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  •  The Food and Agriculture Organisation FAO International Monetary Fund IMF World Bank Group World Food Programme and World Trade Organisation have called for urgent action to address the global food security crisis This is contained in a joint statement issued by the Director General FAO Qu Dongyu Managing Director IMF Kristalina Georgieva President WBG David Malpass Executive Director WFP David Beasley and Director General WTO Dr Ngozi Okonjo Iweala They said the war in Ukraine continues to worsen global food security and nutrition crisis triggering higher volatility in energy food and fertiliser prices They said inspite of the reprieve in global food prices and the resumption of grain exports from the Black Sea food remained beyond reach for many due to high prices and weather shocks They said the number of people facing acute food insecurity worldwide is expected to continue to rise Fertiliser markets they said remained volatile especially in Europe where tight natural gas supplies and high prices had caused many producers of urea and ammonia to stop operations We welcome the efforts of the Global Crisis Response Group and the Black Sea Grain Initiative through the Joint Coordination Centre over three million metric tons of grain and foodstuffs have already been exported from Ukraine We are encouraged by the downward trend of trade restrictive measures implemented by countries and hope that the trend continues they said The World Bank is implementing its 30 billion dollar programme to respond to the food security crisis and front loading resources from the IDA20 Crisis Response Window The leaders added that the IMF was proposing a new food shock window within the IMF emergency lending instruments The FAO has proposed a series of policy recommendations and launched detailed soil nutrition maps at country level to increase efficiencies in the use of fertilisers Maintaining momentum on these fronts and building resilience for the future would require a continued comprehensive and coordinated effort to support efficient production and trade and improve transparency Also to accelerate innovation and joint planning and invest in food systems transformation they said In terms of supporting efficient production and trade they said governments in all countries need to urgently re examine their agricultural trade and market interventions such as subsidies and export restrictions This would help to identify and minimise distortions In terms of improving transparency food market monitoring must be supplemented with transparent tracking of financing by the international community to respond to the food crisis Governments should provide necessary data and resources to support Agricultural Market Information System which enhances transparency in food markets through monitoring the prices and availability of major food crops and promoting policy responses they noted Addressing both infrastructure bottlenecks and input supply bottlenecks for example fertilizers and seeds they said are critical to an efficient food supply system Effective and sustainable support to smallholder farmers will be vital to ensure they are part of the solution and to localise supply chains We remain committed to working together to address immediate food security and nutrition needs tackle structural market issues that may exacerbate adverse impacts and build countries resilience to prevent and mitigate the impacts of future NewsSourceCredit NAN
    FAO, Word Bank, others call for urgent action to address global food crisis
     The Food and Agriculture Organisation FAO International Monetary Fund IMF World Bank Group World Food Programme and World Trade Organisation have called for urgent action to address the global food security crisis This is contained in a joint statement issued by the Director General FAO Qu Dongyu Managing Director IMF Kristalina Georgieva President WBG David Malpass Executive Director WFP David Beasley and Director General WTO Dr Ngozi Okonjo Iweala They said the war in Ukraine continues to worsen global food security and nutrition crisis triggering higher volatility in energy food and fertiliser prices They said inspite of the reprieve in global food prices and the resumption of grain exports from the Black Sea food remained beyond reach for many due to high prices and weather shocks They said the number of people facing acute food insecurity worldwide is expected to continue to rise Fertiliser markets they said remained volatile especially in Europe where tight natural gas supplies and high prices had caused many producers of urea and ammonia to stop operations We welcome the efforts of the Global Crisis Response Group and the Black Sea Grain Initiative through the Joint Coordination Centre over three million metric tons of grain and foodstuffs have already been exported from Ukraine We are encouraged by the downward trend of trade restrictive measures implemented by countries and hope that the trend continues they said The World Bank is implementing its 30 billion dollar programme to respond to the food security crisis and front loading resources from the IDA20 Crisis Response Window The leaders added that the IMF was proposing a new food shock window within the IMF emergency lending instruments The FAO has proposed a series of policy recommendations and launched detailed soil nutrition maps at country level to increase efficiencies in the use of fertilisers Maintaining momentum on these fronts and building resilience for the future would require a continued comprehensive and coordinated effort to support efficient production and trade and improve transparency Also to accelerate innovation and joint planning and invest in food systems transformation they said In terms of supporting efficient production and trade they said governments in all countries need to urgently re examine their agricultural trade and market interventions such as subsidies and export restrictions This would help to identify and minimise distortions In terms of improving transparency food market monitoring must be supplemented with transparent tracking of financing by the international community to respond to the food crisis Governments should provide necessary data and resources to support Agricultural Market Information System which enhances transparency in food markets through monitoring the prices and availability of major food crops and promoting policy responses they noted Addressing both infrastructure bottlenecks and input supply bottlenecks for example fertilizers and seeds they said are critical to an efficient food supply system Effective and sustainable support to smallholder farmers will be vital to ensure they are part of the solution and to localise supply chains We remain committed to working together to address immediate food security and nutrition needs tackle structural market issues that may exacerbate adverse impacts and build countries resilience to prevent and mitigate the impacts of future NewsSourceCredit NAN
    FAO, Word Bank, others call for urgent action to address global food crisis
    Economy3 days ago

    FAO, Word Bank, others call for urgent action to address global food crisis

    The Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank Group, World Food Programme, and World Trade Organisation have called for urgent action to address the global food security crisis.

    This is contained in a joint statement issued by the Director-General, FAO, Qu Dongyu; Managing Director, IMF, Kristalina Georgieva; President, WBG, David Malpass; Executive Director, WFP, David Beasley and Director-General, WTO, Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala.

    They said the war in Ukraine continues to worsen global food security and nutrition crisis, triggering higher volatility in energy, food and fertiliser prices.

    They said inspite of the reprieve in global food prices and the resumption of grain exports from the Black Sea, food remained beyond reach for many due to high prices and weather shocks.

    They said the number of people facing acute food insecurity worldwide is expected to continue to rise.

    Fertiliser markets, they said, remained volatile, especially in Europe, where tight natural gas supplies and high prices had caused many producers of urea and ammonia to stop operations.

    “We welcome the efforts of the Global Crisis Response Group and the Black Sea Grain Initiative: through the Joint Coordination Centre, over three million metric tons of grain and foodstuffs have already been exported from Ukraine.

    ” We are encouraged by the downward trend of trade-restrictive measures implemented by countries and hope that the trend continues, ” they said.

    The World Bank is implementing its 30 billion dollar programme to respond to the food security crisis and front loading resources from the IDA20 Crisis Response Window.

    The leaders added that the IMF was proposing a new food shock window within the IMF emergency lending instruments.

    ” The FAO has proposed a series of policy recommendations and launched detailed soil nutrition maps at country level to increase efficiencies in the use of fertilisers.

    ”Maintaining momentum on these fronts and building resilience for the future would require a continued comprehensive and coordinated effort to support efficient production and trade, and improve transparency.

    “Also to accelerate innovation and joint planning and invest in food systems transformation,” they said.

    In terms of supporting efficient production and trade, they said, governments in all countries need to urgently re-examine their agricultural trade and market interventions, such as subsidies and export restrictions.

    “This would help to identify and minimise distortions.

    ”In terms of improving transparency, food market monitoring must be supplemented with transparent tracking of financing by the international community to respond to the food crisis.

    “Governments should provide necessary data and resources to support Agricultural Market Information System, which enhances transparency in food markets through monitoring the prices and availability of major food crops and promoting policy responses, “they noted.

    Addressing both infrastructure bottlenecks and input supply bottlenecks, for example, fertilizers and seeds, they said are critical to an efficient food supply system.

    “Effective and sustainable support to smallholder farmers will be vital to ensure they are part of the solution and to localise supply chains.

    “We remain committed to working together to address immediate food security and nutrition needs, tackle structural market issues that may exacerbate adverse impacts, and build countries’ resilience to prevent and mitigate the impacts of future.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   In Somalia hundreds of thousands are already facing hunger today and staggering levels of malnutrition are expected among children under the age of five warned the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO and the World Program for Food WFP Large scale deaths from starvation are increasingly likely in the East African nation UN agencies continued noting that unless adequate aid arrives analysts expect by December up to four children or two adults for every 10 000 people will die every day Complex Roots In addition to the emergency already unfolding in Somalia UN agencies pinpointed 18 more deeply related hunger hotspots whose problems have been created by conflict drought economic uncertainty the COVID and Russia s invasion of Ukraine Aid workers are particularly concerned about Afghanistan Ethiopia South Sudan Somalia and Yemen where a record 970 000 people are expected to face catastrophic hunger and are either starving or are forecast to starve or are at risk of worsening hunger to catastrophic conditions if no action is taken the UN agencies said This is 10 times more than six years ago when only two countries had such food insecure populations the FAO and WFP said in a new report Large scale and urgent humanitarian action is needed in all these at risk countries to save lives and livelihoods and prevent famine the UN agencies insisted Hard winter harvest According to the FAO and WFP acute food insecurity around the world will worsen from October to January In addition to Somalia they highlighted that the problem was also serious in the Horn of Africa where the longest drought in more than 40 years is forecast to continue pushing people to the brink of starvation Successive failed rains have destroyed people s crops and killed their livestock on which their survival depends said FAO Director General QU Dongyu warning that people in the poorest countries were at risk increased risk due to dire food security that was increasing rapidly and spreading all over the world FAO s QU calls for a massive increase in aid Vulnerable communities have yet to recover from the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic and are suffering from the domino effects of ongoing conflicts in terms of prices food and fertilizer supplies as well as the weather emergency the FAO chief continued He insisted that without a massively scaled up humanitarian response to sustain agriculture the situation is likely to worsen in many countries in the coming months Echoing that message WFP Executive Director David Beasley called for immediate action to prevent people from dying We urgently need to get help to those in grave danger of starvation in Somalia and other hunger hotspots around the world he said Perfect storm of trouble This is the third time in 10 years that Somalia has been threatened by a devastating famine Mr Beasley continued The 2011 famine was caused by two consecutive failed rainy seasons as well as the conflict Today we are facing a perfect storm a probable fifth consecutive failed rainy season that will cause a drought that will last well into 2023 In addition to skyrocketing food prices people most at risk of acute food insecurity also have very limited opportunities to earn a living due to the pandemic the WFP chief explained as relief teams prepare to famine in the Somali districts of Baidoa and Burhakaba in the Bay region come October Below the highest alert countries identified as Afghanistan Ethiopia Nigeria South Sudan Somalia and Yemen the joint FAO WFP report notes that the Democratic Republic of the Congo Haiti Kenya the Sahel Sudan and Syria are very worrying in addition to the newcomers Central African Republic and Pakistan Guatemala Honduras and Malawi have also been added to the list of countries with hunger hotspots joining Madagascar Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe Barriers to aid Humanitarian assistance is crucial to saving lives and preventing hunger death and the complete collapse of livelihoods the FAO and WFP insist while highlighting chronic access problems caused by insecurity administrative and bureaucratic impediments movement restrictions and physical barriers in 11 of the 19 hotspot countries This includes the six countries where populations face or are projected to face famine or are at risk of deterioration toward catastrophic conditions they said
    Famine looms in Somalia, but many ‘hunger hotspots’ are in deep trouble
      In Somalia hundreds of thousands are already facing hunger today and staggering levels of malnutrition are expected among children under the age of five warned the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO and the World Program for Food WFP Large scale deaths from starvation are increasingly likely in the East African nation UN agencies continued noting that unless adequate aid arrives analysts expect by December up to four children or two adults for every 10 000 people will die every day Complex Roots In addition to the emergency already unfolding in Somalia UN agencies pinpointed 18 more deeply related hunger hotspots whose problems have been created by conflict drought economic uncertainty the COVID and Russia s invasion of Ukraine Aid workers are particularly concerned about Afghanistan Ethiopia South Sudan Somalia and Yemen where a record 970 000 people are expected to face catastrophic hunger and are either starving or are forecast to starve or are at risk of worsening hunger to catastrophic conditions if no action is taken the UN agencies said This is 10 times more than six years ago when only two countries had such food insecure populations the FAO and WFP said in a new report Large scale and urgent humanitarian action is needed in all these at risk countries to save lives and livelihoods and prevent famine the UN agencies insisted Hard winter harvest According to the FAO and WFP acute food insecurity around the world will worsen from October to January In addition to Somalia they highlighted that the problem was also serious in the Horn of Africa where the longest drought in more than 40 years is forecast to continue pushing people to the brink of starvation Successive failed rains have destroyed people s crops and killed their livestock on which their survival depends said FAO Director General QU Dongyu warning that people in the poorest countries were at risk increased risk due to dire food security that was increasing rapidly and spreading all over the world FAO s QU calls for a massive increase in aid Vulnerable communities have yet to recover from the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic and are suffering from the domino effects of ongoing conflicts in terms of prices food and fertilizer supplies as well as the weather emergency the FAO chief continued He insisted that without a massively scaled up humanitarian response to sustain agriculture the situation is likely to worsen in many countries in the coming months Echoing that message WFP Executive Director David Beasley called for immediate action to prevent people from dying We urgently need to get help to those in grave danger of starvation in Somalia and other hunger hotspots around the world he said Perfect storm of trouble This is the third time in 10 years that Somalia has been threatened by a devastating famine Mr Beasley continued The 2011 famine was caused by two consecutive failed rainy seasons as well as the conflict Today we are facing a perfect storm a probable fifth consecutive failed rainy season that will cause a drought that will last well into 2023 In addition to skyrocketing food prices people most at risk of acute food insecurity also have very limited opportunities to earn a living due to the pandemic the WFP chief explained as relief teams prepare to famine in the Somali districts of Baidoa and Burhakaba in the Bay region come October Below the highest alert countries identified as Afghanistan Ethiopia Nigeria South Sudan Somalia and Yemen the joint FAO WFP report notes that the Democratic Republic of the Congo Haiti Kenya the Sahel Sudan and Syria are very worrying in addition to the newcomers Central African Republic and Pakistan Guatemala Honduras and Malawi have also been added to the list of countries with hunger hotspots joining Madagascar Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe Barriers to aid Humanitarian assistance is crucial to saving lives and preventing hunger death and the complete collapse of livelihoods the FAO and WFP insist while highlighting chronic access problems caused by insecurity administrative and bureaucratic impediments movement restrictions and physical barriers in 11 of the 19 hotspot countries This includes the six countries where populations face or are projected to face famine or are at risk of deterioration toward catastrophic conditions they said
    Famine looms in Somalia, but many ‘hunger hotspots’ are in deep trouble
    Africa4 days ago

    Famine looms in Somalia, but many ‘hunger hotspots’ are in deep trouble

    In Somalia, "hundreds of thousands are already facing hunger today and staggering levels of malnutrition are expected among children under the age of five," warned the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Program for Food (WFP).

    "Large-scale deaths from starvation" are increasingly likely in the East African nation, UN agencies continued, noting that unless "adequate" aid arrives, analysts expect by December, "up to four children or two adults for every 10,000 people, will die every day."

    Complex Roots In addition to the emergency already unfolding in Somalia, UN agencies pinpointed 18 more deeply related "hunger hotspots" whose problems have been created by conflict, drought, economic uncertainty, the COVID and Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

    Aid workers are particularly concerned about Afghanistan, Ethiopia, South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen, where a record 970,000 people are expected to "face catastrophic hunger and are either starving or are forecast to starve or are at risk of worsening hunger."

    to catastrophic conditions, if no action is taken.

    ”, the UN agencies said.

    This is 10 times more than six years ago, when only two countries had such food-insecure populations, the FAO and WFP said in a new report.

    Large-scale and urgent humanitarian action is needed in all these at-risk countries "to save lives and livelihoods" and prevent famine, the UN agencies insisted.

    Hard winter harvest According to the FAO and WFP, acute food insecurity around the world will worsen from October to January.

    In addition to Somalia, they highlighted that the problem was also serious in the Horn of Africa, where the longest drought in more than 40 years is forecast to continue, pushing people “to the brink of starvation”.

    Successive failed rains have destroyed people's crops and killed their livestock "on which their survival depends", said FAO Director-General QU Dongyu, warning that "people in the poorest countries" were at risk.

    increased risk due to dire food security that was "increasing rapidly."

    and spreading all over the world.

    FAO's QU calls for a massive increase in aid Vulnerable communities "have yet to recover from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and are suffering from the domino effects of ongoing conflicts, in terms of prices, food and fertilizer supplies as well as the weather.

    emergency,” the FAO chief continued.

    He insisted that "without a massively scaled-up humanitarian response" to sustain agriculture, "the situation is likely to worsen in many countries in the coming months."

    Echoing that message, WFP Executive Director David Beasley called for immediate action to prevent people from dying.

    “We urgently need to get help to those in grave danger of starvation in Somalia and other hunger hotspots around the world,” he said.

    Perfect storm of trouble “This is the third time in 10 years that Somalia has been threatened by a devastating famine,” Mr Beasley continued.

    “The 2011 famine was caused by two consecutive failed rainy seasons, as well as the conflict.

    Today we are facing a perfect storm: a probable fifth consecutive failed rainy season that will cause a drought that will last well into 2023.” In addition to skyrocketing food prices, people most at risk of acute food insecurity also have "very limited opportunities" to earn a living due to the pandemic, the WFP chief explained, as relief teams prepare to famine in the Somali districts of Baidoa and Burhakaba.

    in the Bay region, come October.

    Below the "highest alert" countries, identified as Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Nigeria, South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen, the joint FAO-WFP report notes that the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Kenya, the Sahel, Sudan and Syria are "very worrying", in addition to the newcomers Central African Republic and Pakistan.

    Guatemala, Honduras and Malawi have also been added to the list of countries with hunger hotspots, joining Madagascar, Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe.

    Barriers to aid Humanitarian assistance is crucial to saving lives and preventing hunger, death and the complete collapse of livelihoods, the FAO and WFP insist, while highlighting chronic access problems caused by “ insecurity, administrative and bureaucratic impediments, movement restrictions and physical barriers” in 11 of the 19 hotspot countries.

    This includes “the six countries where populations face or are projected to face famine…or are at risk of deterioration toward catastrophic conditions,” they said.

  •   Under the leadership of the ECOWAS Regional Animal Health Center RAHC and its technical FAO ECTAD AU IBAR WHO BROOKE WA and financial partners European Union World Bank African Development Bank Swiss Cooperation the meeting of the ECOWAS Regional Animal Health Networks RAHN was inaugurated this Monday September 19 2022 at the Vulcano Hotel in Cape Verde under the effective direction of the Minister of Agriculture and Environment of Cape Verde Dr Gilberto Silva and the ECOWAS Commissioner for Economic Affairs and Agriculture Ms Massandje Tour Lits This 8th meeting brings together Directors of Veterinary Services focal points of veterinary laboratories RESOLOB and epidemiological surveillance RESEPI and leaders of veterinary orders from all ECOWAS Member States plus Mauritania and Chad The axis of the 2022 edition is Horizon 2030 Situation challenges and perspectives for the eradication of Peste des Petits Ruminants and Rabies and the control of Foot and Mouth Disease and Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia priority animal diseases in the region of ECOWAS with the main objective of evaluating the progress of the ECOWAS member states in the eradication or control of PPR rabies foot and mouth disease and contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and monitoring the implementation of action of RESEPI and RESOLAB The various exhibitors at the official opening of the meeting recalled the need for collaborative work to overcome transboundary animal diseases in the region On the first day of the meeting September 19 2022 the status of implementation of the recommendations of the 7th meeting held in 2021 in C te d Ivoire was reviewed The presentation by the host country Cape Verde highlighted the urgent need to support this country in its efforts to be recognized by the World Organization for Animal Health as a country free of PPR and Foot and Mouth Disease For this the epidemiological field surveys sampling results of serological analysis training of technical personnel the last dates of declaration of the two diseases and their insular position were presented ECOWAS through its Regional Agricultural Policy ECOWAP is committed to supporting its member countries through RAHC which have developed important regional strategies and regulations related to the control and prevention of transboundary animal diseases and zoonoses in collaboration with its technical and financial partners To recall the ECOWAS Specialized Center for Animal Health RAHC was established by Complementary Law in 2012 with the mandate to i coordinate actions that contribute to food security and nutrition ii improve livelihoods by improving the health and welfare of animals iii develop animal resources ensuring the formulation of relevant regulations and iv coordinate actions on the prevention and control of transboundary animal diseases and zoonoses Since its start up in 2018 the Center has developed and adopted several regulatory texts and regional strategies including the Regional Framework Strategy for Animal Health and Welfare the Regional Strategy for the Identification and Traceability of Livestock ECOLITS the Regional Strategy for Eradication PRPD the Regional Rabies Control Strategy Strategy and Regional Action Plan for the Control of Diseases Transmitted by Trypanosomes and Ticks With the support of financial partners the Center is implementing its strategies through the implementation of several projects to support national actions in disease control and livestock development
    Ribeira Grande de Santiago (Cape Verde), Animal Health Capital of West Africa
      Under the leadership of the ECOWAS Regional Animal Health Center RAHC and its technical FAO ECTAD AU IBAR WHO BROOKE WA and financial partners European Union World Bank African Development Bank Swiss Cooperation the meeting of the ECOWAS Regional Animal Health Networks RAHN was inaugurated this Monday September 19 2022 at the Vulcano Hotel in Cape Verde under the effective direction of the Minister of Agriculture and Environment of Cape Verde Dr Gilberto Silva and the ECOWAS Commissioner for Economic Affairs and Agriculture Ms Massandje Tour Lits This 8th meeting brings together Directors of Veterinary Services focal points of veterinary laboratories RESOLOB and epidemiological surveillance RESEPI and leaders of veterinary orders from all ECOWAS Member States plus Mauritania and Chad The axis of the 2022 edition is Horizon 2030 Situation challenges and perspectives for the eradication of Peste des Petits Ruminants and Rabies and the control of Foot and Mouth Disease and Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia priority animal diseases in the region of ECOWAS with the main objective of evaluating the progress of the ECOWAS member states in the eradication or control of PPR rabies foot and mouth disease and contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and monitoring the implementation of action of RESEPI and RESOLAB The various exhibitors at the official opening of the meeting recalled the need for collaborative work to overcome transboundary animal diseases in the region On the first day of the meeting September 19 2022 the status of implementation of the recommendations of the 7th meeting held in 2021 in C te d Ivoire was reviewed The presentation by the host country Cape Verde highlighted the urgent need to support this country in its efforts to be recognized by the World Organization for Animal Health as a country free of PPR and Foot and Mouth Disease For this the epidemiological field surveys sampling results of serological analysis training of technical personnel the last dates of declaration of the two diseases and their insular position were presented ECOWAS through its Regional Agricultural Policy ECOWAP is committed to supporting its member countries through RAHC which have developed important regional strategies and regulations related to the control and prevention of transboundary animal diseases and zoonoses in collaboration with its technical and financial partners To recall the ECOWAS Specialized Center for Animal Health RAHC was established by Complementary Law in 2012 with the mandate to i coordinate actions that contribute to food security and nutrition ii improve livelihoods by improving the health and welfare of animals iii develop animal resources ensuring the formulation of relevant regulations and iv coordinate actions on the prevention and control of transboundary animal diseases and zoonoses Since its start up in 2018 the Center has developed and adopted several regulatory texts and regional strategies including the Regional Framework Strategy for Animal Health and Welfare the Regional Strategy for the Identification and Traceability of Livestock ECOLITS the Regional Strategy for Eradication PRPD the Regional Rabies Control Strategy Strategy and Regional Action Plan for the Control of Diseases Transmitted by Trypanosomes and Ticks With the support of financial partners the Center is implementing its strategies through the implementation of several projects to support national actions in disease control and livestock development
    Ribeira Grande de Santiago (Cape Verde), Animal Health Capital of West Africa
    Africa4 days ago

    Ribeira Grande de Santiago (Cape Verde), Animal Health Capital of West Africa

    Under the leadership of the ECOWAS Regional Animal Health Center (RAHC) and its technical (FAO, ECTAD, AU-IBAR, WHO, BROOKE WA) and financial partners (European Union, World Bank, African Development Bank, Swiss Cooperation) , the meeting of the ECOWAS Regional Animal Health Networks (RAHN) was inaugurated this Monday, September 19, 2022 at the Vulcano Hotel in Cape Verde, under the effective direction of the Minister of Agriculture and Environment of Cape Verde, Dr. Gilberto Silva, and the ECOWAS Commissioner for Economic Affairs and Agriculture, Ms. Massandje Touré-Litsé.

    This 8th meeting brings together Directors of Veterinary Services, focal points of veterinary laboratories (RESOLOB) and epidemiological surveillance (RESEPI) and leaders of veterinary orders from all ECOWAS Member States plus Mauritania and Chad. The axis of the 2022 edition is: "Horizon 2030: Situation, challenges and perspectives for the eradication of Peste des Petits Ruminants and Rabies and the control of Foot-and-Mouth Disease and Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia, priority animal diseases in the region of ECOWAS”, with the main objective of evaluating the progress of the ECOWAS member states in the eradication or control of PPR, rabies, foot-and-mouth disease and contagious bovine pleuropneumonia, and monitoring the implementation of action of RESEPI and RESOLAB.

    The various exhibitors at the official opening of the meeting recalled the need for collaborative work to overcome transboundary animal diseases in the region.

    On the first day of the meeting, September 19, 2022, the status of implementation of the recommendations of the 7th meeting held in 2021 in Côte d'Ivoire was reviewed.

    The presentation by the host country, Cape Verde, highlighted the urgent need to support this country in its efforts to be recognized by the World Organization for Animal Health as a country free of PPR and Foot-and-Mouth Disease.

    For this, the epidemiological field surveys, sampling, results of serological analysis, training of technical personnel, the last dates of declaration of the two diseases and their insular position were presented.

    ECOWAS, through its Regional Agricultural Policy (ECOWAP), is committed to supporting its member countries, through RAHC, which have developed important regional strategies and regulations related to the control and prevention of transboundary animal diseases and zoonoses in collaboration.

    with its technical and financial partners.

    To recall, the ECOWAS Specialized Center for Animal Health (RAHC) was established by Complementary Law in 2012 with the mandate to (i) coordinate actions that contribute to food security and nutrition, (ii) improve livelihoods by improving the health and welfare of animals, (iii) develop animal resources ensuring the formulation of relevant regulations, and (iv) coordinate actions on the prevention and control of transboundary animal diseases and zoonoses.

    Since its start-up in 2018, the Center has developed and adopted several regulatory texts and regional strategies, including the Regional Framework Strategy for Animal Health and Welfare, the Regional Strategy for the Identification and Traceability of Livestock (ECOLITS), the Regional Strategy for Eradication PRPD, the Regional Rabies Control Strategy.

    Strategy and Regional Action Plan for the Control of Diseases Transmitted by Trypanosomes and Ticks.

    With the support of financial partners, the Center is implementing its strategies through the implementation of several projects to support national actions in disease control and livestock development.

  •   Many small farmers and marginalized populations in Zimbabwe depend on livestock for their livelihoods However a significant number of cattle owned by these ranchers die from disease Between 2014 and 2020 Zimbabwe lost around 15 328 head of cattle due to tick borne diseases leading to huge economic losses in livestock assets and agricultural savings in the country To reduce livestock deaths improve farmers livelihoods promote better livestock production better nutrition and better lives FAO under the project funded Zimbabwe Idai Recovery Project ZIRP World Bank supported vaccination campaigns for cattle against lumpy skin black leg anthrax botulism and new castle poultry vaccination in 8 ZIRP districts FAO also supplied 546 community managed dip tanks with acaricides in Chimanimani Chipinge Buhera Chikomba Gutu and Bikita districts to minimize livestock deaths from tick related deaths including Theileria January disease The supply of miticides has helped promote the practice of regular bathing among affected communities Farmers hold weekly soaking sessions during the rainy season and fortnightly baths during dry periods This is helping cattle owners in Manicaland Mashonaland East and Masvingo provinces to manage one of the biggest obstacles tick borne diseases especially Theileriosis January disease facing smallholders trying to increase their meat and milk productivity says Brian Nhlema FAO ZIRP Project Coordinator Working together to improve livelihoods FAO has worked closely with the Government s Department of Veterinary Services DVS to provide training and technical support to 9 000 locally recruited community based vaccinators CBVs who have in turn vaccinated approximately 2 1 million birds Through support and support to supervisors and veterinary extension workers a total of 500 000 cattle were vaccinated against anthrax botulism blackleg and nodular skin diseases between 2020 and 2021 The DVS is also training rural farmers led by volunteer livestock development committees LDCs on environmental issues and social stewardship of dip tanks covering handling and safe disposal of dip chemicals soil conservation and water waste management effluent disposal constitutional revisions to improve governance of dip tanks among others Veterinary staff found that vaccinations and regular dips have led to a significant decrease in cases of tick borne illness and tick related deaths by nearly 60 in some areas and 100 in others Regular dipping in ZIRP project districts has resulted in zero cases of tick related deaths in those respective areas of the province said Roy Dube chief provincial animal health specialist for Manicaland Province Farmers in areas affected by Cyclone Idai highlighted that large scale vaccinations deworming campaigns and the regular dip program supported by FAO are helping to increase their disposable income Vaccinations and regular dipping sessions have resulted in healthier animals that produce more meat and milk and command higher market prices Higher market prices have allowed women like me to increase spending on household essentials such as clothing food health and my children s education and to invest in group income savings and loans ISALs English acronym says 70 year old Sofia Mucharwa from the Chimombe immersion tank in the Mutare district Cyclone Idai killed a large number of livestock and those that remained were affected by tick borne diseases and tick borne diseases emerged I lost two cattle to the January disease I didn t know what to do but thanks to the support of the FAO I now have the knowledge on how to keep my cattle healthy For the last two years my cattle production has increased I am able to sell my cattle to pay for my children s school fees extra lessons and transportation to and from school added another LCD farmer and treasurer for the tank of Glenview Dive Tsanangurai Musavengena 52 Other benefits reported by farmers included increased manure to fertilize farmland and increased draft power availability from healthier animals which can pull plows What s next after the ZIRP project FAO and DVS have adopted a two pronged approach to ensure the sustainability of project interventions Substantial progress has been made with both approaches The first approach focuses on transferring knowledge about the importance of regular bathing and vaccination of cattle to reduce cattle deaths This has resulted in most farmers understanding the importance of dipping and vaccinating their cattle Farmers who do not wet their cattle are often severely fined or prosecuted To promote regular immersion we have enacted a constitution that is strict anyone not dipping their cattle is fined 20 00 as it endangers our livelihood Our local leadership supports and enforces this regulation said the LDC president at one of the dip tanks in the Chipinge district The second approach leverages local financial resources VSL ISAL and SACCO and market linkages with agricultural traders to ensure that farmers can purchase vaccines and acaricides on their own when the government is incapacitated At Glenview Dip Tank each share owner pays 5 00 a year to fuel our revolving fund We use this money to buy miticides when the government is incapacitated We regularly use this money to pay the water carrier In the future we will use this money as recommended by the FAO to purchase personal protective equipment for our bathroom attendants Musavengena said FAO through ZIRP will provide two of the seven least developed country members with PPE material including gloves gowns boots head coverings and masks The shareholders will supplement this by providing PPE material for the other five members
    Improving livelihoods through animal disease control in areas affected by Cyclone Idai in Zimbabwe
      Many small farmers and marginalized populations in Zimbabwe depend on livestock for their livelihoods However a significant number of cattle owned by these ranchers die from disease Between 2014 and 2020 Zimbabwe lost around 15 328 head of cattle due to tick borne diseases leading to huge economic losses in livestock assets and agricultural savings in the country To reduce livestock deaths improve farmers livelihoods promote better livestock production better nutrition and better lives FAO under the project funded Zimbabwe Idai Recovery Project ZIRP World Bank supported vaccination campaigns for cattle against lumpy skin black leg anthrax botulism and new castle poultry vaccination in 8 ZIRP districts FAO also supplied 546 community managed dip tanks with acaricides in Chimanimani Chipinge Buhera Chikomba Gutu and Bikita districts to minimize livestock deaths from tick related deaths including Theileria January disease The supply of miticides has helped promote the practice of regular bathing among affected communities Farmers hold weekly soaking sessions during the rainy season and fortnightly baths during dry periods This is helping cattle owners in Manicaland Mashonaland East and Masvingo provinces to manage one of the biggest obstacles tick borne diseases especially Theileriosis January disease facing smallholders trying to increase their meat and milk productivity says Brian Nhlema FAO ZIRP Project Coordinator Working together to improve livelihoods FAO has worked closely with the Government s Department of Veterinary Services DVS to provide training and technical support to 9 000 locally recruited community based vaccinators CBVs who have in turn vaccinated approximately 2 1 million birds Through support and support to supervisors and veterinary extension workers a total of 500 000 cattle were vaccinated against anthrax botulism blackleg and nodular skin diseases between 2020 and 2021 The DVS is also training rural farmers led by volunteer livestock development committees LDCs on environmental issues and social stewardship of dip tanks covering handling and safe disposal of dip chemicals soil conservation and water waste management effluent disposal constitutional revisions to improve governance of dip tanks among others Veterinary staff found that vaccinations and regular dips have led to a significant decrease in cases of tick borne illness and tick related deaths by nearly 60 in some areas and 100 in others Regular dipping in ZIRP project districts has resulted in zero cases of tick related deaths in those respective areas of the province said Roy Dube chief provincial animal health specialist for Manicaland Province Farmers in areas affected by Cyclone Idai highlighted that large scale vaccinations deworming campaigns and the regular dip program supported by FAO are helping to increase their disposable income Vaccinations and regular dipping sessions have resulted in healthier animals that produce more meat and milk and command higher market prices Higher market prices have allowed women like me to increase spending on household essentials such as clothing food health and my children s education and to invest in group income savings and loans ISALs English acronym says 70 year old Sofia Mucharwa from the Chimombe immersion tank in the Mutare district Cyclone Idai killed a large number of livestock and those that remained were affected by tick borne diseases and tick borne diseases emerged I lost two cattle to the January disease I didn t know what to do but thanks to the support of the FAO I now have the knowledge on how to keep my cattle healthy For the last two years my cattle production has increased I am able to sell my cattle to pay for my children s school fees extra lessons and transportation to and from school added another LCD farmer and treasurer for the tank of Glenview Dive Tsanangurai Musavengena 52 Other benefits reported by farmers included increased manure to fertilize farmland and increased draft power availability from healthier animals which can pull plows What s next after the ZIRP project FAO and DVS have adopted a two pronged approach to ensure the sustainability of project interventions Substantial progress has been made with both approaches The first approach focuses on transferring knowledge about the importance of regular bathing and vaccination of cattle to reduce cattle deaths This has resulted in most farmers understanding the importance of dipping and vaccinating their cattle Farmers who do not wet their cattle are often severely fined or prosecuted To promote regular immersion we have enacted a constitution that is strict anyone not dipping their cattle is fined 20 00 as it endangers our livelihood Our local leadership supports and enforces this regulation said the LDC president at one of the dip tanks in the Chipinge district The second approach leverages local financial resources VSL ISAL and SACCO and market linkages with agricultural traders to ensure that farmers can purchase vaccines and acaricides on their own when the government is incapacitated At Glenview Dip Tank each share owner pays 5 00 a year to fuel our revolving fund We use this money to buy miticides when the government is incapacitated We regularly use this money to pay the water carrier In the future we will use this money as recommended by the FAO to purchase personal protective equipment for our bathroom attendants Musavengena said FAO through ZIRP will provide two of the seven least developed country members with PPE material including gloves gowns boots head coverings and masks The shareholders will supplement this by providing PPE material for the other five members
    Improving livelihoods through animal disease control in areas affected by Cyclone Idai in Zimbabwe
    Africa4 days ago

    Improving livelihoods through animal disease control in areas affected by Cyclone Idai in Zimbabwe

    Many small farmers and marginalized populations in Zimbabwe depend on livestock for their livelihoods.

    However, a significant number of cattle owned by these ranchers die from disease.

    Between 2014 and 2020, Zimbabwe lost around 15,328 head of cattle due to tick-borne diseases, leading to huge economic losses in livestock assets and agricultural savings in the country.

    To reduce livestock deaths, improve farmers' livelihoods, promote better livestock production, better nutrition and better lives, FAO, under the project-funded Zimbabwe Idai Recovery Project (ZIRP), World Bank, supported vaccination campaigns for cattle against lumpy skin, black leg, anthrax, botulism and new castle poultry vaccination in 8 ZIRP districts.

    FAO also supplied 546 community-managed dip tanks with acaricides in Chimanimani, Chipinge, Buhera, Chikomba, Gutu and Bikita districts to minimize livestock deaths from tick-related deaths, including Theileria (January disease).

    The supply of miticides has helped promote the practice of regular bathing among affected communities.

    Farmers hold weekly soaking sessions during the rainy season and fortnightly baths during dry periods.

    “This is helping cattle owners in Manicaland, Mashonaland East and Masvingo provinces to manage one of the biggest obstacles (tick-borne diseases), especially Theileriosis (January disease), facing smallholders trying to increase their meat and milk productivity”, says Brian Nhlema FAO- ZIRP Project Coordinator.

    Working together to improve livelihoods FAO has worked closely with the Government's Department of Veterinary Services (DVS) to provide training and technical support to 9,000 locally recruited community-based vaccinators (CBVs), who have in turn vaccinated approximately 2.1 million birds.

    Through support and support to supervisors and veterinary extension workers, a total of 500,000 cattle were vaccinated against anthrax, botulism, blackleg, and nodular skin diseases between 2020 and 2021.

    The DVS is also training rural farmers led by volunteer livestock development committees (LDCs) on environmental issues and social stewardship of dip tanks covering handling and safe disposal of dip chemicals, soil conservation and water, waste management, effluent disposal, constitutional revisions to improve governance of dip tanks, among others.

    Veterinary staff found that vaccinations and regular dips have led to a significant decrease in cases of tick-borne illness and tick-related deaths by nearly 60% in some areas and 100% in others.

    "Regular dipping in ZIRP project districts has resulted in zero cases of tick-related deaths in those respective areas of the province," said Roy Dube, chief provincial animal health specialist for Manicaland Province.

    Farmers in areas affected by Cyclone Idai highlighted that large-scale vaccinations, deworming campaigns and the regular dip program supported by FAO are helping to increase their disposable income.

    “Vaccinations and regular dipping sessions have resulted in healthier animals that produce more meat and milk and command higher market prices.

    Higher market prices have allowed women like me to increase spending on household essentials such as clothing, food, health and my children's education, and to invest in group income savings and loans (ISALs).

    English acronym),” says 70-year-old Sofia Mucharwa.

    , from the Chimombe immersion tank, in the Mutare district.

    .

    “Cyclone Idai killed a large number of livestock, and those that remained were affected by tick-borne diseases and tick-borne diseases emerged.

    I lost two cattle to the January disease.

    I didn't know what to do, but thanks to the support of the FAO, I now have the knowledge on how to keep my cattle healthy.

    For the last two years my cattle production has increased, I am able to sell my cattle to pay for my children's school fees, extra lessons and transportation to and from school,” added another LCD farmer and treasurer for the tank of Glenview Dive, Tsanangurai Musavengena (52).

    Other benefits reported by farmers included increased manure to fertilize farmland and increased draft power availability from healthier animals, which can pull plows.

    What's next after the ZIRP project?

    FAO and DVS have adopted a two-pronged approach to ensure the sustainability of project interventions.

    Substantial progress has been made with both approaches.

    The first approach focuses on transferring knowledge about the importance of regular bathing and vaccination of cattle to reduce cattle deaths.

    This has resulted in most farmers understanding the importance of dipping and vaccinating their cattle.

    Farmers who do not wet their cattle are often severely fined or prosecuted.

    “To promote regular immersion, we have enacted a constitution that is strict; anyone not dipping their cattle is fined $20.00 as it endangers our livelihood.

    Our local leadership supports and enforces this regulation,” said the LDC president at one of the dip tanks in the Chipinge district.

    The second approach leverages local financial resources (VSL, ISAL, and SACCO) and market linkages with agricultural traders to ensure that farmers can purchase vaccines and acaricides on their own when the government is incapacitated.

    “At Glenview Dip Tank, each share owner pays $5.00 a year to fuel our revolving fund.

    We use this money to buy miticides when the government is incapacitated.

    We regularly use this money to pay the water carrier.

    In the future, we will use this money, as recommended by the FAO, to purchase personal protective equipment for our bathroom attendants,” Musavengena said.

    FAO, through ZIRP, will provide two of the seven least developed country members with PPE material, including gloves, gowns, boots, head coverings and masks.

    The shareholders will supplement this by providing PPE material for the other five members.

  •   The number of people facing acute food insecurity around the world is expected to continue to skyrocket as the food crisis tightens its grip on 19 hunger hotspots fueled by rising conflict weather extremes and the economic instability aggravated by the pandemic and the domino effect of the crisis in Ukraine according to a joint UN report published today The report Hunger Hotspots FAO and WFP Early Warnings on Acute Food Insecurity published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO and the World Food Program WFP of the United Nations calls for urgent humanitarian action to save lives and livelihoods and prevent famine in hotspot countries where acute food insecurity is expected to worsen between October 2022 and January 2023 The report sets out country specific recommendations on priorities for anticipatory action short term protective measures that are implemented before new humanitarian needs materialize and emergency response actions to address existing humanitarian needs The severe drought in the Horn of Africa has brought people to the brink of starvation destroying crops and killing the livestock on which their survival depends Acute food insecurity is increasing rapidly and spreading throughout the world In particular people in the poorest countries that have not yet recovered from the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic are suffering from the effects of ongoing conflicts in terms of prices food and fertilizer supplies as well as the emergency climate Without a massively scaled up humanitarian response with urgent and vital agricultural assistance at its core the situation is likely to worsen in many countries in the coming months said FAO Director General QU Dongyu This is the third time in 10 years that Somalia has been threatened by a devastating famine The 2011 famine was caused by two consecutive failed rainy seasons as well as the conflict We are facing a perfect storm today a likely fifth consecutive failed rainy season that will lead to a drought that will last well into 2023 But people in the thick of the current crisis are also facing rising food prices and severely limited opportunities to earn a living following the pandemic We urgently need to help those who are at grave risk of starvation in Somalia and in other hunger hotspots around the world said David Beasley WFP Executive Director The report highlights the hunger crisis in the Horn of Africa where the longest drought in over 40 years is forecast to continue with a failed fifth consecutive rainy season on the horizon adding to the cumulative and devastating effects of successive rainfall deficits Economic crises and conflicts have had on vulnerable households since 2020 Water scarcity has led to below average harvests livestock deaths and has forced hundreds of thousands of people off their land in search of livelihood while increasing the risk of resource based and inter community conflict Up to 26 million people are expected to face crisis levels or worse IPC Phase 3 and above of food insecurity in Somalia southern and eastern Ethiopia and northern and eastern Kenya With humanitarian assistance at risk of being cut due to funding shortages the specter of large scale starvation looms over Somalia with famine likely to grip Baidoa and Burhakaba districts in the region of Bay from October Without an adequate humanitarian response analysts expect that by December as many as four children or two adults per 10 000 people will die each day Hundreds of thousands are already facing hunger today and staggering levels of malnutrition are expected among children under the age of 5 Globally an all time high of 970 000 people are expected to face catastrophic hunger IPC Phase 5 and are starving or projected to starve or at risk of deterioration to catastrophic conditions in Afghanistan Ethiopia South Sudan Somalia and Yemen if no action is taken ten times higher than six years ago when only two countries had Phase 5 populations Key Findings According to the report Afghanistan Ethiopia Nigeria South Sudan Somalia The US and Yemen remain on high alert as hotspots alone accounting for nearly a million people facing catastrophic levels of hunger IPC Phase 5 Catastrophe with hunger and death a daily reality and where Extreme levels of mortality and malnutrition can develop without immediate action The Democratic Republic of the Congo Haiti Kenya the Sahel Sudan and Syria continue to be very worrying due to deteriorating conditions as in the June edition of the quarterly report but the alert extends to the Central African Republic and Pakistan Meanwhile Guatemala Honduras and Malawi have been added to the list of countries joining Sri Lanka Zimbabwe and Madagascar that remain hotspots of hunger Violent conflict remains the main driver of acute hunger and analysis indicates a continuation of this trend in 2022 with particular concern for Ethiopia where escalating conflict and inter ethnic violence in several regions is expected to further escalate increasing humanitarian needs Extreme weather events such as floods tropical storms and droughts remain critical factors in many parts of the world and a new normal of back to back extreme weather events is becoming apparent especially in hotspots Devastating floods have affected 33 million people this year alone in Pakistan and South Sudan is facing a fourth consecutive year of extreme flooding Meanwhile a third consecutive below average rainy season is projected in Syria For the first time in 20 years the La Ni a weather event has continued for three consecutive years affecting agriculture and causing crop and livestock losses in many parts of the world including Afghanistan West and East Africa and Syria On the economic front persistently high global prices for food fuel and fertilizer continue to drive high domestic prices and economic instability Rising inflation rates have forced governments to enact monetary tightening measures in advanced economies that have also increased the cost of credit for low income countries This is restricting the ability of highly indebted countries the number of countries has increased significantly in recent years to finance the import of essential items Faced with these macroeconomic challenges many governments are forced to introduce austerity measures that affect income and purchasing power particularly among the most vulnerable families These trends are expected to increase in the coming months the report notes with rising poverty and acute food insecurity as well as risks of civil unrest caused by rising socio economic grievances Humanitarian assistance is crucial to saving lives and preventing starvation death and the total collapse of livelihoods says the report which highlights that insecurity administrative and bureaucratic impediments movement restrictions and physical barriers limit The access of humanitarian responders to people facing acute hunger in eleven of the hotspot countries including the six countries where populations face or are projected to face hunger IPC Phase 5 or are at risk of severe hunger deteriorate to catastrophic conditions Humanitarian action is critical to prevent hunger and death The report calls for targeted humanitarian action to save lives and livelihoods in the 19 famine hotspots noting that in Afghanistan Ethiopia Nigeria Somalia South Sudan and Yemen humanitarian action will be essential to prevent further hunger and death
    Food crisis tightens its grip on 19 ‘hunger hotspots’ as famine looms in Horn of Africa – New report
      The number of people facing acute food insecurity around the world is expected to continue to skyrocket as the food crisis tightens its grip on 19 hunger hotspots fueled by rising conflict weather extremes and the economic instability aggravated by the pandemic and the domino effect of the crisis in Ukraine according to a joint UN report published today The report Hunger Hotspots FAO and WFP Early Warnings on Acute Food Insecurity published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO and the World Food Program WFP of the United Nations calls for urgent humanitarian action to save lives and livelihoods and prevent famine in hotspot countries where acute food insecurity is expected to worsen between October 2022 and January 2023 The report sets out country specific recommendations on priorities for anticipatory action short term protective measures that are implemented before new humanitarian needs materialize and emergency response actions to address existing humanitarian needs The severe drought in the Horn of Africa has brought people to the brink of starvation destroying crops and killing the livestock on which their survival depends Acute food insecurity is increasing rapidly and spreading throughout the world In particular people in the poorest countries that have not yet recovered from the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic are suffering from the effects of ongoing conflicts in terms of prices food and fertilizer supplies as well as the emergency climate Without a massively scaled up humanitarian response with urgent and vital agricultural assistance at its core the situation is likely to worsen in many countries in the coming months said FAO Director General QU Dongyu This is the third time in 10 years that Somalia has been threatened by a devastating famine The 2011 famine was caused by two consecutive failed rainy seasons as well as the conflict We are facing a perfect storm today a likely fifth consecutive failed rainy season that will lead to a drought that will last well into 2023 But people in the thick of the current crisis are also facing rising food prices and severely limited opportunities to earn a living following the pandemic We urgently need to help those who are at grave risk of starvation in Somalia and in other hunger hotspots around the world said David Beasley WFP Executive Director The report highlights the hunger crisis in the Horn of Africa where the longest drought in over 40 years is forecast to continue with a failed fifth consecutive rainy season on the horizon adding to the cumulative and devastating effects of successive rainfall deficits Economic crises and conflicts have had on vulnerable households since 2020 Water scarcity has led to below average harvests livestock deaths and has forced hundreds of thousands of people off their land in search of livelihood while increasing the risk of resource based and inter community conflict Up to 26 million people are expected to face crisis levels or worse IPC Phase 3 and above of food insecurity in Somalia southern and eastern Ethiopia and northern and eastern Kenya With humanitarian assistance at risk of being cut due to funding shortages the specter of large scale starvation looms over Somalia with famine likely to grip Baidoa and Burhakaba districts in the region of Bay from October Without an adequate humanitarian response analysts expect that by December as many as four children or two adults per 10 000 people will die each day Hundreds of thousands are already facing hunger today and staggering levels of malnutrition are expected among children under the age of 5 Globally an all time high of 970 000 people are expected to face catastrophic hunger IPC Phase 5 and are starving or projected to starve or at risk of deterioration to catastrophic conditions in Afghanistan Ethiopia South Sudan Somalia and Yemen if no action is taken ten times higher than six years ago when only two countries had Phase 5 populations Key Findings According to the report Afghanistan Ethiopia Nigeria South Sudan Somalia The US and Yemen remain on high alert as hotspots alone accounting for nearly a million people facing catastrophic levels of hunger IPC Phase 5 Catastrophe with hunger and death a daily reality and where Extreme levels of mortality and malnutrition can develop without immediate action The Democratic Republic of the Congo Haiti Kenya the Sahel Sudan and Syria continue to be very worrying due to deteriorating conditions as in the June edition of the quarterly report but the alert extends to the Central African Republic and Pakistan Meanwhile Guatemala Honduras and Malawi have been added to the list of countries joining Sri Lanka Zimbabwe and Madagascar that remain hotspots of hunger Violent conflict remains the main driver of acute hunger and analysis indicates a continuation of this trend in 2022 with particular concern for Ethiopia where escalating conflict and inter ethnic violence in several regions is expected to further escalate increasing humanitarian needs Extreme weather events such as floods tropical storms and droughts remain critical factors in many parts of the world and a new normal of back to back extreme weather events is becoming apparent especially in hotspots Devastating floods have affected 33 million people this year alone in Pakistan and South Sudan is facing a fourth consecutive year of extreme flooding Meanwhile a third consecutive below average rainy season is projected in Syria For the first time in 20 years the La Ni a weather event has continued for three consecutive years affecting agriculture and causing crop and livestock losses in many parts of the world including Afghanistan West and East Africa and Syria On the economic front persistently high global prices for food fuel and fertilizer continue to drive high domestic prices and economic instability Rising inflation rates have forced governments to enact monetary tightening measures in advanced economies that have also increased the cost of credit for low income countries This is restricting the ability of highly indebted countries the number of countries has increased significantly in recent years to finance the import of essential items Faced with these macroeconomic challenges many governments are forced to introduce austerity measures that affect income and purchasing power particularly among the most vulnerable families These trends are expected to increase in the coming months the report notes with rising poverty and acute food insecurity as well as risks of civil unrest caused by rising socio economic grievances Humanitarian assistance is crucial to saving lives and preventing starvation death and the total collapse of livelihoods says the report which highlights that insecurity administrative and bureaucratic impediments movement restrictions and physical barriers limit The access of humanitarian responders to people facing acute hunger in eleven of the hotspot countries including the six countries where populations face or are projected to face hunger IPC Phase 5 or are at risk of severe hunger deteriorate to catastrophic conditions Humanitarian action is critical to prevent hunger and death The report calls for targeted humanitarian action to save lives and livelihoods in the 19 famine hotspots noting that in Afghanistan Ethiopia Nigeria Somalia South Sudan and Yemen humanitarian action will be essential to prevent further hunger and death
    Food crisis tightens its grip on 19 ‘hunger hotspots’ as famine looms in Horn of Africa – New report
    Africa4 days ago

    Food crisis tightens its grip on 19 ‘hunger hotspots’ as famine looms in Horn of Africa – New report

    The number of people facing acute food insecurity around the world is expected to continue to skyrocket, as the food crisis tightens its grip on 19 'hunger hotspots', fueled by rising conflict, weather extremes and the economic instability aggravated by the pandemic and the domino effect.

    of the crisis in Ukraine, according to a joint UN report published today.

    The report 'Hunger Hotspots: FAO and WFP Early Warnings on Acute Food Insecurity', published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Food Program (WFP) of the United Nations, calls for urgent humanitarian action to save lives and livelihoods.

    and prevent famine in hotspot countries where acute food insecurity is expected to worsen between October 2022 and January 2023.

    The report sets out country-specific recommendations on priorities for anticipatory action: short-term protective measures that are implemented before new humanitarian needs materialize.

    ; and emergency response: actions to address existing humanitarian needs.

    “The severe drought in the Horn of Africa has brought people to the brink of starvation, destroying crops and killing the livestock on which their survival depends.

    Acute food insecurity is increasing rapidly and spreading throughout the world.

    In particular, people in the poorest countries that have not yet recovered from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic are suffering from the effects of ongoing conflicts, in terms of prices, food and fertilizer supplies, as well as the emergency climate.

    Without a massively scaled-up humanitarian response with urgent and vital agricultural assistance at its core, the situation is likely to worsen in many countries in the coming months,” said FAO Director-General QU Dongyu.

    “This is the third time in 10 years that Somalia has been threatened by a devastating famine.

    The 2011 famine was caused by two consecutive failed rainy seasons, as well as the conflict.

    We are facing a perfect storm today: a likely fifth consecutive failed rainy season that will lead to a drought that will last well into 2023.

    But people in the thick of the current crisis are also facing rising food prices and severely limited opportunities to earn a living.

    following the pandemic.

    We urgently need to help those who are at grave risk of starvation in Somalia and in other hunger hotspots around the world,” said David Beasley, WFP Executive Director.

    The report highlights the hunger crisis in the Horn of Africa, where the longest drought in over 40 years is forecast to continue, with a failed fifth consecutive rainy season on the horizon, adding to the cumulative and devastating effects of successive rainfall deficits, Economic crises and conflicts have had on vulnerable households since 2020.

    Water scarcity has led to below-average harvests, livestock deaths and has forced hundreds of thousands of people off their land in search of livelihood, while increasing the risk of resource-based and inter-community conflict.

    .

    Up to 26 million people are expected to face crisis levels or worse (IPC Phase 3 and above) of food insecurity in Somalia, southern and eastern Ethiopia, and northern and eastern Kenya.

    With humanitarian assistance at risk of being cut due to funding shortages, the specter of large-scale starvation looms over Somalia, with famine likely to grip Baidoa and Burhakaba districts in the region.

    of Bay from October.

    Without an adequate humanitarian response, analysts expect that by December, as many as four children or two adults per 10,000 people will die each day.

    Hundreds of thousands are already facing hunger today and staggering levels of malnutrition are expected among children under the age of 5.

    Globally, an all-time high of 970,000 people are expected to face catastrophic hunger (IPC Phase 5) and are starving or projected to starve or at risk of deterioration to catastrophic conditions in Afghanistan, Ethiopia , South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen, if no action is taken, ten times higher than six years ago when only two countries had Phase 5 populations.

    Key Findings According to the report, Afghanistan , Ethiopia, Nigeria, South Sudan, Somalia The US and Yemen remain on 'high alert' as hotspots, alone accounting for nearly a million people facing catastrophic levels of hunger (IPC Phase 5 'Catastrophe') with hunger and death a daily reality and where Extreme levels of mortality and malnutrition can develop without immediate action.

    The Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Kenya, the Sahel, Sudan and Syria continue to be "very worrying" due to deteriorating conditions, as in the June edition of the quarterly report, but the alert extends to the Central African Republic and Pakistan .

    Meanwhile, Guatemala, Honduras and Malawi have been added to the list of countries, joining Sri Lanka, Zimbabwe and Madagascar that remain hotspots of hunger.

    Violent conflict remains the main driver of acute hunger and analysis indicates a continuation of this trend in 2022, with particular concern for Ethiopia, where escalating conflict and inter-ethnic violence in several regions is expected to further escalate, increasing humanitarian needs.

    Extreme weather events such as floods, tropical storms and droughts remain critical factors in many parts of the world, and a "new normal" of back-to-back extreme weather events is becoming apparent, especially in hotspots.

    Devastating floods have affected 33 million people this year alone in Pakistan and South Sudan is facing a fourth consecutive year of extreme flooding.

    Meanwhile, a third consecutive below-average rainy season is projected in Syria.

    For the first time in 20 years, the La Niña weather event has continued for three consecutive years, affecting agriculture and causing crop and livestock losses in many parts of the world, including Afghanistan, West and East Africa, and Syria.

    On the economic front, persistently high global prices for food, fuel, and fertilizer continue to drive high domestic prices and economic instability.

    Rising inflation rates have forced governments to enact monetary tightening measures in advanced economies that have also increased the cost of credit for low-income countries.

    This is restricting the ability of highly indebted countries (the number of countries has increased significantly in recent years) to finance the import of essential items.

    Faced with these macroeconomic challenges, many governments are forced to introduce austerity measures that affect income and purchasing power, particularly among the most vulnerable families.

    These trends are expected to increase in the coming months, the report notes, with rising poverty and acute food insecurity, as well as risks of civil unrest caused by rising socio-economic grievances.

    Humanitarian assistance is crucial to saving lives and preventing starvation, death and the total collapse of livelihoods, says the report, which highlights that insecurity, administrative and bureaucratic impediments, movement restrictions and physical barriers limit The access of humanitarian responders to people facing acute hunger in eleven of the hotspot countries, including the six countries where populations face or are projected to face hunger (IPC Phase 5), or are at risk of severe hunger.

    deteriorate to catastrophic conditions.

    Humanitarian action is critical to prevent hunger and death The report calls for targeted humanitarian action to save lives and livelihoods in the 19 famine hotspots, noting that in Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen, humanitarian action will be essential to prevent further hunger and death.

  •   The eighth Annual Regional Animal Health Network for the Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS will take place in Praia Cape Verde from September 19 to 23 2022 with the aim of taking stock of the progress of ECOWAS Member States in the eradication or control of PPR rabies Foot and Mouth Disease FMD and Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia CBPP The meeting also aims to follow up on the implementation of the RESEPI and RESOLAB action plans Under the slogan Horizon 2030 situation challenges and perspectives for the eradication of PPR and rabies and the control of foot and mouth disease and PCB priority animal diseases in the ECOWAS region the speech read on behalf of the Director AU IBAR interim Dr Nick Nwankpa expressed AU IBAR s gratitude to ECOWAS RAHC FAO World Organization for Animal Health WOAH Brooke West Africa and USDA APHIS for partnering to address health challenges Dr Nwankpa also noted that the theme reflects the state of animal health in the landscape and our collective aspirations In the recent past AU BAR supported Nigeria to address the HPAI problem and is currently supporting Cape Verde to demonstrate its freedom status for recognition as a PPR and FMD free country by WOAH in 2023 The meeting assured the committed support of AU IBAR and AU PANVAC to all countries in the fight against priority animal diseases and will continue to maintain strategic alliances with FAO WOAH RAHC and all interested parties to provide support necessary to our Member states At the country level the RAHC has the Network of Veterinary Laboratories RESOLAB Laboratory Network and the Epidemic Surveillance Network RESEPI that were created with the support of FAO and AU IBAR The Regional Veterinary Committee RVC established by the ECOWAS Commission through Regulation C Reg 23 11 10 and which brings together the Directors of Veterinary Services thus completes the regional institutional structure that allows the Commission of ECOWAS through the RASC to coordinate animal health initiatives in the region in accordance with its mandate Thus each year the annual meeting of the animal health networks RVC RESOLAB and RESEPI is institutionalized and organized by the RAHC in collaboration with the FAO AU IBAR and its traditional partners to serve as a framework for exchange evaluation of the level of implementation of the activities during the last year and the results obtained discuss the difficulties foresee solutions and plan future activities The meeting participants are from the Member States The 15 RESEPI Focal Points in the ECOWAS Member States The 15 Focal Points of RESOLAB in the ECOWAS Member States The 15 Directors of Veterinary Services of the ECOWAS Member States and the 15 Presidents of the National Veterinary Associations Statutory Bodies of ECOWAS Member States Several invited countries are also present notably the Democratic Republic of the Congo Cameroon national epidemiology and laboratory focal points and Mauritania and Chad and a number of regional and international organizations in particular ECOWAS Commission ARAA WAHO REDISSE Regional Coordination Unit and PROALAB RAHC CILSS Regional Coordination Unit PRAPS PREDIP UEMOA AU IBAR and ECCAS RAHC Central Africa
    The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) celebrates the 8th Annual Regional Animal Health Network
      The eighth Annual Regional Animal Health Network for the Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS will take place in Praia Cape Verde from September 19 to 23 2022 with the aim of taking stock of the progress of ECOWAS Member States in the eradication or control of PPR rabies Foot and Mouth Disease FMD and Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia CBPP The meeting also aims to follow up on the implementation of the RESEPI and RESOLAB action plans Under the slogan Horizon 2030 situation challenges and perspectives for the eradication of PPR and rabies and the control of foot and mouth disease and PCB priority animal diseases in the ECOWAS region the speech read on behalf of the Director AU IBAR interim Dr Nick Nwankpa expressed AU IBAR s gratitude to ECOWAS RAHC FAO World Organization for Animal Health WOAH Brooke West Africa and USDA APHIS for partnering to address health challenges Dr Nwankpa also noted that the theme reflects the state of animal health in the landscape and our collective aspirations In the recent past AU BAR supported Nigeria to address the HPAI problem and is currently supporting Cape Verde to demonstrate its freedom status for recognition as a PPR and FMD free country by WOAH in 2023 The meeting assured the committed support of AU IBAR and AU PANVAC to all countries in the fight against priority animal diseases and will continue to maintain strategic alliances with FAO WOAH RAHC and all interested parties to provide support necessary to our Member states At the country level the RAHC has the Network of Veterinary Laboratories RESOLAB Laboratory Network and the Epidemic Surveillance Network RESEPI that were created with the support of FAO and AU IBAR The Regional Veterinary Committee RVC established by the ECOWAS Commission through Regulation C Reg 23 11 10 and which brings together the Directors of Veterinary Services thus completes the regional institutional structure that allows the Commission of ECOWAS through the RASC to coordinate animal health initiatives in the region in accordance with its mandate Thus each year the annual meeting of the animal health networks RVC RESOLAB and RESEPI is institutionalized and organized by the RAHC in collaboration with the FAO AU IBAR and its traditional partners to serve as a framework for exchange evaluation of the level of implementation of the activities during the last year and the results obtained discuss the difficulties foresee solutions and plan future activities The meeting participants are from the Member States The 15 RESEPI Focal Points in the ECOWAS Member States The 15 Focal Points of RESOLAB in the ECOWAS Member States The 15 Directors of Veterinary Services of the ECOWAS Member States and the 15 Presidents of the National Veterinary Associations Statutory Bodies of ECOWAS Member States Several invited countries are also present notably the Democratic Republic of the Congo Cameroon national epidemiology and laboratory focal points and Mauritania and Chad and a number of regional and international organizations in particular ECOWAS Commission ARAA WAHO REDISSE Regional Coordination Unit and PROALAB RAHC CILSS Regional Coordination Unit PRAPS PREDIP UEMOA AU IBAR and ECCAS RAHC Central Africa
    The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) celebrates the 8th Annual Regional Animal Health Network
    Africa5 days ago

    The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) celebrates the 8th Annual Regional Animal Health Network

    The eighth Annual Regional Animal Health Network for the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) will take place in Praia, Cape Verde, from September 19 to 23, 2022, with the aim of taking stock of the progress of ECOWAS Member States in the eradication or control of PPR, rabies, Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) and Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP).

    The meeting also aims to follow up on the implementation of the RESEPI and RESOLAB action plans.

    Under the slogan "Horizon 2030: situation, challenges and perspectives for the eradication of PPR and rabies and the control of foot-and-mouth disease and PCB, priority animal diseases in the ECOWAS region", the speech read on behalf of the Director AU-IBAR interim Dr. Nick Nwankpa expressed AU-IBAR's gratitude to ECOWAS.

    /RAHC, FAO, World Organization for Animal Health (WOAH), Brooke West Africa, and USDA/APHIS for partnering to address health challenges.

    Dr Nwankpa also noted that the theme “reflects the state of animal health in the landscape and our collective aspirations.

    In the recent past, AU-BAR supported Nigeria to address the HPAI problem and is currently supporting Cape Verde to demonstrate its freedom status for recognition as a PPR and FMD free country by WOAH in 2023” .

    The meeting assured the committed support of AU-IBAR and AU-PANVAC to all countries in the fight against priority animal diseases and will continue to maintain strategic alliances with FAO, WOAH, RAHC and all interested parties to provide support necessary to our Member.

    states At the country level, the RAHC has the Network of Veterinary Laboratories (RESOLAB Laboratory Network) and the Epidemic Surveillance Network (RESEPI) that were created with the support of FAO and AU-IBAR.

    The Regional Veterinary Committee (RVC), established by the ECOWAS Commission through Regulation C/Reg.23/11/10 and which brings together the Directors of Veterinary Services, thus completes the regional institutional structure that allows the Commission of ECOWAS, through the RASC, to coordinate animal health initiatives in the region, in accordance with its mandate.

    Thus, each year, the annual meeting of the animal health networks (RVC, RESOLAB and RESEPI) is institutionalized and organized by the RAHC in collaboration with the FAO, AU IBAR and its traditional partners, to serve as a framework for exchange, evaluation of the level of implementation of the activities during the last year and the results obtained, discuss the difficulties, foresee solutions and plan future activities.

    The meeting participants are from the Member States: The 15 RESEPI Focal Points in the ECOWAS Member States; The 15 Focal Points of RESOLAB in the ECOWAS Member States; The 15 Directors of Veterinary Services of the ECOWAS Member States; and the 15 Presidents of the National Veterinary Associations/Statutory Bodies of ECOWAS Member States.

    Several invited countries are also present; notably; the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Cameroon (national epidemiology and laboratory focal points; and Mauritania and Chad, and a number of regional and international organizations, in particular: ECOWAS Commission, ARAA, WAHO: REDISSE Regional Coordination Unit and PROALAB, RAHC; CILSS: Regional Coordination Unit PRAPS & PREDIP, UEMOA, AU-IBAR, and ECCAS RAHC Central Africa.

  •   The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO the World Organization for Animal Health WOAH SADC and the African Union Inter African Bureau for Animal Resources AU IBAR organized the Third Meeting of the Leaf Peste des Petits Ruminants PPR roadmap followed by training on risk based approaches to PPR prevention and emergency response in historically free SADC countries Background Peste des petits ruminants PPR is a highly contagious and widespread viral disease that continues to affect mainly domestic small ruminants but also some wild animals since 1942 when it was first reported in C te D Ivoire Since then the geographic distribution of PPR has been extensive and has spread to numerous parts of the world Of the 16 SADC Member States six 6 of them are officially recognized by WOAH as PPR free with one 1 country officially recognized as a PPR free zone while five 5 countries do not have WOAH but have never detected PPR PPR is present endemic in the remaining four 4 SADC Member States posing a serious threat to the rest of the region The PPR Global Control and Eradication Strategy PPR GCES prepared jointly by FAO and WOAH was approved in April 2015 in C te d Ivoire Subsequently the PPR Global Eradication Program PPR GEP I was developed to launch the first implementation phase of the strategy for 2017 2021 The Abidjan conference recommended a review of the implementation of the strategy after the first five years In 2021 FAO and WOAH launched the revision of the PPR GEP I to formulate the second phase of the PPR GEP PPR GEP II The PPR GEP review process is currently underway with the expectation of launching the second phase of the PPR GEP in early November 2022 Working together FAO WOAH SADC and AU IBAR led by the Global Strategy for Control and Eradication of PPR are working collaboratively to i eradicate PPR by 2030 ii strengthen veterinary services and iii reduce the impact of other major infectious diseases of small ruminants in the SADC region PPR represents a serious impediment to small ruminant value chains and a tremendous threat to sheep and goat health food security and the social welfare and livelihoods of smallholders Countries that are not infected with PPR are being enabled to demonstrate through evidence and data obtained from extensive surveillance activities the absence to gain official recognition of PPR free status from WOAH From 12 to 14 September 2022 the third regional meeting of the roadmap was organized in Gaborone Botswana The objectives of the meeting were i to review and update the epidemiological situation of PPR in southern Africa ii update the progress of Southern African countries through the PPR control stages iii map the key activities to prevent and control PPR including projects iv identify and adopt next steps for PPR control in SADC countries and v identify key capacity gaps and challenges affecting PPR control eradication in Southern African countries and agree on proposed solutions and recommendations The meeting was attended by 35 participants from Angola Botswana eSwatini Lesotho Malawi Mauritius Mozambique Tanzania Zambia and Zimbabwe as well as representatives from FAO and WOAH headquarters and sub regional offices the SADC Secretariat AU IBAR AU PANVAC and the Botswana Vaccine Institute Following the third regional roadmap meeting training on risk based approaches to PPR prevention and response was conducted emergency in historically free SADC countries from 15 to 16 September 2022 in Gaborone The training paved the way for historically free countries in the SADC region to develop emergency preparedness and response plans and train them in the preparation of dossiers to be submitted to WOAH for declaration of PPR freedom The objectives of the training were i to provide an overview of the epidemiology clinical signs and diagnosis of PPR in small ruminants and wildlife ii to describe the surveillance activities that can be implemented to demonstrate the absence of PPR iii describe other necessary dossier submission requirements including the development of emergency preparedness and response plans as well as iv assist countries in developing dossier submission work plans The training was attended by 26 participants from the following countries Tanzania Zambia Botswana Zimbabwe Mozambique Malawi and Mauritius Results and recommendations on the eradication of Peste des petits ruminants PPR Considering that there are 3 groups of countries within the region PPR free historically free and infected countries the meeting agreed that For PPR free countries recommended that i development of new contingency plans or review of existing ones ii that partners support simulation activities to validate contingency plans iii Member States with the support of FAO WOAH IBAR PANVAC address challenges related to shipping samples For historically free countries it was recommended that i countries mobilize resources and upgrade PPR surveillance to national coverage and include wildlife ii Intensify awareness campaigns for all actors in the value chain iii capacity building for Member States for the preparation of dossiers iv Harmonized regional PPR surveillance v Organize cross border harmonization and bilateral meetings and vi Countries wishing to be declared PPR free by 2024 should submit their dossiers by June 2023 FAO stands ready to support and WOAH will provide guidance For infected countries there is a need to develop disease trend maps to guide prevention and control interventions through i emphasizing the importance of strengthening partnerships and collaborations within the region as we move towards eradication ii Need for a communication platform to share experiences and good practices due to the different levels of capacity of the countries iii It is necessary to strengthen the management and exchange of data between countries within the region iv Need for cross border cross border harmonization on surveillance and vaccination within the region as we move towards eradication v Develop advocacy for resource mobilization at the national level and vi Establish a Protection Zone epistemic buffer zone in southern Tanzania DRC and Angola to protect SADC by focusing on surveillance and vaccination
    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Organization for Animal Health (WOAH), SADC and AU-IBAR are working together to control and eradicate peste des petits ruminants (PPR) in the South Africa
      The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO the World Organization for Animal Health WOAH SADC and the African Union Inter African Bureau for Animal Resources AU IBAR organized the Third Meeting of the Leaf Peste des Petits Ruminants PPR roadmap followed by training on risk based approaches to PPR prevention and emergency response in historically free SADC countries Background Peste des petits ruminants PPR is a highly contagious and widespread viral disease that continues to affect mainly domestic small ruminants but also some wild animals since 1942 when it was first reported in C te D Ivoire Since then the geographic distribution of PPR has been extensive and has spread to numerous parts of the world Of the 16 SADC Member States six 6 of them are officially recognized by WOAH as PPR free with one 1 country officially recognized as a PPR free zone while five 5 countries do not have WOAH but have never detected PPR PPR is present endemic in the remaining four 4 SADC Member States posing a serious threat to the rest of the region The PPR Global Control and Eradication Strategy PPR GCES prepared jointly by FAO and WOAH was approved in April 2015 in C te d Ivoire Subsequently the PPR Global Eradication Program PPR GEP I was developed to launch the first implementation phase of the strategy for 2017 2021 The Abidjan conference recommended a review of the implementation of the strategy after the first five years In 2021 FAO and WOAH launched the revision of the PPR GEP I to formulate the second phase of the PPR GEP PPR GEP II The PPR GEP review process is currently underway with the expectation of launching the second phase of the PPR GEP in early November 2022 Working together FAO WOAH SADC and AU IBAR led by the Global Strategy for Control and Eradication of PPR are working collaboratively to i eradicate PPR by 2030 ii strengthen veterinary services and iii reduce the impact of other major infectious diseases of small ruminants in the SADC region PPR represents a serious impediment to small ruminant value chains and a tremendous threat to sheep and goat health food security and the social welfare and livelihoods of smallholders Countries that are not infected with PPR are being enabled to demonstrate through evidence and data obtained from extensive surveillance activities the absence to gain official recognition of PPR free status from WOAH From 12 to 14 September 2022 the third regional meeting of the roadmap was organized in Gaborone Botswana The objectives of the meeting were i to review and update the epidemiological situation of PPR in southern Africa ii update the progress of Southern African countries through the PPR control stages iii map the key activities to prevent and control PPR including projects iv identify and adopt next steps for PPR control in SADC countries and v identify key capacity gaps and challenges affecting PPR control eradication in Southern African countries and agree on proposed solutions and recommendations The meeting was attended by 35 participants from Angola Botswana eSwatini Lesotho Malawi Mauritius Mozambique Tanzania Zambia and Zimbabwe as well as representatives from FAO and WOAH headquarters and sub regional offices the SADC Secretariat AU IBAR AU PANVAC and the Botswana Vaccine Institute Following the third regional roadmap meeting training on risk based approaches to PPR prevention and response was conducted emergency in historically free SADC countries from 15 to 16 September 2022 in Gaborone The training paved the way for historically free countries in the SADC region to develop emergency preparedness and response plans and train them in the preparation of dossiers to be submitted to WOAH for declaration of PPR freedom The objectives of the training were i to provide an overview of the epidemiology clinical signs and diagnosis of PPR in small ruminants and wildlife ii to describe the surveillance activities that can be implemented to demonstrate the absence of PPR iii describe other necessary dossier submission requirements including the development of emergency preparedness and response plans as well as iv assist countries in developing dossier submission work plans The training was attended by 26 participants from the following countries Tanzania Zambia Botswana Zimbabwe Mozambique Malawi and Mauritius Results and recommendations on the eradication of Peste des petits ruminants PPR Considering that there are 3 groups of countries within the region PPR free historically free and infected countries the meeting agreed that For PPR free countries recommended that i development of new contingency plans or review of existing ones ii that partners support simulation activities to validate contingency plans iii Member States with the support of FAO WOAH IBAR PANVAC address challenges related to shipping samples For historically free countries it was recommended that i countries mobilize resources and upgrade PPR surveillance to national coverage and include wildlife ii Intensify awareness campaigns for all actors in the value chain iii capacity building for Member States for the preparation of dossiers iv Harmonized regional PPR surveillance v Organize cross border harmonization and bilateral meetings and vi Countries wishing to be declared PPR free by 2024 should submit their dossiers by June 2023 FAO stands ready to support and WOAH will provide guidance For infected countries there is a need to develop disease trend maps to guide prevention and control interventions through i emphasizing the importance of strengthening partnerships and collaborations within the region as we move towards eradication ii Need for a communication platform to share experiences and good practices due to the different levels of capacity of the countries iii It is necessary to strengthen the management and exchange of data between countries within the region iv Need for cross border cross border harmonization on surveillance and vaccination within the region as we move towards eradication v Develop advocacy for resource mobilization at the national level and vi Establish a Protection Zone epistemic buffer zone in southern Tanzania DRC and Angola to protect SADC by focusing on surveillance and vaccination
    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Organization for Animal Health (WOAH), SADC and AU-IBAR are working together to control and eradicate peste des petits ruminants (PPR) in the South Africa
    Africa5 days ago

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Organization for Animal Health (WOAH), SADC and AU-IBAR are working together to control and eradicate peste des petits ruminants (PPR) in the South Africa

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Organization for Animal Health (WOAH), SADC and the African Union – Inter-African Bureau for Animal Resources (AU-IBAR) organized the Third Meeting of the Leaf Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) roadmap, followed by training on risk-based approaches to PPR prevention and emergency response in historically free SADC countries.

    Background Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious and widespread viral disease that continues to affect mainly domestic small ruminants, but also some wild animals, since 1942, when it was first reported in Côte D'Ivoire.

    Since then, the geographic distribution of PPR has been extensive and has spread to numerous parts of the world.

    Of the 16 SADC Member States, six (6) of them are officially recognized by WOAH as PPR free with one (1) country officially recognized as a PPR free zone, while five (5) countries do not have WOAH but have never detected PPR.

    PPR is present (endemic) in the remaining four (4) SADC Member States, posing a serious threat to the rest of the region.

    The PPR Global Control and Eradication Strategy (PPR GCES), prepared jointly by FAO and WOAH, was approved in April 2015 in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Subsequently, the PPR Global Eradication Program (PPR GEP I) was developed to launch the first implementation phase of the strategy for 2017-2021.

    The Abidjan conference recommended a review of the implementation of the strategy after the first five years.

    In 2021, FAO and WOAH launched the revision of the PPR GEP I to formulate the second phase of the PPR GEP (PPR GEP II).

    The PPR GEP review process is currently underway with the expectation of launching the second phase of the PPR GEP in early November 2022.

    Working together FAO, WOAH, SADC and AU-IBAR led by the Global Strategy for Control and Eradication of PPR are working collaboratively.

    to (i) eradicate PPR by 2030, (ii) strengthen veterinary services, and (iii) reduce the impact of other major infectious diseases of small ruminants in the SADC region.

    PPR represents a serious impediment to small ruminant value chains and a tremendous threat to sheep and goat health, food security, and the social welfare and livelihoods of smallholders.

    Countries that are not infected with PPR are being enabled to demonstrate through evidence and data obtained from extensive surveillance activities the absence to gain official recognition of PPR free status from WOAH.

    From 12 to 14 September 2022, the third regional meeting of the roadmap was organized in Gaborone-Botswana.

    The objectives of the meeting were: i) to review and update the epidemiological situation of PPR in southern Africa; ii) update the progress of Southern African countries through the PPR control stages; iii) map the key activities to prevent and control PPR, including projects; iv) identify and adopt next steps for PPR control in SADC countries; and v) identify key capacity gaps and challenges affecting PPR control/eradication in Southern African countries and agree on proposed solutions and recommendations.

    The meeting was attended by 35 participants from Angola, Botswana, eSwatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe, as well as representatives from FAO and WOAH headquarters and sub-regional offices, the SADC Secretariat, AU -IBAR, AU-PANVAC and the Botswana Vaccine Institute, Following the third regional roadmap meeting, training on risk-based approaches to PPR prevention and response was conducted.

    emergency in historically free SADC countries from 15 to 16 September 2022 in Gaborone.

    The training paved the way for historically free countries in the SADC region to develop emergency preparedness and response plans and train them in the preparation of dossiers to be submitted to WOAH for declaration of PPR freedom.

    The objectives of the training were i) to provide an overview of the epidemiology, clinical signs and diagnosis of PPR in small ruminants and wildlife, ii) to describe the surveillance activities that can be implemented to demonstrate the absence of PPR, iii) describe other necessary dossier submission requirements, including the development of emergency preparedness and response plans, as well as iv) assist countries in developing dossier submission work plans.

    The training was attended by 26 participants from the following countries: Tanzania, Zambia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Malawi and Mauritius.

    Results and recommendations on the eradication of Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) Considering that there are 3 groups of countries within the region: PPR free, historically free and infected countries, the meeting agreed that: For PPR free countries, recommended that: i) development of new contingency plans or review of existing ones, ii) that partners support simulation activities to validate contingency plans; iii) Member States, with the support of FAO/WOAH/IBAR/PANVAC, address challenges related to shipping samples.

    For historically free countries, it was recommended that i) countries mobilize resources and upgrade PPR surveillance to national coverage and include wildlife; ii) Intensify awareness campaigns for all actors in the value chain; iii) capacity building for Member States for the preparation of dossiers; iv) Harmonized regional PPR surveillance; v) Organize cross-border harmonization and bilateral meetings and vi) Countries wishing to be declared PPR-free by 2024 should submit their dossiers by June 2023.

    FAO stands ready to support and WOAH will provide guidance.

    For infected countries, there is a need to develop disease trend maps to guide prevention and control interventions through: i) emphasizing the importance of strengthening partnerships and collaborations within the region as we move towards eradication; ii) Need for a communication platform to share experiences and good practices due to the different levels of capacity of the countries; iii) It is necessary to strengthen the management and exchange of data between countries within the region; iv) Need for cross-border/cross-border harmonization on surveillance and vaccination within the region as we move towards eradication; v) Develop advocacy for resource mobilization at the national level and vi) Establish a Protection Zone (epistemic buffer zone) in southern Tanzania, DRC and Angola to protect SADC by focusing on surveillance and vaccination.

  •   Bamadi affectionately called Barma by people in his community has opened its doors to more than 200 families since 2014 when the crisis began in Cameroon s Far North region Thousands of internally displaced persons IDPs have fled violence perpetrated by armed groups in Logone et Chari department and host communities such as Barma in Makary s Dor district They have provided shelter Recent inter ethnic conflicts have aggravated the situation that has dragged on for years particularly in the Lake Chad basin affecting hundreds of thousands of families Host communities are sharing their limited food natural resources and basic social services which has gradually weakened their resilience leading to the disruption of production systems livelihoods and social cohesion in the region Barma for example a father of 13 children was already struggling to support his family as a seasonal farmer At the same time he knew that he had to help in any way he could We could not remain insensitive to the situation These people have lost everything and have nothing to eat I and others in the neighborhood welcomed them says Barma I had to do something Like him other members of the host community have sheltered more than 30 000 IDPs to date Stabilization and recovery With financial support from the United Nations Secretary General s Peacebuilding Fund FAO implemented the project Stabilization and recovery of communities affected by the security crisis in the Far North Cameroon In collaboration with the International Organization for Migration IOM and the United Nations Population Fund UNFPA the project is improving the resilience of internally displaced persons returnees and host communities facing food insecurity in the department of Logone et Chari FAO gave me three goats two females and one male for breeding I also received training on small ruminant husbandry management says Barma I knew absolutely nothing about this activity because before I lived only from agriculture The initiative supported 245 households raising small ruminants in the towns of Makary and Kousseri in the far north A total of 735 goats were distributed in addition to bags of feed licks vaccines and treatments for small ruminants FAO also provided training and monitoring in animal care and health in partnership with local technical services Through this project several families are not only improving their nutritional status by eating goat meat which is rich in protein but also generating income to cover basic daily needs Today thanks to the support of the FAO my small farm has 15 goats and is one of six model farms in the Logone et Chari department It is a source of pride for me because people come from other places to train with me and learn from my experience and the organization of my farm he continues Building resilience through commercial gardening As part of the project 134 IDPs and members of their host communities were given 10 hectares of land to grow their own fruit and vegetables The communities are now producing onions carrots nightshades tomatoes cabbage peppers and okra The fields are irrigated daily through a solar energy well built specifically for this use Being a new activity for some FAO has supervised training in farmer field schools on this solar energy technology Crops from these fields are consumed directly by families or sold in local markets The income generated from these sales allows them to buy food that they do not grow helping them to diversify and balance their meals Since the cultivation of these fields households have been able to feed themselves in a healthy and varied way Crops for sale are transported to the local market This allows the beneficiaries to meet their basic needs through the profits from the sales says Djingui Souga Leonard FAO project officer Another community member now involved in the FAO project Ali Mahamat used to cut wood for heating and sell it to households At 62 years old Ali was taking huge risks doing this activity but she was doing it to feed his family Now that crops are grown the heavy physical work required has been reduced FAO has freed me from this hard work by supporting me in agriculture Thanks to the profit from the sale of my onions I can feed my family well clothe and care for my children when they are sick he explains Violence and insecurity cause the displacement of people placing them as well as their host communities in situations of vulnerability FAO works with partners to help people affected by conflict and their host communities increase their self reliance and strengthen their resilience
    Communities in the Far North region of Cameroon open their doors to those fleeing the conflict
      Bamadi affectionately called Barma by people in his community has opened its doors to more than 200 families since 2014 when the crisis began in Cameroon s Far North region Thousands of internally displaced persons IDPs have fled violence perpetrated by armed groups in Logone et Chari department and host communities such as Barma in Makary s Dor district They have provided shelter Recent inter ethnic conflicts have aggravated the situation that has dragged on for years particularly in the Lake Chad basin affecting hundreds of thousands of families Host communities are sharing their limited food natural resources and basic social services which has gradually weakened their resilience leading to the disruption of production systems livelihoods and social cohesion in the region Barma for example a father of 13 children was already struggling to support his family as a seasonal farmer At the same time he knew that he had to help in any way he could We could not remain insensitive to the situation These people have lost everything and have nothing to eat I and others in the neighborhood welcomed them says Barma I had to do something Like him other members of the host community have sheltered more than 30 000 IDPs to date Stabilization and recovery With financial support from the United Nations Secretary General s Peacebuilding Fund FAO implemented the project Stabilization and recovery of communities affected by the security crisis in the Far North Cameroon In collaboration with the International Organization for Migration IOM and the United Nations Population Fund UNFPA the project is improving the resilience of internally displaced persons returnees and host communities facing food insecurity in the department of Logone et Chari FAO gave me three goats two females and one male for breeding I also received training on small ruminant husbandry management says Barma I knew absolutely nothing about this activity because before I lived only from agriculture The initiative supported 245 households raising small ruminants in the towns of Makary and Kousseri in the far north A total of 735 goats were distributed in addition to bags of feed licks vaccines and treatments for small ruminants FAO also provided training and monitoring in animal care and health in partnership with local technical services Through this project several families are not only improving their nutritional status by eating goat meat which is rich in protein but also generating income to cover basic daily needs Today thanks to the support of the FAO my small farm has 15 goats and is one of six model farms in the Logone et Chari department It is a source of pride for me because people come from other places to train with me and learn from my experience and the organization of my farm he continues Building resilience through commercial gardening As part of the project 134 IDPs and members of their host communities were given 10 hectares of land to grow their own fruit and vegetables The communities are now producing onions carrots nightshades tomatoes cabbage peppers and okra The fields are irrigated daily through a solar energy well built specifically for this use Being a new activity for some FAO has supervised training in farmer field schools on this solar energy technology Crops from these fields are consumed directly by families or sold in local markets The income generated from these sales allows them to buy food that they do not grow helping them to diversify and balance their meals Since the cultivation of these fields households have been able to feed themselves in a healthy and varied way Crops for sale are transported to the local market This allows the beneficiaries to meet their basic needs through the profits from the sales says Djingui Souga Leonard FAO project officer Another community member now involved in the FAO project Ali Mahamat used to cut wood for heating and sell it to households At 62 years old Ali was taking huge risks doing this activity but she was doing it to feed his family Now that crops are grown the heavy physical work required has been reduced FAO has freed me from this hard work by supporting me in agriculture Thanks to the profit from the sale of my onions I can feed my family well clothe and care for my children when they are sick he explains Violence and insecurity cause the displacement of people placing them as well as their host communities in situations of vulnerability FAO works with partners to help people affected by conflict and their host communities increase their self reliance and strengthen their resilience
    Communities in the Far North region of Cameroon open their doors to those fleeing the conflict
    Africa6 days ago

    Communities in the Far North region of Cameroon open their doors to those fleeing the conflict

    Bamadi, affectionately called Barma by people in his community, has opened its doors to more than 200 families since 2014 when the crisis began in Cameroon's Far North region.

    Thousands of internally displaced persons (IDPs) have fled violence perpetrated by armed groups in Logone-et-Chari department, and host communities, such as Barma in Makary's Dor district, They have provided shelter.

    Recent inter-ethnic conflicts have aggravated the situation that has dragged on for years, particularly in the Lake Chad basin, affecting hundreds of thousands of families.

    Host communities are sharing their limited food, natural resources and basic social services, which has gradually weakened their resilience, leading to the disruption of production systems, livelihoods and social cohesion in the region.

    Barma, for example, a father of 13 children, was already struggling to support his family as a seasonal farmer.

    At the same time, he knew that he had to help in any way he could.

    “We could not remain insensitive to the situation.

    These people have lost everything and have nothing to eat.

    I and others in the neighborhood welcomed them,” says Barma.

    "I had to do something."

    Like him, other members of the host community have sheltered more than 30,000 IDPs to date.

    Stabilization and recovery With financial support from the United Nations Secretary-General's Peacebuilding Fund, FAO implemented the project Stabilization and recovery of communities affected by the security crisis in the Far North, Cameroon.

    In collaboration with the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the project is improving the resilience of internally displaced persons, returnees and host communities facing food insecurity.

    in the department of Logone-et-Chari.

    “FAO gave me three goats: two females and one male for breeding.

    I also received training on small ruminant husbandry management,” says Barma.

    "I knew absolutely nothing about this activity because before I lived only from agriculture."

    The initiative supported 245 households raising small ruminants in the towns of Makary and Kousseri in the far north.

    A total of 735 goats were distributed, in addition to bags of feed, licks, vaccines and treatments for small ruminants.

    FAO also provided training and monitoring in animal care and health in partnership with local technical services.

    Through this project, several families are not only improving their nutritional status by eating goat meat, which is rich in protein, but also generating income to cover basic daily needs.

    “Today, thanks to the support of the FAO, my small farm has 15 goats and is one of six model farms in the Logone-et-Chari department.

    It is a source of pride for me because people come from other places to train with me and learn from my experience and the organization of my farm”, he continues.

    Building resilience through commercial gardening As part of the project, 134 IDPs and members of their host communities were given 10 hectares of land to grow their own fruit and vegetables.

    The communities are now producing onions, carrots, nightshades, tomatoes, cabbage, peppers and okra.

    The fields are irrigated daily through a solar energy well built specifically for this use.

    Being a new activity for some, FAO has supervised training in farmer field schools on this solar energy technology.

    Crops from these fields are consumed directly by families or sold in local markets.

    The income generated from these sales allows them to buy food that they do not grow, helping them to diversify and balance their meals.

    “Since the cultivation of these fields, households have been able to feed themselves in a healthy and varied way.

    Crops for sale are transported to the local market.

    This allows the beneficiaries to meet their basic needs through the profits from the sales,” says Djingui Souga Leonard, FAO project officer.

    Another community member now involved in the FAO project, Ali Mahamat, used to cut wood for heating and sell it to households.

    At 62 years old, Ali was taking huge risks doing this activity, but she was doing it to feed his family.

    Now that crops are grown, the heavy physical work required has been reduced.

    “FAO has freed me from this hard work by supporting me in agriculture.

    Thanks to the profit from the sale of my onions, I can feed my family well, clothe and care for my children when they are sick,” he explains.

    Violence and insecurity cause the displacement of people, placing them, as well as their host communities, in situations of vulnerability.

    FAO works with partners to help people affected by conflict and their host communities increase their self-reliance and strengthen their resilience.

  •   Dramatic dialogue music and poetry are not the usual ways that the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO raises awareness and sensitizes rural communities about women s rights to land but An innovative project in Uganda is doing just that through so called Talking Books Talking books are audio devices that allow people with little or no literacy to receive training in a dynamic way In partnership with Amplio a US based nonprofit social enterprise the pilot project has adopted these easy to use devices to engage some 8 000 people sharing stories and ideas about women s land rights and its benefits to households and communities Talking Books were developed by Amplio to reach remote and underserved rural populations that are often overlooked by conventional development initiatives Designed for people with limited access to the Internet or electricity Talking Books can play several hours of carefully crafted audio content work offline and run on conventional or rechargeable batteries Digital solutions for learning and engagement This initiative will shed light on how inclusive digital solutions can be powerful tools to promote social inclusion and empowerment in rural contexts as well as innovative vehicles to drive social change and foster gender equality highlighted Martha Osorio FAO Gender and Rural Development Officer who leads the initiative The Talking Books will motivate people to reflect on and discuss the gender dimension of land issues inducing debates within households and entire communities Audio messages challenge discriminatory social norms and encourage new ways of thinking For example one dialogue highlights the benefits that registering land in the name of the wife and husband can bring to the well being of the family because after joint registration both will be more inclined to invest in their land Likewise a widow s testimony described how community elders helped her mediate with her late husband s brothers to convince them that she had the right to continue living using and controlling the land on which she and her family have depended During the last years last ten years Talking Books content also covers other topics relevant to agricultural contexts such as climate change and how to mitigate its impacts on food production and farmers livelihoods Thanks to the support of the Flexible Voluntary Contribution FVC of the FAO the project is executed under the subprogram Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women in Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition and is now working to distribute 400 Books Speakers through Farmers Field School FFS and Watershed Management WM groups in two districts of the West Nile region of Uganda Adjumani and Moyo Members of these groups who receive the Talking Books will have the opportunity to listen to the educational audio content at their convenience either alone or together with neighbors friends or family Since the devices allow users to record their questions and comments about the project and the messages they hear FAO and Broad will be able to analyze and use this data to tailor messages for subsequent rounds of implementation according to user interests needs and priorities The field deployment was launched in Adjumani on August 8 2022 The kick off event was an opportunity to convene local government representatives and paramount chiefs who expressed interest and support for such a very good communication approach unique and innovative as different participants described the Talking Books The project team conducted a baseline survey to gain a better understanding of gender dynamics and social norms within the target communities as well as their knowledge and awareness of land rights and related national laws The baseline serves to inform program and content design as well as assess changes in knowledge and attitudes among the communities that receive the Talking Books at the end of the program
    Talking Books offers an innovative solution to reach rural communities in Uganda
      Dramatic dialogue music and poetry are not the usual ways that the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO raises awareness and sensitizes rural communities about women s rights to land but An innovative project in Uganda is doing just that through so called Talking Books Talking books are audio devices that allow people with little or no literacy to receive training in a dynamic way In partnership with Amplio a US based nonprofit social enterprise the pilot project has adopted these easy to use devices to engage some 8 000 people sharing stories and ideas about women s land rights and its benefits to households and communities Talking Books were developed by Amplio to reach remote and underserved rural populations that are often overlooked by conventional development initiatives Designed for people with limited access to the Internet or electricity Talking Books can play several hours of carefully crafted audio content work offline and run on conventional or rechargeable batteries Digital solutions for learning and engagement This initiative will shed light on how inclusive digital solutions can be powerful tools to promote social inclusion and empowerment in rural contexts as well as innovative vehicles to drive social change and foster gender equality highlighted Martha Osorio FAO Gender and Rural Development Officer who leads the initiative The Talking Books will motivate people to reflect on and discuss the gender dimension of land issues inducing debates within households and entire communities Audio messages challenge discriminatory social norms and encourage new ways of thinking For example one dialogue highlights the benefits that registering land in the name of the wife and husband can bring to the well being of the family because after joint registration both will be more inclined to invest in their land Likewise a widow s testimony described how community elders helped her mediate with her late husband s brothers to convince them that she had the right to continue living using and controlling the land on which she and her family have depended During the last years last ten years Talking Books content also covers other topics relevant to agricultural contexts such as climate change and how to mitigate its impacts on food production and farmers livelihoods Thanks to the support of the Flexible Voluntary Contribution FVC of the FAO the project is executed under the subprogram Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women in Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition and is now working to distribute 400 Books Speakers through Farmers Field School FFS and Watershed Management WM groups in two districts of the West Nile region of Uganda Adjumani and Moyo Members of these groups who receive the Talking Books will have the opportunity to listen to the educational audio content at their convenience either alone or together with neighbors friends or family Since the devices allow users to record their questions and comments about the project and the messages they hear FAO and Broad will be able to analyze and use this data to tailor messages for subsequent rounds of implementation according to user interests needs and priorities The field deployment was launched in Adjumani on August 8 2022 The kick off event was an opportunity to convene local government representatives and paramount chiefs who expressed interest and support for such a very good communication approach unique and innovative as different participants described the Talking Books The project team conducted a baseline survey to gain a better understanding of gender dynamics and social norms within the target communities as well as their knowledge and awareness of land rights and related national laws The baseline serves to inform program and content design as well as assess changes in knowledge and attitudes among the communities that receive the Talking Books at the end of the program
    Talking Books offers an innovative solution to reach rural communities in Uganda
    Africa1 week ago

    Talking Books offers an innovative solution to reach rural communities in Uganda

    Dramatic dialogue, music and poetry are not the usual ways that the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) raises awareness and sensitizes rural communities about women's rights to land, but An innovative project in Uganda is doing just that through so-called Talking Books.

    Talking books are audio devices that allow people with little or no literacy to receive training in a dynamic way.

    In partnership with Amplio, a US-based nonprofit social enterprise, the pilot project has adopted these easy-to-use devices to engage some 8,000 people, sharing stories and ideas about women's land rights.

    and its benefits to households and communities.

    Talking Books were developed by Amplio to reach remote and underserved rural populations that are often overlooked by conventional development initiatives.

    Designed for people with limited access to the Internet or electricity, Talking Books can play several hours of carefully crafted audio content, work offline, and run on conventional or rechargeable batteries.

    Digital solutions for learning and engagement "This initiative will shed light on how inclusive digital solutions can be powerful tools to promote social inclusion and empowerment in rural contexts, as well as innovative vehicles to drive social change and foster gender equality."

    ", highlighted Martha Osorio, FAO Gender and Rural Development Officer, who leads the initiative.

    "The Talking Books will motivate people to reflect on and discuss the gender dimension of land issues, inducing debates within households and entire communities."

    Audio messages challenge discriminatory social norms and encourage new ways of thinking.

    For example, one dialogue highlights the benefits that registering land in the name of the wife and husband can bring to the well-being of the family, because after joint registration, both will be more inclined to invest in their land.

    Likewise, a widow's testimony described how community elders helped her mediate with her late husband's brothers to convince them that she had the right to continue living, using and controlling the land on which she and her family have depended.

    During the last years.

    last ten years.

    Talking Books content also covers other topics relevant to agricultural contexts, such as climate change and how to mitigate its impacts on food production and farmers' livelihoods.

    Thanks to the support of the Flexible Voluntary Contribution (FVC) of the FAO, the project is executed under the subprogram “Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women in Agriculture, Food Security and Nutrition” and is now working to distribute 400 Books Speakers through Farmers Field School (FFS) and Watershed Management (WM) groups in two districts of the West Nile region of Uganda, Adjumani and Moyo. Members of these groups who receive the Talking Books will have the opportunity to listen to the educational audio content at their convenience, either alone or together with neighbors, friends or family.

    Since the devices allow users to record their questions and comments about the project and the messages they hear, FAO and Broad will be able to analyze and use this data to tailor messages for subsequent rounds of implementation according to user interests.

    needs and priorities.

    The field deployment was launched in Adjumani on August 8, 2022.

    The kick-off event was an opportunity to convene local government representatives and paramount chiefs, who expressed interest and support for such a "very good" communication approach," unique" and "innovative".

    ” as different participants described the Talking Books.

    The project team conducted a baseline survey to gain a better understanding of gender dynamics and social norms within the target communities, as well as their knowledge and awareness of land rights and related national laws.

    The baseline serves to inform program and content design, as well as assess changes in knowledge and attitudes among the communities that receive the Talking Books at the end of the program.

  •   Somali farmers and herders are on the front lines of global climate change Khaijo Abdi Tigaa who lives in the rural town of Beletweyne in southern Somalia has experienced erratic weather due to climate change such as floods and droughts which have increased in recent years As a riverside farmer Tigaa relies on the nearby Shabelle River to irrigate her crops and feed her family but like many in her community floods and droughts have wreaked havoc on her crops and food security of her family We are farmers Our life depends on agriculture When the floods came I was devastated by the loss of our vegetables I had to leave all my crops corn lettuce and spinach to the floods she said When we came back from displacement our houses and properties were destroyed The flooding was devastating she said Tigaa and her community have often fled their homes to higher ground after heavy rains caused water to spill over poorly managed river dams and weakened irrigation canals That was until the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO launched the Sustainable Action for Flood Management and Risk Reduction project in partnership with the Federal Government of Somalia and with funding from the Government of Somalia United Kingdom The project aims to reduce these risks through a climate and ecosystem approach to water and flood management in riverside communities The project modeled flash flooding in the area and built flood mitigation infrastructure at strategic locations along the Shabelle River such as embankments and dams Currently 10 kilometers of levee rehabilitation are underway and FAO in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Program UNEP is also implementing nature based solutions that involve the use of natural ecosystems to improve water quantity and quality and increase resilience to climate change such as planting grasses and native plants on embankments to prevent erosion during floods It is projects like these that will help communities face climate change and an uncertain future of droughts and floods Until now communities in this area have lacked the tools they need to manage the changing environment in which they live said Ahmed Mohamud Adam FAO s national project manager in Beletweyne With the level of data we were able to collect from geospatial imagery historical data and computer models the improvements will not only protect the community now but for years to come he said The intervention also has a significant focus on technical capacity building and outreach support particularly through the National Task Force on Floods and Droughts and the development and implementation of policy guidelines This approach is in line with the overall framework of FAO s country program and its commitment to institutional support in the country The project has fulfilled this commitment by supporting the National Task Force on Floods and Droughts holding consultation meetings with government and community committees to ensure sustainable delivery and technical capacity development It also published the Flood Roadmap and developed the Flood Works Guidelines a Flood Policy and Action as well as supporting the Task Force in developing a structured situation assessment process to ensure a baseline of understanding current conditions and inform action for the future We hope that this project will reduce the flooding and resulting displacement in Beletweyne and surrounding areas that we used to see almost every year said Ahmed Mohamud Adam FAO National Project Manager I think our work has given the people of Beletweyne a lot of hope because a lot of land that was once uninhabited is now worth living on he added The work in Beletweyne is expected to protect around 400 hectares of agricultural land and contribute to the protection of more than 13 000 rural families like the one in Tigaa Before the dams and embankments were built we felt that our lives were constantly in danger With these developments we hope to keep our families safe and sound and we are optimistic about the future said Tigaa
    Reduce displacement and help communities cope with a changing climate in rural Somalia
      Somali farmers and herders are on the front lines of global climate change Khaijo Abdi Tigaa who lives in the rural town of Beletweyne in southern Somalia has experienced erratic weather due to climate change such as floods and droughts which have increased in recent years As a riverside farmer Tigaa relies on the nearby Shabelle River to irrigate her crops and feed her family but like many in her community floods and droughts have wreaked havoc on her crops and food security of her family We are farmers Our life depends on agriculture When the floods came I was devastated by the loss of our vegetables I had to leave all my crops corn lettuce and spinach to the floods she said When we came back from displacement our houses and properties were destroyed The flooding was devastating she said Tigaa and her community have often fled their homes to higher ground after heavy rains caused water to spill over poorly managed river dams and weakened irrigation canals That was until the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO launched the Sustainable Action for Flood Management and Risk Reduction project in partnership with the Federal Government of Somalia and with funding from the Government of Somalia United Kingdom The project aims to reduce these risks through a climate and ecosystem approach to water and flood management in riverside communities The project modeled flash flooding in the area and built flood mitigation infrastructure at strategic locations along the Shabelle River such as embankments and dams Currently 10 kilometers of levee rehabilitation are underway and FAO in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Program UNEP is also implementing nature based solutions that involve the use of natural ecosystems to improve water quantity and quality and increase resilience to climate change such as planting grasses and native plants on embankments to prevent erosion during floods It is projects like these that will help communities face climate change and an uncertain future of droughts and floods Until now communities in this area have lacked the tools they need to manage the changing environment in which they live said Ahmed Mohamud Adam FAO s national project manager in Beletweyne With the level of data we were able to collect from geospatial imagery historical data and computer models the improvements will not only protect the community now but for years to come he said The intervention also has a significant focus on technical capacity building and outreach support particularly through the National Task Force on Floods and Droughts and the development and implementation of policy guidelines This approach is in line with the overall framework of FAO s country program and its commitment to institutional support in the country The project has fulfilled this commitment by supporting the National Task Force on Floods and Droughts holding consultation meetings with government and community committees to ensure sustainable delivery and technical capacity development It also published the Flood Roadmap and developed the Flood Works Guidelines a Flood Policy and Action as well as supporting the Task Force in developing a structured situation assessment process to ensure a baseline of understanding current conditions and inform action for the future We hope that this project will reduce the flooding and resulting displacement in Beletweyne and surrounding areas that we used to see almost every year said Ahmed Mohamud Adam FAO National Project Manager I think our work has given the people of Beletweyne a lot of hope because a lot of land that was once uninhabited is now worth living on he added The work in Beletweyne is expected to protect around 400 hectares of agricultural land and contribute to the protection of more than 13 000 rural families like the one in Tigaa Before the dams and embankments were built we felt that our lives were constantly in danger With these developments we hope to keep our families safe and sound and we are optimistic about the future said Tigaa
    Reduce displacement and help communities cope with a changing climate in rural Somalia
    Africa1 week ago

    Reduce displacement and help communities cope with a changing climate in rural Somalia

    Somali farmers and herders are on the front lines of global climate change.

    Khaijo Abdi Tigaa, who lives in the rural town of Beletweyne in southern Somalia, has experienced erratic weather due to climate change, such as floods and droughts, which have increased in recent years.

    As a riverside farmer, Tigaa relies on the nearby Shabelle River to irrigate her crops and feed her family, but like many in her community, floods and droughts have wreaked havoc on her crops and food security.

    of her family.

    “We are farmers.

    Our life depends on agriculture.

    When the floods came, I was devastated by the loss of our vegetables.

    I had to leave all my crops – corn, lettuce and spinach – to the floods,” she said.

    “When we came back from displacement, our houses and properties were destroyed.

    The flooding was devastating,” she said.

    Tigaa and her community have often fled their homes to higher ground after heavy rains caused water to spill over poorly managed river dams and weakened irrigation canals.

    That was until the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) launched the "Sustainable Action for Flood Management and Risk Reduction" project in partnership with the Federal Government of Somalia and with funding from the Government of Somalia.

    United Kingdom.

    The project aims to reduce these risks through a climate and ecosystem approach to water and flood management in riverside communities.

    The project modeled flash flooding in the area and built flood mitigation infrastructure at strategic locations along the Shabelle River, such as embankments and dams.

    Currently, 10 kilometers of levee rehabilitation are underway and FAO, in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), is also implementing nature-based solutions that involve the use of natural ecosystems to improve water quantity and quality and increase resilience to climate change.

    , such as planting grasses and native plants on embankments to prevent erosion during floods.

    It is projects like these that will help communities face climate change and an uncertain future of droughts and floods.

    "Until now, communities in this area have lacked the tools they need to manage the changing environment in which they live," said Ahmed Mohamud Adam, FAO's national project manager in Beletweyne.

    “With the level of data we were able to collect from geospatial imagery, historical data and computer models, the improvements will not only protect the community now, but for years to come,” he said.

    The intervention also has a significant focus on technical capacity building and outreach support, particularly through the National Task Force on Floods and Droughts and the development and implementation of policy guidelines.

    This approach is in line with the overall framework of FAO's country program and its commitment to institutional support in the country.

    The project has fulfilled this commitment by supporting the National Task Force on Floods and Droughts, holding consultation meetings with government and community committees to ensure sustainable delivery and technical capacity development.

    It also published the Flood Roadmap and developed the Flood Works Guidelines (a Flood Policy and Action), as well as supporting the Task Force in developing a structured situation assessment process to ensure a baseline of understanding.

    current conditions and inform action for the future.

    “We hope that this project will reduce the flooding and resulting displacement in Beletweyne and surrounding areas that we used to see almost every year,” said Ahmed Mohamud Adam, FAO National Project Manager.

    I think our work has given the people of Beletweyne a lot of hope because a lot of land that was once uninhabited is now worth living on,” he added.

    The work in Beletweyne is expected to protect around 400 hectares of agricultural land and contribute to the protection of more than 13,000 rural families like the one in Tigaa.

    “Before the dams and embankments were built, we felt that our lives were constantly in danger.

    With these developments, we hope to keep our families safe and sound, and we are optimistic about the future,” said Tigaa.