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  •  Eswatini s king praises police crackdown on pro democracy protests
    Eswatini’s king praises police crackdown on pro-democracy protests
     Eswatini s king praises police crackdown on pro democracy protests
    Eswatini’s king praises police crackdown on pro-democracy protests
    Foreign2 weeks ago

    Eswatini’s king praises police crackdown on pro-democracy protests

    The king of Eswatini, Africa’s last absolute monarchy, on Friday praised police who brutally put down last year’s pro-democracy demonstrations in which dozens of protesters were killed.

    At least 37 people were killed and hundreds injured during weeks of anti-monarchy protests that first erupted in June last year, in the worst unrest to hit the usually peaceful former British colony.

    Human Rights Watch put the toll at 46.

    In recent weeks, at least four police officers have been killed in what authorities believe are revenge attacks by suspected anti-government activists.

    “I am very happy that even in present day, after you have been victims of attacks from terrorists, you have not stopped, but continued to uphold the oath that you took when you joined the police service,” King Mswati III said.

    “The high work ethic and level of acumen in your policing approaches should be maintained and continually strengthened,” the monarch said, speaking at an event to celebrate the police force in Eswatini, which was formerly known as Swaziland.

    Eswatini has traditionally stifled dissent and pro-democracy movements and political parties have been banned in the southern African country since 1973.

    Last year’s violence in the country of 1.

    3 million people sandwiched between South Africa and Mozambique drew international condemnation.

  •  Healthy life expectancy in Africa increases by almost ten years
    Healthy life expectancy in Africa increases by almost ten years
     Healthy life expectancy in Africa increases by almost ten years
    Healthy life expectancy in Africa increases by almost ten years
    Africa2 weeks ago

    Healthy life expectancy in Africa increases by almost ten years

    Healthy life expectancy in the African region has increased by an average of 10 years per person between 2000 and 2019, according to an assessment by the World Health Organization (WHO).

    This increase is greater than in any other region of the world during the same period.

    The report also notes that the disruptive impact of the COVID-19 pandemic could threaten these enormous achievements.

    The WHO Africa Region Universal Health Coverage Tracking 2022 report shows that healthy life expectancy, or the number of years a person is in good health, increased to 56 years in 2019, compared with 46 in 2000.

    Although still well below the global average of 64, during the same period, global healthy life expectancy increased by only five years.

    Improvements in the provision of essential health services, advances in reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health, as well as advances in the fight against infectious diseases, thanks to the rapid expansion of measures to control HIV, tuberculosis and malaria beginning in 2005.

    helped extend healthy life expectancy.

    On average, coverage of essential health services improved to 46% in 2019, compared to 24% in 2000.

    The most significant gains were in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases, but this was offset by the drastic increase in hypertension, diabetes and other non-communicable diseases and the lack of health services directed at these diseases.

    “The marked increase in healthy life expectancy over the last two decades is a testament to the region's drive to improve the health and well-being of the population.

    In essence, it means more people living longer, healthier lives, with fewer infectious disease threats and better access to disease prevention and care services,” said Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa.

    .

    “But progress must not stall.

    Unless countries improve measures against the threat of cancer and other noncommunicable diseases, health gains could be jeopardized."

    Progress in healthy life expectancy could also be undermined by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic unless robust recovery plans are instituted.

    On average, African countries reported higher disruptions to essential services compared to other regions.

    More than 90% of the 36 countries that responded to a 2021 WHO survey reported one or more interruptions in essential health services, with immunization, neglected tropical diseases and nutrition services experiencing the greatest interruptions.

    Efforts have been made to restore essential services affected by the pandemic.

    However, to improve health services and ensure that they are adequate, of good quality and accessible to all, it is essential that governments increase funding for public health.

    Most governments in Africa fund less than 50% of their national health budgets, leading to large funding gaps.

    Only Algeria, Botswana, Cape Verde, Eswatini, Gabon, Seychelles and South Africa finance more than 50% of their national health budgets.

    “COVID-19 has shown how investing in health is critical to a country's security.

    The better Africa can cope with pandemics and other health threats, the more our people and economies will prosper.

    I urge governments to invest in health and be prepared to deal with the next pathogen that comes our way,” said Dr. Moeti.

    One of the key measures to improve access to health services is for governments to reduce catastrophic household out-of-pocket expenses.

    Health spending is considered non-catastrophic when families spend less than 10% of their income on health expenses, regardless of their poverty level.

    Over the last 20 years, out-of-pocket spending has either stagnated or increased in 15 countries.

    The WHO report also looked at differences in healthy life expectancy and health service coverage by country income level and geographic location.

    High- and upper-middle-income countries tend to have better health service coverage and longer healthy life expectancies at birth than low-income countries, with around 10 additional years of healthy life expectancy.

    The report recommends that countries accelerate efforts to improve financial risk protection, rethink and reactivate health service delivery with a focus on incorporating non-communicable health services as part of essential health services, involving to communities and the private sector.

    It also recommends implementing subnational system monitoring systems so that countries can better capture early warning signs of health threats and system failures.

  •  World Food Program receives 1 6 million from Japan to help feed school children in Eswatini
    World Food Program receives  World Food Program receives 1 6 million from Japan to help feed school children in Eswatini .6 million from Japan to help feed school children in Eswatini
     World Food Program receives 1 6 million from Japan to help feed school children in Eswatini
    World Food Program receives  World Food Program receives 1 6 million from Japan to help feed school children in Eswatini .6 million from Japan to help feed school children in Eswatini
    Africa2 weeks ago

    World Food Program receives $1.6 million from Japan to help feed school children in Eswatini

    The United Nations World Food Program (WFP) acknowledges the Government of Japan's contribution of 200,000,000 JPY (equivalent to 25 million euros) in funds from the Government of Japan to ensure the supply of nutritious meals to more than 24,000 school-age children (11,571 girls and 12,659 boys).

    through Eswatini.

    A press conference and signing ceremony were held today to commemorate the contribution.

    The ceremony was officiated by the Minister of Economic Planning and Development, the Honorable Dr. Tambo Gina, in the presence of the Ambassador of Japan, the Hon. Mr. Norio Maruyama and the Head of the WFP Office in Eswatini, Deepak Shah. In 2021, during school closures as a result of COVID-19 regulations, most children were deprived of their only meal for the day.

    The scourge of COVID-19 has exacerbated food insecurity through limited economic opportunities and high commodity prices, exacerbating vulnerability, especially among women and children.

    The amount of E 25,000,000 (equivalent to US$ 1,641,497) will go to the Homegrown School-Feeding (HGSF) program, which seeks to provide nutritious and varied meals to schoolchildren.

    The food basket consists of porridge/rice, beans, spinach, cabbage, onion, lettuce, vegetable oil, and eggs, a recent addition.

    In addition to rice and vegetable oil, the food comes from more than 600 small local farmers who belong to 17 registered cooperatives.

    In addition to ensuring a healthy cooked lunch for school children (for many, their only meal of the day), the funding will ensure smallholder farmers' access to guaranteed markets for their produce, facilitating sustainable food production.

    Participating farmers will also receive training in "conservation" farming techniques, helping them increase yields and reduce costs.

    “We are grateful to Japan for this timely contribution, which will allow us to continue our work to save and improve lives here,” said Mr. Shah. “Covid-19 caused large-scale job losses, reduced income and opportunities for families, and severely aggravated already severe food insecurity, especially among the poorest and youngest.” According to the most recent assessments, sixteen percent of Eswatini's 1.2 million people are acutely food insecure, and a similar proportion of its children are stunted due to chronic malnutrition.

    HE Norio Maruyama, Ambassador of Japan to the Kingdom of Eswatini, said: “During this unprecedented time, we would like to contribute again to improving the livelihoods of vulnerable people in Eswatini.

    This assistance illustrates a longstanding friendship between our two peoples.” The Government of Japan has been financing food assistance for developing countries since 1968 and is a long-time partner of WFP in Eswatini.

  •  Botswana reaches historic UN HIV target
    Botswana reaches ‘historic’ UN HIV target
     Botswana reaches historic UN HIV target
    Botswana reaches ‘historic’ UN HIV target
    Foreign3 weeks ago

    Botswana reaches ‘historic’ UN HIV target

    Botswana has become the second nation in the world, after Eswatini, to reach a historic UN goal to eradicate AIDS, researchers said Wednesday, in what health experts called "stellar results."

    The country has reached the so-called "95-95-95" target in HIV diagnosis, treatment and viral suppression several years earlier, according to a study released ahead of a world conference on the disease.

    About one in five people in Botswana is living with the virus, one of the highest rates in the world, according to the UN AIDS agency (UNAIDS).

    The agency wanted 95 percent of people with HIV to know their status, 95 percent of those diagnosed on medication and 95 percent of those on treatment to show signs that the virus was being suppressed in their blood. by 2025.

    But the study led by Botswana's Ministry of Health found that the country had already met or exceeded all three thresholds, with a score of 95-98-98. The global average in 2020 was 84-87-90, says UNAIDS.

    “Botswana is making historic new progress against HIV,” said Sharon Lewin, president-elect of the International AIDS Society (IAS), at a virtual news conference presenting the results.

    The country is "well positioned to end its HIV epidemic by 2030. Simply put, these are truly stellar results."

    Madisa Mine, lead author of the study and a Botswana government virologist, said the results were encouraging.

    “We have translated a hopeless situation into a situation where there is now hope,” he said.

    Now both the government and people taking medication could hope that Botswana would one day become AIDS-free, Mine added.

    That was a far cry from when he began working on the disease two decades ago, and it seemed the nation was "facing extinction" due to the sheer number of infections.

    'Doable' The article, which has not yet been peer-reviewed or published in a journal, was based on interviews and blood tests of more than 14,000 people aged 15 to 64.

    Another southern African country, the small landlocked kingdom of Eswatini, became the first country to reach the UN target by 2020, says UNAIDS.

    UNAIDS Deputy Executive Director Matthew Kavanagh said Botswana's progress was due to a number of factors, including government investment and rapid adoption of the self-assessment.

    In 2002, Botswana became the first African country to offer free antiretroviral drugs, which help contain the virus and prevent it from infecting others.

    And in 2019, the country of 2.3 million people decriminalized same-sex relationships, something Kavanagh said "has helped more and more people get attention."

    Botswana showed that it was possible to control the disease, said IAS President Adeeba Kamarulzaman.

    “It is not an easy feat. But what it shows is that it is feasible with investment and political commitment, as well as with communities working to provide the necessary services," he told AFP from Montreal ahead of the 24th International AIDS Conference, which opens in the city on Friday. Canadian.

    Globally, around 38 million people, including almost two million children, were living with HIV in 2020, and more than 600,000 died from AIDS-related illnesses, according to UNAIDS.

    Eastern and Southern Africa are the most affected regions, accounting for more than half of all cases.

  •  Paradigm Initiative PIN celebrates 15 years of improving the livelihoods of underserved young Africans through digital inclusion and rights programs
    Paradigm Initiative (PIN) celebrates 15 years of improving the livelihoods of underserved young Africans through digital inclusion and rights programs
     Paradigm Initiative PIN celebrates 15 years of improving the livelihoods of underserved young Africans through digital inclusion and rights programs
    Paradigm Initiative (PIN) celebrates 15 years of improving the livelihoods of underserved young Africans through digital inclusion and rights programs
    Africa3 weeks ago

    Paradigm Initiative (PIN) celebrates 15 years of improving the livelihoods of underserved young Africans through digital inclusion and rights programs

    Leading Pan African Digital Rights and Inclusion organization, Paradigm Initiative (PIN) (www.Paradigmhq.org) is celebrating 15 years of impacting the lives of more than 5,000 underserved young Africans with better livelihoods through digital opportunities and protection. of their lives online. Rights.

    For more than eight years, PIN has played a critical role in advancing Internet freedom, proposing policy solutions and monitoring the legal and policy framework around Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in the continent. to guarantee the rights of citizens. This contribution has been strengthened by the organization's competencies in ICT capacity building, research and reporting.

    The organization has also trained a significant number of non-profit organizations and educational institutions on the use of ICTs for digital, online and social media safety advocacy through its annual Digital Rights Reports, which they have been made into short films to target more of a younger audience.

    This milestone is commemorated through a series of activities that began with a dinner and award ceremony held on Saturday in Lagos, Nigeria. At the dinner, PIN honored individuals, stakeholders and partner organizations who contributed to the success of its mission. The event also provided a platform for open discussion about PIN's journey and testimonials.

    PIN, which has regional offices in Cameroon, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal, Zambia and Zimbabwe, is also organizing a debate competition that will allow young Africans to support or oppose the topic: 'Do social and cultural norms in Africa prevent the realization of of digital rights and inclusion?' From a pool of 321 entrants (249 English and 72 French), eight contestants from Benin, Côte d'Ivoire, Cameroon, Eswatini, Malawi and Nigeria were shortlisted to compete for the semi-finals (second round). The final winner (in both the French and English categories) will be announced during the PIN Festival that will take place in Harare, Zimbabwe, between October 10 and 14, 2022.

    The festival is a celebration of the behind-the-scenes collective effort to promote digital rights and inclusion in Africa over the years. During the festival in Harare, PIN will highlight their work and the impact the organization has made through collaborations.

    PIN Executive Director Mr. 'Gbenga Sesan reaffirmed the organization's commitment to digital inclusion and improving digital skills, adding that beneficiaries of the program now enjoy a better quality of life and have more freedom. on the Internet with a greater awareness of their rights online.

    This has been achieved primarily through the organisation's flagship programme: Digital Inclusion, which includes Life Skills, ICT, Financial Literacy and Entrepreneurship Training (LIFE), Girls' Digital Readiness Program and a software engineering school, Dufuna , which targets high-potential young Africans who are techies. -driven.

    The digital inclusion program has grown by leaps and bounds and started in a community in Ajegunle, Lagos State, South West Region of Nigeria. Today, the LIFE program is being implemented in Senegal and in three regions of Nigeria, namely the South West, South East and North West regions.

    Working in partnership with organizations such as Mentor an Africa Child Initiative, Startup Kebbi and the Youth and Women Empowerment Center (YOWEC), the LIFE program has since expanded to Ogun, Kebbi and Rivers States.

    The program has also been implemented in secondary schools under the auspices of LIFE@Schools Clubs. Under the technology club, students receive weekly training using the same curriculum as the LIFE program in the process of improving their digital skills.

    With the advent of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in 2020, PIN introduced the virtual version of the LIFE training program that has enabled the organization to train youth in 12 African countries, namely; Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe.

  •  IDU facilitates budgeting across Africa
    IDU facilitates budgeting across Africa
     IDU facilitates budgeting across Africa
    IDU facilitates budgeting across Africa
    Africa4 weeks ago

    IDU facilitates budgeting across Africa

    IDU Holdings (https://www.IDUsoft.com/), the financial planning and analysis software company, has set out to replicate its success in southern and eastern African countries in other markets in Africa. Its recent restructuring, including the merger with IDU KZN, has prepared the company for this next phase of growth. Alliances will be key to the expansion strategy.

    Margie Whitten joined the IDU Holdings senior management team as CRO (Africa) in early June 2022. Whitten was previously a Director of IDU KZN where she successfully grew IDU's client base in Eswatini, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, South Africa (KZN), Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe. She will bring this experience to bear on growth in existing and new African countries.

    IDU is ideally configured to implement this expansion strategy. Over the last two years, it has optimized its flagship product, idu-Concept, to meet the budgeting and forecasting requirements of customers in any industry. During the pandemic, IDU customers used idu-Concept to speed up budgeting cycles from months to weeks, and forecasting cycles were reduced to days, if not hours. This allowed IDU clients to have the information they needed at their fingertips to make good data-driven decisions and the flexibility to change direction when markets changed. Nonfinancial managers were happy not to be bogged down in budgeting. Additionally, with the merger, all IDU customers are now supported by a consolidated help desk and have access to the depth and breadth of experience and knowledge within the IDU team.

    "African business leaders recently predicted that sub-Saharan Africa will exceed IMF forecasts for GDP growth in 2022 and 2023," Whitten said. “Foresight, budgeting and planning will continue to be key business activities for the companies driving this growth, allowing them to avoid risks and take advantage of the opportunities that exist. IDU not only makes these financial processes much less painful and time-consuming, it also gives businesses the flexibility and agility to navigate a post-pandemic economy that is far from predictable.”

    “I am delighted to have someone of Margie Whitten's caliber and experience leading our expansion and growth in Africa. She has the technical and business knowledge to help companies solve their budgeting and forecasting challenges and achieve rapid ROI,” said Kevin Phillips, CEO of IDU. "As a company founded in South Africa, with locally developed software, we are well positioned to understand the dynamics of business challenges in diverse African markets and well placed to support our customers."

    IDU's operations, including support, are located in Cape Town, South Africa, and in a similar time zone to the rest of the region. Through its network of partners, which IDU is now actively growing, the company has a good understanding of the local contexts in which businesses operate.

    Whitten will visit Gaborone (Aug 2, 2022), Lusaka (Aug 11, 2022) and Kampala (Aug 16, 2022), along with our partners 4Site/AccTech Botswana, Zambia and Uganda. To schedule a meeting, please email margie@idusoft.com.

  •  African Development Bank Group Board approves over 1 billion for emergency food production plan
    African Development Bank Group Board approves over  African Development Bank Group Board approves over 1 billion for emergency food production plan billion for emergency food production plan
     African Development Bank Group Board approves over 1 billion for emergency food production plan
    African Development Bank Group Board approves over  African Development Bank Group Board approves over 1 billion for emergency food production plan billion for emergency food production plan
    Africa4 weeks ago

    African Development Bank Group Board approves over $1 billion for emergency food production plan

    The Board of Directors of the African Development Bank Group (www.AfDB.org) has approved 24 accelerated programs to help Africa mitigate rising food prices and inflation caused by Russia's war in Ukraine, the climate and the Covid-19 pandemic.

    The first round of approvals is part of the Bank's $1.5 billion African Emergency Food Production Fund, established in May to boost food security, nutrition and resilience across the continent.

    The facility will provide 20 million small African farmers with certified seeds and increased access to agricultural fertilizers. It will also support governance and policy reform, which is expected to encourage greater investment in Africa's agricultural sector. The African Emergency Food Production Facility will enable African farmers to produce an additional 38 million tonnes of food over the next two years. This is food with an estimated value of 12,000 million dollars.

    As of July 15, the Bank Group's Board of Directors had approved a total of $1.13 billion in blended financing for Emergency Fund programs for 24 countries: eight West African countries; five in East Africa; six in southern Africa; four in Central Africa and one in North Africa.

    "This is a historic week for the African Development Bank and the African Emergency Food Production Fund," said Dr. Beth Dunford, Bank Vice President for Agriculture, Human and Social Development. "These programs will deliver much-needed climate-adapted seeds, access to affordable fertilizers and usher in policy reforms to enable the agricultural sector to provide immediate, medium and long-term solutions to the challenges facing member countries." region of".

    The African Emergency Food Production Service is designing programs to respond to requests from more countries on the continent.

    The facility focuses on staple crops that many African nations import heavily from Russia and Ukraine. However, the war between Russia and Ukraine has left the continent with a deficit of at least 30 million tons of food. The successful implementation of the facility will deliver 38 million tons of food, exceeding the amount imported from Russia and Ukraine. Through the facility, African farmers will produce approximately 11 million tons of wheat, 18 million tons of corn, 6 million tons of rice and 2.5 million tons of soybeans.

    The program will build on the success of the Bank of African Agricultural Transformation Technologies (TAAT) platform. Launched in 2019, TAAT delivered heat-tolerant wheat seed varieties to 1.8 million farmers in seven countries. Wheat production also increased by 2.7 million tons, valued at 840 million dollars.

    Full list of beneficiary countries of the first batch of approvals:

    West Africa (8): Senegal, Liberia, Niger, Togo, Sierra Leone, Gambia, Côte d'Ivoire Nigeria East Africa (5): Tanzania, Kenya, Burundi, South Sudan, Somalia South Africa (6): Eswatini, Madagascar, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Mozambique. Central Africa (4): Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Cameroon. North Africa (1): Egypt

    For more details on the African Emergency Food Production Fund, click here (https://bit.ly/3cjGGfT):

  •  Coronavirus Southern Africa faces uptick in COVID 19 cases
    Coronavirus: Southern Africa faces uptick in COVID-19 cases
     Coronavirus Southern Africa faces uptick in COVID 19 cases
    Coronavirus: Southern Africa faces uptick in COVID-19 cases
    Africa3 months ago

    Coronavirus: Southern Africa faces uptick in COVID-19 cases

    Southern Africa is facing a surge in COVID-19 cases for the third consecutive week as the region's winter season approaches. The rebound has broken a two-month decline in overall infections recorded across the continent.

    The subregion recorded 46,271 cases in the week ending May 8, 2022, which represents an increase of 32% from the previous week. The increase is largely due to a spike in South Africa, where weekly recorded cases have quadrupled in the past three weeks. However, deaths have not risen as fast. South Africa recorded 376 deaths in the last three weeks, double compared to the previous three weeks.

    Although cases have increased, hospitalization in South Africa remains low, with the number of currently admitted patients who have tested positive for COVID-19 around 20% of the peak in late December 2021. In Gauteng and KwaZulu provinces -Natal, where the last wave was detected for the first time, both hospitalizations and in-hospital deaths increased between 90% and 100% in the last two weeks compared to the previous fortnight.

    The current surge is being driven by the Omicron variant amid relaxed public health and social measures. Since the beginning of April, South Africa alone has recorded 1,369 cases of Omicron's subvariant BA.2, 703 cases of subvariant BA.4, and 222 cases of subvariant BA.5. However, BA.4 and BA.5 remain the most concerning because the two subvariants contain the largest number of mutations and it is not yet clear how they affect immunity.

    In addition to South Africa, Eswatini and Namibia also saw an increase in cases, with both reporting 50% more new cases in the last two weeks compared to the previous two weeks.

    Africa's last four pandemic waves occurred in the middle and end of the year and were mostly driven by new variants of COVID-19, winter seasons, and high population movement during these holiday periods. In 2021, the Delta-driven mid-year surge began around May and late November with the appearance of Omicron.

    “This increase in cases is an early warning sign that we are closely monitoring. Now is the time for countries to step up preparedness and ensure that they can mount an effective response in the event of a new pandemic wave,” said Dr. Abdou Salam Gueye, Director of Emergency Preparedness and Response at the Regional Office of the World Health Organization (WHO). for Africa

    In the past two years, African countries have greatly improved their response to COVID-19, with key aspects such as surveillance, testing and treatment being strengthened. It is vital that these measures are maintained and rapidly expanded should COVID-19 cases rise further and in many countries.

    The continent has also stepped up genomic sequencing. Between January and April 2021, African laboratories reported over 9,000 sequences. This has increased more than fourfold to almost 40,000 during the same period this year.

    However, with cases declining earlier this year, countries have rolled back public health measures, including surveillance. Testing has also decreased. Between March and May 2022, only 30% of countries reporting testing data met the WHO benchmark of 10 tests per 10,000 people per week. This is down from 40% in the months between the Delta and Omicron-driven waves in 2021.

    "With the experience gained in the past two years, we must do everything possible to curb the adverse impacts of a new pandemic wave by intensifying vaccination and measures to detect and prevent the spread of the virus, as well as treat patients." Dr. Gueye said. “To defeat this pandemic, we must remain vigilant. The harsh reality is that complacency comes at a high price.”

    So far, Africa has reported 11.7 million cases and around 253,000 deaths. The mainland recorded 52,878 cases in the week ending May 8, a 38% increase from the previous week.

    WHO today held a virtual press conference led by Dr. Gueye and facilitated by APO Group. He was joined by Professor Placide Mbala, Head of the Department of Epidemiology and Head of the Laboratory of Genomic Pathogens, National Institute for Biomedical Research, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Dr Kerrigan McCarthy, Specialist Pathologist, National Institute of Communicable Diseases, South Africa .

    Also present from the WHO Regional Office for Africa to answer questions were Dr. Thierno Balde, Regional Incident Manager for COVID-19, Dr. Nicksy Gumede-Moeletsi, Regional Virologist, Dr. Mory Keita, Manager Director for the Ebola outbreak response in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Zora Machekanyanga, Communications Officer, Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, WHO Intercountry Support Team for Eastern and Southern Africa.

  •  New Permanent Representative of Eswatini Presents Credentials to the Director General of the United Nations Office at Geneva
    New Permanent Representative of Eswatini Presents Credentials to the Director-General of the United Nations Office at Geneva
     New Permanent Representative of Eswatini Presents Credentials to the Director General of the United Nations Office at Geneva
    New Permanent Representative of Eswatini Presents Credentials to the Director-General of the United Nations Office at Geneva
    Africa3 months ago

    New Permanent Representative of Eswatini Presents Credentials to the Director-General of the United Nations Office at Geneva

    Vuyile Dumisani Dlamini, the new Permanent Representative of Eswatini to the United Nations Office at Geneva, today presented his credentials to Tatiana Valovaya, Director General of the United Nations Office at Geneva.

    Prior to his appointment in Geneva, Mr. Dlamini had served as Legal Advisor to the Eswatini Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation since February 2015. From October to December 2020 and April to July 2021, he also served as Principal Secretary. for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation. Between October 2007 and January 2015 he served as Legal Advisor to the Ministry of Health. He worked at the Attorney General's Office from January 1999 to October 2007 in various positions.

    Mr. Dlamini has a Bachelor of Laws from the University of the Witwatersrand (1995) and a Bachelor of Laws from the University of Eswatini (1989). He was born on March 21, 1964 and is married.

  •  United Cities and Local Governments of Africa UCLG Africa and CitiIQ Announce Scoring of 60 Major African Cities
    United Cities and Local Governments of Africa (UCLG Africa) and CitiIQ Announce Scoring of 60 Major African Cities
     United Cities and Local Governments of Africa UCLG Africa and CitiIQ Announce Scoring of 60 Major African Cities
    United Cities and Local Governments of Africa (UCLG Africa) and CitiIQ Announce Scoring of 60 Major African Cities
    Africa3 months ago

    United Cities and Local Governments of Africa (UCLG Africa) and CitiIQ Announce Scoring of 60 Major African Cities

    United Cities and Local Governments of Africa (UCLGA Africa) (www.UCLGA.org) and CitiIQ, creator of an innovative global city measurement standard, today announced that 60 major African cities have been qualified as contributing to the Africities Summit to be held in Africa. is celebrating in Kisumu, Kenya, from May 17 to 21. Research shows that the continent of Africa will experience unprecedented population growth over the next 30 years, with dramatic urban growth expected to put pressure on its cities, large and small.

    CitiIQ uses an evidence-based methodology to rate 35 Essential Considerations, within the five Dimensions of Basic Needs, Competitiveness, Opportunity, Livability and Destination. Using an intuitive online dashboard, a city's metrics are available to customers through an annual cloud-based subscription.

    The top 60 cities score models the importance of measurement for intermediate cities in Africa. Accurate and consistent data collection is critical to the growth and development of African cities. The confidence of local, regional, national and international investors increases significantly when progress over time can be reliably determined. Intermediate cities must institute accurate data measures to meet their needs, which is critical to building capacity for growth. A consistent scoring system will accelerate the growth of effective data cultures for intermediate cities.

    UCLG Africa is a member of 51 national associations of local governments from all regions of Africa, as well as 2,000 cities and territories with more than 100,000 inhabitants. As such, the organization represents nearly 350 million African citizens.

    Mr. Jean Pierre Elong Mbassi, Secretary General of UCLG Africa, says: “We have specifically selected the theme for the 9th Africities Summit, to focus on the role of African intermediate cities in the implementation of the United Nations 2030 Agenda. Nations and the African Union. Agenda 2063”. UCLG Africa mobilizes strategies, methods and tools to support its members under three pillars aimed at supporting the development of local governments to better serve their communities.

    Kisumu, Kenya, is the first intermediate city to host the Africities Summit.

    CitiIQ uses a wide range of technology tools and expertise to collect city data that is processed through its global city measurement algorithm. Comparable scores out of 100 are produced for the 35 most important considerations in any city. The data feeds into a dashboard that easily illustrates the scores and allows customers to drill down into the data for the 114 city indicators used.

    "Increasingly, the health and well-being of people around the world depend on the effectiveness of their city," says Don Simmonds, CEO of CitiIQ. "City leaders face immense challenges and benefit greatly when comprehensive and comparable data can guide their decisions."

    Most cities struggle to translate disparate data into actions that can improve the lives of their citizens. The CitiIQ method normalizes the data so that city elements can be easily compared within a given city or with other cities around the world. The service is delivered as an application that can run on any website of the customer's city of choice. This can be viewed on desktop, laptop, tablet, and smartphone formats.

    CitiIQ has recognized the critical role intermediate cities play around the world as home to more than half of the world's urban population. Often neglected, these cities play a key role in localizing the SDGs, empowering local governance, and policy coherence that link higher-order priorities with citizens' local priorities.

    Accurate, frequent, and accessible data for local governments and their citizens supports more effective decision-making. The CitiIQ dashboard is a common reference point in the complex interactions of society. Data also plays an increasingly important role as the currency of equity and support for vulnerable populations. CitiIQ provides a benchmark for the values ​​of solidarity, responsibility, transparency and service that characterize intermediary cities.

    In Africa, there are 56 cities with a population between 1 million and 500 thousand, 85 with a population between 500 thousand and 300 thousand, 380 with a population between 100 thousand and 300 thousand and 564 with a population between 50 thousand and 100 thousand. These 1,086 cities need a strong data infrastructure for their development to be effective for decades to come.

    60 African cities rated by CitiIQ

    Region

    Country

    Town

    North Africa

    Algeria

    Algiers, Oran

    Egypt

    Cairo, Alexandria

    Libya

    Tripoli

    Mauritania

    Nouakchott

    Morocco

    Rabat, Casablanca

    Tunisia

    Tunisia

    West Africa

    Benin

    Cotonou

    Burkina Faso

    Ouagadougou

    Cape Verde

    Beach

    Ivory Coast

    Abidjan

    Gambia

    Banjul

    Ghana

    Accra

    Guinea

    Conakry

    Guinea-Bissau

    Bissau

    Liberia

    Monrovia

    Mali

    bamako

    Niger

    Niamey

    Nigeria

    lakes

    Senegal

    Dakar

    Sierra Leone

    free city

    To go

    lomé

    South Africa

    Angolan

    Luanda

    botswana

    Gaborone

    Eswatini

    Manzini

    Lesotho

    Maseru

    Mozambique

    Maputo

    Namibia

    Windhoek

    South Africa

    Johannesburg, Cape Town

    Zambia

    Lusaka

    Zimbabwe

    harare

    Central Africa

    Central African Republic

    bangui

    Chad

    Ndjamena

    Republic of Congo

    Brazzaville

    Democratic Republic of Congo

    Kinshasa

    Equatorial Guinea

    Malabo

    Gabon

    Libreville

    Sao Tome and Principe

    Saint tome

    Cameroon

    Yaounde

    East africa

    Burundi

    Bujumbura

    Comoros

    Moroni

    Djibouti

    Djibouti

    Eritrea

    Asmara

    Ethiopia

    Addis Ababa

    Kenya

    Nairobi, Kisumu

    Madagascar

    Antananarivo

    malawi

    Lilongwe

    Mauricio

    port louis

    Rwanda

    Kigali

    seychelles

    Victory

    Somalia

    Mogadishu

    South Sudan

    Juba

    Sudan

    Khartoum

    Tanzania

    dar es salaam

    Uganda

    Kampala