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  •  African Union Member States 52 reporting COVID 19 cases 23 505 deaths 1 158 and recoveries 5 833 by region Central 1 912 cases 75 deaths 384 recoveries Burundi 6 1 4 Cameroon 1 163 42 305 Central African Republic 14 0 10 Chad 33 0 8 Congo 143 6 11 DRC 350 25 35 Equatorial Guinea 79 0 4 Gabon 120 1 7 Sao Tome amp Principe 4 0 0 Eastern 2 542 56 590 Djibouti 846 2 102 Eritrea 39 0 3 Ethiopia 111 3 16 Kenya 281 14 69 Madagascar 121 0 41 Mauritius 328 9 224 Rwanda 147 0 80 Seychelles 11 0 5 Somalia 237 8 3 South Sudan 4 0 0 Sudan 107 12 8 Tanzania 254 8 11 Uganda 56 0 28 Northern 10 052 817 2 326 Algeria 2 718 384 1 099 Egypt 3 333 250 821 Libya 51 1 11 Mauritania 7 1 2 Morocco 3 064 143 350 Tunisia 879 38 43 Southern 3 525 70 969 Angola 19 2 6 Botswana 20 1 0 Eswatini 24 1 8 Malawi 17 2 3 Mozambique 39 0 8 Namibia 16 0 4 South Africa 3 300 58 903 Zambia 65 3 35 Zimbabwe 25 3 2 Western 5 474 140 1 564 Benin 54 1 27 Burkina Faso 581 38 357 Cape Verde 67 1 1 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 879 10 287 Gambia 10 1 2 Ghana 1 042 9 99 Guinea 622 5 122 Guinea Bissau 50 0 0 Liberia 99 8 7 Mali 246 14 56 Niger 655 20 124 Nigeria 665 22 188 Senegal 377 5 235 Sierra Leone 43 0 6 Togo 84 6 53
    Coronavirus – Africa: African Union Member States reporting COVID-19 cases (21-04-2020)
     African Union Member States 52 reporting COVID 19 cases 23 505 deaths 1 158 and recoveries 5 833 by region Central 1 912 cases 75 deaths 384 recoveries Burundi 6 1 4 Cameroon 1 163 42 305 Central African Republic 14 0 10 Chad 33 0 8 Congo 143 6 11 DRC 350 25 35 Equatorial Guinea 79 0 4 Gabon 120 1 7 Sao Tome amp Principe 4 0 0 Eastern 2 542 56 590 Djibouti 846 2 102 Eritrea 39 0 3 Ethiopia 111 3 16 Kenya 281 14 69 Madagascar 121 0 41 Mauritius 328 9 224 Rwanda 147 0 80 Seychelles 11 0 5 Somalia 237 8 3 South Sudan 4 0 0 Sudan 107 12 8 Tanzania 254 8 11 Uganda 56 0 28 Northern 10 052 817 2 326 Algeria 2 718 384 1 099 Egypt 3 333 250 821 Libya 51 1 11 Mauritania 7 1 2 Morocco 3 064 143 350 Tunisia 879 38 43 Southern 3 525 70 969 Angola 19 2 6 Botswana 20 1 0 Eswatini 24 1 8 Malawi 17 2 3 Mozambique 39 0 8 Namibia 16 0 4 South Africa 3 300 58 903 Zambia 65 3 35 Zimbabwe 25 3 2 Western 5 474 140 1 564 Benin 54 1 27 Burkina Faso 581 38 357 Cape Verde 67 1 1 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 879 10 287 Gambia 10 1 2 Ghana 1 042 9 99 Guinea 622 5 122 Guinea Bissau 50 0 0 Liberia 99 8 7 Mali 246 14 56 Niger 655 20 124 Nigeria 665 22 188 Senegal 377 5 235 Sierra Leone 43 0 6 Togo 84 6 53
    Coronavirus – Africa: African Union Member States reporting COVID-19 cases (21-04-2020)
    Africa3 years ago

    Coronavirus – Africa: African Union Member States reporting COVID-19 cases (21-04-2020)



    African Union Member States (52) reporting COVID-19 cases (23,505) deaths (1,158), and recoveries (5,833) by region:

    Central (1,912 cases; 75 deaths; 384 recoveries): Burundi (6; 1; 4), Cameroon (1,163; 42; 305), Central African Republic (14; 0; 10), Chad (33; 0; 8), Congo (143; 6; 11), DRC (350; 25; 35), Equatorial Guinea (79; 0; 4), Gabon (120; 1; 7), Sao Tome & Principe (4; 0; 0).

    Eastern (2,542; 56; 590): Djibouti (846; 2; 102), Eritrea (39; 0; 3), Ethiopia (111; 3; 16), Kenya (281; 14; 69), Madagascar (121; 0; 41), Mauritius (328; 9; 224), Rwanda (147; 0; 80), Seychelles (11; 0; 5), Somalia (237; 8; 3), South Sudan (4; 0; 0), Sudan (107; 12; 8), Tanzania (254; 8; 11), Uganda (56; 0; 28).

    Northern (10,052; 817; 2,326): Algeria (2,718; 384; 1,099), Egypt (3,333; 250; 821), Libya (51; 1; 11), Mauritania (7; 1; 2), Morocco (3,064; 143; 350), Tunisia (879; 38; 43).

    Southern (3,525; 70; 969): Angola (19; 2; 6), Botswana (20; 1; 0), Eswatini (24; 1; 8), Malawi (17; 2; 3), Mozambique (39; 0; 8), Namibia (16; 0; 4), South Africa (3,300; 58; 903), Zambia (65; 3; 35), Zimbabwe (25; 3; 2).

    Western (5,474; 140; 1,564): Benin (54; 1; 27), Burkina Faso (581; 38; 357), Cape Verde (67; 1; 1), Côte d'Ivoire (879; 10; 287), Gambia (10; 1; 2), Ghana (1,042; 9; 99), Guinea (622; 5; 122), Guinea-Bissau (50; 0; 0), Liberia (99; 8; 7), Mali (246; 14; 56), Niger (655; 20; 124), Nigeria (665; 22; 188), Senegal (377; 5; 235), Sierra Leone (43; 0; 6), Togo (84; 6; 53).

  •   Authorities in Sub Saharan Africa must take urgent action to protect people in detention from COVID 19 including releasing prisoners of conscience reviewing cases of pre trial detention and guaranteeing access to healthcare and sanitation products in all facilities Amnesty International said today In many countries across Sub Saharan Africa a high proportion of those in detention are there just for peacefully exercising their human rights As well as being the right thing to do releasing prisoners of conscience immediately and unconditionally would free up space in these facilities and help to protect prisoners and staff from the COVID 19 Samira Daoud Amnesty International s Director for West and Central Africa As COVID 19 spreads across Sub Saharan Africa the severe overcrowding seen in many prisons and detention centres risks becoming a public health catastrophe especially given the general lack of health care and sanitation said Samira Daoud Amnesty International s Director for West and Central Africa In many countries across the region a high proportion of those in detention are there just for peacefully exercising their human rights As well as being the right thing to do releasing prisoners of conscience immediately and unconditionally would free up space in these facilities and help to protect prisoners and staff from the virus Amnesty International is also calling authorities to consider early temporary or conditional release of older prisoners and those with underlying medical conditions as well as women and girls who are in detention with dependent children or who are pregnant Across Sub Saharan Africa pre trial detention remains widely used excessively and as a tool of punishment As at June 2019 there were 28 045 people detained in prisons in Madagascar which have a total national capacity of 10 360 More than 75 percent of the 977 boys detained were in pre trial detention Children and adults accused of petty crimes in Madagascar are equally forced to stay in overcrowded and unhygienic prisons for longer than the legal term of pre trial detention In Senegal before the release of detainees announced in March 2020 the country had 11 547 people held in 37 prisons with a total capacity of 4 224 detainees Similarly Burundi whose prisons have a capacity of 4 194 people had 11 464 detainees by December 2019 of which 45 5 were in pre trial detention The latest data available from Makala Central Prison in the DRC shows that in 2016 it held 8 000 prisoners more than five times its official capacity of 1 500 While about 700 prisoners were released countrywide in 2019 at least 120 detainees died from starvation lack of access to clean water and proper healthcare in the same period Even before the COVID 19 pandemic prisons in DRC were deadly places As well as exposing the appalling reality people deprived of their liberty face the virus is exacerbating the risks that detainees face day to day Deprose Muchena Amnesty International s Director for East and Southern Africa Even before the COVID 19 pandemic prisons in DRC were deadly places As well as exposing the appalling reality people deprived of their liberty face the virus is exacerbating the risks that detainees face day to day said Deprose Muchena Amnesty International s Director for East and Southern Africa Journalists human rights defenders students Many countries in the region have a long record of arbitrarily detaining people for exercising or defending the rights to freedom of expression peaceful assembly or association which has contributed to overcrowding Amnesty International has highlighted the plight of several prisoners of conscience who are now faced with the real threat of COVID 19 in prison These include The journalist Ignace Sossou in Benin was sentenced on 24 December 2019 to 18 months imprisonment for harassment through electronic means of communication for tweeting remarks attributed to the public prosecutor who spoke at a conference organized by the French Media Development Agency CFI In Burundi human rights defender Germain Rukuki was arrested for his work and is currently serving a 32 year prison sentence while four journalists working for one of the country s few remaining independent media Iwacu were sentenced on 30 January 2020 to two and a half years in jail for attempting to investigate deadly clashes in the country Three students Fomusoh Ivo Feh Afuh Nivelle Nfor and Azah Levis Gob were sentenced to 10 years in prison for failing to report terrorism related information after texting a joke on Boko Haram in Cameroon Among people still detained for protesting peacefully either against the alleged irregularities during the 2018 presidential election or in favor of economic and social rights in English speaking regions there is notably the case of Mancho Bibixy Tse He was arrested on 9 January 2017 and sentenced on 25 May 2018 by a military court to 15 years in prison for terrorism simply for having peacefully protested marginalization of English speaking Cameroonians In Chad Martin Inoua the director of the privately owned newspaper Salam Info was sentenced to three years imprisonment in September 2019 for defamation slanderous accusation and criminal conspiracy after publishing an article alleging sexual assault by a former minister Amnesty International considers all these people prisoners of conscience who have been imprisoned for exercising their human rights They must be released immediately and unconditionally Deprose Muchena Amnesty International considers all these people prisoners of conscience who have been imprisoned for exercising their human rights They must be released immediately and unconditionally said Deprose Muchena In Guinea activists of the National Front for the Defense of the Constitution FNDC are arbitrarily detained for peacefully demonstrating against a constitutional reform project that could allow President Alpha Cond to run for a third term and the holding of the constitutional referendum of 22 March 2020 Ibrahimo Abu Mbaruco a journalist in Mozambique was forcibly disappeared on 7 April 2020 after sending a text message to a colleague saying he was being harassed by soldiers near his house in Palma town in Cabo Delgado Province in the North Mozambican authorities are known for arbitrarily detaining journalists in prison and subjecting them to torture and other ill treatment It is frightening that such a large number of people who peacefully exercised their human rights are now faced with the risk of contracting the deadly COVID 19 in prisons across Africa They must all be released without further ado Deprose Muchena It is frightening that such a large number of people who peacefully exercised their human rights are now faced with the risk of contracting the deadly COVID 19 in prisons across Africa They must all be released without further ado said Deprose Muchena In Somaliland President Muse Bihi Abdi pardoned 574 prisoners on 1 April to ease overcrowding in the face of COVID 19 but failed to release freelance journalist Abdimalik Muse Oldon who was arrested and arbitrarily detained a year ago for criticizing the president on Facebook Political opponents and government critics In Congo four supporters of the opposition movement Incarner L Espoir Parfait Mabiala Franck Donald Saboukoulou Loubaki Guil Miangu Ossebi and Meldry Rolf Dissavoulou were accused of endangering state security and have been detained arbitrarily for several months Political opponents and candidates for the 2016 presidential election Jean Marie Michel Mokoko and Andr Okombi Salissa were condemned for endangering the internal security of the state in 2018 and have since been in arbitrary detention In Eritrea anyone expressing a differing political view from that of the government is at risk of arrest thousands of politicians journalists human rights defenders and even their family members have been detained for years with no record of their release While Ethiopia has released over 10 000 prisoners about to complete their sentences or serving a maximum of three year jail terms in the face of COVID 19 the government continues with the unjust detention of opposition politicians and journalists simply for their views or for doing their work In Madagascar Arphine Helisoa publishing director of the Ny Valosoa newspaper was sent to pre trial detention in the capital city s Antanimora prison on 4 April after being charged with spreading fake news and incitement of hatred towards President Andry Rajoelina for criticizing the president s handling of the national response to COVID 19 In South Sudan the National Security Service has arbitrarily detained hundreds possibly thousands of perceived government opponents journalists and members of civil society without charge since the conflict begun in 2013 Prisoners rely on their families for food many of whom are now unable to do so because of COVID 19 restrictions In Tanzania human rights lawyer Tito Magoti and his co accused Theodory Giyani have been in police detention since 20 December 2019 the court adjourning their trial for the ninth time on 15 April 2020 In Uganda military police arrested writer and law student Kakwenza Rukira on 13 April 2020 over his book Greedy Barbarians which criticizes the country s first family He is yet to be charged The spread of COVID 19 is a public health concern even in prisons and other detention facilities Reducing the number of people in detention should be an integral and urgent part of state responses to COVID 19 which must begin by immediately and unconditionally releasing all those who shouldn t be incarcerated in the first place Samira Daoud The spread of COVID 19 is a public health concern even in prisons and other detention facilities Reducing the number of people in detention should be an integral and urgent part of state responses to COVID 19 which must begin by immediately and unconditionally releasing all those who shouldn t be incarcerated in the first place said Samira Daoud
    Protect detainees at risk of COVID-19, unclog prisons and release prisoners of conscience
      Authorities in Sub Saharan Africa must take urgent action to protect people in detention from COVID 19 including releasing prisoners of conscience reviewing cases of pre trial detention and guaranteeing access to healthcare and sanitation products in all facilities Amnesty International said today In many countries across Sub Saharan Africa a high proportion of those in detention are there just for peacefully exercising their human rights As well as being the right thing to do releasing prisoners of conscience immediately and unconditionally would free up space in these facilities and help to protect prisoners and staff from the COVID 19 Samira Daoud Amnesty International s Director for West and Central Africa As COVID 19 spreads across Sub Saharan Africa the severe overcrowding seen in many prisons and detention centres risks becoming a public health catastrophe especially given the general lack of health care and sanitation said Samira Daoud Amnesty International s Director for West and Central Africa In many countries across the region a high proportion of those in detention are there just for peacefully exercising their human rights As well as being the right thing to do releasing prisoners of conscience immediately and unconditionally would free up space in these facilities and help to protect prisoners and staff from the virus Amnesty International is also calling authorities to consider early temporary or conditional release of older prisoners and those with underlying medical conditions as well as women and girls who are in detention with dependent children or who are pregnant Across Sub Saharan Africa pre trial detention remains widely used excessively and as a tool of punishment As at June 2019 there were 28 045 people detained in prisons in Madagascar which have a total national capacity of 10 360 More than 75 percent of the 977 boys detained were in pre trial detention Children and adults accused of petty crimes in Madagascar are equally forced to stay in overcrowded and unhygienic prisons for longer than the legal term of pre trial detention In Senegal before the release of detainees announced in March 2020 the country had 11 547 people held in 37 prisons with a total capacity of 4 224 detainees Similarly Burundi whose prisons have a capacity of 4 194 people had 11 464 detainees by December 2019 of which 45 5 were in pre trial detention The latest data available from Makala Central Prison in the DRC shows that in 2016 it held 8 000 prisoners more than five times its official capacity of 1 500 While about 700 prisoners were released countrywide in 2019 at least 120 detainees died from starvation lack of access to clean water and proper healthcare in the same period Even before the COVID 19 pandemic prisons in DRC were deadly places As well as exposing the appalling reality people deprived of their liberty face the virus is exacerbating the risks that detainees face day to day Deprose Muchena Amnesty International s Director for East and Southern Africa Even before the COVID 19 pandemic prisons in DRC were deadly places As well as exposing the appalling reality people deprived of their liberty face the virus is exacerbating the risks that detainees face day to day said Deprose Muchena Amnesty International s Director for East and Southern Africa Journalists human rights defenders students Many countries in the region have a long record of arbitrarily detaining people for exercising or defending the rights to freedom of expression peaceful assembly or association which has contributed to overcrowding Amnesty International has highlighted the plight of several prisoners of conscience who are now faced with the real threat of COVID 19 in prison These include The journalist Ignace Sossou in Benin was sentenced on 24 December 2019 to 18 months imprisonment for harassment through electronic means of communication for tweeting remarks attributed to the public prosecutor who spoke at a conference organized by the French Media Development Agency CFI In Burundi human rights defender Germain Rukuki was arrested for his work and is currently serving a 32 year prison sentence while four journalists working for one of the country s few remaining independent media Iwacu were sentenced on 30 January 2020 to two and a half years in jail for attempting to investigate deadly clashes in the country Three students Fomusoh Ivo Feh Afuh Nivelle Nfor and Azah Levis Gob were sentenced to 10 years in prison for failing to report terrorism related information after texting a joke on Boko Haram in Cameroon Among people still detained for protesting peacefully either against the alleged irregularities during the 2018 presidential election or in favor of economic and social rights in English speaking regions there is notably the case of Mancho Bibixy Tse He was arrested on 9 January 2017 and sentenced on 25 May 2018 by a military court to 15 years in prison for terrorism simply for having peacefully protested marginalization of English speaking Cameroonians In Chad Martin Inoua the director of the privately owned newspaper Salam Info was sentenced to three years imprisonment in September 2019 for defamation slanderous accusation and criminal conspiracy after publishing an article alleging sexual assault by a former minister Amnesty International considers all these people prisoners of conscience who have been imprisoned for exercising their human rights They must be released immediately and unconditionally Deprose Muchena Amnesty International considers all these people prisoners of conscience who have been imprisoned for exercising their human rights They must be released immediately and unconditionally said Deprose Muchena In Guinea activists of the National Front for the Defense of the Constitution FNDC are arbitrarily detained for peacefully demonstrating against a constitutional reform project that could allow President Alpha Cond to run for a third term and the holding of the constitutional referendum of 22 March 2020 Ibrahimo Abu Mbaruco a journalist in Mozambique was forcibly disappeared on 7 April 2020 after sending a text message to a colleague saying he was being harassed by soldiers near his house in Palma town in Cabo Delgado Province in the North Mozambican authorities are known for arbitrarily detaining journalists in prison and subjecting them to torture and other ill treatment It is frightening that such a large number of people who peacefully exercised their human rights are now faced with the risk of contracting the deadly COVID 19 in prisons across Africa They must all be released without further ado Deprose Muchena It is frightening that such a large number of people who peacefully exercised their human rights are now faced with the risk of contracting the deadly COVID 19 in prisons across Africa They must all be released without further ado said Deprose Muchena In Somaliland President Muse Bihi Abdi pardoned 574 prisoners on 1 April to ease overcrowding in the face of COVID 19 but failed to release freelance journalist Abdimalik Muse Oldon who was arrested and arbitrarily detained a year ago for criticizing the president on Facebook Political opponents and government critics In Congo four supporters of the opposition movement Incarner L Espoir Parfait Mabiala Franck Donald Saboukoulou Loubaki Guil Miangu Ossebi and Meldry Rolf Dissavoulou were accused of endangering state security and have been detained arbitrarily for several months Political opponents and candidates for the 2016 presidential election Jean Marie Michel Mokoko and Andr Okombi Salissa were condemned for endangering the internal security of the state in 2018 and have since been in arbitrary detention In Eritrea anyone expressing a differing political view from that of the government is at risk of arrest thousands of politicians journalists human rights defenders and even their family members have been detained for years with no record of their release While Ethiopia has released over 10 000 prisoners about to complete their sentences or serving a maximum of three year jail terms in the face of COVID 19 the government continues with the unjust detention of opposition politicians and journalists simply for their views or for doing their work In Madagascar Arphine Helisoa publishing director of the Ny Valosoa newspaper was sent to pre trial detention in the capital city s Antanimora prison on 4 April after being charged with spreading fake news and incitement of hatred towards President Andry Rajoelina for criticizing the president s handling of the national response to COVID 19 In South Sudan the National Security Service has arbitrarily detained hundreds possibly thousands of perceived government opponents journalists and members of civil society without charge since the conflict begun in 2013 Prisoners rely on their families for food many of whom are now unable to do so because of COVID 19 restrictions In Tanzania human rights lawyer Tito Magoti and his co accused Theodory Giyani have been in police detention since 20 December 2019 the court adjourning their trial for the ninth time on 15 April 2020 In Uganda military police arrested writer and law student Kakwenza Rukira on 13 April 2020 over his book Greedy Barbarians which criticizes the country s first family He is yet to be charged The spread of COVID 19 is a public health concern even in prisons and other detention facilities Reducing the number of people in detention should be an integral and urgent part of state responses to COVID 19 which must begin by immediately and unconditionally releasing all those who shouldn t be incarcerated in the first place Samira Daoud The spread of COVID 19 is a public health concern even in prisons and other detention facilities Reducing the number of people in detention should be an integral and urgent part of state responses to COVID 19 which must begin by immediately and unconditionally releasing all those who shouldn t be incarcerated in the first place said Samira Daoud
    Protect detainees at risk of COVID-19, unclog prisons and release prisoners of conscience
    AMA3 years ago

    Protect detainees at risk of COVID-19, unclog prisons and release prisoners of conscience

     

    Authorities in Sub-Saharan Africa must take urgent action to protect people in detention from COVID-19, including releasing prisoners of conscience, reviewing cases of pre-trial detention, and guaranteeing access to healthcare and sanitation products in all facilities, Amnesty International said today.

    In many countries across Sub-Saharan Africa, a high proportion of those in detention are there just for peacefully exercising their human rights. As well as being the right thing to do, releasing prisoners of conscience immediately and unconditionally would free up space in these facilities and help to protect prisoners and staff from the COVID-19.

    Samira Daoud, Amnesty International’s Director for West and Central Africa. 

    “As COVID-19 spreads across Sub-Saharan Africa, the severe overcrowding seen in many prisons and detention centres risks becoming a public health catastrophe, especially given the general lack of health care and sanitation,” said Samira Daoud, Amnesty International’s Director for West and Central Africa.

    “In many countries across the region, a high proportion of those in detention are there just for peacefully exercising their human rights. As well as being the right thing to do, releasing prisoners of conscience immediately and unconditionally would free up space in these facilities and help to protect prisoners and staff from the virus.”

    Amnesty International is also calling authorities to consider early, temporary or conditional release of older prisoners and those with underlying medical conditions, as well as women and girls who are in detention with dependent children or who are pregnant.

    Across Sub-Saharan Africa, pre-trial detention remains widely used excessively and as a tool of punishment.  As at June 2019, there were 28,045 people detained in prisons in Madagascar which have a total national capacity of 10, 360. More than 75 percent of the 977 boys detained were in pre-trial detention. Children and adults accused of petty crimes in Madagascar are equally forced to stay in overcrowded and unhygienic prisons for longer than the legal term of pre-trial detention.

    In Senegal, before the release of detainees announced in March 2020, the country had 11,547 people held in 37 prisons with a total capacity of 4,224 detainees. Similarly, Burundi, whose prisons have a capacity of 4,194 people, had 11,464 detainees by December 2019, of which 45.5% were in pre-trial detention.

    The latest data available from Makala Central Prison, in the DRC, shows that in 2016 it held 8,000 prisoners, more than five times its official capacity of 1,500.  While about 700 prisoners were released countrywide in 2019, at least 120 detainees died from starvation, lack of access to clean water and proper healthcare in the same period.

    Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, prisons in DRC were deadly places. As well as exposing the appalling reality people deprived of their liberty face, the virus is exacerbating the risks that detainees face day to day.

    Deprose Muchena, Amnesty International’s Director for East and Southern Africa.

    “Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, prisons in DRC were deadly places. As well as exposing the appalling reality people deprived of their liberty face, the virus is exacerbating the risks that detainees face day to day,” said Deprose Muchena, Amnesty International’s Director for East and Southern Africa.

    Journalists, human rights defenders, students

    Many countries in the region have a long record of arbitrarily detaining people for exercising or defending the rights to freedom of expression, peaceful assembly or association, which has contributed to overcrowding.

    Amnesty International has highlighted the plight of several prisoners of conscience, who are now faced with the real threat of COVID-19 in prison. These include:

    The journalist Ignace Sossou in Benin was sentenced on 24 December 2019 to 18 months imprisonment for “harassment through electronic means of communication” for tweeting remarks attributed to the public prosecutor, who spoke at a conference organized by the French Media Development Agency (CFI).

    In Burundi, human rights defender Germain Rukuki was arrested for his work and is currently serving a 32-year prison sentence, while four journalists working for one of the country’s few remaining independent media, Iwacu, were sentenced on 30 January 2020 to two and a half years in jail for attempting to investigate deadly clashes in the country.

    Three students, Fomusoh Ivo Feh, Afuh Nivelle Nfor and Azah Levis Gob, were sentenced to 10 years in prison for “failing to report terrorism related information” after texting a joke on Boko Haram in Cameroon. Among people still detained for protesting peacefully either against the alleged irregularities during the 2018 presidential election or in favor of economic and social rights in English-speaking regions, there  is notably the case of Mancho Bibixy Tse. He was arrested on 9 January 2017 and sentenced on 25 May 2018 by a military court to 15 years in prison for “terrorism”, simply for having peacefully protested marginalization of English-speaking Cameroonians.

    In Chad, Martin Inoua, the director of the privately-owned newspaper Salam Info, was sentenced to three years imprisonment in September 2019 for defamation, slanderous accusation and criminal conspiracy after publishing an article alleging sexual assault by a former minister.

    Amnesty International considers all these people prisoners of conscience who have been imprisoned for exercising their human rights. They must be released immediately and unconditionally.

    Deprose Muchena. 

    “Amnesty International considers all these people prisoners of conscience who have been imprisoned for exercising their human rights. They must be released immediately and unconditionally,” said Deprose Muchena.

    In Guinea, activists of the National Front for the Defense of the Constitution (FNDC) are arbitrarily detained for peacefully demonstrating against a constitutional reform project that could allow President Alpha Condé to run for a third term and the holding of the constitutional referendum of 22 March 2020.

    Ibrahimo Abu Mbaruco, a journalist in Mozambique, was forcibly disappeared on 7 April 2020 after sending a text message to a colleague saying he was being harassed by soldiers near his house in Palma town, in Cabo Delgado Province in the North. Mozambican authorities are known for arbitrarily detaining journalists in prison, and subjecting them to torture and other ill-treatment.

    It is frightening that such a large number of people who peacefully exercised their human rights are now faced with the risk of contracting the deadly COVID-19 in prisons across Africa. They must all be released without further ado.

    Deprose Muchena

    “It is frightening that such a large number of people who peacefully exercised their human rights are now faced with the risk of contracting the deadly COVID-19 in prisons across Africa. They must all be released without further ado,” said Deprose Muchena.

    In Somaliland, President Muse Bihi Abdi pardoned 574 prisoners on 1 April to ease overcrowding in the face of COVID-19 but failed to release freelance journalist Abdimalik Muse Oldon, who was arrested and arbitrarily detained a year ago for criticizing the president on Facebook.

    Political opponents and government critics

    In Congo, four supporters of the opposition movement “Incarner L’Espoir”, Parfait Mabiala, Franck Donald Saboukoulou Loubaki, Guil Miangué Ossebi and Meldry Rolf Dissavoulou, were accused of endangering state security and have been detained arbitrarily for several months. Political opponents and candidates for the 2016 presidential election, Jean-Marie Michel Mokoko and André Okombi Salissa, were condemned for endangering the internal security of the state in 2018 and have since been in arbitrary detention.

    In Eritrea, anyone expressing a differing political view from that of the government is at risk of arrest; thousands of politicians, journalists, human rights defenders and even their family members have been detained for years with no record of their release.

    While Ethiopia has released over 10,000 prisoners about to complete their sentences or serving a maximum of three-year jail-terms in the face of COVID-19, the government continues with the unjust detention of opposition politicians and journalists simply for their views or for doing their work.

    In Madagascar, Arphine Helisoa, publishing director of the ‘Ny Valosoa’ newspaper, was sent to pre-trial detention in the capital city’s Antanimora prison on 4 April after being charged with spreading “fake news” and “incitement of hatred towards President Andry Rajoelina”, for criticizing the president’s handling of the national response to COVID-19.

    In South Sudan, the National Security Service has arbitrarily detained hundreds, possibly thousands, of perceived government opponents, journalists and members of civil society without charge since the conflict begun in 2013. Prisoners rely on their families for food, many of whom are now unable to do so because of COVID-19 restrictions.

    In Tanzania, human rights lawyer Tito Magoti and his co-accused Theodory Giyani have been in police detention since 20 December 2019, the court adjourning their trial for the ninth time on 15 April 2020. In Uganda, military police arrested writer and law student Kakwenza Rukira on 13 April 2020 over his book “Greedy Barbarians”, which criticizes the country’s first family. He is yet to be charged.

    The spread of COVID-19 is a public health concern even in prisons and other detention facilities. Reducing the number of people in detention should be an integral and urgent part of state responses to COVID-19, which must begin by immediately and unconditionally releasing all those who shouldn’t be incarcerated in the first place.

    Samira Daoud

    “The spread of COVID-19 is a public health concern even in prisons and other detention facilities. Reducing the number of people in detention should be an integral and urgent part of state responses to COVID-19, which must begin by immediately and unconditionally releasing all those who shouldn’t be incarcerated in the first place,” said Samira Daoud.

  •  Total number nbsp positive cases in Africa nbsp 9 457 51 countries 442 deaths 848 recovery cases by Region African Union Member States 51 reporting COVID 19 cases 9 457 deaths 442 and recoveries 848 by region nbsp Central 917 cases 33 deaths 30 recoveries nbsp Burundi 3 0 0 Cameroon 650 9 17 Central African Republic 9 0 3 Chad 9 0 1 Congo 45 5 2 DRC 161 18 5 Equatorial Guinea 16 0 1 Gabon 24 1 1 Eastern 841 18 38 Djibouti 90 0 9 Eritrea 29 0 0 Ethiopia 44 2 4 Kenya 158 6 4 Madagascar 82 0 2 Mauritius 227 7 7 Rwanda 104 0 4 Seychelles 11 0 0 Somalia 7 0 1 South Sudan 1 0 0 Sudan 12 2 3 Tanzania 24 1 3 Uganda 52 0 0 Northern 4 204 321 420 Algeria 1 320 130 90 Egypt 1 173 78 247 Libya 18 1 0 Mauritania 6 1 2 Morocco 1 113 71 76 Tunisia 574 18 5 Southern 1 757 16 55 Angola 8 2 0 Botswana 6 1 0 Eswatini 9 0 1 Malawi 5 0 0 Mozambique 10 0 1 Namibia 16 0 3 South Africa 1 655 11 45 Zambia 39 1 5 Zimbabwe 9 1 0 Western 1 741 54 306 Benin 22 1 5 Burkina Faso 345 17 90 Cape Verde 6 1 0 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 261 3 37 Gambia 4 1 2 Ghana 214 5 3 Guinea 111 0 5 Guinea Bissau 18 0 0 Liberia 13 3 3 Mali 47 3 1 Niger 184 10 13 Nigeria 232 5 33 Senegal 226 2 92 Sierra Leone 6 0 0 Togo 52 3 22
    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 6 April 2020 5:00 p.m
     Total number nbsp positive cases in Africa nbsp 9 457 51 countries 442 deaths 848 recovery cases by Region African Union Member States 51 reporting COVID 19 cases 9 457 deaths 442 and recoveries 848 by region nbsp Central 917 cases 33 deaths 30 recoveries nbsp Burundi 3 0 0 Cameroon 650 9 17 Central African Republic 9 0 3 Chad 9 0 1 Congo 45 5 2 DRC 161 18 5 Equatorial Guinea 16 0 1 Gabon 24 1 1 Eastern 841 18 38 Djibouti 90 0 9 Eritrea 29 0 0 Ethiopia 44 2 4 Kenya 158 6 4 Madagascar 82 0 2 Mauritius 227 7 7 Rwanda 104 0 4 Seychelles 11 0 0 Somalia 7 0 1 South Sudan 1 0 0 Sudan 12 2 3 Tanzania 24 1 3 Uganda 52 0 0 Northern 4 204 321 420 Algeria 1 320 130 90 Egypt 1 173 78 247 Libya 18 1 0 Mauritania 6 1 2 Morocco 1 113 71 76 Tunisia 574 18 5 Southern 1 757 16 55 Angola 8 2 0 Botswana 6 1 0 Eswatini 9 0 1 Malawi 5 0 0 Mozambique 10 0 1 Namibia 16 0 3 South Africa 1 655 11 45 Zambia 39 1 5 Zimbabwe 9 1 0 Western 1 741 54 306 Benin 22 1 5 Burkina Faso 345 17 90 Cape Verde 6 1 0 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 261 3 37 Gambia 4 1 2 Ghana 214 5 3 Guinea 111 0 5 Guinea Bissau 18 0 0 Liberia 13 3 3 Mali 47 3 1 Niger 184 10 13 Nigeria 232 5 33 Senegal 226 2 92 Sierra Leone 6 0 0 Togo 52 3 22
    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 6 April 2020 5:00 p.m
    Africa3 years ago

    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 6 April 2020 5:00 p.m


    Total number positive cases in #Africa 9,457

    51 countries

    442 deaths

    848 recovery cases by Region

    African Union Member States (51) reporting COVID-19 cases (9,457), deaths (442), and recoveries (848) by region: 

    Central (917 cases; 33 deaths; 30 recoveries):  Burundi (3; 0; 0), Cameroon (650; 9; 17), Central African Republic (9; 0; 3), Chad (9; 0; 1), Congo (45; 5; 2), DRC (161; 18; 5), Equatorial Guinea (16; 0; 1), Gabon (24; 1; 1)

    Eastern (841; 18; 38): Djibouti (90; 0; 9), Eritrea (29; 0; 0), Ethiopia (44; 2; 4), Kenya (158; 6; 4), Madagascar (82; 0; 2), Mauritius (227; 7; 7), Rwanda (104; 0; 4), Seychelles (11; 0; 0), Somalia (7; 0; 1), South Sudan (1; 0; 0), Sudan (12; 2; 3), Tanzania (24; 1; 3), Uganda (52; 0; 0)

    Northern (4,204; 321; 420): Algeria (1,320; 130; 90), Egypt (1,173; 78; 247), Libya (18; 1; 0), Mauritania (6; 1; 2), Morocco (1,113; 71; 76), Tunisia (574; 18; 5)

    Southern (1,757; 16; 55): Angola (8; 2; 0), Botswana (6; 1; 0), Eswatini (9; 0; 1), Malawi (5; 0; 0), Mozambique (10; 0; 1), Namibia (16; 0; 3), South Africa (1,655; 11; 45), Zambia (39; 1; 5), Zimbabwe (9; 1; 0)

    Western (1,741; 54; 306): Benin (22; 1; 5), Burkina Faso (345; 17; 90), Cape Verde (6; 1; 0), Côte d'Ivoire (261; 3; 37), Gambia (4; 1; 2), Ghana (214; 5; 3), Guinea (111; 0; 5), Guinea-Bissau (18; 0; 0), Liberia (13; 3; 3), Mali (47; 3; 1), Niger (184; 10; 13), Nigeria (232; 5; 33), Senegal (226; 2; 92), Sierra Leone (6; 0; 0), Togo (52 3; 22)

  •  Total number nbsp positive cases in Africa nbsp 9 457 51 countries 442 deaths 848 recovery cases by Region African Union Member States 51 reporting COVID 19 cases 9 457 deaths 442 and recoveries 848 by region nbsp Central 917 cases 33 deaths 30 recoveries nbsp Burundi 3 0 0 Cameroon 650 9 17 Central African Republic 9 0 3 Chad 9 0 1 Congo 45 5 2 DRC 161 18 5 Equatorial Guinea 16 0 1 Gabon 24 1 1 Eastern 841 18 38 Djibouti 90 0 9 Eritrea 29 0 0 Ethiopia 44 2 4 Kenya 158 6 4 Madagascar 82 0 2 Mauritius 227 7 7 Rwanda 104 0 4 Seychelles 11 0 0 Somalia 7 0 1 South Sudan 1 0 0 Sudan 12 2 3 Tanzania 24 1 3 Uganda 52 0 0 Northern 4 204 321 420 Algeria 1 320 130 90 Egypt 1 173 78 247 Libya 18 1 0 Mauritania 6 1 2 Morocco 1 113 71 76 Tunisia 574 18 5 Southern 1 757 16 55 Angola 8 2 0 Botswana 6 1 0 Eswatini 9 0 1 Malawi 5 0 0 Mozambique 10 0 1 Namibia 16 0 3 South Africa 1 655 11 45 Zambia 39 1 5 Zimbabwe 9 1 0 Western 1 741 54 306 Benin 22 1 5 Burkina Faso 345 17 90 Cape Verde 6 1 0 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 261 3 37 Gambia 4 1 2 Ghana 214 5 3 Guinea 111 0 5 Guinea Bissau 18 0 0 Liberia 13 3 3 Mali 47 3 1 Niger 184 10 13 Nigeria 232 5 33 Senegal 226 2 92 Sierra Leone 6 0 0 Togo 52 3 22
    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 6 April 2020 5:00 p.m
     Total number nbsp positive cases in Africa nbsp 9 457 51 countries 442 deaths 848 recovery cases by Region African Union Member States 51 reporting COVID 19 cases 9 457 deaths 442 and recoveries 848 by region nbsp Central 917 cases 33 deaths 30 recoveries nbsp Burundi 3 0 0 Cameroon 650 9 17 Central African Republic 9 0 3 Chad 9 0 1 Congo 45 5 2 DRC 161 18 5 Equatorial Guinea 16 0 1 Gabon 24 1 1 Eastern 841 18 38 Djibouti 90 0 9 Eritrea 29 0 0 Ethiopia 44 2 4 Kenya 158 6 4 Madagascar 82 0 2 Mauritius 227 7 7 Rwanda 104 0 4 Seychelles 11 0 0 Somalia 7 0 1 South Sudan 1 0 0 Sudan 12 2 3 Tanzania 24 1 3 Uganda 52 0 0 Northern 4 204 321 420 Algeria 1 320 130 90 Egypt 1 173 78 247 Libya 18 1 0 Mauritania 6 1 2 Morocco 1 113 71 76 Tunisia 574 18 5 Southern 1 757 16 55 Angola 8 2 0 Botswana 6 1 0 Eswatini 9 0 1 Malawi 5 0 0 Mozambique 10 0 1 Namibia 16 0 3 South Africa 1 655 11 45 Zambia 39 1 5 Zimbabwe 9 1 0 Western 1 741 54 306 Benin 22 1 5 Burkina Faso 345 17 90 Cape Verde 6 1 0 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 261 3 37 Gambia 4 1 2 Ghana 214 5 3 Guinea 111 0 5 Guinea Bissau 18 0 0 Liberia 13 3 3 Mali 47 3 1 Niger 184 10 13 Nigeria 232 5 33 Senegal 226 2 92 Sierra Leone 6 0 0 Togo 52 3 22
    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 6 April 2020 5:00 p.m
    Africa3 years ago

    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 6 April 2020 5:00 p.m


    Total number positive cases in #Africa 9,457

    51 countries

    442 deaths

    848 recovery cases by Region

    African Union Member States (51) reporting COVID-19 cases (9,457), deaths (442), and recoveries (848) by region: 

    Central (917 cases; 33 deaths; 30 recoveries):  Burundi (3; 0; 0), Cameroon (650; 9; 17), Central African Republic (9; 0; 3), Chad (9; 0; 1), Congo (45; 5; 2), DRC (161; 18; 5), Equatorial Guinea (16; 0; 1), Gabon (24; 1; 1)

    Eastern (841; 18; 38): Djibouti (90; 0; 9), Eritrea (29; 0; 0), Ethiopia (44; 2; 4), Kenya (158; 6; 4), Madagascar (82; 0; 2), Mauritius (227; 7; 7), Rwanda (104; 0; 4), Seychelles (11; 0; 0), Somalia (7; 0; 1), South Sudan (1; 0; 0), Sudan (12; 2; 3), Tanzania (24; 1; 3), Uganda (52; 0; 0)

    Northern (4,204; 321; 420): Algeria (1,320; 130; 90), Egypt (1,173; 78; 247), Libya (18; 1; 0), Mauritania (6; 1; 2), Morocco (1,113; 71; 76), Tunisia (574; 18; 5)

    Southern (1,757; 16; 55): Angola (8; 2; 0), Botswana (6; 1; 0), Eswatini (9; 0; 1), Malawi (5; 0; 0), Mozambique (10; 0; 1), Namibia (16; 0; 3), South Africa (1,655; 11; 45), Zambia (39; 1; 5), Zimbabwe (9; 1; 0)

    Western (1,741; 54; 306): Benin (22; 1; 5), Burkina Faso (345; 17; 90), Cape Verde (6; 1; 0), Côte d'Ivoire (261; 3; 37), Gambia (4; 1; 2), Ghana (214; 5; 3), Guinea (111; 0; 5), Guinea-Bissau (18; 0; 0), Liberia (13; 3; 3), Mali (47; 3; 1), Niger (184; 10; 13), Nigeria (232; 5; 33), Senegal (226; 2; 92), Sierra Leone (6; 0; 0), Togo (52 3; 22)

  •  Nigeria and 38 other countries are to benefit from the 250 million funding dollars announced by the Global Partnership for Education GPE for developing countries The funds will help developing countries to mitigate both the immediate and long term disruptions to education being caused by the COVID 19 pandemic The funds will also help to sustain learning for up to 355 million children with a focus on ensuring that girls and poor children who will be hit the hardest by school closures to continue their education The Nigeria News Agency reports that the Global Partnership for Education supports developing countries to ensure that every child receives quality basic education prioritising the poorest the most vulnerable and those living in countries affected by fragility or conflict GPE mobilises financing for education and supports developing countries to build effective education systems founded on evidence based planning and policiesHowever the GPE in a statement on Monday said that on the whole there are 67 developing countries eligible for the COVID 19 funding In Africa the 39 eligible countries include Benin Burkina Faso Burundi Cape Verde Cameroon Central African Republic Chad Comoros Cote d Ivoire Djibouti Democratic Republic of Congo Eritrea and Ethiopia Others are The Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea Bissau Kenya Lesotho Liberia Madagascar Malawi Mali Mauritania Mozambique Niger Nigeria Rwanda Senegal Sierra Leone Somalia South Sudan Sudan Tanzania Togo Uganda Zambia and Zimbabwe Of the 67 countries eligible for the GPE funds 63 have already closed schools nation wide in response to the pandemic Julia Gillard GPE Board Chair said The COVID 19 pandemic is creating an education emergency that could have devastating impacts on children in developing countries Unless we act now to support education systems millions of vulnerable children especially the poorest girls may not be able to resume learning when this crisis is over SerigneMbaye Thiam GPE Vice Board Chair said GPE has acted swiftly in the face of an unprecedented challenge These funds will ensure that developing countries like Senegal are able to act quickly to mitigate the detrimental impact COVID 19 will have on the most vulnerable children and maintain the resilience of education systems Also Alice Albright GPE s Chief Executive Officer said We are stepping up to mitigate the impacts that school closures in developing countries will have on the most vulnerable children GPE is committed to ensuring that learning can continue and that no child s education is left behind The GPE said the funding will be available immediately to support coordinated and country driven responses in up to 67 countries and meet both urgent and longer term needs The Ministries of Education and local education partners can use the funds to ensure learning can continue particularly for the poorest and most vulnerable for example by producing educational radio and television programmes and distributing equipment such as radios and textbooks to the poorest households The funds can also be used to support teachers ensure children with special needs and disabilities are included and collect data to know that learning is happening the statement said It added tht they can be used to mitigate poverty and gender barriers to learning which will be exacerbated by economic shock and ensure that teachers and schools are equipped to re open when it is safe to do so Edited By Vivian Ihechu Peter Ejiofor NAN
    Nigeria to benefit from GPE’s 0 million for developing countries battling COVID-19
     Nigeria and 38 other countries are to benefit from the 250 million funding dollars announced by the Global Partnership for Education GPE for developing countries The funds will help developing countries to mitigate both the immediate and long term disruptions to education being caused by the COVID 19 pandemic The funds will also help to sustain learning for up to 355 million children with a focus on ensuring that girls and poor children who will be hit the hardest by school closures to continue their education The Nigeria News Agency reports that the Global Partnership for Education supports developing countries to ensure that every child receives quality basic education prioritising the poorest the most vulnerable and those living in countries affected by fragility or conflict GPE mobilises financing for education and supports developing countries to build effective education systems founded on evidence based planning and policiesHowever the GPE in a statement on Monday said that on the whole there are 67 developing countries eligible for the COVID 19 funding In Africa the 39 eligible countries include Benin Burkina Faso Burundi Cape Verde Cameroon Central African Republic Chad Comoros Cote d Ivoire Djibouti Democratic Republic of Congo Eritrea and Ethiopia Others are The Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea Bissau Kenya Lesotho Liberia Madagascar Malawi Mali Mauritania Mozambique Niger Nigeria Rwanda Senegal Sierra Leone Somalia South Sudan Sudan Tanzania Togo Uganda Zambia and Zimbabwe Of the 67 countries eligible for the GPE funds 63 have already closed schools nation wide in response to the pandemic Julia Gillard GPE Board Chair said The COVID 19 pandemic is creating an education emergency that could have devastating impacts on children in developing countries Unless we act now to support education systems millions of vulnerable children especially the poorest girls may not be able to resume learning when this crisis is over SerigneMbaye Thiam GPE Vice Board Chair said GPE has acted swiftly in the face of an unprecedented challenge These funds will ensure that developing countries like Senegal are able to act quickly to mitigate the detrimental impact COVID 19 will have on the most vulnerable children and maintain the resilience of education systems Also Alice Albright GPE s Chief Executive Officer said We are stepping up to mitigate the impacts that school closures in developing countries will have on the most vulnerable children GPE is committed to ensuring that learning can continue and that no child s education is left behind The GPE said the funding will be available immediately to support coordinated and country driven responses in up to 67 countries and meet both urgent and longer term needs The Ministries of Education and local education partners can use the funds to ensure learning can continue particularly for the poorest and most vulnerable for example by producing educational radio and television programmes and distributing equipment such as radios and textbooks to the poorest households The funds can also be used to support teachers ensure children with special needs and disabilities are included and collect data to know that learning is happening the statement said It added tht they can be used to mitigate poverty and gender barriers to learning which will be exacerbated by economic shock and ensure that teachers and schools are equipped to re open when it is safe to do so Edited By Vivian Ihechu Peter Ejiofor NAN
    Nigeria to benefit from GPE’s 0 million for developing countries battling COVID-19
    Education3 years ago

    Nigeria to benefit from GPE’s $250 million for developing countries battling COVID-19

    Nigeria and 38 other countries are to benefit from the 250 million funding dollars announced by the Global Partnership for Education (GPE) for developing countries.

    The funds will help developing countries to mitigate both the immediate and long-term disruptions to education being caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    The funds will also help to sustain learning for up to 355 million children, with a focus on ensuring that girls and poor children who will be hit the hardest by school closures to continue their education.

    The Nigeria News Agency reports that the Global Partnership for Education supports developing countries to ensure that every child receives quality basic education, prioritising the poorest, the most vulnerable and those living in countries affected by fragility or conflict.

    GPE mobilises financing for education and supports developing countries to build effective education systems founded on evidence-based planning and policies

    However, the GPE in a statement on Monday said that on the whole, there are 67 developing countries eligible for the COVID-19 funding.

    In Africa, the 39 eligible countries include Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cape Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Cote d’Ivoire, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea and Ethiopia.

    Others are  The Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    Of the 67 countries eligible for the GPE funds, 63 have already closed schools nation-wide in response to the pandemic.

    Julia Gillard, GPE Board Chair, said: “The COVID-19 pandemic is creating an education emergency that could have devastating impacts on children in developing countries.

    “Unless we act now to support education systems, millions of vulnerable children, especially the poorest girls, may not be able to resume learning when this crisis is over.”

    SerigneMbaye Thiam, GPE Vice Board Chair, said: “GPE has acted swiftly in the face of an unprecedented challenge.

    “These funds will ensure that developing countries, like Senegal, are able to act quickly to mitigate the detrimental impact COVID-19 will have on the most vulnerable children and maintain the resilience of education systems.’’

    Also, Alice Albright, GPE’s Chief Executive Officer, said: “We are stepping up to mitigate the impacts that school closures in developing countries will have on the most vulnerable children.

    “GPE  is committed to ensuring that learning can continue, and that no child’s education is left behind.’’

    The GPE said the  funding will be available immediately to support coordinated and country-driven responses in up to 67 countries and meet both urgent and longer-term needs.

    The Ministries of Education and local education partners can use the funds to ensure learning can continue, particularly for the poorest and most vulnerable, for example by producing educational radio and television programmes and distributing equipment such as radios and textbooks to the poorest households.

    The funds can also be used to support teachers, ensure children with special needs and disabilities are included and collect data to know that learning is happening, the statement said.

    It added tht they can be used to mitigate poverty and gender barriers to learning, which will be exacerbated by economic shock; and ensure that teachers and schools are equipped to re-open when it is safe to do so.  

    (
    Edited By: Vivian Ihechu/Peter Ejiofor)
    (NAN)

  •  Total number nbsp positive cases in Africa nbsp 9 198 51 countries 414 deaths 813 recovery cases by Region AfricaPrepares FactsNotFear African Union Member States 51 reporting COVID 19 cases 9 198 deaths 414 and recoveries 813 by region nbsp Central 917 cases 33 deaths 30 recoveries nbsp Burundi 3 0 0 Cameroon 650 9 17 Central African Republic 9 0 3 Chad 9 0 1 Congo 45 5 2 DRC 161 18 5 Equatorial Guinea 16 0 1 Gabon 24 1 1 Eastern 778 16 28 Djibouti 59 0 9 Eritrea 29 0 0 Ethiopia 43 2 4 Kenya 142 4 4 Madagascar 72 0 0 Mauritius 227 7 0 Rwanda 104 0 4 Seychelles 10 0 0 Somalia 7 0 1 South Sudan 1 0 0 Sudan 12 2 3 Tanzania 20 1 3 Uganda 52 0 0 Northern 4 043 298 420 Algeria 1 251 130 90 Egypt 1 173 78 247 Libya 18 1 0 Mauritania 6 1 2 Morocco 1021 70 76 Tunisia 574 18 5 Southern 1 756 16 53 Angola 8 2 0 Botswana 6 1 0 Eswatini 9 0 1 Malawi 4 0 0 Mozambique 10 0 1 nbsp Namibia 16 0 3 South Africa 1 655 11 45 Zambia 39 1 3 Zimbabwe 9 1 0 Western 1 707 51 282 Benin 22 0 5 Burkina Faso 345 17 90 Cape Verde 6 1 0 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 245 1 25 Gambia 4 1 2 Ghana 214 5 3 Guinea 111 0 5 Guinea Bissau 18 0 0 Liberia 13 3 3 Mali 41 3 1 Niger 184 10 13 Nigeria 232 5 33 Senegal 222 2 82 Sierra Leone 6 0 0 Togo 44 3 20
    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 6 April 2020 9:00a.m
     Total number nbsp positive cases in Africa nbsp 9 198 51 countries 414 deaths 813 recovery cases by Region AfricaPrepares FactsNotFear African Union Member States 51 reporting COVID 19 cases 9 198 deaths 414 and recoveries 813 by region nbsp Central 917 cases 33 deaths 30 recoveries nbsp Burundi 3 0 0 Cameroon 650 9 17 Central African Republic 9 0 3 Chad 9 0 1 Congo 45 5 2 DRC 161 18 5 Equatorial Guinea 16 0 1 Gabon 24 1 1 Eastern 778 16 28 Djibouti 59 0 9 Eritrea 29 0 0 Ethiopia 43 2 4 Kenya 142 4 4 Madagascar 72 0 0 Mauritius 227 7 0 Rwanda 104 0 4 Seychelles 10 0 0 Somalia 7 0 1 South Sudan 1 0 0 Sudan 12 2 3 Tanzania 20 1 3 Uganda 52 0 0 Northern 4 043 298 420 Algeria 1 251 130 90 Egypt 1 173 78 247 Libya 18 1 0 Mauritania 6 1 2 Morocco 1021 70 76 Tunisia 574 18 5 Southern 1 756 16 53 Angola 8 2 0 Botswana 6 1 0 Eswatini 9 0 1 Malawi 4 0 0 Mozambique 10 0 1 nbsp Namibia 16 0 3 South Africa 1 655 11 45 Zambia 39 1 3 Zimbabwe 9 1 0 Western 1 707 51 282 Benin 22 0 5 Burkina Faso 345 17 90 Cape Verde 6 1 0 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 245 1 25 Gambia 4 1 2 Ghana 214 5 3 Guinea 111 0 5 Guinea Bissau 18 0 0 Liberia 13 3 3 Mali 41 3 1 Niger 184 10 13 Nigeria 232 5 33 Senegal 222 2 82 Sierra Leone 6 0 0 Togo 44 3 20
    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 6 April 2020 9:00a.m
    Africa3 years ago

    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 6 April 2020 9:00a.m


    Total number positive cases in #Africa 9,198.

    51 countries
    414 deaths
    813 recovery cases by Region

    #AfricaPrepares #FactsNotFear

    African Union Member States (51) reporting COVID-19 cases (9,198), deaths (414), and recoveries (813) by region: 

    Central (917 cases; 33 deaths; 30 recoveries): Burundi (3; 0; 0), Cameroon (650; 9; 17), Central African Republic (9; 0; 3), Chad (9; 0; 1), Congo (45; 5; 2), DRC (161; 18; 5), Equatorial Guinea (16; 0; 1), Gabon (24; 1; 1).

    Eastern (778; 16; 28): Djibouti (59; 0; 9), Eritrea (29; 0; 0), Ethiopia (43; 2; 4), Kenya (142; 4; 4), Madagascar (72; 0; 0), Mauritius (227; 7; 0), Rwanda (104; 0; 4), Seychelles (10; 0; 0), Somalia (7; 0; 1), South Sudan (1; 0; 0), Sudan (12; 2; 3), Tanzania (20; 1; 3), Uganda (52; 0; 0).

    Northern (4,043; 298; 420): Algeria (1,251; 130; 90), Egypt (1,173; 78; 247), Libya (18; 1; 0), Mauritania (6; 1; 2), Morocco (1021; 70; 76), Tunisia (574; 18; 5).

    Southern (1,756; 16; 53): Angola (8; 2; 0), Botswana (6; 1; 0), Eswatini (9; 0; 1), Malawi (4; 0; 0), Mozambique (10; 0; 1), Namibia (16; 0; 3), South Africa (1,655; 11; 45), Zambia (39; 1; 3), Zimbabwe (9; 1; 0).

    Western (1,707; 51; 282): Benin (22; 0; 5), Burkina Faso (345; 17; 90), Cape Verde (6; 1; 0), Côte d'Ivoire (245; 1; 25), Gambia (4; 1; 2), Ghana (214; 5; 3), Guinea (111; 0; 5), Guinea-Bissau (18; 0; 0), Liberia (13; 3; 3), Mali (41; 3; 1), Niger (184; 10; 13), Nigeria (232; 5; 33), Senegal (222; 2; 82), Sierra Leone (6; 0; 0), Togo (44; 3; 20).

  •  Eritrean American Ciham Ali Ahmed turns 23 today ndash and once again she is spending her birthday behind bars This year she faces the additional and potentially deadly risk of contracting COVID 19 in some prison in Eritrea She is a prisoner of conscience jailed simply for trying to exercise her human rights to leave the country As of 2 April Eritrea a country notorious for arbitrarily arresting and detaining or forcibly disappearing people simply for speaking their minds had at least 22 confirmed cases of COVID 19 according to its Ministry of Health ldquo We join Eritrean families and activists who are extremely worried about their loved ones in calling on the Eritrean authorities to immediately and unconditionally release Ciham Ali and all others jailed simply for exercising their rights rdquo said Deprose Muchena Amnesty International rsquo s Director for East and Southern Africa ldquo The overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in Eritrea rsquo s prisons increase chances of transmission of COVID 19 putting Ciham rsquo s and other prisoners rsquo health and lives at risk President Isaias Afewerki must urgently take measures to reduce the number of people in prison ndash including pre trial detainees the elderly and those with underlying health conditions rdquo The Eritrean authorities must further ensure that prisoners enjoy the same standards of health care as are available to everyone in the community including access to testing prevention and treatment of COVID 19 Ciham Ali was arrested when she was just 15 years old shortly after her father then a minister in President Aferwerki rsquo s government defected and fled to exile She has neither been charged with any crime nor allowed access to her lawyers or family since her arrest Her family does not even know where she is being held or her state of health ldquo Ciham Ali like other prisoners of conscience in Eritrea has lost many years and has seen her life aspirations dashed as days in prison have turned into months and years She must be released and allowed to pursue her dreams rdquo said Deprose Muchena Eritrea is known for jailing thousands of people for their political views their work as journalists or even for practising their religions Many are arrested and detained without charge or trial Once in detention many are denied access to lawyers or family members Amnesty International has documented poor prison conditions in Eritrea in some cases amounting to cruel inhuman or degrading treatment Prisons in Eritrea are generally overcrowded with inadequate water and sanitation facilities and providing poor quality food and drinking water
    Coronavirus – Eritrea: Show humanity and release prisoners of conscience amid COVID-19
     Eritrean American Ciham Ali Ahmed turns 23 today ndash and once again she is spending her birthday behind bars This year she faces the additional and potentially deadly risk of contracting COVID 19 in some prison in Eritrea She is a prisoner of conscience jailed simply for trying to exercise her human rights to leave the country As of 2 April Eritrea a country notorious for arbitrarily arresting and detaining or forcibly disappearing people simply for speaking their minds had at least 22 confirmed cases of COVID 19 according to its Ministry of Health ldquo We join Eritrean families and activists who are extremely worried about their loved ones in calling on the Eritrean authorities to immediately and unconditionally release Ciham Ali and all others jailed simply for exercising their rights rdquo said Deprose Muchena Amnesty International rsquo s Director for East and Southern Africa ldquo The overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in Eritrea rsquo s prisons increase chances of transmission of COVID 19 putting Ciham rsquo s and other prisoners rsquo health and lives at risk President Isaias Afewerki must urgently take measures to reduce the number of people in prison ndash including pre trial detainees the elderly and those with underlying health conditions rdquo The Eritrean authorities must further ensure that prisoners enjoy the same standards of health care as are available to everyone in the community including access to testing prevention and treatment of COVID 19 Ciham Ali was arrested when she was just 15 years old shortly after her father then a minister in President Aferwerki rsquo s government defected and fled to exile She has neither been charged with any crime nor allowed access to her lawyers or family since her arrest Her family does not even know where she is being held or her state of health ldquo Ciham Ali like other prisoners of conscience in Eritrea has lost many years and has seen her life aspirations dashed as days in prison have turned into months and years She must be released and allowed to pursue her dreams rdquo said Deprose Muchena Eritrea is known for jailing thousands of people for their political views their work as journalists or even for practising their religions Many are arrested and detained without charge or trial Once in detention many are denied access to lawyers or family members Amnesty International has documented poor prison conditions in Eritrea in some cases amounting to cruel inhuman or degrading treatment Prisons in Eritrea are generally overcrowded with inadequate water and sanitation facilities and providing poor quality food and drinking water
    Coronavirus – Eritrea: Show humanity and release prisoners of conscience amid COVID-19
    Africa3 years ago

    Coronavirus – Eritrea: Show humanity and release prisoners of conscience amid COVID-19



    Eritrean-American Ciham Ali Ahmed turns 23 today – and once again she is spending her birthday behind bars. This year she faces the additional and potentially deadly risk of contracting COVID-19 in some prison in Eritrea. She is a prisoner of conscience, jailed simply for trying to exercise her human rights to leave the country.

    As of 2 April, Eritrea, a country notorious for arbitrarily arresting and detaining or forcibly disappearing people simply for speaking their minds, had at least 22 confirmed cases of COVID-19, according to its Ministry of Health.

    “We join Eritrean families and activists who are extremely worried about their loved ones in calling on the Eritrean authorities to immediately and unconditionally release Ciham Ali and all others jailed simply for exercising their rights,” said Deprose Muchena, Amnesty International’s Director for East and Southern Africa.

    “The overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in Eritrea’s prisons increase chances of transmission of COVID-19, putting Ciham’s and other prisoners’ health and lives at risk. President Isaias Afewerki must urgently take measures to reduce the number of people in prison – including pre-trial detainees, the elderly and those with underlying health conditions.”

    The Eritrean authorities must further ensure that prisoners enjoy the same standards of health care as are available to everyone in the community, including access to testing, prevention and treatment of COVID-19.

    Ciham Ali was arrested when she was just 15 years old, shortly after her father, then a minister in President Aferwerki’s government defected and fled to exile. She has neither been charged with any crime nor allowed access to her lawyers or family since her arrest. Her family does not even know where she is being held or her state of health.

    “Ciham Ali, like other prisoners of conscience in Eritrea, has lost many years and has seen her life aspirations dashed as days in prison have turned into months and years. She must be released and allowed to pursue her dreams,” said Deprose Muchena.

    Eritrea is known for jailing thousands of people for their political views, their work as journalists or even for practising their religions. Many are arrested and detained without charge or trial. Once in detention, many are denied access to lawyers or family members.

    Amnesty International has documented poor prison conditions in Eritrea, in some cases amounting to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment. Prisons in Eritrea are generally overcrowded, with inadequate water and sanitation facilities and providing poor-quality food and drinking water.

  •  Total number nbsp positive cases in Africa nbsp 8 536 50 countries 360 deaths 710 recovery cases by Region African Union Member States 50 reporting COVID 19 cases 8 536 deaths 360 and recoveries 710 by region nbsp Central 766 cases 32 deaths 28 recoveries nbsp Burundi 3 0 0 Cameroon 509 8 17 Central African Republic 9 0 3 Chad 9 0 1 Congo 45 5 2 DRC 154 18 3 Equatorial Guinea 16 0 1 Gabon 21 1 1 Eastern 707 14 23 Djibouti 51 0 8 Eritrea 29 0 0 Ethiopia 38 0 4 Kenya 126 4 4 Madagascar 70 0 0 Mauritius 196 7 0 Rwanda 102 0 0 Seychelles 10 0 0 Somalia 7 0 1 Sudan 10 2 3 Tanzania 20 1 3 Uganda 48 0 0 Northern 3 837 255 391 Algeria 1 171 105 77 Egypt 1 170 71 241 Libya 18 1 0 Mauritania 6 1 2 Morocco 919 59 66 Tunisia 553 18 5 Southern 1 682 14 51 Angola 8 2 0 Botswana 4 1 0 Eswatini 9 0 1 Malawi 4 0 0 Mozambique 10 0 1 nbsp Namibia 14 0 2 South Africa 1 585 9 45 Zambia 39 1 2 Zimbabwe 9 1 0 Western 1 541 45 217 Benin 16 0 2 Burkina Faso 318 16 66 Cape Verde 6 1 0 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 245 1 25 Gambia 4 1 2 Ghana 214 5 3 Guinea 52 0 1 Guinea Bissau 18 0 0 Liberia 10 1 3 Mali 39 3 0 Niger 144 8 0 Nigeria 214 4 25 Senegal 219 2 72 Sierra Leone 4 0 0 Togo 41 3 18
    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 5 April 2020 9:00a.m
     Total number nbsp positive cases in Africa nbsp 8 536 50 countries 360 deaths 710 recovery cases by Region African Union Member States 50 reporting COVID 19 cases 8 536 deaths 360 and recoveries 710 by region nbsp Central 766 cases 32 deaths 28 recoveries nbsp Burundi 3 0 0 Cameroon 509 8 17 Central African Republic 9 0 3 Chad 9 0 1 Congo 45 5 2 DRC 154 18 3 Equatorial Guinea 16 0 1 Gabon 21 1 1 Eastern 707 14 23 Djibouti 51 0 8 Eritrea 29 0 0 Ethiopia 38 0 4 Kenya 126 4 4 Madagascar 70 0 0 Mauritius 196 7 0 Rwanda 102 0 0 Seychelles 10 0 0 Somalia 7 0 1 Sudan 10 2 3 Tanzania 20 1 3 Uganda 48 0 0 Northern 3 837 255 391 Algeria 1 171 105 77 Egypt 1 170 71 241 Libya 18 1 0 Mauritania 6 1 2 Morocco 919 59 66 Tunisia 553 18 5 Southern 1 682 14 51 Angola 8 2 0 Botswana 4 1 0 Eswatini 9 0 1 Malawi 4 0 0 Mozambique 10 0 1 nbsp Namibia 14 0 2 South Africa 1 585 9 45 Zambia 39 1 2 Zimbabwe 9 1 0 Western 1 541 45 217 Benin 16 0 2 Burkina Faso 318 16 66 Cape Verde 6 1 0 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 245 1 25 Gambia 4 1 2 Ghana 214 5 3 Guinea 52 0 1 Guinea Bissau 18 0 0 Liberia 10 1 3 Mali 39 3 0 Niger 144 8 0 Nigeria 214 4 25 Senegal 219 2 72 Sierra Leone 4 0 0 Togo 41 3 18
    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 5 April 2020 9:00a.m
    Africa3 years ago

    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 5 April 2020 9:00a.m


    Total number positive cases in #Africa 8,536

    50 countries

    360 deaths

    710 recovery cases by Region

    African Union Member States (50) reporting COVID-19 cases (8,536), deaths (360), and recoveries (710) by region: 

    Central (766 cases; 32 deaths; 28 recoveries):  Burundi (3; 0; 0), Cameroon (509; 8; 17), Central African Republic (9; 0; 3), Chad (9; 0; 1), Congo (45; 5; 2), DRC (154; 18; 3), Equatorial Guinea (16; 0; 1), Gabon (21; 1; 1)

    Eastern (707; 14; 23): Djibouti (51; 0; 8), Eritrea (29; 0; 0), Ethiopia (38; 0; 4), Kenya (126; 4; 4), Madagascar (70; 0; 0), Mauritius (196; 7; 0), Rwanda (102; 0; 0), Seychelles (10; 0; 0), Somalia (7; 0; 1), Sudan (10; 2; 3), Tanzania (20; 1; 3), Uganda (48; 0; 0)

    Northern (3,837; 255; 391): Algeria (1,171; 105; 77), Egypt (1,170; 71; 241), Libya (18; 1; 0), Mauritania (6; 1; 2), Morocco (919; 59; 66), Tunisia (553; 18; 5)

    Southern (1,682; 14; 51): Angola (8; 2; 0), Botswana (4; 1; 0), Eswatini (9; 0; 1), Malawi (4; 0; 0), Mozambique (10; 0; 1), Namibia (14; 0; 2), South Africa (1,585; 9; 45), Zambia (39; 1; 2), Zimbabwe (9; 1; 0)

    Western (1,541; 45; 217): Benin (16; 0; 2), Burkina Faso (318; 16; 66), Cape Verde (6; 1; 0), Côte d'Ivoire (245; 1; 25), Gambia (4; 1; 2), Ghana (214; 5; 3), Guinea (52; 0; 1), Guinea-Bissau (18; 0; 0), Liberia (10; 1; 3), Mali (39; 3; 0), Niger (144; 8; 0), Nigeria (214; 4; 25), Senegal (219; 2; 72), Sierra Leone (4; 0; 0), Togo (41; 3; 18)

  •  Total number nbsp positive cases in Africa nbsp 8 736 50 countries 399 deaths 747 recovery cases by Region African Union Member States 51 reporting COVID 19 cases 8 736 deaths 399 and recoveries 747 by region nbsp Central 766 cases 32 deaths 28 recoveries nbsp Burundi 3 0 0 Cameroon 509 8 17 Central African Republic 9 0 3 Chad 9 0 1 Congo 45 5 2 DRC 154 18 3 Equatorial Guinea 16 0 1 Gabon 21 1 1 Eastern 762 15 27 Djibouti 51 0 8 Eritrea 29 0 0 Ethiopia 43 1 4 Kenya 142 4 4 Madagascar 72 0 0 Mauritius 227 7 0 Rwanda 102 0 4 Seychelles 10 0 0 Somalia 7 0 1 South Sudan 1 0 0 Sudan 10 2 3 Tanzania 20 1 3 Uganda 48 0 0 Northern 3 959 290 408 Algeria 1 251 130 90 Egypt 1 170 71 241 Libya 18 1 0 Mauritania 6 1 2 Morocco 961 69 70 Tunisia 553 18 5 Southern 1 684 14 53 Angola 8 2 0 Botswana 4 1 0 Eswatini 9 0 1 Malawi 4 0 0 Mozambique 10 0 1 nbsp Namibia 16 0 2 South Africa 1 585 9 45 Zambia 39 1 3 Zimbabwe 9 1 0 Western 1 565 48 231 Benin 16 0 2 Burkina Faso 318 16 66 Cape Verde 6 1 0 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 245 1 25 Gambia 4 1 2 Ghana 214 5 3 Guinea 52 0 1 Guinea Bissau 18 0 0 Liberia 13 3 3 Mali 39 3 0 Niger 144 8 0 Nigeria 224 5 27 Senegal 222 2 82 Sierra Leone 6 0 0 Togo 44 3 20
    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 5 April 2020 5:00p.m
     Total number nbsp positive cases in Africa nbsp 8 736 50 countries 399 deaths 747 recovery cases by Region African Union Member States 51 reporting COVID 19 cases 8 736 deaths 399 and recoveries 747 by region nbsp Central 766 cases 32 deaths 28 recoveries nbsp Burundi 3 0 0 Cameroon 509 8 17 Central African Republic 9 0 3 Chad 9 0 1 Congo 45 5 2 DRC 154 18 3 Equatorial Guinea 16 0 1 Gabon 21 1 1 Eastern 762 15 27 Djibouti 51 0 8 Eritrea 29 0 0 Ethiopia 43 1 4 Kenya 142 4 4 Madagascar 72 0 0 Mauritius 227 7 0 Rwanda 102 0 4 Seychelles 10 0 0 Somalia 7 0 1 South Sudan 1 0 0 Sudan 10 2 3 Tanzania 20 1 3 Uganda 48 0 0 Northern 3 959 290 408 Algeria 1 251 130 90 Egypt 1 170 71 241 Libya 18 1 0 Mauritania 6 1 2 Morocco 961 69 70 Tunisia 553 18 5 Southern 1 684 14 53 Angola 8 2 0 Botswana 4 1 0 Eswatini 9 0 1 Malawi 4 0 0 Mozambique 10 0 1 nbsp Namibia 16 0 2 South Africa 1 585 9 45 Zambia 39 1 3 Zimbabwe 9 1 0 Western 1 565 48 231 Benin 16 0 2 Burkina Faso 318 16 66 Cape Verde 6 1 0 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 245 1 25 Gambia 4 1 2 Ghana 214 5 3 Guinea 52 0 1 Guinea Bissau 18 0 0 Liberia 13 3 3 Mali 39 3 0 Niger 144 8 0 Nigeria 224 5 27 Senegal 222 2 82 Sierra Leone 6 0 0 Togo 44 3 20
    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 5 April 2020 5:00p.m
    Africa3 years ago

    Africa – COVID-19 Surveillance Update: 5 April 2020 5:00p.m


    Total number positive cases in #Africa 8,736

    50 countries

    399 deaths

    747 recovery cases by Region

    African Union Member States (51) reporting COVID-19 cases (8,736), deaths (399), and recoveries (747) by region: 

    Central (766 cases; 32 deaths; 28 recoveries):  Burundi (3; 0; 0), Cameroon (509; 8; 17), Central African Republic (9; 0; 3), Chad (9; 0; 1), Congo (45; 5; 2), DRC (154; 18; 3), Equatorial Guinea (16; 0; 1), Gabon (21; 1; 1)

    Eastern (762; 15; 27): Djibouti (51; 0; 8), Eritrea (29; 0; 0), Ethiopia (43; 1; 4), Kenya (142; 4; 4), Madagascar (72; 0; 0), Mauritius (227; 7; 0), Rwanda (102; 0; 4), Seychelles (10; 0; 0), Somalia (7; 0; 1), South Sudan (1; 0; 0), Sudan (10; 2; 3), Tanzania (20; 1; 3), Uganda (48; 0; 0)

    Northern (3,959; 290; 408): Algeria (1,251; 130; 90), Egypt (1,170; 71; 241), Libya (18; 1; 0), Mauritania (6; 1; 2), Morocco (961; 69; 70), Tunisia (553; 18; 5)

    Southern (1,684; 14; 53): Angola (8; 2; 0), Botswana (4; 1; 0), Eswatini (9; 0; 1), Malawi (4; 0; 0), Mozambique (10; 0; 1), Namibia (16; 0; 2), South Africa (1,585; 9; 45), Zambia (39; 1; 3), Zimbabwe (9; 1; 0)

    Western (1,565; 48; 231): Benin (16; 0; 2), Burkina Faso (318; 16; 66), Cape Verde (6; 1; 0), Côte d'Ivoire (245; 1; 25), Gambia (4; 1; 2), Ghana (214; 5; 3), Guinea (52; 0; 1), Guinea-Bissau (18; 0; 0), Liberia (13; 3; 3), Mali (39; 3; 0), Niger (144; 8; 0), Nigeria (224; 5; 27), Senegal (222; 2; 82), Sierra Leone (6; 0; 0), Togo (44; 3; 20)

  •  Total number positive cases in Africa 7 028 50 countries nbsp 289 deaths nbsp 592 recovery cases by Region African Union Member States 50 reporting COVID 19 cases 7 123 deaths 289 and recoveries 592 by region nbsp nbsp Central 535 cases 24 deaths 20 recoveries nbsp Burundi 3 0 0 Cameroon 306 7 10 Central African Republic 8 0 3 Chad 7 0 0 Congo 41 3 2 DRC 134 13 3 Equatorial Guinea 15 0 1 Gabon 21 1 1 Eastern 643 14 16 Djibouti 41 0 2 Eritrea 22 0 0 Ethiopia 35 0 4 Kenya 122 3 4 Madagascar 65 0 0 Mauritius 186 7 0 Rwanda 84 0 0 Seychelles 10 0 0 Somalia 5 0 1 Sudan 8 2 2 Tanzania 20 1 3 Uganda 45 0 0 Northern 3 057 203 332 Algeria 986 83 77 Egypt 865 58 201 Libya 11 1 0 Mauritania 5 0 0 Morocco 735 47 49 Tunisia 455 14 5 Southern 1 558 10 48 Angola 8 2 0 Botswana 4 1 0 Eswatini 9 0 1 Malawi 3 0 0 Mozambique 10 0 0 nbsp Namibia 14 0 2 South Africa 1 462 5 45 Zambia 39 1 0 Zimbabwe 9 1 0 Western 1 330 38 176 Benin 16 0 2 Burkina Faso 288 16 50 Cape Verde 6 1 0 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 194 1 15 Gambia 4 1 2 Ghana 204 5 3 Guinea 30 0 1 Guinea Bissau 9 0 0 Liberia 6 0 0 Mali 36 3 0 Niger 98 5 0 Nigeria 190 2 20 Senegal 207 1 66 Sierra Leone 2 0 0 Togo 40 3 17
    Africa: COVID-19 Surveillance Update -3 April 2020 5:00p.m
     Total number positive cases in Africa 7 028 50 countries nbsp 289 deaths nbsp 592 recovery cases by Region African Union Member States 50 reporting COVID 19 cases 7 123 deaths 289 and recoveries 592 by region nbsp nbsp Central 535 cases 24 deaths 20 recoveries nbsp Burundi 3 0 0 Cameroon 306 7 10 Central African Republic 8 0 3 Chad 7 0 0 Congo 41 3 2 DRC 134 13 3 Equatorial Guinea 15 0 1 Gabon 21 1 1 Eastern 643 14 16 Djibouti 41 0 2 Eritrea 22 0 0 Ethiopia 35 0 4 Kenya 122 3 4 Madagascar 65 0 0 Mauritius 186 7 0 Rwanda 84 0 0 Seychelles 10 0 0 Somalia 5 0 1 Sudan 8 2 2 Tanzania 20 1 3 Uganda 45 0 0 Northern 3 057 203 332 Algeria 986 83 77 Egypt 865 58 201 Libya 11 1 0 Mauritania 5 0 0 Morocco 735 47 49 Tunisia 455 14 5 Southern 1 558 10 48 Angola 8 2 0 Botswana 4 1 0 Eswatini 9 0 1 Malawi 3 0 0 Mozambique 10 0 0 nbsp Namibia 14 0 2 South Africa 1 462 5 45 Zambia 39 1 0 Zimbabwe 9 1 0 Western 1 330 38 176 Benin 16 0 2 Burkina Faso 288 16 50 Cape Verde 6 1 0 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 194 1 15 Gambia 4 1 2 Ghana 204 5 3 Guinea 30 0 1 Guinea Bissau 9 0 0 Liberia 6 0 0 Mali 36 3 0 Niger 98 5 0 Nigeria 190 2 20 Senegal 207 1 66 Sierra Leone 2 0 0 Togo 40 3 17
    Africa: COVID-19 Surveillance Update -3 April 2020 5:00p.m
    Africa3 years ago

    Africa: COVID-19 Surveillance Update -3 April 2020 5:00p.m


    Total number positive cases in Africa 7,028 50 countries  289 deaths  592 recovery cases by Region

    African Union Member States (50) reporting COVID-19 cases (7,123), deaths (289), and recoveries (592) by region:   

    Central (535 cases, 24 deaths, 20 recoveries):  Burundi (3, 0, 0), Cameroon (306, 7, 10), Central African Republic (8, 0, 3), Chad (7, 0, 0), Congo (41, 3, 2), DRC (134, 13, 3), Equatorial Guinea (15, 0, 1), Gabon (21, 1, 1)

    Eastern (643, 14, 16): Djibouti (41, 0, 2), Eritrea (22, 0, 0), Ethiopia (35, 0, 4), Kenya (122, 3, 4), Madagascar (65, 0, 0), Mauritius (186, 7, 0), Rwanda (84, 0, 0), Seychelles (10, 0, 0), Somalia (5, 0, 1), Sudan (8, 2, 2), Tanzania (20, 1, 3), Uganda (45, 0, 0)

    Northern (3,057, 203, 332): Algeria (986, 83, 77), Egypt (865, 58, 201), Libya (11, 1, 0), Mauritania (5, 0, 0), Morocco (735, 47, 49), Tunisia (455, 14, 5)

    Southern (1,558, 10, 48): Angola (8, 2, 0), Botswana (4, 1, 0), Eswatini (9, 0, 1), Malawi, (3,0,0), Mozambique (10, 0, 0),  Namibia (14, 0, 2), South Africa (1,462, 5, 45), Zambia (39, 1, 0), Zimbabwe (9, 1, 0)

    Western (1,330, 38, 176): Benin (16, 0, 2), Burkina Faso (288, 16, 50), Cape Verde (6, 1, 0), Côte d'Ivoire (194, 1, 15), Gambia (4, 1, 2), Ghana (204, 5, 3), Guinea (30, 0, 1), Guinea-Bissau (9, 0, 0), Liberia (6, 0, 0), Mali (36, 3, 0), Niger (98, 5, 0), Nigeria (190, 2, 20), Senegal (207, 1, 66), Sierra Leone (2, 0, 0), Togo (40, 3, 17)

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