Africa Bureau www MercyShips Africa En agosto el Informe de seguimiento de la OMS sobre la cobertura sanitaria universal en frica revel un aumento de 10 a os en la esperanza de vida entre 2000 y 2019 Este aumento dr stico es un consecuencia de la ca da del 37 en la mortalidad entre 2000 y 2015 tras la implementaci n de los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio 2000 2015 De hecho durante las ltimas dos d cadas frica ha hecho un enorme progreso en el cuidado de la salud y estos dos indicadores esenciales marcadores de la salud de una poblaci n as lo atestiguan Si bien es cierto que es leg timo regocijarse por este aumento para un continente azotado por tantos males debemos ser cautelosos y evitar la complacencia porque esta noticia positiva es un rbol que esconde el bosque Por lo tanto es prudente permanecer alerta y proseguir incansablemente los esfuerzos para mejorar el nivel de salud de las poblaciones africanas El rbol El baobab que esconde el bosque Numerosos informes estudios y evaluaciones incluidos los publicados por la OMS muestran que este progreso se debe a los avances en la prevenci n y el tratamiento de enfermedades infecciosas VIH tuberculosis y malaria salud reproductiva materna neonatal e infantil en particular con la mejora en la cobertura de los servicios de salud esenciales que alcanz el 46 en 2019 en comparaci n con el 24 en 2000 Si bien este progreso es notable se distribuye de manera desigual en frica entre las regiones entre pa ses e incluso dentro de los pa ses y la lenta reducci n de las enfermedades infecciosas indica una transici n epidemiol gica que merece especial atenci n porque las enfermedades no transmisibles son una epidemia silenciosa y mortal ahora y en el futuro Este avance es tambi n el resultado de los compromisos adquiridos sucesivamente en el marco de los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio 2000 2015 seguidos de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible ODS 2015 2030 Han liderado el liderazgo nacional para servir al mayor n mero de personas para garantizar un cambio duradero A nivel nacional e internacional estos compromisos han permitido una visi n y planificaci n centrada en las personas para una mayor inversi n en salud como parte de los programas nacionales de desarrollo La buena gobernanza democr tica la estabilidad y el crecimiento econ mico en los pa ses africanos durante las ltimas dos d cadas as como el apoyo a numerosas iniciativas tambi n han influido positivamente en los indicadores de salud Para lograr la Cobertura Universal de Salud en l nea con los ODS para el a o 2030 es esencial construir alianzas efectivas e inclusivas entre los gobiernos el sector privado la sociedad civil y las comunidades Deben construirse sobre principios y valores comunes de solidaridad y fraternidad que sit en a todas las personas en el centro del proceso En este contexto Mercy Ships ha estado trabajando con la gente de frica desde 1990 para en palabras del profesor de medicina franc s Marc Gentilini atenuar el dolor del mundo a trav s del acceso gratuito a una atenci n quir rgica muy compleja y de alta calidad para quienes de lo contrario no podr a acceder a l El Bosque Sistemas de salud desorganizados fr giles y desequilibrados Hogar del 17 de la poblaci n mundial frica tiene s lo el 2 del total mundial de m dicos y menos de 1 especialista quir rgico por cada 100 000 habitantes Solo el continente representa el 25 de la morbilidad mundial y un tercio de las condiciones cl nicas que requieren atenci n quir rgica obst trica y anest sica Hoy en d a los sistemas de salud africanos sacan a la luz debilidades significativas tales como Financiaci n y presupuesto de salud p blica insuficientes y costos restantes demasiado altos para los pacientes Acceso limitado de la poblaci n a atenci n m dica y servicios asequibles y de calidad disponibles en todo momento y en todos los lugares Inadecuados sistemas de recolecci n de datos y estad sticas que impiden el seguimiento y evaluaci n de las intervenciones tan tiles para orientar la acci n en salud p blica Sobredimensionada centralizaci n de los sistemas que afectan a los niveles perif ricos Infraestructuras de salud deficientes Desigualdades persistentes en el acceso a intervenciones de salud comprobadas especialmente en la cobertura de poblaciones clave y vulnerables como ni os adolescentes mujeres y adultos mayores Recursos humanos en salud insuficientes e inadecuados Sistemas inadecuados de vigilancia y respuesta ante epidemias y pandemias Acceso deficiente a medicamentos vacunas y tecnolog as esenciales Falta de transparencia y liderazgo en la gobernanza que no No siempre se considera la salud como un derecho humano fundamental Al mismo tiempo la pandemia de Covid 19 ha revelado recientemente la fragilidad de los sistemas de salud en muchos pa ses africanos Por tanto la gesti n de la salud p blica debe ser rigurosa y eficiente transparente y solidaria basada en la evidencia cient fica y en el respeto a los derechos humanos En el centro de la acci n mujeres y hombres de excelencia competentes ntegros y responsables har n posible la consecuci n de los ODS Vivir con buena salud y promover el bienestar de todas las personas en todas las edades que son condiciones esenciales para el desarrollo sostenible Periferias abandonadas La cirug a un componente desatendido de los sistemas de salud en frica Durante las ltimas dos d cadas los esfuerzos de salud p blica en frica no han ido acompa ados de un progreso similar en los sistemas de salud la integraci n de servicios o la atenci n hospitalaria ni se han distribuido equitativamente entre individuos de todos los niveles socioecon micos La atenci n quir rgica y anest sica se ha descuidado en gran medida en la mayor a de los pa ses africanos Seg n la Comisi n Lancet sobre Cirug a Global el 93 de la poblaci n del frica subsahariana no tiene acceso a una cirug a segura y cada a o se necesitan m s de 25 millones de cirug as adicionales para salvar vidas y prevenir discapacidades El desaf o de la equidad y la integraci n de la atenci n quir rgica y anest sica en los sistemas nacionales de salud son requisitos previos para lograr la Cobertura Universal de Salud en frica En frica recibir atenci n adecuada por hemorragia de parto o quemaduras por ejemplo es un desaf o para el individuo su familia el personal de salud y la comunidad Una distocia lesi n de nacimiento conduce a la muerte de la madre y del reci n nacido un labio y paladar hendido se convierte en un obst culo para el crecimiento y desarrollo normal de un ni o un hueso roto provoca una discapacidad permanente para un joven que trabaja para mantener Su familia El acceso a atenci n quir rgica obst trica y anest sica de calidad segura y asequible es un lujo en la mayor a de los pa ses africanos y especialmente para las poblaciones m s pobres frica Mercy Ships y sus socios aceptan el desaf o En conmemoraci n de sus 30 a os de servicio en el continente africano y para fortalecer su defensa de una cirug a segura y de calidad en frica Mercy Ships se ha comprometido con gobiernos africanos socios nacionales e internacionales y expertos en salud en una acci n pol tica y estrat gica continental de la investigaci n acci n al compromiso pol tico Su objetivo es aumentar la inversi n en la mejora de los sistemas de atenci n quir rgica obst trica y anest sica para 2030 para lograr la Cobertura Universal de Salud La investigaci n La investigaci n consisti en una evaluaci n de las insuficiencias de los sistemas de atenci n quir rgica en frica Condujo al desarrollo de un plan de acci n prioritario para ampliar e invertir en el fortalecimiento de la atenci n m dica en frica y una estrategia para la implementaci n el seguimiento y la evaluaci n Este estudio nico se llev a cabo en 602 hospitales de distrito en 32 pa ses del frica subsahariana Los resultados preliminares muestran una situaci n alarmante que requiere una acci n urgente en todos los pa ses Por ejemplo uno de cada cuatro hospitales de distrito no tiene agua ni electricidad y solo uno de cada veinticinco tiene conexi n a Internet en este siglo de informatizaci n La discusi n estrat gica Del 4 al 6 de mayo de 2022 en Dakar se reunieron expertos de 28 pa ses africanos en los campos de cirug a obstetricia y anestesia Los Ministros de Salud que se comprometieron a mejorar la situaci n en los pr ximos diez a os propusieron un compromiso denominado Acceso a atenci n quir rgica obst trica y anest sica equitativa asequible y de calidad en frica as como un Plan de acci n regional 2022 2030 Los presentaron a los Jefes de Estado africanos incluido el Excmo Sr Presidente Macky Sall de la Rep blica de Senegal y Presidente de la Uni n Africana Compromiso pol tico El 30 de mayo en Dakar seis estados africanos Camer n Comoras Congo Gambia Guinea Bissau y Senegal adoptaron la Declaraci n de Dakar Esta Declaraci n anuncia nueve compromisos fuertes y un Plan de Acci n Regional 2022 2030 que incluye 12 acciones urgentes y necesarias 6 prioridades estrat gicas 16 indicadores clave y un cuadro de mando de seguimiento anual Esta Declaraci n es ambiciosa y trae la esperanza de llenar el vac o de atenci n m dica para la mayor a de las poblaciones de frica Esta esperanza es que todos los l deres gobiernos y socios africanos se comprometan con la inversi n financiera necesaria para desarrollar acciones concretas para mejorar la salud de las poblaciones especialmente las m s pobres Pero una declaraci n pol tica es s lo el punto de partida para la acci n Para que sea una realidad debe existir una voluntad pol tica real y un fuerte liderazgo en favor de la salud En frica tantas declaraciones han quedado en los bloques de partida La Declaraci n de Abuja de 2001 asignaci n del 15 del presupuesto nacional anual a la salud por ejemplo todav a se est implementando lo que resulta en sistemas de salud inconsistentes y el hecho de que la cirug a sigue siendo un componente descuidado El guardabosques La soluci n As como una persona conduce el coche pilota el avi n o el dron dise a y gu a la inteligencia artificial las personas deben estar en el centro del cambio Es m s til hoy en d a contar con m dicos y enfermeras calificados especializados y dedicados a n sin equipo sofisticado que hospitales con equipos costosos sin recurso humano de salud de alto nivel para operarlos Por lo tanto los programas de capacitaci n son esenciales uno de los grandes desaf os para los profesionales de la salud en el continente africano es acceder a capacitaci n avanzada programas continuos de desarrollo de capacidades e investigaci n para evitar costosas evacuaciones m dicas a pa ses desarrollados Necesitamos profesionales de la salud en frica que puedan curar y restaurar la dignidad de los pacientes En la marcha hacia la Cobertura Universal de Salud los gobiernos africanos deben adoptar un enfoque estrat gico y cient fico riguroso planificar un programa adaptado a la situaci n local respaldado por un compromiso pol tico suficiente para ser sostenible hacer un mejor uso de los recursos disponibles eliminar las barreras financieras para el acceso a la atenci n mientras reduce los riesgos financieros asociados con la enfermedad implementa y respeta el compromiso de Abuja 2001 y finalmente invierte en la construcci n de sistemas de salud resilientes La riqueza relativa de un pa s no es el nico factor en juego Aunque la prioridad otorgada a la salud en los presupuestos nacionales generalmente aumenta con el ingreso nacional es importante se alar que algunos gobiernos eligen dedicar una alta proporci n de sus presupuestos al gasto en salud a pesar de un nivel relativamente bajo de ingreso nacional Otros en cambio que son relativamente m s ricos destinan una proporci n menor La Declaraci n de Dakar sobre el acceso a cuidados quir rgicos obst tricos y anest sicos equitativos asequibles y de calidad y su Plan de acci n 2022 2030 presentado a los Jefes de Estado africanos en mayo de 2022 es un poderoso instrumento pol tico Esta hoja de ruta acelerar la cobertura sanitaria universal para el a o 2030 en frica Este es un verdadero desaf o universal que debemos cumplir porque nos quedan menos de 10 a os para lograrlo Por lo tanto los gobiernos africanos y sus poblaciones tienen un papel clave que desempe ar en estos esfuerzos especialmente aquellos destinados a mejorar el acceso a una atenci n quir rgica de calidad que no deje a nadie atr s Est claro que la acci n pol tica marcar la diferencia porque debe ser como el bistur del cirujano no dejar lugar a la incertidumbre
    Salud en África: el árbol que esconde el bosque (Por Pierre M’Pelé)
      Por Pierre M Pel Director Mercy Ships Africa Bureau www MercyShips Africa En agosto el Informe de seguimiento de la OMS sobre la cobertura sanitaria universal en frica revel un aumento de 10 a os en la esperanza de vida entre 2000 y 2019 Este aumento dr stico es un consecuencia de la ca da del 37 en la mortalidad entre 2000 y 2015 tras la implementaci n de los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio 2000 2015 De hecho durante las ltimas dos d cadas frica ha hecho un enorme progreso en el cuidado de la salud y estos dos indicadores esenciales marcadores de la salud de una poblaci n as lo atestiguan Si bien es cierto que es leg timo regocijarse por este aumento para un continente azotado por tantos males debemos ser cautelosos y evitar la complacencia porque esta noticia positiva es un rbol que esconde el bosque Por lo tanto es prudente permanecer alerta y proseguir incansablemente los esfuerzos para mejorar el nivel de salud de las poblaciones africanas El rbol El baobab que esconde el bosque Numerosos informes estudios y evaluaciones incluidos los publicados por la OMS muestran que este progreso se debe a los avances en la prevenci n y el tratamiento de enfermedades infecciosas VIH tuberculosis y malaria salud reproductiva materna neonatal e infantil en particular con la mejora en la cobertura de los servicios de salud esenciales que alcanz el 46 en 2019 en comparaci n con el 24 en 2000 Si bien este progreso es notable se distribuye de manera desigual en frica entre las regiones entre pa ses e incluso dentro de los pa ses y la lenta reducci n de las enfermedades infecciosas indica una transici n epidemiol gica que merece especial atenci n porque las enfermedades no transmisibles son una epidemia silenciosa y mortal ahora y en el futuro Este avance es tambi n el resultado de los compromisos adquiridos sucesivamente en el marco de los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio 2000 2015 seguidos de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible ODS 2015 2030 Han liderado el liderazgo nacional para servir al mayor n mero de personas para garantizar un cambio duradero A nivel nacional e internacional estos compromisos han permitido una visi n y planificaci n centrada en las personas para una mayor inversi n en salud como parte de los programas nacionales de desarrollo La buena gobernanza democr tica la estabilidad y el crecimiento econ mico en los pa ses africanos durante las ltimas dos d cadas as como el apoyo a numerosas iniciativas tambi n han influido positivamente en los indicadores de salud Para lograr la Cobertura Universal de Salud en l nea con los ODS para el a o 2030 es esencial construir alianzas efectivas e inclusivas entre los gobiernos el sector privado la sociedad civil y las comunidades Deben construirse sobre principios y valores comunes de solidaridad y fraternidad que sit en a todas las personas en el centro del proceso En este contexto Mercy Ships ha estado trabajando con la gente de frica desde 1990 para en palabras del profesor de medicina franc s Marc Gentilini atenuar el dolor del mundo a trav s del acceso gratuito a una atenci n quir rgica muy compleja y de alta calidad para quienes de lo contrario no podr a acceder a l El Bosque Sistemas de salud desorganizados fr giles y desequilibrados Hogar del 17 de la poblaci n mundial frica tiene s lo el 2 del total mundial de m dicos y menos de 1 especialista quir rgico por cada 100 000 habitantes Solo el continente representa el 25 de la morbilidad mundial y un tercio de las condiciones cl nicas que requieren atenci n quir rgica obst trica y anest sica Hoy en d a los sistemas de salud africanos sacan a la luz debilidades significativas tales como Financiaci n y presupuesto de salud p blica insuficientes y costos restantes demasiado altos para los pacientes Acceso limitado de la poblaci n a atenci n m dica y servicios asequibles y de calidad disponibles en todo momento y en todos los lugares Inadecuados sistemas de recolecci n de datos y estad sticas que impiden el seguimiento y evaluaci n de las intervenciones tan tiles para orientar la acci n en salud p blica Sobredimensionada centralizaci n de los sistemas que afectan a los niveles perif ricos Infraestructuras de salud deficientes Desigualdades persistentes en el acceso a intervenciones de salud comprobadas especialmente en la cobertura de poblaciones clave y vulnerables como ni os adolescentes mujeres y adultos mayores Recursos humanos en salud insuficientes e inadecuados Sistemas inadecuados de vigilancia y respuesta ante epidemias y pandemias Acceso deficiente a medicamentos vacunas y tecnolog as esenciales Falta de transparencia y liderazgo en la gobernanza que no No siempre se considera la salud como un derecho humano fundamental Al mismo tiempo la pandemia de Covid 19 ha revelado recientemente la fragilidad de los sistemas de salud en muchos pa ses africanos Por tanto la gesti n de la salud p blica debe ser rigurosa y eficiente transparente y solidaria basada en la evidencia cient fica y en el respeto a los derechos humanos En el centro de la acci n mujeres y hombres de excelencia competentes ntegros y responsables har n posible la consecuci n de los ODS Vivir con buena salud y promover el bienestar de todas las personas en todas las edades que son condiciones esenciales para el desarrollo sostenible Periferias abandonadas La cirug a un componente desatendido de los sistemas de salud en frica Durante las ltimas dos d cadas los esfuerzos de salud p blica en frica no han ido acompa ados de un progreso similar en los sistemas de salud la integraci n de servicios o la atenci n hospitalaria ni se han distribuido equitativamente entre individuos de todos los niveles socioecon micos La atenci n quir rgica y anest sica se ha descuidado en gran medida en la mayor a de los pa ses africanos Seg n la Comisi n Lancet sobre Cirug a Global el 93 de la poblaci n del frica subsahariana no tiene acceso a una cirug a segura y cada a o se necesitan m s de 25 millones de cirug as adicionales para salvar vidas y prevenir discapacidades El desaf o de la equidad y la integraci n de la atenci n quir rgica y anest sica en los sistemas nacionales de salud son requisitos previos para lograr la Cobertura Universal de Salud en frica En frica recibir atenci n adecuada por hemorragia de parto o quemaduras por ejemplo es un desaf o para el individuo su familia el personal de salud y la comunidad Una distocia lesi n de nacimiento conduce a la muerte de la madre y del reci n nacido un labio y paladar hendido se convierte en un obst culo para el crecimiento y desarrollo normal de un ni o un hueso roto provoca una discapacidad permanente para un joven que trabaja para mantener Su familia El acceso a atenci n quir rgica obst trica y anest sica de calidad segura y asequible es un lujo en la mayor a de los pa ses africanos y especialmente para las poblaciones m s pobres frica Mercy Ships y sus socios aceptan el desaf o En conmemoraci n de sus 30 a os de servicio en el continente africano y para fortalecer su defensa de una cirug a segura y de calidad en frica Mercy Ships se ha comprometido con gobiernos africanos socios nacionales e internacionales y expertos en salud en una acci n pol tica y estrat gica continental de la investigaci n acci n al compromiso pol tico Su objetivo es aumentar la inversi n en la mejora de los sistemas de atenci n quir rgica obst trica y anest sica para 2030 para lograr la Cobertura Universal de Salud La investigaci n La investigaci n consisti en una evaluaci n de las insuficiencias de los sistemas de atenci n quir rgica en frica Condujo al desarrollo de un plan de acci n prioritario para ampliar e invertir en el fortalecimiento de la atenci n m dica en frica y una estrategia para la implementaci n el seguimiento y la evaluaci n Este estudio nico se llev a cabo en 602 hospitales de distrito en 32 pa ses del frica subsahariana Los resultados preliminares muestran una situaci n alarmante que requiere una acci n urgente en todos los pa ses Por ejemplo uno de cada cuatro hospitales de distrito no tiene agua ni electricidad y solo uno de cada veinticinco tiene conexi n a Internet en este siglo de informatizaci n La discusi n estrat gica Del 4 al 6 de mayo de 2022 en Dakar se reunieron expertos de 28 pa ses africanos en los campos de cirug a obstetricia y anestesia Los Ministros de Salud que se comprometieron a mejorar la situaci n en los pr ximos diez a os propusieron un compromiso denominado Acceso a atenci n quir rgica obst trica y anest sica equitativa asequible y de calidad en frica as como un Plan de acci n regional 2022 2030 Los presentaron a los Jefes de Estado africanos incluido el Excmo Sr Presidente Macky Sall de la Rep blica de Senegal y Presidente de la Uni n Africana Compromiso pol tico El 30 de mayo en Dakar seis estados africanos Camer n Comoras Congo Gambia Guinea Bissau y Senegal adoptaron la Declaraci n de Dakar Esta Declaraci n anuncia nueve compromisos fuertes y un Plan de Acci n Regional 2022 2030 que incluye 12 acciones urgentes y necesarias 6 prioridades estrat gicas 16 indicadores clave y un cuadro de mando de seguimiento anual Esta Declaraci n es ambiciosa y trae la esperanza de llenar el vac o de atenci n m dica para la mayor a de las poblaciones de frica Esta esperanza es que todos los l deres gobiernos y socios africanos se comprometan con la inversi n financiera necesaria para desarrollar acciones concretas para mejorar la salud de las poblaciones especialmente las m s pobres Pero una declaraci n pol tica es s lo el punto de partida para la acci n Para que sea una realidad debe existir una voluntad pol tica real y un fuerte liderazgo en favor de la salud En frica tantas declaraciones han quedado en los bloques de partida La Declaraci n de Abuja de 2001 asignaci n del 15 del presupuesto nacional anual a la salud por ejemplo todav a se est implementando lo que resulta en sistemas de salud inconsistentes y el hecho de que la cirug a sigue siendo un componente descuidado El guardabosques La soluci n As como una persona conduce el coche pilota el avi n o el dron dise a y gu a la inteligencia artificial las personas deben estar en el centro del cambio Es m s til hoy en d a contar con m dicos y enfermeras calificados especializados y dedicados a n sin equipo sofisticado que hospitales con equipos costosos sin recurso humano de salud de alto nivel para operarlos Por lo tanto los programas de capacitaci n son esenciales uno de los grandes desaf os para los profesionales de la salud en el continente africano es acceder a capacitaci n avanzada programas continuos de desarrollo de capacidades e investigaci n para evitar costosas evacuaciones m dicas a pa ses desarrollados Necesitamos profesionales de la salud en frica que puedan curar y restaurar la dignidad de los pacientes En la marcha hacia la Cobertura Universal de Salud los gobiernos africanos deben adoptar un enfoque estrat gico y cient fico riguroso planificar un programa adaptado a la situaci n local respaldado por un compromiso pol tico suficiente para ser sostenible hacer un mejor uso de los recursos disponibles eliminar las barreras financieras para el acceso a la atenci n mientras reduce los riesgos financieros asociados con la enfermedad implementa y respeta el compromiso de Abuja 2001 y finalmente invierte en la construcci n de sistemas de salud resilientes La riqueza relativa de un pa s no es el nico factor en juego Aunque la prioridad otorgada a la salud en los presupuestos nacionales generalmente aumenta con el ingreso nacional es importante se alar que algunos gobiernos eligen dedicar una alta proporci n de sus presupuestos al gasto en salud a pesar de un nivel relativamente bajo de ingreso nacional Otros en cambio que son relativamente m s ricos destinan una proporci n menor La Declaraci n de Dakar sobre el acceso a cuidados quir rgicos obst tricos y anest sicos equitativos asequibles y de calidad y su Plan de acci n 2022 2030 presentado a los Jefes de Estado africanos en mayo de 2022 es un poderoso instrumento pol tico Esta hoja de ruta acelerar la cobertura sanitaria universal para el a o 2030 en frica Este es un verdadero desaf o universal que debemos cumplir porque nos quedan menos de 10 a os para lograrlo Por lo tanto los gobiernos africanos y sus poblaciones tienen un papel clave que desempe ar en estos esfuerzos especialmente aquellos destinados a mejorar el acceso a una atenci n quir rgica de calidad que no deje a nadie atr s Est claro que la acci n pol tica marcar la diferencia porque debe ser como el bistur del cirujano no dejar lugar a la incertidumbre
    Salud en África: el árbol que esconde el bosque (Por Pierre M’Pelé)
    Africa3 days ago

    Salud en África: el árbol que esconde el bosque (Por Pierre M’Pelé)

    Por Pierre M'Pelé, Director, Mercy Ships Africa Bureau (www.MercyShips.Africa) En agosto, el Informe de seguimiento de la OMS sobre la cobertura sanitaria universal en África reveló un aumento de 10 años en la esperanza de vida entre 2000 y 2019.

    Este aumento drástico es un consecuencia de la caída del 37% en la mortalidad entre 2000 y 2015 tras la implementación de los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio 2000-2015.

    De hecho, durante las últimas dos décadas, África ha hecho un enorme progreso en el cuidado de la salud y estos dos indicadores esenciales, marcadores de la salud de una población, así lo atestiguan.

    Si bien es cierto que es legítimo regocijarse por este aumento para un continente azotado por tantos males, debemos ser cautelosos y evitar la complacencia porque esta noticia positiva es un árbol que esconde el bosque.

    Por lo tanto, es prudente permanecer alerta y proseguir incansablemente los esfuerzos para mejorar el nivel de salud de las poblaciones africanas.

    El árbol...

    El baobab que esconde el bosque Numerosos informes, estudios y evaluaciones, incluidos los publicados por la OMS, muestran que este progreso se debe a los avances en la prevención y el tratamiento de enfermedades infecciosas (VIH, tuberculosis y malaria), salud reproductiva, materna, neonatal e infantil, en particular con la mejora en la cobertura de los servicios de salud esenciales, que alcanzó el 46 % en 2019, en comparación con el 24 % en 2000.

    Si bien este progreso es notable, se distribuye de manera desigual en África, entre las regiones , entre países, e incluso dentro de los países, y la lenta reducción de las enfermedades infecciosas indica una transición epidemiológica que merece especial atención porque las enfermedades no transmisibles son una epidemia silenciosa y mortal ahora y en el futuro.

    Este avance es también el resultado de los compromisos adquiridos sucesivamente en el marco de los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio 2000-2015 seguidos de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible (ODS) 2015-2030.

    Han liderado el liderazgo nacional para servir al mayor número de personas para garantizar un cambio duradero.

    A nivel nacional e internacional, estos compromisos han permitido una visión y planificación centrada en las personas para una mayor inversión en salud como parte de los programas nacionales de desarrollo.

    La buena gobernanza democrática, la estabilidad y el crecimiento económico en los países africanos durante las últimas dos décadas, así como el apoyo a numerosas iniciativas, también han influido positivamente en los indicadores de salud.

    Para lograr la Cobertura Universal de Salud en línea con los ODS para el año 2030, es esencial construir alianzas efectivas e inclusivas entre los gobiernos, el sector privado, la sociedad civil y las comunidades.

    Deben construirse sobre principios y valores comunes de solidaridad y fraternidad que sitúen a todas las personas en el centro del proceso.

    En este contexto, Mercy Ships ha estado trabajando con la gente de África desde 1990 para, en palabras del profesor de medicina francés Marc Gentilini, "atenuar el dolor del mundo" a través del acceso gratuito a una atención quirúrgica muy compleja y de alta calidad para quienes de lo contrario no podría acceder a él.

    El Bosque...

    Sistemas de salud desorganizados, frágiles y desequilibrados Hogar del 17% de la población mundial, África tiene sólo el 2% del total mundial de médicos y menos de 1 especialista quirúrgico por cada 100.000 habitantes.

    Solo el continente representa el 25% de la morbilidad mundial y un tercio de las condiciones clínicas que requieren atención quirúrgica, obstétrica y anestésica.

    Hoy en día, los sistemas de salud africanos sacan a la luz debilidades significativas, tales como: Financiación y presupuesto de salud pública insuficientes, y "costos restantes" demasiado altos para los pacientes Acceso limitado de la población a atención médica y servicios asequibles y de calidad, disponibles en todo momento y en todos los lugares Inadecuados sistemas de recolección de datos y estadísticas que impiden el seguimiento y evaluación de las intervenciones, tan útiles para orientar la acción en salud pública Sobredimensionada centralización de los sistemas que afectan a los niveles periféricos Infraestructuras de salud deficientes Desigualdades persistentes en el acceso a intervenciones de salud comprobadas, especialmente en la cobertura de poblaciones clave y vulnerables como niños, adolescentes, mujeres y adultos mayores Recursos humanos en salud insuficientes e inadecuados Sistemas inadecuados de vigilancia y respuesta ante epidemias y pandemias Acceso deficiente a medicamentos, vacunas y tecnologías esenciales Falta de transparencia y liderazgo en la gobernanza, que no No siempre se considera la salud como un derecho humano fundamental.

    Al mismo tiempo, la pandemia de Covid-19 ha revelado recientemente la fragilidad de los sistemas de salud en muchos países africanos.

    Por tanto, la gestión de la salud pública debe ser rigurosa y eficiente, transparente y solidaria, basada en la evidencia científica y en el respeto a los derechos humanos.

    En el centro de la acción, mujeres y hombres de excelencia, competentes, íntegros y responsables harán posible la consecución de los ODS: "Vivir con buena salud y promover el bienestar de todas las personas en todas las edades, que son condiciones esenciales para el desarrollo sostenible".

    Periferias abandonadas...

    La cirugía, un componente desatendido de los sistemas de salud en África Durante las últimas dos décadas, los esfuerzos de salud pública en África no han ido acompañados de un progreso similar en los sistemas de salud, la integración de servicios o la atención hospitalaria, ni se han distribuido equitativamente entre individuos de todos los niveles socioeconómicos.

    La atención quirúrgica y anestésica se ha descuidado en gran medida en la mayoría de los países africanos.

    Según la Comisión Lancet sobre Cirugía Global, el 93 % de la población del África subsahariana no tiene acceso a una cirugía segura y cada año se necesitan más de 25 millones de cirugías adicionales para salvar vidas y prevenir discapacidades.

    El desafío de la equidad y la integración de la atención quirúrgica y anestésica en los sistemas nacionales de salud son requisitos previos para lograr la Cobertura Universal de Salud en África.

    En África, recibir atención adecuada por hemorragia de parto o quemaduras, por ejemplo, es un desafío para el individuo, su familia, el personal de salud y la comunidad.

    Una distocia (lesión de nacimiento) conduce a la muerte de la madre y del recién nacido, un labio y paladar hendido se convierte en un obstáculo para el crecimiento y desarrollo normal de un niño, un hueso roto provoca una discapacidad permanente para un joven que trabaja para mantener Su familia.

    El acceso a atención quirúrgica, obstétrica y anestésica de calidad, segura y asequible es un lujo en la mayoría de los países africanos y especialmente para las poblaciones más pobres.

    África, Mercy Ships y sus socios aceptan el desafío...

    En conmemoración de sus 30 años de servicio en el continente africano y para fortalecer su defensa de una cirugía segura y de calidad en África, Mercy Ships se ha comprometido con gobiernos africanos, socios nacionales e internacionales, y expertos en salud en una acción política y estratégica continental: de la investigación-acción al compromiso político.

    Su objetivo es aumentar la inversión en la mejora de los sistemas de atención quirúrgica, obstétrica y anestésica para 2030 para lograr la Cobertura Universal de Salud.

    La investigación La investigación consistió en una evaluación de las insuficiencias de los sistemas de atención quirúrgica en África.

    Condujo al desarrollo de un plan de acción prioritario para ampliar e invertir en el fortalecimiento de la atención médica en África, y una estrategia para la implementación, el seguimiento y la evaluación.

    Este estudio único se llevó a cabo en 602 hospitales de distrito en 32 países del África subsahariana.

    Los resultados preliminares muestran una situación alarmante que requiere una acción urgente en todos los países.

    Por ejemplo, uno de cada cuatro hospitales de distrito no tiene agua ni electricidad, y solo uno de cada veinticinco tiene conexión a Internet en este siglo de informatización.

    La discusión estratégica Del 4 al 6 de mayo de 2022 en Dakar, se reunieron expertos de 28 países africanos en los campos de cirugía, obstetricia y anestesia.

    Los Ministros de Salud, que se comprometieron a mejorar la situación en los próximos diez años, propusieron un compromiso denominado Acceso a atención quirúrgica, obstétrica y anestésica equitativa, asequible y de calidad en África, así como un Plan de acción regional 2022-2030.

    Los presentaron a los Jefes de Estado africanos, incluido el Excmo.

    Sr. Presidente Macky Sall, de la República de Senegal y Presidente de la Unión Africana.

    Compromiso político El 30 de mayo en Dakar, seis estados africanos (Camerún, Comoras, Congo, Gambia, Guinea Bissau y Senegal) adoptaron la Declaración de Dakar.

    Esta Declaración anuncia nueve compromisos fuertes y un Plan de Acción Regional 2022-2030 que incluye 12 acciones urgentes y necesarias, 6 prioridades estratégicas, 16 indicadores clave y un cuadro de mando de seguimiento anual.

    Esta Declaración es ambiciosa y trae la esperanza de llenar el vacío de atención médica para la mayoría de las poblaciones de África.

    Esta esperanza es que todos los líderes, gobiernos y socios africanos se comprometan con la inversión financiera necesaria para desarrollar acciones concretas para mejorar la salud de las poblaciones, especialmente las más pobres.

    Pero una declaración política es sólo el punto de partida para la acción.

    Para que sea una realidad, debe existir una voluntad política real y un fuerte liderazgo en favor de la salud.

    En África, tantas declaraciones han quedado en los bloques de partida...

    La Declaración de Abuja de 2001 (asignación del 15% del presupuesto nacional anual a la salud), por ejemplo, todavía se está implementando, lo que resulta en sistemas de salud inconsistentes y el hecho de que la cirugía sigue siendo un componente descuidado.

    El guardabosques...

    La solución Así como una persona conduce el coche, pilota el avión o el dron, diseña y guía la inteligencia artificial, las personas deben estar en el centro del cambio.

    Es más útil hoy en día contar con médicos y enfermeras calificados, especializados y dedicados aún sin equipo sofisticado, que hospitales con equipos costosos sin recurso humano de salud de alto nivel para operarlos.

    Por lo tanto, los programas de capacitación son esenciales; uno de los grandes desafíos para los profesionales de la salud en el continente africano es acceder a capacitación avanzada, programas continuos de desarrollo de capacidades e investigación para evitar costosas evacuaciones médicas a países desarrollados.

    Necesitamos profesionales de la salud en África que puedan curar y restaurar la dignidad de los pacientes.

    En la marcha hacia la Cobertura Universal de Salud, los gobiernos africanos deben adoptar un enfoque estratégico y científico riguroso: planificar un programa adaptado a la situación local respaldado por un compromiso político suficiente para ser sostenible, hacer un mejor uso de los recursos disponibles, eliminar las barreras financieras para el acceso a la atención mientras reduce los riesgos financieros asociados con la enfermedad, implementa y respeta el compromiso de Abuja 2001 y, finalmente, invierte en la construcción de sistemas de salud resilientes.

    La riqueza relativa de un país no es el único factor en juego.

    Aunque la prioridad otorgada a la salud en los presupuestos nacionales generalmente aumenta con el ingreso nacional, es importante señalar que algunos gobiernos eligen dedicar una alta proporción de sus presupuestos al gasto en salud a pesar de un nivel relativamente bajo de ingreso nacional.

    Otros, en cambio, que son relativamente más ricos, destinan una proporción menor.

    La Declaración de Dakar sobre el acceso a cuidados quirúrgicos, obstétricos y anestésicos equitativos, asequibles y de calidad y su Plan de acción 2022-2030 presentado a los Jefes de Estado africanos en mayo de 2022 es un poderoso instrumento político.

    Esta hoja de ruta acelerará la cobertura sanitaria universal para el año 2030 en África.

    Este es un verdadero desafío universal que debemos cumplir porque nos quedan menos de 10 años para lograrlo.

    Por lo tanto, los gobiernos africanos y sus poblaciones tienen un papel clave que desempeñar en estos esfuerzos, especialmente aquellos destinados a mejorar el acceso a una atención quirúrgica de calidad que no deje a nadie atrás.

    Está claro que “la acción política marcará la diferencia porque debe ser como el bisturí del cirujano: no dejar lugar a la incertidumbre”.

  •   All governments that receive US foreign assistance must undergo a fiscal transparency assessment As a recipient of US foreign assistance the Government of The Gambia has been congratulated for being one of seventy two 72 governments that meet the minimum requirements for fiscal transparency in the 2022 report The assessment includes ensuring that the publication of key budget documents be publicly accessible substantially complete and generally reliable publish data on public debt including state owned companies maintain independent and effective supreme audit institutions maintain transparent processes for awarding government prizes for natural resource extraction and where appropriate guarantee the sound legal structure and transparency of the sovereign wealth fund Fiscal transparency is a critical element of effective public finance management helps build market confidence and underpins economic stability and sustainability Transparent tax systems provide information to legislatures private markets civil society and citizens who have a stake in financial decision making processes and equip them with the information necessary to promote and promote economic growth and development It should be noted that the report does not purport to cover all aspects of fiscal transparency For example the report does not currently assess the transparency of most public procurement procedures nor does it assess how closely the government consults with civil society in budget development The report also fails to assess the presence of corruption or the overall quality of a government s fiscal policy Additionally the applicable law requires that the minimum fiscal transparency requirements continue to be updated and reinforced annually The criteria applied to perform this year s evaluations may change in future years evaluations The determinations may change in future reports due to the updating and strengthening of the minimum fiscal transparency requirements as required by law changes in the performance of governments in public fiscal management or new information that comes to the attention of the Department The United States applauds The Gambia for meeting the requirements for this 2022 report and looks forward to a continued partnership to help promote both economic transparency and overall prosperity
    Embassy of the United States congratulates Gambia for fiscal transparency report
      All governments that receive US foreign assistance must undergo a fiscal transparency assessment As a recipient of US foreign assistance the Government of The Gambia has been congratulated for being one of seventy two 72 governments that meet the minimum requirements for fiscal transparency in the 2022 report The assessment includes ensuring that the publication of key budget documents be publicly accessible substantially complete and generally reliable publish data on public debt including state owned companies maintain independent and effective supreme audit institutions maintain transparent processes for awarding government prizes for natural resource extraction and where appropriate guarantee the sound legal structure and transparency of the sovereign wealth fund Fiscal transparency is a critical element of effective public finance management helps build market confidence and underpins economic stability and sustainability Transparent tax systems provide information to legislatures private markets civil society and citizens who have a stake in financial decision making processes and equip them with the information necessary to promote and promote economic growth and development It should be noted that the report does not purport to cover all aspects of fiscal transparency For example the report does not currently assess the transparency of most public procurement procedures nor does it assess how closely the government consults with civil society in budget development The report also fails to assess the presence of corruption or the overall quality of a government s fiscal policy Additionally the applicable law requires that the minimum fiscal transparency requirements continue to be updated and reinforced annually The criteria applied to perform this year s evaluations may change in future years evaluations The determinations may change in future reports due to the updating and strengthening of the minimum fiscal transparency requirements as required by law changes in the performance of governments in public fiscal management or new information that comes to the attention of the Department The United States applauds The Gambia for meeting the requirements for this 2022 report and looks forward to a continued partnership to help promote both economic transparency and overall prosperity
    Embassy of the United States congratulates Gambia for fiscal transparency report
    Africa3 days ago

    Embassy of the United States congratulates Gambia for fiscal transparency report

    All governments that receive US foreign assistance must undergo a fiscal transparency assessment.

    As a recipient of US foreign assistance, the Government of The Gambia has been congratulated for being one of seventy-two (72) governments that meet the minimum requirements for fiscal transparency in the 2022 report.

    The assessment includes ensuring that the publication of key budget documents be publicly accessible, substantially complete, and generally reliable; publish data on public debt, including state-owned companies; maintain independent and effective supreme audit institutions; maintain transparent processes for awarding government prizes for natural resource extraction; and, where appropriate, guarantee the sound legal structure and transparency of the sovereign wealth fund.

    Fiscal transparency is a critical element of effective public finance management, helps build market confidence, and underpins economic stability and sustainability.

    Transparent tax systems provide information to legislatures, private markets, civil society, and citizens who have a stake in financial decision-making processes and equip them with the information necessary to promote and promote economic growth and development.

    It should be noted that the report does not purport to cover all aspects of fiscal transparency.

    For example, the report does not currently assess the transparency of most public procurement procedures, nor does it assess how closely the government consults with civil society in budget development.

    The report also fails to assess the presence of corruption or the overall quality of a government's fiscal policy.

    Additionally, the applicable law requires that the minimum fiscal transparency requirements continue to be updated and reinforced annually.

    The criteria applied to perform this year's evaluations may change in future years' evaluations.

    The determinations may change in future reports due to the updating and strengthening of the minimum fiscal transparency requirements as required by law, changes in the performance of governments in public fiscal management or new information that comes to the attention of the Department.

    The United States applauds The Gambia for meeting the requirements for this 2022 report and looks forward to a continued partnership to help promote both economic transparency and overall prosperity.

  •   The Vice President of the ECOWAS Commission Her Excellency Damtien L Tchintchibidja as part of a mission to monitor the ongoing activities being implemented by the ECOWAS Commission and its partners in The Gambia engaged the Gambia Pilot project team to the Regional Stabilization and Development Fund to observe the status of implementation and collect key lessons that could be useful in designing intervention strategies for additional countries receiving support from the Fund namely Guinea Bissau Niger and Mali She congratulated the project team GAMWORKS and GIZ for the work done so far and encouraged them to speed up the implementation of the remaining activities as the project prepares to close in December 2023 She highlighted the importance of using the project to build resilience through the provision of basic social services and the creation of sustainable economic opportunities for women and youth Following engagement with the project team the Vice President embarked on visits to a fish processing site built by the project to support women s economic activities in Brufut as well as an 80 bed student dormitory built by the project to improve vocational training at the Gambia Technical Training Institute GTTI in Mansa Konko He noted some innovations developed by students and encouraged the Vocational Institute to take advantage of the support provided by the ECOWAS Commission and its partners to increase access to vocational skills development for youth in the country The Vice President also visited the newly created National Center for the Coordination of the Early Warning and Response Mechanism NCCRM the ECOWAS Regional Competition Authority ERCA the ECOWAS Military Intervention Headquarters in The Gambia ECOMIG and had a work session with Ms Miatta French ECOWAS Resident Representative in The Gambia the West African Police Information System WAPIS project team and partners from the International Criminal Police Organization INTERPOL and the European Union EU
    The Vice President of the Commission of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) visits the agencies and projects of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in The Gambia
      The Vice President of the ECOWAS Commission Her Excellency Damtien L Tchintchibidja as part of a mission to monitor the ongoing activities being implemented by the ECOWAS Commission and its partners in The Gambia engaged the Gambia Pilot project team to the Regional Stabilization and Development Fund to observe the status of implementation and collect key lessons that could be useful in designing intervention strategies for additional countries receiving support from the Fund namely Guinea Bissau Niger and Mali She congratulated the project team GAMWORKS and GIZ for the work done so far and encouraged them to speed up the implementation of the remaining activities as the project prepares to close in December 2023 She highlighted the importance of using the project to build resilience through the provision of basic social services and the creation of sustainable economic opportunities for women and youth Following engagement with the project team the Vice President embarked on visits to a fish processing site built by the project to support women s economic activities in Brufut as well as an 80 bed student dormitory built by the project to improve vocational training at the Gambia Technical Training Institute GTTI in Mansa Konko He noted some innovations developed by students and encouraged the Vocational Institute to take advantage of the support provided by the ECOWAS Commission and its partners to increase access to vocational skills development for youth in the country The Vice President also visited the newly created National Center for the Coordination of the Early Warning and Response Mechanism NCCRM the ECOWAS Regional Competition Authority ERCA the ECOWAS Military Intervention Headquarters in The Gambia ECOMIG and had a work session with Ms Miatta French ECOWAS Resident Representative in The Gambia the West African Police Information System WAPIS project team and partners from the International Criminal Police Organization INTERPOL and the European Union EU
    The Vice President of the Commission of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) visits the agencies and projects of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in The Gambia
    Africa4 days ago

    The Vice President of the Commission of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) visits the agencies and projects of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in The Gambia

    The Vice President of the ECOWAS Commission, Her Excellency Damtien L.

    Tchintchibidja, as part of a mission to monitor the ongoing activities being implemented by the ECOWAS Commission and its partners in The Gambia, engaged the Gambia Pilot project team to the Regional Stabilization and Development Fund. , to observe the status of implementation and collect key lessons that could be useful in designing intervention strategies for additional countries receiving support from the Fund, namely Guinea Bissau, Niger and Mali. She congratulated the project team (GAMWORKS and GIZ) for the work done so far and encouraged them to speed up the implementation of the remaining activities as the project prepares to close in December 2023.

    She highlighted the importance of using the project to build resilience.

    , through the provision of basic social services and the creation of sustainable economic opportunities for women and youth.

    Following engagement with the project team, the Vice President embarked on visits to a fish processing site built by the project to support women's economic activities in Brufut, as well as an 80-bed student dormitory built by the project to improve vocational training.

    at the Gambia Technical Training Institute (GTTI) in Mansa Konko.

    He noted some innovations developed by students and encouraged the Vocational Institute to take advantage of the support provided by the ECOWAS Commission and its partners to increase access to vocational skills development for youth in the country.

    The Vice President also visited the newly created National Center for the Coordination of the Early Warning and Response Mechanism (NCCRM), the ECOWAS Regional Competition Authority (ERCA), the ECOWAS Military Intervention Headquarters in The Gambia (ECOMIG) and had a work session.

    with Ms. Miatta French, ECOWAS Resident Representative in The Gambia, the West African Police Information System (WAPIS) project team, and partners from the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) and the European Union (EU).

  •   On September 27 at 9 40 am for about 20 minutes Mr YAMADA Kenji Minister of State for Foreign Affairs met with H E Dr Mamadou Tangara Minister for Foreign Affairs International Cooperation and Overseas Gambians Republic of The Gambia who is visiting Japan to attend the state funeral of former Prime Minister ABE Shinzo The summary of the meeting is as follows At first State Minister Yamada expressed his gratitude to Minister Tangara for his attendance at the state funeral of former Prime Minister ABE Shinzo and stated that he wished to further develop the excellent diplomatic relations established under former Prime Minister Abe In response Minister Tangara conveyed his deepest condolences to former Prime Minister Abe and stated that President Barrow also expressed his deepest condolences The Minister of State then extended his thanks to Minister Tangara for President Barrow s participation in TICAD 8 held in August this year State Minister Yamada then stated that he wishes to advance Japan Gambia cooperation in the area of development with the goal of sustainable growth and poverty reduction Minister Tangara expressed his appreciation for Japan s broad support for The Gambia and his hopes for further strengthening of bilateral relations In addition both parties exchanged points of view on current international issues such as the situation in Ukraine State Minister Yamada also stated the importance of strengthening food security and ensuring the transparency and fairness of development financing and both sides confirmed that they will cooperate with each other on these issues They also confirmed working for further development of bilateral relations following up on the results of TICAD 8
    Japan: Meeting between the Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Yamada Kenji, and the Honorable Dr. Mamadou Tangara, Minister for Foreign Affairs, International Cooperation and Overseas Gambians of the Republic of Gambia
      On September 27 at 9 40 am for about 20 minutes Mr YAMADA Kenji Minister of State for Foreign Affairs met with H E Dr Mamadou Tangara Minister for Foreign Affairs International Cooperation and Overseas Gambians Republic of The Gambia who is visiting Japan to attend the state funeral of former Prime Minister ABE Shinzo The summary of the meeting is as follows At first State Minister Yamada expressed his gratitude to Minister Tangara for his attendance at the state funeral of former Prime Minister ABE Shinzo and stated that he wished to further develop the excellent diplomatic relations established under former Prime Minister Abe In response Minister Tangara conveyed his deepest condolences to former Prime Minister Abe and stated that President Barrow also expressed his deepest condolences The Minister of State then extended his thanks to Minister Tangara for President Barrow s participation in TICAD 8 held in August this year State Minister Yamada then stated that he wishes to advance Japan Gambia cooperation in the area of development with the goal of sustainable growth and poverty reduction Minister Tangara expressed his appreciation for Japan s broad support for The Gambia and his hopes for further strengthening of bilateral relations In addition both parties exchanged points of view on current international issues such as the situation in Ukraine State Minister Yamada also stated the importance of strengthening food security and ensuring the transparency and fairness of development financing and both sides confirmed that they will cooperate with each other on these issues They also confirmed working for further development of bilateral relations following up on the results of TICAD 8
    Japan: Meeting between the Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Yamada Kenji, and the Honorable Dr. Mamadou Tangara, Minister for Foreign Affairs, International Cooperation and Overseas Gambians of the Republic of Gambia
    Africa4 days ago

    Japan: Meeting between the Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Yamada Kenji, and the Honorable Dr. Mamadou Tangara, Minister for Foreign Affairs, International Cooperation and Overseas Gambians of the Republic of Gambia

    On September 27 at 9:40 am for about 20 minutes, Mr. YAMADA Kenji, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, met with H.E. Dr. Mamadou Tangara, Minister for Foreign Affairs, International Cooperation and Overseas Gambians, Republic of The Gambia, who is visiting Japan to attend the state funeral of former Prime Minister ABE Shinzo.

    The summary of the meeting is as follows.

    At first, State Minister Yamada expressed his gratitude to Minister Tangara for his attendance at the state funeral of former Prime Minister ABE Shinzo and stated that he wished to further develop the excellent diplomatic relations established under former Prime Minister Abe. In response, Minister Tangara conveyed his deepest condolences to former Prime Minister Abe and stated that President Barrow also expressed his deepest condolences.

    The Minister of State then extended his thanks to Minister Tangara for President Barrow's participation in TICAD 8 held in August this year.

    State Minister Yamada then stated that he wishes to advance Japan-Gambia cooperation in the area of ​​development with the goal of sustainable growth and poverty reduction.

    Minister Tangara expressed his appreciation for Japan's broad support for The Gambia and his hopes for further strengthening of bilateral relations.

    In addition, both parties exchanged points of view on current international issues, such as the situation in Ukraine.

    State Minister Yamada also stated the importance of strengthening food security and ensuring the transparency and fairness of development financing, and both sides confirmed that they will cooperate with each other on these issues.

    They also confirmed working for further development of bilateral relations, following up on the results of TICAD 8.