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  •   UN Habitat in cooperation with Nestle Waters Diageo Arcadis IBI Group and Development Inc organized a side event during the 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference COP27 under the title Transitioning towards a circular economy Innovation in plastic and glass waste recycling addressing the challenges and solutions of solid waste management in the Middle East and North Africa MENA region During the session moderated by Dr Laila Iskandar Former Minister of Environment and State for Urban Renewal and Informal Settlements in Egypt and Founder of CID Consulting experts from UN Habitat and the partner organizations showcased the achievements of the Plan Zero and Dorna initiatives in advancing innovative solutions in plastic and glass waste recycling to support the transition towards a circular economy UN Habitat is committed to taking transformative measures towards creating a circular economy and raising awareness of the social economic and environmental benefits of reducing reusing and recycling glass and plastic waste said Dr Erfan Ali UN Habitat Regional Representative for the Arab States Each partner presented its efforts all moving toward more sustainable and greener approaches through glass and plastic collection and recycling as well as protecting renewing and restoring natural resources Our Bottled Water packaging can be fully circular and has a central role to play in a circular economy it has value is recyclable is collectable and can be used as recycled content Mr Rasem Dabbas Business Executive Officer Nestle Waters Egypt said It is crucial that more PET plastic is collected to increase the availability of feedstock to achieve greater circularity Advancing circular economy requires systemic transformation and we take it as our responsibility to be at the forefront of this transformation That s why in Egypt Nestl Pure life was the first Bottled Water brand to revolutionize packaging through the launch of the first recycled water bottles made of 100 recycled plastics We re proud to be all setting bolder and ambitious targets to help us transition towards a circular economy and more sustainable world Ziad Karam Diageo Corporate Relations Director MENA commented What we can reuse we will reuse and what we can t reuse we will recycle Our collaboration and partnership in Plan Zero help us accelerate our executions and scale to create best practices and positive consumer and customers experience with our packaging and glass The Plan Zero initiative is a regional alliance that aims at reducing carbon footprint in the targeted countries Lebanon Jordan Tunisia Algeria Morocco UAE Saudi Arabia Egypt by diverting packaging waste from landfills water bodies and the environment through retrieving recyclables and non recyclable plastic fiber glass and metal packaging material In Lebanon and Jordan water bottles are being collected from consumers through reverse vending machines In Egypt the Dorna initiative undertakes the collection recovery and recycling of post consumer plastics through tracking and documenting the movement of material along the value chain to the final manufacturing point It is time that the construction industry fully embraces and takes the circular economy seriously At the core of our designs is sustainability so naturally Arcadis IBI Group is excited to further enhance and infuse into design the innovative Rejects of Glass and Plastic ROGP technology and not only into buildings but also across critical engineering designs From the pipes and engineering systems to the places we live in and the furniture we sit in there is an opportunity to re use these resources and truly achieve a circular economy Hassan Ktaech Associate Built Environment of Arcadis IBI Group said In 2016 the MENA region generated 129 million tons of waste of which only 9 are being recycled and the vast majority disposed of in open fields and dumpsites The region is expected to double its waste generation by 2050 Glass and plastic waste comprise almost 15 percent of the total waste generated in the region The packaging problem has proved to be one of the most pressing environmental issues the world is facing We are happy that we are working with the producers and UN Habitat to sort this issue out in an impactful way in Lebanon and Jordan and soon in Egypt and more MENA countries Mohamed Daoud CEO of Development Inc stated Development Inc s role is to design and implement the project towards this target using out of the box impactful methods while maintaining a flawless traceability for the operations We are grateful to the opportunity that was given to us by UN Habitat to implement these methods around the targeted areas The COP which is the main decision making body of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is held every year to assesses the measures of the parties to limit climate change This year COP27 is held in Sharm El Sheikh Egypt from 6 to 18 November
    United Nations (UN)-Habitat, Nestle Waters, Diageo, Arcadis IBI Group, Development Inc. discuss innovation in plastic and glass waste recycling
      UN Habitat in cooperation with Nestle Waters Diageo Arcadis IBI Group and Development Inc organized a side event during the 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference COP27 under the title Transitioning towards a circular economy Innovation in plastic and glass waste recycling addressing the challenges and solutions of solid waste management in the Middle East and North Africa MENA region During the session moderated by Dr Laila Iskandar Former Minister of Environment and State for Urban Renewal and Informal Settlements in Egypt and Founder of CID Consulting experts from UN Habitat and the partner organizations showcased the achievements of the Plan Zero and Dorna initiatives in advancing innovative solutions in plastic and glass waste recycling to support the transition towards a circular economy UN Habitat is committed to taking transformative measures towards creating a circular economy and raising awareness of the social economic and environmental benefits of reducing reusing and recycling glass and plastic waste said Dr Erfan Ali UN Habitat Regional Representative for the Arab States Each partner presented its efforts all moving toward more sustainable and greener approaches through glass and plastic collection and recycling as well as protecting renewing and restoring natural resources Our Bottled Water packaging can be fully circular and has a central role to play in a circular economy it has value is recyclable is collectable and can be used as recycled content Mr Rasem Dabbas Business Executive Officer Nestle Waters Egypt said It is crucial that more PET plastic is collected to increase the availability of feedstock to achieve greater circularity Advancing circular economy requires systemic transformation and we take it as our responsibility to be at the forefront of this transformation That s why in Egypt Nestl Pure life was the first Bottled Water brand to revolutionize packaging through the launch of the first recycled water bottles made of 100 recycled plastics We re proud to be all setting bolder and ambitious targets to help us transition towards a circular economy and more sustainable world Ziad Karam Diageo Corporate Relations Director MENA commented What we can reuse we will reuse and what we can t reuse we will recycle Our collaboration and partnership in Plan Zero help us accelerate our executions and scale to create best practices and positive consumer and customers experience with our packaging and glass The Plan Zero initiative is a regional alliance that aims at reducing carbon footprint in the targeted countries Lebanon Jordan Tunisia Algeria Morocco UAE Saudi Arabia Egypt by diverting packaging waste from landfills water bodies and the environment through retrieving recyclables and non recyclable plastic fiber glass and metal packaging material In Lebanon and Jordan water bottles are being collected from consumers through reverse vending machines In Egypt the Dorna initiative undertakes the collection recovery and recycling of post consumer plastics through tracking and documenting the movement of material along the value chain to the final manufacturing point It is time that the construction industry fully embraces and takes the circular economy seriously At the core of our designs is sustainability so naturally Arcadis IBI Group is excited to further enhance and infuse into design the innovative Rejects of Glass and Plastic ROGP technology and not only into buildings but also across critical engineering designs From the pipes and engineering systems to the places we live in and the furniture we sit in there is an opportunity to re use these resources and truly achieve a circular economy Hassan Ktaech Associate Built Environment of Arcadis IBI Group said In 2016 the MENA region generated 129 million tons of waste of which only 9 are being recycled and the vast majority disposed of in open fields and dumpsites The region is expected to double its waste generation by 2050 Glass and plastic waste comprise almost 15 percent of the total waste generated in the region The packaging problem has proved to be one of the most pressing environmental issues the world is facing We are happy that we are working with the producers and UN Habitat to sort this issue out in an impactful way in Lebanon and Jordan and soon in Egypt and more MENA countries Mohamed Daoud CEO of Development Inc stated Development Inc s role is to design and implement the project towards this target using out of the box impactful methods while maintaining a flawless traceability for the operations We are grateful to the opportunity that was given to us by UN Habitat to implement these methods around the targeted areas The COP which is the main decision making body of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is held every year to assesses the measures of the parties to limit climate change This year COP27 is held in Sharm El Sheikh Egypt from 6 to 18 November
    United Nations (UN)-Habitat, Nestle Waters, Diageo, Arcadis IBI Group, Development Inc. discuss innovation in plastic and glass waste recycling
    Africa2 months ago

    United Nations (UN)-Habitat, Nestle Waters, Diageo, Arcadis IBI Group, Development Inc. discuss innovation in plastic and glass waste recycling

    UN-Habitat, in cooperation with Nestle Waters, Diageo, Arcadis IBI Group and Development Inc. organized a side event during the 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27) under the title “Transitioning towards a circular economy: Innovation in plastic and glass waste recycling”, addressing the challenges and solutions of solid waste management in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.

    During the session, moderated by Dr. Laila Iskandar, Former Minister of Environment and State for Urban Renewal and Informal Settlements in Egypt and Founder of CID Consulting, experts from UN-Habitat and the partner organizations showcased the achievements of the “Plan Zero” and “Dorna” initiatives in advancing innovative solutions in plastic and glass waste recycling to support the transition towards a circular economy.

    “UN-Habitat is committed to taking transformative measures towards creating a circular economy and raising awareness of the social, economic and environmental benefits of reducing, reusing and recycling glass and plastic waste” said Dr. Erfan Ali, UN-Habitat Regional Representative for the Arab States.

    Each partner presented its efforts, all moving toward more sustainable and greener approaches through glass and plastic collection and recycling, as well as protecting, renewing and restoring natural resources.

    “Our Bottled Water packaging can be fully circular and has a central role to play in a circular economy: it has value, is recyclable, is collectable and can be used as recycled content,” Mr. Rasem Dabbas, Business Executive Officer Nestle Waters Egypt, said.

    “It is crucial that more PET plastic is collected, to increase the availability of feedstock, to achieve greater circularity.

    Advancing circular economy requires systemic transformation, and we take it as our responsibility to be at the forefront of this transformation.

    That’s why in Egypt Nestlé Pure life was the first Bottled Water brand to revolutionize packaging through the launch of the first recycled water bottles made of 100% recycled plastics.” “We’re proud to be all setting bolder and ambitious targets to help us transition towards a circular economy and more sustainable world,” Ziad Karam, Diageo Corporate Relations Director, MENA, commented.

    “What we can reuse we will reuse and what we can’t reuse we will recycle.

    Our collaboration and partnership in Plan Zero help us accelerate our executions and scale to create best practices and positive consumer and customers experience with our packaging and glass.” The “Plan Zero” initiative is a regional alliance that aims at reducing carbon footprint in the targeted countries – Lebanon, Jordan, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Egypt– by diverting packaging waste from landfills, water bodies and the environment, through retrieving recyclables and non-recyclable plastic, fiber, glass and metal packaging material.

    In Lebanon and Jordan, water bottles are being collected from consumers through reverse vending machines.

    In Egypt, the “Dorna” initiative undertakes the collection, recovery and recycling of post-consumer plastics through tracking and documenting the movement of material along the value chain to the final manufacturing point.

    “It is time that the construction industry fully embraces and takes the circular economy seriously.

    At the core of our designs is sustainability, so naturally Arcadis IBI Group is excited to further enhance and infuse into design the innovative Rejects of Glass and Plastic (ROGP) technology and not only into buildings but also across critical engineering designs.

    From the pipes and engineering systems to the places we live in and the furniture we sit in, there is an opportunity to re-use these resources and truly achieve a circular economy,” Hassan Ktaech, Associate, Built Environment of Arcadis IBI Group, said.

    In 2016, the MENA region generated 129 million tons of waste of which only 9% are being recycled and the vast majority disposed of in open fields and dumpsites.

    The region is expected to double its waste generation by 2050.

    Glass and plastic waste comprise almost 15 percent of the total waste generated in the region. 

    “The packaging problem has proved to be one of the most pressing environmental issues the world is facing.

    We are happy that we are working with the producers and UN-Habitat to sort this issue out in an impactful way in Lebanon and Jordan and soon in Egypt and more MENA countries,” Mohamed Daoud, CEO of Development Inc, stated.

    “Development Inc’s role is to design and implement the project towards this target using out of the box impactful methods, while maintaining a flawless traceability for the operations.

    We are grateful to the opportunity that was given to us by UN-Habitat to implement these methods around the targeted areas.” The COP, which is the main decision-making body of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is held every year, to assesses the measures of the parties to limit climate change.

    This year COP27 is held in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, from 6 to 18 November. 

     

  •   The UN Climate Change High Level Champions took stock of the contribution of non State actors at the UN Climate Change Conference COP27 at a special event this evening wrapping up a two week programme of more than 50 events Across the two weeks the Champions supported and delivered a wide range of actions announcements and events across mitigation adaptation finance and equity with a clear focus on implementation This included the launch of the African Cities Water Adaptation Fund an African led insurance commitment to provide cover for up to USD 14 billion in climate losses and the Sharm El Sheik Adaptation Agenda in partnership with the COP27 Presidency A full list of announcements and initiatives can be found in the press release from the UN High Level Climate Champions here
    United Nations Climate Change High-Level Champions: Contribution of the ‘All of Society’ Global Climate Action Agenda at Conference of the Parties (COP27)
      The UN Climate Change High Level Champions took stock of the contribution of non State actors at the UN Climate Change Conference COP27 at a special event this evening wrapping up a two week programme of more than 50 events Across the two weeks the Champions supported and delivered a wide range of actions announcements and events across mitigation adaptation finance and equity with a clear focus on implementation This included the launch of the African Cities Water Adaptation Fund an African led insurance commitment to provide cover for up to USD 14 billion in climate losses and the Sharm El Sheik Adaptation Agenda in partnership with the COP27 Presidency A full list of announcements and initiatives can be found in the press release from the UN High Level Climate Champions here
    United Nations Climate Change High-Level Champions: Contribution of the ‘All of Society’ Global Climate Action Agenda at Conference of the Parties (COP27)
    Africa2 months ago

    United Nations Climate Change High-Level Champions: Contribution of the ‘All of Society’ Global Climate Action Agenda at Conference of the Parties (COP27)

    The UN Climate Change High-Level Champions took stock of the contribution of non-State actors at the UN Climate Change Conference COP27 at a special event this evening, wrapping-up a two week programme of more than 50 events. 

    Across the two weeks, the Champions supported and delivered a wide range of actions, announcements, and events across mitigation, adaptation finance and equity, with a clear focus on implementation.

    This included the launch of the African Cities Water Adaptation Fund, an African-led insurance commitment to provide cover for up to USD 14 billion in climate losses, and the Sharm-El-Sheik Adaptation Agenda in partnership with the COP27 Presidency.

    A full list of announcements and initiatives can be found in the press release from the UN High-Level Climate Champions here.

  •   An Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa released today by the Climate and Clean Air Coalition CCAC the United Nations Environment Programme UNEP and the African Union Commission shows how African leaders can act quickly across 5 key areas transport residential energy agriculture and waste to fight climate change prevent air pollution and protect human health Air pollutants and greenhouse gases often share the same sources and can be even more dangerous when combined By following the Assessment s recommended actions to cut air pollution and prevent climate change African governments could prevent 200 000 premature deaths per year by 2030 and 880 000 deaths per year by 2063 reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 55 methane emissions by 74 and nitrous oxide emissions 40 by 2063 improve food security by reducing desertification and increasing crop yields for rice maize soy and wheat and contribute significantly to global efforts to keep warming below 1 5 C limiting the negative effects of regional climate change Air pollution is a climate and health emergency in Africa and around the world By cutting short lived climate pollutants we can slow down the worst effects of climate change in the very near term while protecting human lives We must come together to work with African nations to reduce emissions from short lived climate pollutants and eliminate air pollution as much as possible this decade said Inger Andersen Executive Director of UNEP Air pollution is the one of the greatest environmental threats to human health and is responsible for about 7 million deaths each year globally Air pollutants and greenhouse gases often share the same sources and drivers including fossil fuel driven economic growth Some pollutants including methane and black carbon directly contribute to both impacts simultaneously And because Africa is particularly vulnerable to climate change preventing emissions from short lived climate pollutants like methane and black carbon will help both save lives and protect the environment Air pollution and climate change are a deadly duo and must be tackled together said Soipan Tuya Cabinet Secretary for Environment and Forestry Government of Kenya We welcome the release of this Assessment and its findings which demonstrate how Kenya and African nations can achieve the air pollution and climate goals without compromising on the livelihoods and development objectives of the continent she added The Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa is the first ever integrated assessment of air pollution and climate change for the continent and provides a robust scientific basis for action towards clean air in Africa The report was developed by a pan African team of researchers with contributions from international scientists and experts coordinated by CCAC partner Stockholm Environment Institute SEI The Assessment s recommendations are closely aligned with key priorities of Agenda 2063 and with the goals and targets of the Sustainable Development Goals SDG Nearly all the recommendations can be found in at least one African Nationally Determined Contribution NDC and are currently identified as contributing to achieving national climate change mitigation goals This Assessment shows that Africa has a huge opportunity to continue developing sustainably improve human well being and protect nature by investing in solutions to fight climate change and air pollution together said H E Amb Josefa Sacko Commissioner of Agriculture Rural Development Blue Economy and Sustainable Environment African Union Commission We look forward to working with countries and funders to develop the AUC s Clean Air Program for implementation of the Assessment measures as supported by the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment she added The Assessment demonstrates a sustainable path forward despite the huge increases in economic activity urbanization and population that will accompany development Across five key areas the Assessment suggests 37 measures that are cost effective and proven including Shifting to cleaner vehicles and to safe and affordable public transport as well as safe cycling and walking Transitioning to sustainable clean cooking and efficient household appliances for refrigeration and air conditioning in the residential sector Moving to renewable energy and increasing energy efficiency capturing methane from oil gas and coal and drastically reducing other GHG and SLCP emissions Reducing methane emissions from agriculture with better livestock and manure practices reducing crop losses and food waste and promoting healthy diets Developing better waste management systems generating less organic waste and reducing open burning African nations are responsible for a small fraction of global greenhouse gas emissions but bear an outsized burden of negative climate impacts Importantly the Assessment shows that countries outside of Africa must drastically reduce their own emissions to limit warming to 1 5 C help Africa avoid the worst impacts of climate change and reduce the cost of adaptation Scientific business finance non state actors governments development and other actors must join forces to pool resources and implement the Assessment s measures to achieve significant impactful change This assessment comes at a timely moment as COP27 is focused on implementation said M ns Nilsson Executive Director Stockholm Environment Institute SEI Through this report African governments the private sector non governmental organizations and local communities now have the scientific evidence on different options for action that can enable the continent to meet its development objectives while mitigating pollution and GHG emissions he added Without changes in policy the Assessment finds that greenhouse gas emissions will triple by 2063 causing a ripple effect outdoor air pollution will get worse causing about 930 000 premature deaths per year in 2030 and about 1 6 million premature deaths per year in 2063 Without action pressures on resources the environment and human health could increase inequalities and limit Africa s ability to achieve sustainable development
    Africa could prevent 880,000 deaths per year by taking action on air pollution and climate change – Report
      An Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa released today by the Climate and Clean Air Coalition CCAC the United Nations Environment Programme UNEP and the African Union Commission shows how African leaders can act quickly across 5 key areas transport residential energy agriculture and waste to fight climate change prevent air pollution and protect human health Air pollutants and greenhouse gases often share the same sources and can be even more dangerous when combined By following the Assessment s recommended actions to cut air pollution and prevent climate change African governments could prevent 200 000 premature deaths per year by 2030 and 880 000 deaths per year by 2063 reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 55 methane emissions by 74 and nitrous oxide emissions 40 by 2063 improve food security by reducing desertification and increasing crop yields for rice maize soy and wheat and contribute significantly to global efforts to keep warming below 1 5 C limiting the negative effects of regional climate change Air pollution is a climate and health emergency in Africa and around the world By cutting short lived climate pollutants we can slow down the worst effects of climate change in the very near term while protecting human lives We must come together to work with African nations to reduce emissions from short lived climate pollutants and eliminate air pollution as much as possible this decade said Inger Andersen Executive Director of UNEP Air pollution is the one of the greatest environmental threats to human health and is responsible for about 7 million deaths each year globally Air pollutants and greenhouse gases often share the same sources and drivers including fossil fuel driven economic growth Some pollutants including methane and black carbon directly contribute to both impacts simultaneously And because Africa is particularly vulnerable to climate change preventing emissions from short lived climate pollutants like methane and black carbon will help both save lives and protect the environment Air pollution and climate change are a deadly duo and must be tackled together said Soipan Tuya Cabinet Secretary for Environment and Forestry Government of Kenya We welcome the release of this Assessment and its findings which demonstrate how Kenya and African nations can achieve the air pollution and climate goals without compromising on the livelihoods and development objectives of the continent she added The Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa is the first ever integrated assessment of air pollution and climate change for the continent and provides a robust scientific basis for action towards clean air in Africa The report was developed by a pan African team of researchers with contributions from international scientists and experts coordinated by CCAC partner Stockholm Environment Institute SEI The Assessment s recommendations are closely aligned with key priorities of Agenda 2063 and with the goals and targets of the Sustainable Development Goals SDG Nearly all the recommendations can be found in at least one African Nationally Determined Contribution NDC and are currently identified as contributing to achieving national climate change mitigation goals This Assessment shows that Africa has a huge opportunity to continue developing sustainably improve human well being and protect nature by investing in solutions to fight climate change and air pollution together said H E Amb Josefa Sacko Commissioner of Agriculture Rural Development Blue Economy and Sustainable Environment African Union Commission We look forward to working with countries and funders to develop the AUC s Clean Air Program for implementation of the Assessment measures as supported by the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment she added The Assessment demonstrates a sustainable path forward despite the huge increases in economic activity urbanization and population that will accompany development Across five key areas the Assessment suggests 37 measures that are cost effective and proven including Shifting to cleaner vehicles and to safe and affordable public transport as well as safe cycling and walking Transitioning to sustainable clean cooking and efficient household appliances for refrigeration and air conditioning in the residential sector Moving to renewable energy and increasing energy efficiency capturing methane from oil gas and coal and drastically reducing other GHG and SLCP emissions Reducing methane emissions from agriculture with better livestock and manure practices reducing crop losses and food waste and promoting healthy diets Developing better waste management systems generating less organic waste and reducing open burning African nations are responsible for a small fraction of global greenhouse gas emissions but bear an outsized burden of negative climate impacts Importantly the Assessment shows that countries outside of Africa must drastically reduce their own emissions to limit warming to 1 5 C help Africa avoid the worst impacts of climate change and reduce the cost of adaptation Scientific business finance non state actors governments development and other actors must join forces to pool resources and implement the Assessment s measures to achieve significant impactful change This assessment comes at a timely moment as COP27 is focused on implementation said M ns Nilsson Executive Director Stockholm Environment Institute SEI Through this report African governments the private sector non governmental organizations and local communities now have the scientific evidence on different options for action that can enable the continent to meet its development objectives while mitigating pollution and GHG emissions he added Without changes in policy the Assessment finds that greenhouse gas emissions will triple by 2063 causing a ripple effect outdoor air pollution will get worse causing about 930 000 premature deaths per year in 2030 and about 1 6 million premature deaths per year in 2063 Without action pressures on resources the environment and human health could increase inequalities and limit Africa s ability to achieve sustainable development
    Africa could prevent 880,000 deaths per year by taking action on air pollution and climate change – Report
    Africa2 months ago

    Africa could prevent 880,000 deaths per year by taking action on air pollution and climate change – Report

    An Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa released today by the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and the African Union Commission shows how African leaders can act quickly across 5 key areas—transport, residential, energy, agriculture, and waste—to fight climate change, prevent air pollution, and protect human health. 

    Air pollutants and greenhouse gases often share the same sources and can be even more dangerous when combined.

    By following the Assessment’s recommended actions to cut air pollution and prevent climate change, African governments could prevent 200,000 premature deaths per year by 2030 and 880,000 deaths per year by 2063; reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 55%, methane emissions by 74%, and nitrous oxide emissions 40% by 2063; improve food security by reducing desertification and increasing crop yields for rice, maize, soy, and wheat; and contribute significantly to global efforts to keep warming below 1.5°C, limiting the negative effects of regional climate change.

    “Air pollution is a climate and health emergency, in Africa and around the world.

    By cutting short-lived climate pollutants, we can slow down the worst effects of climate change in the very near term while protecting human lives.

    We must come together to work with African nations to reduce emissions from short-lived climate pollutants and eliminate air pollution as much as possible this decade,” said Inger Andersen, Executive Director of UNEP.

    Air pollution is the one of the greatest environmental threats to human health and is responsible for about 7 million deaths each year globally.

    Air pollutants and greenhouse gases often share the same sources and drivers, including fossil-fuel driven economic growth. 

    Some pollutants, including methane and black carbon, directly contribute to both impacts simultaneously.

    And because Africa is particularly vulnerable to climate change, preventing emissions from short-lived climate pollutants, like methane and black carbon, will help both save lives and protect the environment.

    “Air pollution and climate change are a deadly duo, and must be tackled together,” said Soipan Tuya, Cabinet Secretary for Environment and Forestry, Government of Kenya.

    “We welcome the release of this Assessment and its findings, which demonstrate how Kenya and African nations can achieve the air pollution and climate goals without compromising on the livelihoods and development objectives of the continent” she added.

    The Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa is the first-ever integrated assessment of air pollution and climate change for the continent and provides a robust scientific basis for action towards clean air in Africa.

    The report was developed by a pan-African team of researchers with contributions from international scientists and experts, coordinated by CCAC partner Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI).

    The Assessment’s recommendations are closely aligned with key priorities of Agenda 2063 and with the goals and targets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

    Nearly all the recommendations can be found in at least one African Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) and are currently identified as contributing to achieving national climate change mitigation goals.

    “This Assessment shows that Africa has a huge opportunity to continue developing sustainably, improve human well-being, and protect nature by investing in solutions to fight climate change and air pollution together,” said H.E. Amb Josefa Sacko, Commissioner of Agriculture, Rural Development, Blue Economy and Sustainable Environment, African Union Commission.

    “We look forward to working with countries and funders to develop the AUC’s Clean Air Program for implementation of the Assessment measures, as supported by the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment,” she added.

    The Assessment demonstrates a sustainable path forward, despite the huge increases in economic activity, urbanization, and population that will accompany development.

    Across five key areas, the Assessment suggests 37 measures that are cost-effective and proven, including:  Shifting to cleaner vehicles and to safe and affordable public transport, as well as safe cycling and walking Transitioning to sustainable clean cooking and efficient household appliances for refrigeration and air conditioning in the residential sector Moving to renewable energy and increasing energy efficiency, capturing methane from oil, gas, and coal, and drastically reducing other GHG and SLCP emissions Reducing methane emissions from agriculture with better livestock and manure practices, reducing crop losses and food waste, and promoting healthy diets Developing better waste management systems, generating less organic waste, and reducing open burning  African nations are responsible for a small fraction of global greenhouse gas emissions but bear an outsized burden of negative climate impacts.

    Importantly, the Assessment shows that countries outside of Africa must drastically reduce their own emissions to limit warming to 1.5°C, help Africa avoid the worst impacts of climate change, and reduce the cost of adaptation.

    Scientific, business, finance, non-state actors, governments, development, and other actors must join forces to pool resources and implement the Assessment’s measures to achieve significant, impactful change.

    “This assessment comes at a timely moment, as COP27 is focused on implementation,” said Måns Nilsson, Executive Director, Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI).

    “Through this report, African governments, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, and local communities now have the scientific evidence on different options for action that can enable the continent to meet its development objectives while mitigating pollution and GHG emissions,” he added.

    Without changes in policy, the Assessment finds that greenhouse gas emissions will triple by 2063, causing a ripple effect: outdoor air pollution will get worse, causing about 930,000 premature deaths per year in 2030 and about 1.6 million premature deaths per year in 2063.

    Without action, pressures on resources, the environment, and human health could increase inequalities and limit Africa’s ability to achieve sustainable development.

  •   By Dianne Tipping Woods of Africa Nature Based Tourism Platform https NatureBasedTourism africa Farmer Ndaula Liwela from Machita settlement in Namibia s Zambezi province points to the scattered flowers of a baobab tree lying on the dry ground close to her homestead The fruit this year will be small and few she says even though the iconic tree is known for its ability to store water and thrive in dry conditions It s several weeks after she would normally have planted her crops but we stopped ploughing when we saw the clouds were not even starting to build As the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change UNFCCC COP27 takes place in Sharm el Sheikh Egypt from 6 to 18 November 2022 there are hopes that the African COP will mobilise the funds and actions needed for a climate resilient Africa but this means very little to Liwela whose immediate concern is around how to feed her family in the face of an increasingly uncertain future Her home in Namibia s northernmost province lies within the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area KAZA the five country transboundary park formed to protect biodiversity while supporting people who live in the landscape It is not far from the Zambezi River but is water scarce Each year Liwela supplements her livelihood by harvesting baobab and other wild fruits but this year even this wild pantry looks likely to let her down Many parts of Africa are increasingly affected by the dry season growing hotter and rainy seasons arriving later Extreme events such as drought are increasing in frequency and severity Liwela s story is not unique Over the last year we have interviewed farmers fishers grass harvesters and many others who rely on natural resources in this region They have noted the impacts of changing weather patterns on their ability to sustain themselves This leaves them vulnerable not just to climate change impacts but also to other shocks like the COVID 19 pandemic says WWF Namibia s Sigrid Nyambe She has been working with communities in this region to gather data on climate change impacts on communities as part of WWF s Climate Crowd program http bit ly 3tAPcgb This information informs pilot projects to help rural communities adapt to the changes they are experiencing while reducing pressure on biodiversity The latest IPCC Working Group II report on Impacts Adaptation and Vulnerability http bit ly 3gbdmuz shows that many climate risks are bigger than previously anticipated particularly for vulnerable African countries Many nations have included nature based solutions as part of their national climate change adaptation plans but need financial and technical support for action at a grassroots level Addressing the Forum on Finance for Nature Based Solutions organized by the UNFCCC s Standing Committee of Finance UN Climate Change Deputy Executive Secretary Ovais Sarmad said We face a double crisis of climate change and nature The two are inextricably linked The mutual intertwined destruction grows worse by the day If nature and climate change are linked it only stands to reason that nature based solutions lie at the heart of addressing both Yet according to Inger Andersen Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme http bit ly 3EAa78f in a recent article for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change only about 133 billion dollars are channeled into nature based solutions and investments must triple by 2030 to meet the climate the nature and land neutrality targets In the last few years we ve seen two crises climate change and a global pandemic intersect Both impact the most vulnerable communities the hardest and affect how people interact with their natural resources says WWF director of climate communities and wildlife Nikhil Advani For example in Namibia climate change and the pandemic both increased the unsustainable use of natural resources says Advani who also runs the African Nature Based Tourism Platform http bit ly 3AKXRRd This project was launched in 2021 to connect funders to communities involved in nature based tourism across 11 countries in eastern and southern Africa helping to identify the hardest hit communities and enterprises and their most pressing needs Over half of Namibians interviewed in 2021 2022 for the Climate Crowd project reported direct impacts on local wildlife including high mortality rates and wildlife migration to other areas where water and food are more abundant Fifty eight percent of respondents reported that crops had failed or produced very little in recent years and 62 noted declines in livestock health About three quarters of respondents said that the wild fruits harvested seasonally are also declining And as natural resources become increasingly difficult to find more people and their livestock come into conflict with wildlife The data we ve collected shows that we need to focus more on adaptation efforts that protect the people who are most vulnerable he said Within KAZA there are examples and opportunities for resilience building through initiatives that are also climate adaptation strategies These practical nature compatible pilot projects being implemented through Climate Crowd often draw on solutions shaped by a community s own traditional indigenous and local knowledge and practices Beekeeping is an environmentally friendly and potentially lucrative complementary industry helping communities cope with unpredictable crop yields Youth in these communities are frequently unemployed and lack access to income generating activities as rain fed agriculture declines In Namibia one such project involves training youths from Muyako Omega 3 and Luitcikxom villages in Bwabwata National Park in beekeeping David Mushavanga a local bee farmer with over 16 years of experience will implement the project in partnership with WWF Climate Crowd and the Ministry of Environment Forestry and Tourism Other projects being implemented in Namibia will focus on increasing water security through rainwater harvesting and solar powered boreholes climate smart agriculture installing clean cookstoves and other alternative livelihoods such as craft making Climate Crowd is a bottom up community driven initiative It s important to support projects the community feels a sense of ownership over These projects can help them build resilience to multiple shocks and stressors Environmental emergencies such as climate change could cause social and economic damages far larger than those caused by COVID 19 says Advani Through Climate Crowd and the African Nature Based Tourism Platform WWF works with community based natural resource management organisations in several other eastern and southern African countries to provide funding and technical support for solutions that protect natural ecosystems and benefit people while building resilience to future shocks and stressors For example in Malawi a recently funded project led by African Nature Based Tourism Platform partner KAWICCODA supports the scaling up of conservation friendly alternative livelihood activities within the five kilometre belt around Kasungu National Park Both the climate crisis and pandemics threaten the wellbeing of people and nature which is why we urgently need to pilot projects that make people and nature more resilient We can learn from these grassroots led initiatives And then we can scale them says Advani
    COVID-19 and Climate Change – Working with Communities and Nature to Build Resilience to Shocks and Stressors in Africa (By Dianne Tipping-Woods)
      By Dianne Tipping Woods of Africa Nature Based Tourism Platform https NatureBasedTourism africa Farmer Ndaula Liwela from Machita settlement in Namibia s Zambezi province points to the scattered flowers of a baobab tree lying on the dry ground close to her homestead The fruit this year will be small and few she says even though the iconic tree is known for its ability to store water and thrive in dry conditions It s several weeks after she would normally have planted her crops but we stopped ploughing when we saw the clouds were not even starting to build As the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change UNFCCC COP27 takes place in Sharm el Sheikh Egypt from 6 to 18 November 2022 there are hopes that the African COP will mobilise the funds and actions needed for a climate resilient Africa but this means very little to Liwela whose immediate concern is around how to feed her family in the face of an increasingly uncertain future Her home in Namibia s northernmost province lies within the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area KAZA the five country transboundary park formed to protect biodiversity while supporting people who live in the landscape It is not far from the Zambezi River but is water scarce Each year Liwela supplements her livelihood by harvesting baobab and other wild fruits but this year even this wild pantry looks likely to let her down Many parts of Africa are increasingly affected by the dry season growing hotter and rainy seasons arriving later Extreme events such as drought are increasing in frequency and severity Liwela s story is not unique Over the last year we have interviewed farmers fishers grass harvesters and many others who rely on natural resources in this region They have noted the impacts of changing weather patterns on their ability to sustain themselves This leaves them vulnerable not just to climate change impacts but also to other shocks like the COVID 19 pandemic says WWF Namibia s Sigrid Nyambe She has been working with communities in this region to gather data on climate change impacts on communities as part of WWF s Climate Crowd program http bit ly 3tAPcgb This information informs pilot projects to help rural communities adapt to the changes they are experiencing while reducing pressure on biodiversity The latest IPCC Working Group II report on Impacts Adaptation and Vulnerability http bit ly 3gbdmuz shows that many climate risks are bigger than previously anticipated particularly for vulnerable African countries Many nations have included nature based solutions as part of their national climate change adaptation plans but need financial and technical support for action at a grassroots level Addressing the Forum on Finance for Nature Based Solutions organized by the UNFCCC s Standing Committee of Finance UN Climate Change Deputy Executive Secretary Ovais Sarmad said We face a double crisis of climate change and nature The two are inextricably linked The mutual intertwined destruction grows worse by the day If nature and climate change are linked it only stands to reason that nature based solutions lie at the heart of addressing both Yet according to Inger Andersen Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme http bit ly 3EAa78f in a recent article for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change only about 133 billion dollars are channeled into nature based solutions and investments must triple by 2030 to meet the climate the nature and land neutrality targets In the last few years we ve seen two crises climate change and a global pandemic intersect Both impact the most vulnerable communities the hardest and affect how people interact with their natural resources says WWF director of climate communities and wildlife Nikhil Advani For example in Namibia climate change and the pandemic both increased the unsustainable use of natural resources says Advani who also runs the African Nature Based Tourism Platform http bit ly 3AKXRRd This project was launched in 2021 to connect funders to communities involved in nature based tourism across 11 countries in eastern and southern Africa helping to identify the hardest hit communities and enterprises and their most pressing needs Over half of Namibians interviewed in 2021 2022 for the Climate Crowd project reported direct impacts on local wildlife including high mortality rates and wildlife migration to other areas where water and food are more abundant Fifty eight percent of respondents reported that crops had failed or produced very little in recent years and 62 noted declines in livestock health About three quarters of respondents said that the wild fruits harvested seasonally are also declining And as natural resources become increasingly difficult to find more people and their livestock come into conflict with wildlife The data we ve collected shows that we need to focus more on adaptation efforts that protect the people who are most vulnerable he said Within KAZA there are examples and opportunities for resilience building through initiatives that are also climate adaptation strategies These practical nature compatible pilot projects being implemented through Climate Crowd often draw on solutions shaped by a community s own traditional indigenous and local knowledge and practices Beekeeping is an environmentally friendly and potentially lucrative complementary industry helping communities cope with unpredictable crop yields Youth in these communities are frequently unemployed and lack access to income generating activities as rain fed agriculture declines In Namibia one such project involves training youths from Muyako Omega 3 and Luitcikxom villages in Bwabwata National Park in beekeeping David Mushavanga a local bee farmer with over 16 years of experience will implement the project in partnership with WWF Climate Crowd and the Ministry of Environment Forestry and Tourism Other projects being implemented in Namibia will focus on increasing water security through rainwater harvesting and solar powered boreholes climate smart agriculture installing clean cookstoves and other alternative livelihoods such as craft making Climate Crowd is a bottom up community driven initiative It s important to support projects the community feels a sense of ownership over These projects can help them build resilience to multiple shocks and stressors Environmental emergencies such as climate change could cause social and economic damages far larger than those caused by COVID 19 says Advani Through Climate Crowd and the African Nature Based Tourism Platform WWF works with community based natural resource management organisations in several other eastern and southern African countries to provide funding and technical support for solutions that protect natural ecosystems and benefit people while building resilience to future shocks and stressors For example in Malawi a recently funded project led by African Nature Based Tourism Platform partner KAWICCODA supports the scaling up of conservation friendly alternative livelihood activities within the five kilometre belt around Kasungu National Park Both the climate crisis and pandemics threaten the wellbeing of people and nature which is why we urgently need to pilot projects that make people and nature more resilient We can learn from these grassroots led initiatives And then we can scale them says Advani
    COVID-19 and Climate Change – Working with Communities and Nature to Build Resilience to Shocks and Stressors in Africa (By Dianne Tipping-Woods)
    Africa2 months ago

    COVID-19 and Climate Change – Working with Communities and Nature to Build Resilience to Shocks and Stressors in Africa (By Dianne Tipping-Woods)

    By Dianne Tipping-Woods of Africa Nature-Based Tourism Platform (https://NatureBasedTourism.africa/) Farmer Ndaula Liwela, from Machita settlement in Namibia’s Zambezi province, points to the scattered flowers of a baobab tree lying on the dry ground close to her homestead.

    “The fruit this year will be small and few,” she says, even though the iconic tree is known for its ability to store water and thrive in dry conditions.

    It’s several weeks after she would normally have planted her crops, “but we stopped ploughing when we saw the clouds were not even starting to build”.

    As the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) COP27 takes place in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, from 6 to 18 November 2022, there are hopes that ‘the African COP’ will mobilise the funds and actions needed for a climate-resilient Africa, but this means very little to Liwela, whose immediate concern is around how to feed her family in the face of an increasingly uncertain future.

    Her home in Namibia’s northernmost province lies within the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA), the five-country transboundary park formed to protect biodiversity while supporting people who live in the landscape.

    It is not far from the Zambezi River, but is water-scarce.

    Each year, Liwela supplements her livelihood by harvesting baobab and other wild fruits, but this year, even this wild pantry looks likely to let her down.

    Many parts of Africa are increasingly affected by the dry season growing hotter and rainy seasons arriving later.

    Extreme events such as drought are increasing in frequency and severity.

    “Liwela’s story is not unique.

    Over the last year, we have interviewed farmers, fishers, grass harvesters, and many others who rely on natural resources in this region.

    They have noted the impacts of changing weather patterns on their ability to sustain themselves.

    This leaves them vulnerable, not just to climate change impacts, but also to other shocks, like the COVID-19 pandemic,” says WWF Namibia’s Sigrid Nyambe.

    She has been working with communities in this region to gather data on climate change impacts on communities as part of WWF’s Climate Crowd program (http://bit.ly/3tAPcgb).

    This information informs pilot projects to help rural communities adapt to the changes they are experiencing while reducing pressure on biodiversity.

    The latest IPCC Working Group II report on Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability (http://bit.ly/3gbdmuz) shows that many climate risks are bigger than previously anticipated, particularly for vulnerable African countries.

    Many nations have included nature-based solutions as part of their national climate change adaptation plans, but need financial and technical support for action at a grassroots level.

    Addressing the Forum on Finance for Nature-Based Solutions organized by the UNFCCC’s Standing Committee of Finance, UN Climate Change Deputy Executive Secretary Ovais Sarmad said: “We face a double crisis of climate change and nature.

    The two are inextricably linked.

    The mutual, intertwined destruction grows worse by the day.

    If nature and climate change are linked, it only stands to reason that nature-based solutions lie at the heart of addressing both.” Yet, according to Inger Andersen, Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme (http://bit.ly/3EAa78f), in a recent article for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, “only about 133 billion dollars are channeled into nature-based solutions, and investments must triple by 2030 to meet the climate, the nature, and land-neutrality targets.” “In the last few years, we’ve seen two crises, climate change and a global pandemic – intersect.

    Both impact the most vulnerable communities the hardest and affect how people interact with their natural resources,” says WWF director of climate, communities, and wildlife Nikhil Advani.

    For example, in Namibia, climate change and the pandemic both increased the unsustainable use of natural resources, says Advani, who also runs the African Nature-Based Tourism Platform (http://bit.ly/3AKXRRd).

    This project was launched in 2021 to connect funders to communities involved in nature-based tourism across 11 countries in eastern and southern Africa, helping to identify the hardest-hit communities and enterprises and their most pressing needs.

    Over half of Namibians interviewed in 2021-2022 for the Climate Crowd project reported direct impacts on local wildlife, including high mortality rates and wildlife migration to other areas where water and food are more abundant.

    Fifty-eight percent of respondents reported that crops had failed or produced very little in recent years, and 62% noted declines in livestock health.

    About three-quarters of respondents said that the wild fruits harvested seasonally are also declining.

    And as natural resources become increasingly difficult to find, more people and their livestock come into conflict with wildlife.

    “The data we’ve collected shows that we need to focus more on adaptation efforts that protect the people who are most vulnerable,” he said.

    Within KAZA, there are examples and opportunities for resilience-building through initiatives that are also climate adaptation strategies.

    These practical, nature-compatible pilot projects being implemented through Climate Crowd often draw on solutions shaped by a community’s own traditional, indigenous and local knowledge and practices.

    Beekeeping is an environmentally friendly and potentially lucrative complementary industry helping communities cope with unpredictable crop yields.

    Youth in these communities are frequently unemployed and lack access to income-generating activities as rain-fed agriculture declines.

    In Namibia, one such project involves training youths from Muyako, Omega 3, and Luitcikxom villages in Bwabwata National Park in beekeeping.

    David Mushavanga, a local bee farmer with over 16 years of experience, will implement the project in partnership with WWF Climate Crowd and the Ministry of Environment, Forestry, and Tourism.

    Other projects being implemented in Namibia will focus on increasing water security through rainwater harvesting and solar powered boreholes, climate-smart agriculture, installing clean cookstoves, and other alternative livelihoods such as craft making.

    “Climate Crowd is a bottom-up, community-driven initiative.

    It’s important to support projects the community feels a sense of ownership over.

    These projects can help them build resilience to multiple shocks and stressors.

    Environmental emergencies such as climate change could cause social and economic damages far larger than those caused by COVID-19,” says Advani.

    Through Climate Crowd and the African Nature-Based Tourism Platform, WWF works with community-based natural resource management organisations in several other eastern and southern African countries to provide funding and technical support for solutions that protect natural ecosystems and benefit people while building resilience to future shocks and stressors.

    For example in Malawi, a recently funded project led by African Nature-Based Tourism Platform partner KAWICCODA, supports the scaling up of conservation-friendly alternative livelihood activities within the five-kilometre belt around Kasungu National Park. “Both the climate crisis and pandemics threaten the wellbeing of people and nature, which is why we urgently need to pilot projects that make people and nature more resilient.

    We can learn from these grassroots-led initiatives.

    And then we can scale them,” says Advani.

  •   With the biggest energy event in Africa post COP27 set to take place in Luanda from November 29 to December 1 a strong lineup of regional energy ministers will make their way to Angola to lead discussions on the state of play of their respective energy sectors Angola Oil amp Gas AOG 2022 is committed to securing new investment not just in Angola s sector but the wider regional energy landscape at large with the participation of these ministers serving to only enhance this agenda At the head is Diamantino Azevedo Minister of Mineral Resources Petroleum and Gas of Angola who has played an instrumental role in positioning Angola as the biggest oil producer in Africa an emerging globally competitive gas player and an increasingly attractive renewable energy market On the oil and gas front Angola has seen new discoveries being made such as ExxonMobil s discovery at the Bavuca South 1 exploration well at the Block 15 offshore Angola this month the launch of three new refinery projects and the establishment of one of the largest single investments in the country s energy sector the Angola Liquefied Natural Gas LNG project While on the renewables front new commitments by TotalEnergies and other regional players to monetize the country s abundant solar and wind potential As such the sector is ripe for investment and offers unparalleled opportunities for project developers and financiers alike Representing Namibia the country s Minister of Mines and Energy Hon Tom Alweendo will also be participating in Angola driving the discussion around the role an accelerated exploration drive plays in Africa s energy future With two major oil discoveries by TotalEnergies and Shell made off the coast of Namibia just this year the country is poised for large scale developments and is seeking new partnerships with regional and global financiers In addition to oil and gas Namibia s significant green hydrogen potential has laid the foundation for multi billion dollar project launches by the likes of Hyphen Hydrogen Energy and others With a sectoral transformation on the cards Hon Minister Alweendo will drive the investment discussion in Angola Contributing to this discussion will be Gabriel Mbaga Obiang Lima Minister of Mines and Hydrocarbons of Equatorial Guinea and a strong advocate for the role gas plays in Africa For his part Minister Obiang Lima has been instrumental in positioning his country as a regional gas hub unlocking untapped gas resources across West Africa while working towards creating intra African energy networks in pursuit of energy security Through the processing facility Punta Europe Equatorial Guinea monetizes both domestic and regional resources As the country looks to maximize gas in Africa even further securing new capital will be key in furthering Minister Obiang Lima s expansion agenda Also driving the investment in gas agenda Dr Aissatou Sophie Gladima Senegal s Minister of Petroleum and Energies will be participating at AOG 2022 advocating for heightened investment in African energy With the 2 5 million ton per annum Greater Tortue Ahmeyim LNG development set to come online in early 2023 as well as the launch of other large scale projects such as 230 million barrel Sangomar oil project Senegal s energy future looks bright However to unlock the full potential of the sector H E Dr Minister Gladima is looking at improving investment as well as regional collaboration Meanwhile representing one of Africa s final frontiers Didier Budimbu Ntubuanga Minister of Hydrocarbons of the Democratic Republic of the Congo DRC has investment on the agenda and will be providing critical insight into the DRC s 30 block strong licensing round With 27 oil and three gas blocks opening for investment in July 2022 the country offers stakeholders the opportunities to explore one of the last untapped basins worldwide Finally in pursuit of a defined and aligned oil and gas agenda for Africa H E Haitham Al Ghais Secretary General of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries OPEC will be driving the discussion on how Africa can remain resilient despite global market instability As head of one of the most influential energy organizations worldwide the Secretary General is well positioned to drive the discussion on investment exploration and production and will be joining the ministerial lineup in making a strong case for African oil and gas We will drive a discussion about Oil and Gas in Angola Gas is critical and essential for Angola s industrialization Renewables are critical for the future and we should embrace both Local content free markets energy poverty women in energy and financing Angola s energy growth will be critical NJ Ayuk Executive Chairman of the African Energy Chamber Like we saw at the African Energy Week Angolan energy industry reforms when it comes to eliminating red tape and cut unnecessary barriers is ensuring that the industry remains strong and reinforced our commitment to supporting the oil and natural gas industry in the years to come I am confident that investment opportunities and deals will be closed in Luanda during this event Concluded Ayuk With AOG 2022 set to unlock significant investment across both the Angolan and regional energy landscape the regional energy ministers in attendance will further this agenda by providing key insight into their respective sectors engaging with stakeholders from across the regional and global market while driving the discussion on the role oil and gas plays in Africa s energy future
    Regional and Global Industry Leaders to Make Strong Case for Hydrocarbon Investment at Angola Oil & Gas (AOG) 2022
      With the biggest energy event in Africa post COP27 set to take place in Luanda from November 29 to December 1 a strong lineup of regional energy ministers will make their way to Angola to lead discussions on the state of play of their respective energy sectors Angola Oil amp Gas AOG 2022 is committed to securing new investment not just in Angola s sector but the wider regional energy landscape at large with the participation of these ministers serving to only enhance this agenda At the head is Diamantino Azevedo Minister of Mineral Resources Petroleum and Gas of Angola who has played an instrumental role in positioning Angola as the biggest oil producer in Africa an emerging globally competitive gas player and an increasingly attractive renewable energy market On the oil and gas front Angola has seen new discoveries being made such as ExxonMobil s discovery at the Bavuca South 1 exploration well at the Block 15 offshore Angola this month the launch of three new refinery projects and the establishment of one of the largest single investments in the country s energy sector the Angola Liquefied Natural Gas LNG project While on the renewables front new commitments by TotalEnergies and other regional players to monetize the country s abundant solar and wind potential As such the sector is ripe for investment and offers unparalleled opportunities for project developers and financiers alike Representing Namibia the country s Minister of Mines and Energy Hon Tom Alweendo will also be participating in Angola driving the discussion around the role an accelerated exploration drive plays in Africa s energy future With two major oil discoveries by TotalEnergies and Shell made off the coast of Namibia just this year the country is poised for large scale developments and is seeking new partnerships with regional and global financiers In addition to oil and gas Namibia s significant green hydrogen potential has laid the foundation for multi billion dollar project launches by the likes of Hyphen Hydrogen Energy and others With a sectoral transformation on the cards Hon Minister Alweendo will drive the investment discussion in Angola Contributing to this discussion will be Gabriel Mbaga Obiang Lima Minister of Mines and Hydrocarbons of Equatorial Guinea and a strong advocate for the role gas plays in Africa For his part Minister Obiang Lima has been instrumental in positioning his country as a regional gas hub unlocking untapped gas resources across West Africa while working towards creating intra African energy networks in pursuit of energy security Through the processing facility Punta Europe Equatorial Guinea monetizes both domestic and regional resources As the country looks to maximize gas in Africa even further securing new capital will be key in furthering Minister Obiang Lima s expansion agenda Also driving the investment in gas agenda Dr Aissatou Sophie Gladima Senegal s Minister of Petroleum and Energies will be participating at AOG 2022 advocating for heightened investment in African energy With the 2 5 million ton per annum Greater Tortue Ahmeyim LNG development set to come online in early 2023 as well as the launch of other large scale projects such as 230 million barrel Sangomar oil project Senegal s energy future looks bright However to unlock the full potential of the sector H E Dr Minister Gladima is looking at improving investment as well as regional collaboration Meanwhile representing one of Africa s final frontiers Didier Budimbu Ntubuanga Minister of Hydrocarbons of the Democratic Republic of the Congo DRC has investment on the agenda and will be providing critical insight into the DRC s 30 block strong licensing round With 27 oil and three gas blocks opening for investment in July 2022 the country offers stakeholders the opportunities to explore one of the last untapped basins worldwide Finally in pursuit of a defined and aligned oil and gas agenda for Africa H E Haitham Al Ghais Secretary General of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries OPEC will be driving the discussion on how Africa can remain resilient despite global market instability As head of one of the most influential energy organizations worldwide the Secretary General is well positioned to drive the discussion on investment exploration and production and will be joining the ministerial lineup in making a strong case for African oil and gas We will drive a discussion about Oil and Gas in Angola Gas is critical and essential for Angola s industrialization Renewables are critical for the future and we should embrace both Local content free markets energy poverty women in energy and financing Angola s energy growth will be critical NJ Ayuk Executive Chairman of the African Energy Chamber Like we saw at the African Energy Week Angolan energy industry reforms when it comes to eliminating red tape and cut unnecessary barriers is ensuring that the industry remains strong and reinforced our commitment to supporting the oil and natural gas industry in the years to come I am confident that investment opportunities and deals will be closed in Luanda during this event Concluded Ayuk With AOG 2022 set to unlock significant investment across both the Angolan and regional energy landscape the regional energy ministers in attendance will further this agenda by providing key insight into their respective sectors engaging with stakeholders from across the regional and global market while driving the discussion on the role oil and gas plays in Africa s energy future
    Regional and Global Industry Leaders to Make Strong Case for Hydrocarbon Investment at Angola Oil & Gas (AOG) 2022
    Africa2 months ago

    Regional and Global Industry Leaders to Make Strong Case for Hydrocarbon Investment at Angola Oil & Gas (AOG) 2022

    With the biggest energy event in Africa post-COP27 set to take place in Luanda from November 29 to December 1, a strong lineup of regional energy ministers will make their way to Angola to lead discussions on the state of play of their respective energy sectors.

    Angola Oil & Gas (AOG) 2022 is committed to securing new investment, not just in Angola’s sector, but the wider regional energy landscape at large, with the participation of these ministers serving to only enhance this agenda.

    At the head is Diamantino Azevedo, Minister of Mineral Resources, Petroleum and Gas of Angola, who has played an instrumental role in positioning Angola as the biggest oil producer in Africa, an emerging globally competitive gas player and an increasingly attractive renewable energy market.

    On the oil and gas front, Angola has seen new discoveries being made such as ExxonMobil’s discovery at the Bavuca South-1 exploration well at the Block 15, offshore Angola this month; the launch of three new refinery projects; and the establishment of one of the largest single investments in the country’s energy sector, the Angola Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) project.

    While on the renewables front, new commitments by TotalEnergies and other regional players to monetize the country’s abundant solar and wind potential.

    As such, the sector is ripe for investment and offers unparalleled opportunities for project developers and financiers alike.

    Representing Namibia, the country’s Minister of Mines and Energy, Hon. Tom Alweendo, will also be participating in Angola, driving the discussion around the role an accelerated exploration drive plays in Africa’s energy future.

    With two major oil discoveries by TotalEnergies and Shell made off the coast of Namibia just this year, the country is poised for large-scale developments and is seeking new partnerships with regional and global financiers.

    In addition to oil and gas, Namibia’s significant green hydrogen potential has laid the foundation for multi-billion-dollar project launches by the likes of Hyphen Hydrogen Energy and others.

    With a sectoral transformation on the cards, Hon. Minister Alweendo will drive the investment discussion in Angola.

    Contributing to this discussion will be Gabriel Mbaga Obiang Lima, Minister of Mines and Hydrocarbons of Equatorial Guinea and a strong advocate for the role gas plays in Africa.

    For his part, Minister Obiang Lima has been instrumental in positioning his country as a regional gas hub, unlocking untapped gas resources across West Africa while working towards creating intra-African energy networks in pursuit of energy security.

    Through the processing facility Punta Europe, Equatorial Guinea monetizes both domestic and regional resources.

    As the country looks to maximize gas in Africa even further, securing new capital will be key in furthering Minister Obiang Lima’s expansion agenda.

    Also driving the investment in gas agenda, Dr. Aissatou Sophie Gladima, Senegal’s Minister of Petroleum and Energies, will be participating at AOG 2022, advocating for heightened investment in African energy.

    With the 2.5 million ton per annum Greater Tortue Ahmeyim LNG development set to come online in early 2023, as well as the launch of other large-scale projects such as 230-million-barrel Sangomar oil project, Senegal’s energy future looks bright.

    However, to unlock the full potential of the sector, H.E. Dr. Minister Gladima is looking at improving investment as well as regional collaboration.

    Meanwhile, representing one of Africa’s final frontiers, Didier Budimbu Ntubuanga, Minister of Hydrocarbons of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), has investment on the agenda, and will be providing critical insight into the DRC’s 30-block strong licensing round.

    With 27 oil and three gas blocks opening for investment in July 2022, the country offers stakeholders the opportunities to explore one of the last untapped basins worldwide.

    Finally, in pursuit of a defined and aligned oil and gas agenda for Africa, H.E. Haitham Al Ghais, Secretary General of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) will be driving the discussion on how Africa can remain resilient despite global market instability.

    As head of one of the most influential energy organizations worldwide, the Secretary General is well positioned to drive the discussion on investment, exploration and production, and will be joining the ministerial lineup in making a strong case for African oil and gas.

    “We will drive a discussion about Oil and Gas in Angola.

    Gas is critical and essential for Angola’s industrialization.

    Renewables are critical for the future, and we should embrace both.

    Local content, free markets, energy poverty, women in energy and financing Angola’s energy growth will be critical” NJ Ayuk, Executive Chairman of the African Energy Chamber “Like we saw at the African Energy Week, Angolan energy industry reforms when it comes to eliminating red tape and cut unnecessary barriers is ensuring that the industry remains strong and reinforced our commitment to supporting the oil and natural gas industry in the years to come.

    I am confident that investment opportunities and deals will be closed in Luanda during this event” Concluded Ayuk With AOG 2022 set to unlock significant investment across both the Angolan and regional energy landscape, the regional energy ministers in attendance will further this agenda by providing key insight into their respective sectors, engaging with stakeholders from across the regional and global market while driving the discussion on the role oil and gas plays in Africa’s energy future.

  •   Germany has committed 40 million to the African Development Bank Group s http www AfDB org Climate Action Window http bit ly 3TJVww8 German State Secretary for Economic Cooperation and Development Jochen Flasbarth has announced The contribution is to support climate adaptation in fragile African states Flasbarth made the announcement during a ministerial panel for climate vulnerable countries and champions of adaptation finance at the 27th session of the UN Climate Change Conference COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh Egypt The High Ambition Coalition organized the session titled Putting good quality adaptation finance in the spotlight at COP27 The Climate Action Window is an initiative of the African Development Fund the African Development Bank Group s concessional lending window to low income African states It iso mobilizing up to 13 billion for climate adaptation for some 37 low income and fragile states the worst hit by climate change Flasbarth commended the African Development Bank Group for what he said was its relentless commitment to help Africa mitigate and adapt to climate change The African Development Bank has a very good reputation he said The state secretary said the contribution by Germany was part of its efforts to balance parity in funding between climate mitigation and adaptation despite current global economic challenges He stressed All our countries have challenges to get the right balance between adaption and mitigation but we want to do that We want to look at the quality of adaptation finance and we must look at the accessibility to climate finance specifically for developing countries nationally determined contributions The panel included ministers from Africa Europe and the Caribbean They backed calls for increased financing for climate adaptation in Africa and called on industrialized countries to deliver on their 100 billion a year pledge without further delay African Development Bank Group President Dr Akinwumi Adesina thanked Germany for believing in Africa and for having confidence in the Bank Group Adesina assured Secretary Flasbarth that the funds would be put to good use He said The climate action you are putting your money in will enable 20 million farmers including pastoralists to access weather indexed insurance It will provide 20 million farmers with climate resilient agriculture technologies regenerate a million hectares of degraded land allow for investment in 840 billion cubic meters of water for 18 million people and provide renewable energy for 10 million people The African Development Bank head highlighted several measures and initiatives that the Bank Group had initiated to help ease climate impact in Africa particularly on food production In particular he mentioned the Africa Disaster Risk Insurance Facility which protects farmers against exogenous disasters He called on other industrialized countries to contribute to the Climate Action Window to boost climate adaptation in Africa Although Africa contributes only about 3 to greenhouse emissions the continent is the hardest hit by climate impact including droughts floods cyclones and damaged infrastructure resulting in debts across the continent Africa is choking Africa is suffering and Africa is in great distress because of climate change which it did not cause So we don t have a choice but to adapt to it Adesina stressed
    Conference of the Parties (COP27): Germany commits €40 million to African Development Bank Group’s Climate Action Window initiative for fragile African states
      Germany has committed 40 million to the African Development Bank Group s http www AfDB org Climate Action Window http bit ly 3TJVww8 German State Secretary for Economic Cooperation and Development Jochen Flasbarth has announced The contribution is to support climate adaptation in fragile African states Flasbarth made the announcement during a ministerial panel for climate vulnerable countries and champions of adaptation finance at the 27th session of the UN Climate Change Conference COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh Egypt The High Ambition Coalition organized the session titled Putting good quality adaptation finance in the spotlight at COP27 The Climate Action Window is an initiative of the African Development Fund the African Development Bank Group s concessional lending window to low income African states It iso mobilizing up to 13 billion for climate adaptation for some 37 low income and fragile states the worst hit by climate change Flasbarth commended the African Development Bank Group for what he said was its relentless commitment to help Africa mitigate and adapt to climate change The African Development Bank has a very good reputation he said The state secretary said the contribution by Germany was part of its efforts to balance parity in funding between climate mitigation and adaptation despite current global economic challenges He stressed All our countries have challenges to get the right balance between adaption and mitigation but we want to do that We want to look at the quality of adaptation finance and we must look at the accessibility to climate finance specifically for developing countries nationally determined contributions The panel included ministers from Africa Europe and the Caribbean They backed calls for increased financing for climate adaptation in Africa and called on industrialized countries to deliver on their 100 billion a year pledge without further delay African Development Bank Group President Dr Akinwumi Adesina thanked Germany for believing in Africa and for having confidence in the Bank Group Adesina assured Secretary Flasbarth that the funds would be put to good use He said The climate action you are putting your money in will enable 20 million farmers including pastoralists to access weather indexed insurance It will provide 20 million farmers with climate resilient agriculture technologies regenerate a million hectares of degraded land allow for investment in 840 billion cubic meters of water for 18 million people and provide renewable energy for 10 million people The African Development Bank head highlighted several measures and initiatives that the Bank Group had initiated to help ease climate impact in Africa particularly on food production In particular he mentioned the Africa Disaster Risk Insurance Facility which protects farmers against exogenous disasters He called on other industrialized countries to contribute to the Climate Action Window to boost climate adaptation in Africa Although Africa contributes only about 3 to greenhouse emissions the continent is the hardest hit by climate impact including droughts floods cyclones and damaged infrastructure resulting in debts across the continent Africa is choking Africa is suffering and Africa is in great distress because of climate change which it did not cause So we don t have a choice but to adapt to it Adesina stressed
    Conference of the Parties (COP27): Germany commits €40 million to African Development Bank Group’s Climate Action Window initiative for fragile African states
    Africa2 months ago

    Conference of the Parties (COP27): Germany commits €40 million to African Development Bank Group’s Climate Action Window initiative for fragile African states

    Germany has committed €40 million to the African Development Bank Group's (http://www.AfDB.org) Climate Action Window (http://bit.ly/3TJVww8) , German State Secretary for Economic Cooperation and Development Jochen Flasbarth has announced.

     The contribution is to support climate adaptation in fragile African states.

    Flasbarth made the announcement during a ministerial panel for climate-vulnerable countries and champions of adaptation finance at the 27th session of the UN Climate Change Conference (COP27) in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt.

    The High Ambition Coalition organized the session titled, Putting good quality adaptation finance in the spotlight at COP27.

    The Climate Action Window is an initiative of the African Development Fund, the African Development Bank Group’s concessional lending window to low-income African states.

    It iso mobilizing up to $13 billion for climate adaptation for some 37 low-income and fragile states, the worst hit by climate change.

    Flasbarth commended the African Development Bank Group for what he said was its relentless commitment to help Africa mitigate and adapt to climate change.

    “The African Development Bank has a very good reputation,” he said.

    The state secretary said the contribution by Germany was part of its efforts to balance parity in funding between climate mitigation and adaptation, despite current global economic challenges.

    He stressed: “All our countries have challenges to get the right balance between adaption and mitigation, but we want to do that.

    We want to look at the quality of adaptation finance, and we must look at the accessibility to climate finance, specifically for developing countries’  nationally determined contributions.” The panel included ministers from Africa, Europe and the Caribbean. 

    They backed calls for increased financing for climate adaptation in Africa, and called on industrialized countries to deliver on their $100 billion-a-year pledge without further delay.

    African Development Bank Group President Dr. Akinwumi Adesina thanked Germany for believing in Africa and for having confidence in the Bank Group.

    Adesina assured Secretary Flasbarth that the funds would be put to good use.

    He said: “The climate action you are putting your money in will enable 20 million farmers, including pastoralists, to access weather-indexed insurance.

    It will provide 20 million farmers with climate-resilient agriculture technologies, regenerate a million hectares of degraded land, allow for investment in 840 billion cubic meters of water for 18 million people, and provide renewable energy for 10 million people.” The African Development Bank head highlighted several measures and  initiatives that the Bank Group had initiated to help ease climate impact in Africa, particularly on food production.

    In particular, he mentioned the Africa Disaster Risk Insurance Facility, which protects farmers against exogenous disasters.

    He called on other industrialized countries to contribute to the Climate Action Window to boost climate adaptation in Africa.

    Although Africa contributes only about 3% to greenhouse emissions, the continent is the hardest hit by climate impact, including droughts, floods, cyclones and damaged infrastructure, resulting in debts across the continent.

    “Africa is choking, Africa is suffering, and Africa is in great distress because of climate change which it did not cause…So we don’t have a choice but to adapt to it,” Adesina stressed.

  •   Former Irish president Mary Robinson headlined a panel discussion to mark Gender Day at the 27th United Nations Climate Change Conference COP27 in Egypt She called for a bespoke climate fund to support grassroots women to tackle climate change and build resilience The African Development Bank organized the session held during COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh under the theme Gender Sensitive and climate just finance mechanisms The panelists said facilities tailored to supporting women who are helping to build climate resilience must be visible simple and easily accessible There is a problem about the visibility transparency and accountability and although there is some money floating around we don t have a properly dedicated climate fund or a permanent climate fund to support women entrepreneurs in combating climate change Robinson said Robinson gave the example of some women led projects in Uganda which could do ten times more if they had access to targeted climate resources They had no prospects of getting the money that could be available for their sector they didn t even know who was getting the money or where it was going Opening the session African Development Bank Group Vice President Vice for Power Energy Climate and Green Growth Kevin Kariuki said the Bank had earmarked funding for ten capacity building projects focusing on gender and climate through the Africa Climate Change Fund Moreover we are committing 100 million in loans to public and private sector projects to address gender and climate issues Kariuki said The Bank is also developing an adaptation mechanism to enable individuals and groups including women and children to borrow money for climate adaptation projects he added The African Development Bank hosted other side events to mark Gender Day at the COP27 to highlight the successes challenges and issues surrounding gender equality and climate change They included the launch of the Gender in Climate Action Accelerator a tool to support private sector companies improve the gender responsiveness of their corporate climate governance The Accelerator will support governments in promoting gender sensitive climate sector policies accelerating their green transition to meet the targets of the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals It is a joint initiative by the Egyptian government the African Development Bank the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development and the French Development Agency AFD At a session opened by Kenya s First Lady Rachel Ruto experts agreed that as the efforts for greener economies grow the focus should be on upskilling and reskilling to help women and girls to access green jobs The panel titled Enabling and Tracking Gender responsive Green Jobs Recovery also highlighted access to information for women and strengthening gender responsive capacity building The Bank also held a session on Accelerating gender responsive climate investment for a resilient Sahel which discussed good practices to ramp up gender responsive climate finance in the Sahel In his remarks Al Hamndou Dorsouma Acting Director of Climate Change and Green Growth at the African Development Bank called for a more equitable distribution of climate resources in the Sahel Sidi Mohamed EL Wavi Director of Climate and Green Economy at the Ministry of Environment in Mauritania underscored the importance of eliminating barriers to quality education for women to enhance their representation at all levels
    Conference of the Parties (COP 27): On Gender Day African Development Bank rallies global support for women to build climate resilience
      Former Irish president Mary Robinson headlined a panel discussion to mark Gender Day at the 27th United Nations Climate Change Conference COP27 in Egypt She called for a bespoke climate fund to support grassroots women to tackle climate change and build resilience The African Development Bank organized the session held during COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh under the theme Gender Sensitive and climate just finance mechanisms The panelists said facilities tailored to supporting women who are helping to build climate resilience must be visible simple and easily accessible There is a problem about the visibility transparency and accountability and although there is some money floating around we don t have a properly dedicated climate fund or a permanent climate fund to support women entrepreneurs in combating climate change Robinson said Robinson gave the example of some women led projects in Uganda which could do ten times more if they had access to targeted climate resources They had no prospects of getting the money that could be available for their sector they didn t even know who was getting the money or where it was going Opening the session African Development Bank Group Vice President Vice for Power Energy Climate and Green Growth Kevin Kariuki said the Bank had earmarked funding for ten capacity building projects focusing on gender and climate through the Africa Climate Change Fund Moreover we are committing 100 million in loans to public and private sector projects to address gender and climate issues Kariuki said The Bank is also developing an adaptation mechanism to enable individuals and groups including women and children to borrow money for climate adaptation projects he added The African Development Bank hosted other side events to mark Gender Day at the COP27 to highlight the successes challenges and issues surrounding gender equality and climate change They included the launch of the Gender in Climate Action Accelerator a tool to support private sector companies improve the gender responsiveness of their corporate climate governance The Accelerator will support governments in promoting gender sensitive climate sector policies accelerating their green transition to meet the targets of the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals It is a joint initiative by the Egyptian government the African Development Bank the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development and the French Development Agency AFD At a session opened by Kenya s First Lady Rachel Ruto experts agreed that as the efforts for greener economies grow the focus should be on upskilling and reskilling to help women and girls to access green jobs The panel titled Enabling and Tracking Gender responsive Green Jobs Recovery also highlighted access to information for women and strengthening gender responsive capacity building The Bank also held a session on Accelerating gender responsive climate investment for a resilient Sahel which discussed good practices to ramp up gender responsive climate finance in the Sahel In his remarks Al Hamndou Dorsouma Acting Director of Climate Change and Green Growth at the African Development Bank called for a more equitable distribution of climate resources in the Sahel Sidi Mohamed EL Wavi Director of Climate and Green Economy at the Ministry of Environment in Mauritania underscored the importance of eliminating barriers to quality education for women to enhance their representation at all levels
    Conference of the Parties (COP 27): On Gender Day African Development Bank rallies global support for women to build climate resilience
    Africa2 months ago

    Conference of the Parties (COP 27): On Gender Day African Development Bank rallies global support for women to build climate resilience

    Former Irish president Mary Robinson headlined a panel discussion to mark ‘Gender Day’ at the 27th United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27) in Egypt.

    She called for a bespoke climate fund to support grassroots women to tackle climate change and build resilience.

    The African Development Bank organized the session held during COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh under the theme, Gender Sensitive and climate just finance mechanisms.

    The panelists said facilities tailored to supporting women, who are helping to build climate resilience, must be visible, simple, and easily accessible. 

    “There is a problem about the visibility, transparency and accountability, and although there is some money floating around, we don’t have a properly dedicated climate fund or a permanent climate fund to support women entrepreneurs in combating climate change,” Robinson said.

    Robinson gave the example of some women-led projects in Uganda which could do ten times more if they had access to targeted climate resources.

    “They had no prospects of getting the money that could be available for their sector – they didn’t even know who was getting the money or where it was going.” Opening the session, African Development Bank Group Vice President Vice for Power, Energy, Climate and Green Growth, Kevin Kariuki, said the Bank had earmarked funding for ten capacity-building projects, focusing on gender and climate through the Africa Climate Change Fund. “Moreover, we are committing $100 million in loans to public and private sector projects to address gender and climate issues,” Kariuki said.

    “The Bank is also developing an adaptation mechanism to enable individuals and groups, including women and children, to borrow money for climate adaptation projects,” he added.

    The African Development Bank hosted other side events to mark Gender Day at the COP27 to highlight the successes, challenges and issues surrounding gender equality and climate change.

    They included the launch of the Gender in Climate Action Accelerator, a tool to support private sector companies improve the gender responsiveness of their corporate climate governance.

    The Accelerator will support governments in promoting gender-sensitive climate sector policies, accelerating their green transition to meet the targets of the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals.

    It is a joint initiative by the Egyptian government, the African Development Bank, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the French Development Agency, AFD.

    At a session opened by Kenya’s First Lady Rachel Ruto, experts agreed that as the efforts for greener economies grow, the focus should be on upskilling and reskilling to help women and girls to access green jobs.

    The panel, titled “Enabling and Tracking Gender-responsive Green Jobs Recovery,” also highlighted access to information for women and strengthening gender-responsive capacity building.

    The Bank also held a session on “Accelerating gender-responsive climate investment for a resilient Sahel, which discussed good practices to ramp up gender-responsive climate finance in the Sahel.

    In his remarks, Al Hamndou Dorsouma, Acting Director of Climate Change and Green Growth at the African Development Bank called for a more equitable distribution of climate resources in the Sahel.

    Sidi Mohamed EL Wavi, Director of Climate and Green Economy at the Ministry of Environment in Mauritania, underscored the importance of eliminating barriers to quality education for women to enhance their representation at all levels.

  •   The Egyptian COP27 Presidency will convene the first ever ministerial meeting on urbanization and climate change at the UN Climate Change Conference of Parties on 17 November 2022 The session will focus on housing urban development and multilevel action for climate change This meeting is hosted by Assem Abdelhamid Hafez El Gazzar Minister for Housing Utilities and Urban Communities of Egypt This meeting will reinforce the Paris Climate Agreement Commitments and discuss commitments to climate change mitigation climate change adaptation and local climate finance The COP27 initiative Sustainable Urban Resilience for the Next Generation SURGe will be launched at the event For the first time the meeting will bring together ministers of housing urban development environment and climate change Representatives of local and regional governments through the Local Governments and Municipal Authorities Constituency to the UNFCCC as well as non party and non state actors such as academia civil society non governmental organizations think tanks the private sector urban networks multilateral banks UN agencies and intergovernmental organizations and other observers will also be present Why a ministerial meeting at COP27 National governments are increasingly supporting local climate action Around 84 of the updated Nationally Determined Commitments have strong or moderate urban content compared to 69 in the initial Nationally Determined Commitments National governments play a pivotal role in accelerating subnational climate action and providing an environment for urban and local stakeholders to develop and implement new climate commitments Against this backdrop Member States have requested the UN Habitat s Executive Director to explore the possibility of convening a housing and urban development ministerial meeting on cities and climate change We need appropriate frameworks and guidelines to ensure that climate action in our cities towns communities and even buildings is taken and that various actors are involved in the process We also need a more robust integration of housing and sustainable urban development with Nationally Determined Commitments National Adaptation Policies climate change strategies and plans Many countries cities and even private companies have taken bold steps toward climate action However we need bolder leadership and more action to meet our goal of 1 5 degrees Celsius target by 2030 The ministerial meeting will also showcase frontrunner countries with very strong urban climate content their Nationally Determined Commitments and cities with local net zero plans in place The ministerial meeting takes place at COP27 in Sharn El Sheikh Egypt When 17 November 2022 from 10 00 am to 12 00 pmWhere UNFCCC COP27 Blue Zone Area E Meeting Room MR 20 Sharm El Sheikh Egypt
    The first-ever ministerial meeting on urbanization and climate change
      The Egyptian COP27 Presidency will convene the first ever ministerial meeting on urbanization and climate change at the UN Climate Change Conference of Parties on 17 November 2022 The session will focus on housing urban development and multilevel action for climate change This meeting is hosted by Assem Abdelhamid Hafez El Gazzar Minister for Housing Utilities and Urban Communities of Egypt This meeting will reinforce the Paris Climate Agreement Commitments and discuss commitments to climate change mitigation climate change adaptation and local climate finance The COP27 initiative Sustainable Urban Resilience for the Next Generation SURGe will be launched at the event For the first time the meeting will bring together ministers of housing urban development environment and climate change Representatives of local and regional governments through the Local Governments and Municipal Authorities Constituency to the UNFCCC as well as non party and non state actors such as academia civil society non governmental organizations think tanks the private sector urban networks multilateral banks UN agencies and intergovernmental organizations and other observers will also be present Why a ministerial meeting at COP27 National governments are increasingly supporting local climate action Around 84 of the updated Nationally Determined Commitments have strong or moderate urban content compared to 69 in the initial Nationally Determined Commitments National governments play a pivotal role in accelerating subnational climate action and providing an environment for urban and local stakeholders to develop and implement new climate commitments Against this backdrop Member States have requested the UN Habitat s Executive Director to explore the possibility of convening a housing and urban development ministerial meeting on cities and climate change We need appropriate frameworks and guidelines to ensure that climate action in our cities towns communities and even buildings is taken and that various actors are involved in the process We also need a more robust integration of housing and sustainable urban development with Nationally Determined Commitments National Adaptation Policies climate change strategies and plans Many countries cities and even private companies have taken bold steps toward climate action However we need bolder leadership and more action to meet our goal of 1 5 degrees Celsius target by 2030 The ministerial meeting will also showcase frontrunner countries with very strong urban climate content their Nationally Determined Commitments and cities with local net zero plans in place The ministerial meeting takes place at COP27 in Sharn El Sheikh Egypt When 17 November 2022 from 10 00 am to 12 00 pmWhere UNFCCC COP27 Blue Zone Area E Meeting Room MR 20 Sharm El Sheikh Egypt
    The first-ever ministerial meeting on urbanization and climate change
    Africa2 months ago

    The first-ever ministerial meeting on urbanization and climate change

    The Egyptian COP27 Presidency will convene the first-ever ministerial meeting on urbanization and climate change at the UN Climate Change Conference of Parties on 17 November 2022.

    The session will focus on housing, urban development, and multilevel action for climate change. 

    This meeting is hosted by Assem Abdelhamid Hafez El Gazzar, Minister for Housing, Utilities, and Urban Communities of Egypt.

    This meeting will reinforce the Paris Climate Agreement Commitments and discuss commitments to climate change mitigation, climate change adaptation, and local climate finance.

    The COP27 initiative Sustainable Urban Resilience for the Next Generation (SURGe) will be launched at the event. 

    For the first time, the meeting will bring together ministers of housing, urban development, environment, and climate change.

    Representatives of local and regional governments through the Local Governments and Municipal Authorities Constituency to the UNFCCC, as well as non-party and non-state actors such as academia, civil society, non-governmental organizations, think tanks, the private sector, urban networks, multilateral banks, UN agencies, and intergovernmental organizations, and other observers will also be present.

    Why a ministerial meeting at COP27?

    National governments are increasingly supporting local climate action.

    Around 84 % of the updated Nationally Determined Commitments have strong or moderate urban content compared to 69% in the initial Nationally Determined Commitments.

    National governments play a pivotal role in accelerating subnational climate action and providing an environment for urban and local stakeholders to develop and implement new climate commitments. 

    Against this backdrop, Member States have requested the UN-Habitat’s Executive Director to explore the possibility of convening a housing and urban development ministerial meeting on cities and climate change.

    We need appropriate frameworks and guidelines to ensure that climate action in our cities, towns, communities and even buildings is taken and that various actors are involved in the process.

    We also need a more robust integration of housing and sustainable urban development with Nationally Determined Commitments, National Adaptation Policies, climate change strategies, and plans.

    Many countries, cities, and even private companies have taken bold steps toward climate action.

    However, we need bolder leadership and more action to meet our goal of 1.5 degrees Celsius target by 2030.

    The ministerial meeting will also showcase frontrunner countries with very strong urban climate content, their Nationally Determined Commitments, and cities with local net-zero plans in place.

    The ministerial meeting takes place at COP27 in Sharn El-Sheikh, Egypt.When:17 November 2022 from 10:00 am to 12:00 pmWhere:UNFCCC COP27, Blue Zone, Area E, Meeting Room MR 20, Sharm-El-Sheikh, Egypt

  •   The United Nations World Food Programme WFP has welcomed a total US 4 1 million contribution from the Government of Iceland and the Government of Norway to support thousands of people facing severe hunger at the peak of the lean season in Malawi The joint contribution comprised of US 3 6 million from Norway and US 500 000 from Iceland will provide critical humanitarian assistance to some 270 000 people through cash based transfers in the districts of Balaka and Chikwawa where smallholder farmers have been heavily affected by climate shocks and rising food prices We commend the Governments of Norway and Iceland for their strong commitment to ensuring the food security of the most vulnerable during this exceptionally difficult lean season says Paul Turnbull WFP s Country Director in Malawi As world leaders and experts meet at COP27 in Egypt we must highlight the urgent need to help communities on the frontlines of the climate crisis and invest in durable solutions Some 3 8 million people are estimated to be acutely food insecure and in need of food assistance between October 2022 and March 2023 according to the latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification IPC report over 130 percent increase compared to the same time last year Malawi has been heavily impacted by the global food crisis where the devastating effects of natural disasters have been exacerbated by rising prices of food energy and fertilisers caused in part by the conflict in Ukraine Norway reiterates its commitment to a more food secure and resilient Malawi says Her Excellency Ingrid Marie Mikelsen Ambassador of the Kingdom of Norway to the Republic of Malawi Norway recognises the long standing expertise of WFP and other players to provide essential and opportune assistance in times like these to ensure more people do not slip into hunger Coordinated interventions will ensure the most effective and wide reaching response possible thanks to resources mobilised both by the Government of Malawi humanitarian and development partners Iceland remains steadfast in its support to vulnerable Malawians at risk of hunger said Inga D ra P tursd ttir Head of Mission of the Embassy of Iceland in Malawi The increasing risk of climatic shocks worsens a vicious cycle of food insecurity which is why Iceland partnered with WFP to help vulnerable families to mitigate and manage the impacts of these shocks The Government of Malawi is grateful to Norway and Iceland for their generous contribution to the 2022 2023 lean season response said Charles Kalemba Commissioner of the Department of Disaster Management Affairs Their support will ensure less Malawians go hungry and that Malawi can remain focused on its development goals The cooperation between the Nordic nations is not only based on political history and geographical location but also on common values such as democracy trust transparency equality equity and sustainability Both Iceland and Norway have provided catalytic funding to WFP school feeding in Malawi and were the first supporters of the home grown school feeding model that began in 2014 Norway currently provides direct financial support to WFP s home grown school feeding in addition to supporting the UN Joint Programme on Girls Education a US 40 million programme implemented jointly by WFP UNICEF and UNFPA Norway was also a key supporter of WFP activities during the COVID 19 Urban Cash Initiative CUCI response in 2020 Since 2014 Iceland has supported WFP school feeding activities in Mangochi and more recently has expanded support to include and resilience building activities in the same district Additionally Iceland supported WFP activities linked to the national COVID 19 response as well as provided support to flood victims in Chikwawa district earlier this year
    Iceland and Norway help World Food Programme (WFP) mount response as hunger peaks in Malawi
      The United Nations World Food Programme WFP has welcomed a total US 4 1 million contribution from the Government of Iceland and the Government of Norway to support thousands of people facing severe hunger at the peak of the lean season in Malawi The joint contribution comprised of US 3 6 million from Norway and US 500 000 from Iceland will provide critical humanitarian assistance to some 270 000 people through cash based transfers in the districts of Balaka and Chikwawa where smallholder farmers have been heavily affected by climate shocks and rising food prices We commend the Governments of Norway and Iceland for their strong commitment to ensuring the food security of the most vulnerable during this exceptionally difficult lean season says Paul Turnbull WFP s Country Director in Malawi As world leaders and experts meet at COP27 in Egypt we must highlight the urgent need to help communities on the frontlines of the climate crisis and invest in durable solutions Some 3 8 million people are estimated to be acutely food insecure and in need of food assistance between October 2022 and March 2023 according to the latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification IPC report over 130 percent increase compared to the same time last year Malawi has been heavily impacted by the global food crisis where the devastating effects of natural disasters have been exacerbated by rising prices of food energy and fertilisers caused in part by the conflict in Ukraine Norway reiterates its commitment to a more food secure and resilient Malawi says Her Excellency Ingrid Marie Mikelsen Ambassador of the Kingdom of Norway to the Republic of Malawi Norway recognises the long standing expertise of WFP and other players to provide essential and opportune assistance in times like these to ensure more people do not slip into hunger Coordinated interventions will ensure the most effective and wide reaching response possible thanks to resources mobilised both by the Government of Malawi humanitarian and development partners Iceland remains steadfast in its support to vulnerable Malawians at risk of hunger said Inga D ra P tursd ttir Head of Mission of the Embassy of Iceland in Malawi The increasing risk of climatic shocks worsens a vicious cycle of food insecurity which is why Iceland partnered with WFP to help vulnerable families to mitigate and manage the impacts of these shocks The Government of Malawi is grateful to Norway and Iceland for their generous contribution to the 2022 2023 lean season response said Charles Kalemba Commissioner of the Department of Disaster Management Affairs Their support will ensure less Malawians go hungry and that Malawi can remain focused on its development goals The cooperation between the Nordic nations is not only based on political history and geographical location but also on common values such as democracy trust transparency equality equity and sustainability Both Iceland and Norway have provided catalytic funding to WFP school feeding in Malawi and were the first supporters of the home grown school feeding model that began in 2014 Norway currently provides direct financial support to WFP s home grown school feeding in addition to supporting the UN Joint Programme on Girls Education a US 40 million programme implemented jointly by WFP UNICEF and UNFPA Norway was also a key supporter of WFP activities during the COVID 19 Urban Cash Initiative CUCI response in 2020 Since 2014 Iceland has supported WFP school feeding activities in Mangochi and more recently has expanded support to include and resilience building activities in the same district Additionally Iceland supported WFP activities linked to the national COVID 19 response as well as provided support to flood victims in Chikwawa district earlier this year
    Iceland and Norway help World Food Programme (WFP) mount response as hunger peaks in Malawi
    Africa2 months ago

    Iceland and Norway help World Food Programme (WFP) mount response as hunger peaks in Malawi

    The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) has welcomed a total US$ 4.1 million contribution from the Government of Iceland and the Government of Norway to support thousands of people facing severe hunger at the peak of the lean season in Malawi.

    The joint contribution – comprised of US$3.6 million from Norway and US$500,000 from Iceland - will provide critical humanitarian assistance to some 270,000 people through cash-based transfers in the districts of Balaka and Chikwawa where smallholder farmers have been heavily affected by climate shocks and rising food prices.

    “We commend the Governments of Norway and Iceland for their strong commitment to ensuring the food security of the most vulnerable during this exceptionally difficult lean season,” says Paul Turnbull, WFP’s Country Director in Malawi.

    “As world leaders and experts meet at COP27 in Egypt, we must highlight the urgent need to help communities on the frontlines of the climate crisis and invest in durable solutions.” Some 3.8 million people are estimated to be acutely food insecure and in need of food assistance between October 2022 and March 2023 according to the latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) report – over 130 percent increase compared to the same time last year.

    Malawi has been heavily impacted by the global food crisis where the devastating effects of natural disasters have been exacerbated by rising prices of food, energy and fertilisers caused in part by the conflict in Ukraine.

    “Norway reiterates its commitment to a more food secure and resilient Malawi,” says Her Excellency Ingrid Marie Mikelsen, Ambassador of the Kingdom of Norway to the Republic of Malawi. 

    “Norway recognises the long-standing expertise of WFP and other players to provide essential and opportune assistance in times like these to ensure more people do not slip into hunger.” Coordinated interventions will ensure the most effective and wide-reaching response possible thanks to resources mobilised both by the Government of Malawi, humanitarian and development partners.

    “Iceland remains steadfast in its support to vulnerable Malawians at risk of hunger,” said Inga Dóra Pétursdóttir, Head of Mission of the Embassy of Iceland in Malawi. 

    “The increasing risk of climatic shocks worsens a vicious cycle of food insecurity, which is why Iceland partnered with WFP to help vulnerable families to mitigate and manage the impacts of these shocks.” The Government of Malawi is grateful to Norway and Iceland for their generous contribution to the 2022-2023 lean season response,” said Charles Kalemba, Commissioner of the Department of Disaster Management Affairs. 

    Their support will ensure less Malawians go hungry and that Malawi can remain focused on its development goals.” The cooperation between the Nordic nations is not only based on political history and geographical location, but also on common values ​​such as democracy, trust, transparency, equality, equity and sustainability.

    Both Iceland and Norway have provided catalytic funding to WFP school feeding in Malawi and were the first supporters of the home-grown school feeding model that began in 2014.

    Norway currently provides direct financial support to WFP’s home-grown school feeding in addition to supporting the UN Joint Programme on Girls Education, a US$ 40 million programme implemented jointly by WFP, UNICEF and UNFPA.

    Norway was also a key supporter of WFP activities during the COVID-19 Urban Cash Initiative (CUCI) response in 2020.

    Since 2014 Iceland has supported WFP school feeding activities in Mangochi and, more recently, has expanded support to include and resilience-building activities in the same district. 

    Additionally, Iceland supported WFP activities linked to the national COVID-19 response as well as provided support to flood victims in Chikwawa district earlier this year.

  •   With over 600 million people currently lacking access to electricity and 900 million people without access to clean cooking solutions coupled with the fact that Africa as a continent faces the worst effects of the climate crisis there has never been a more pressing time to invest in Angolan oil and gas For its part the country s resources hold the key for widespread electrification climate mitigation and sustainable economic growth and with accelerated investment in these resources not only Angola but Africa has the potential to both develop and thrive as an economy It is within this context that the Angola Oil amp Gas AOG conference and exhibition emerges Scheduled to take place in Luanda from November 29 to December 1 the third edition of the event will see AOG 2022 emerging as not only the biggest energy conference in the country but the biggest to take place in Africa post COP27 Its significance therefore cannot be understated and at a time when urgent investment is needed in Angola the event is set to lay the foundation for robust discussions lucrative deals and new capital commitments that will transform Angola s energy landscape for the better Building on the theme of Promoting an Inclusive Attractive and Innovative Oil and Gas Industry in Angola AOG 2022 will awaken new opportunities for partnerships and dialogue thereby making a strong case for Angolan investment while setting the tone for other energy related discussions across other African events in 2022 and beyond Its role as a forum comes not only from its position as the country s premier energy event but as the first and biggest energy conference taking place post COP27 Taking place merely a week after COP27 concludes AOG 2022 represents the platform of choice for policymakers energy leaders and public and private sector executives to discuss the impacts of decisions made during the climate summit With this year s summit placing more emphasis on the role fossil fuels play in the world s energy future and African representatives delivering a strong argument for the development of these resources for the good of Africa AOG 2022 will build on while strengthening this narrative placing oil and gas investment and development at the center of all discussions Why Angola To date Angola s proven oil reserves stand at 8 5 billion barrels of oil while its proven natural gas reserves stand at 11 trillion cubic feet and while significant progress has been made to develop these resources much more needs to be done from both an investment and participatory standpoint With the aim of unlocking the true potential of the country s oil and gas sector the Government of Angola through the national oil company Sonangol and the national regulator the National Agency for Oil Gas and Biofuels ANPG has introduced a six year licensing round in 2019 offering 50 up for exploration in the hopes of accelerating upstream activities implemented a series of structural and policy reforms to reawaken new investment in the already competitive market while offering new rules of engagement reductions in E amp P approval timelines and petroleum tax revisions to secure the participation of a range of international companies Under the leadership of both the President Jo o Louren o and the Minister of Mineral Resources Oil and Gas Diamantino Azevedo the country continues to witness unprecedented growth across the entire energy value chain owing largely to the efforts undertaken by the minister and president to establish both and enabling an increasingly competitive environment for investment NJ Ayuk the Executive Chairman of the AEC Now in 2022 the country has emerged as the destination of choice for project developers and financiers and leveraging the significant untapped resources available Angola is set to awaken a new era of investment and development all thanks to President Louren o and Minister Azevedo s strong development drive Concluded Ayuk Building on the reforms implemented AOG 2022 will provide insight into the country s regulatory and legal landscape paving the way for heightened collaboration between local and global stakeholders while unlocking new levels of investment across the entire energy value chain In partnership with the Ministry of Mineral Resources and Petroleum and the African Energy Chamber the event welcomes the participation of a suite of local regional and international stakeholders As the country s official gathering for energy stakeholders and the biggest energy event on the continent post COP27 AOG 2022 represents a not to be missed energy event Secure your participation at AOG 2022 and be part of the conversation on Angola s energy future For more information visit http bit ly 3UyBCpP
    Angola to Host Energy Investors with the Largest Event in Africa Post-Conference of Parties (COP27)
      With over 600 million people currently lacking access to electricity and 900 million people without access to clean cooking solutions coupled with the fact that Africa as a continent faces the worst effects of the climate crisis there has never been a more pressing time to invest in Angolan oil and gas For its part the country s resources hold the key for widespread electrification climate mitigation and sustainable economic growth and with accelerated investment in these resources not only Angola but Africa has the potential to both develop and thrive as an economy It is within this context that the Angola Oil amp Gas AOG conference and exhibition emerges Scheduled to take place in Luanda from November 29 to December 1 the third edition of the event will see AOG 2022 emerging as not only the biggest energy conference in the country but the biggest to take place in Africa post COP27 Its significance therefore cannot be understated and at a time when urgent investment is needed in Angola the event is set to lay the foundation for robust discussions lucrative deals and new capital commitments that will transform Angola s energy landscape for the better Building on the theme of Promoting an Inclusive Attractive and Innovative Oil and Gas Industry in Angola AOG 2022 will awaken new opportunities for partnerships and dialogue thereby making a strong case for Angolan investment while setting the tone for other energy related discussions across other African events in 2022 and beyond Its role as a forum comes not only from its position as the country s premier energy event but as the first and biggest energy conference taking place post COP27 Taking place merely a week after COP27 concludes AOG 2022 represents the platform of choice for policymakers energy leaders and public and private sector executives to discuss the impacts of decisions made during the climate summit With this year s summit placing more emphasis on the role fossil fuels play in the world s energy future and African representatives delivering a strong argument for the development of these resources for the good of Africa AOG 2022 will build on while strengthening this narrative placing oil and gas investment and development at the center of all discussions Why Angola To date Angola s proven oil reserves stand at 8 5 billion barrels of oil while its proven natural gas reserves stand at 11 trillion cubic feet and while significant progress has been made to develop these resources much more needs to be done from both an investment and participatory standpoint With the aim of unlocking the true potential of the country s oil and gas sector the Government of Angola through the national oil company Sonangol and the national regulator the National Agency for Oil Gas and Biofuels ANPG has introduced a six year licensing round in 2019 offering 50 up for exploration in the hopes of accelerating upstream activities implemented a series of structural and policy reforms to reawaken new investment in the already competitive market while offering new rules of engagement reductions in E amp P approval timelines and petroleum tax revisions to secure the participation of a range of international companies Under the leadership of both the President Jo o Louren o and the Minister of Mineral Resources Oil and Gas Diamantino Azevedo the country continues to witness unprecedented growth across the entire energy value chain owing largely to the efforts undertaken by the minister and president to establish both and enabling an increasingly competitive environment for investment NJ Ayuk the Executive Chairman of the AEC Now in 2022 the country has emerged as the destination of choice for project developers and financiers and leveraging the significant untapped resources available Angola is set to awaken a new era of investment and development all thanks to President Louren o and Minister Azevedo s strong development drive Concluded Ayuk Building on the reforms implemented AOG 2022 will provide insight into the country s regulatory and legal landscape paving the way for heightened collaboration between local and global stakeholders while unlocking new levels of investment across the entire energy value chain In partnership with the Ministry of Mineral Resources and Petroleum and the African Energy Chamber the event welcomes the participation of a suite of local regional and international stakeholders As the country s official gathering for energy stakeholders and the biggest energy event on the continent post COP27 AOG 2022 represents a not to be missed energy event Secure your participation at AOG 2022 and be part of the conversation on Angola s energy future For more information visit http bit ly 3UyBCpP
    Angola to Host Energy Investors with the Largest Event in Africa Post-Conference of Parties (COP27)
    Africa2 months ago

    Angola to Host Energy Investors with the Largest Event in Africa Post-Conference of Parties (COP27)

    With over 600 million people currently lacking access to electricity and 900 million people without access to clean cooking solutions, coupled with the fact that Africa as a continent faces the worst effects of the climate crisis, there has never been a more pressing time to invest in Angolan oil and gas.

    For its part, the country’s resources hold the key for widespread electrification, climate mitigation and sustainable economic growth, and with accelerated investment in these resources, not only Angola but Africa has the potential to both develop and thrive as an economy.

    It is within this context that the Angola Oil & Gas (AOG) conference and exhibition emerges.

    Scheduled to take place in Luanda from November 29 to December 1, the third edition of the event will see AOG 2022 emerging as not only the biggest energy conference in the country but the biggest to take place in Africa post-COP27.

    Its significance, therefore, cannot be understated, and at a time when urgent investment is needed in Angola, the event is set to lay the foundation for robust discussions, lucrative deals and new capital commitments that will transform Angola’s energy landscape for the better. 

    Building on the theme of ‘Promoting an Inclusive, Attractive and Innovative Oil and Gas Industry in Angola,’ AOG 2022 will awaken new opportunities for partnerships and dialogue, thereby making a strong case for Angolan investment while setting the tone for other energy-related discussions across other African events in 2022 and beyond.

    Its role as a forum comes not only from its position as the country’s premier energy event but as the first and biggest energy conference taking place post-COP27.

    Taking place merely a week after COP27 concludes, AOG 2022 represents the platform of choice for policymakers, energy leaders and public and private sector executives to discuss the impacts of decisions made during the climate summit.

    With this year’s summit placing more emphasis on the role fossil fuels play in the world’s energy future, and African representatives delivering a strong argument for the development of these resources for the good of Africa, AOG 2022 will build on while strengthening this narrative, placing oil and gas investment and development at the center of all discussions.

    Why Angola?

    To date, Angola’s proven oil reserves stand at 8.5 billion barrels of oil while its proven natural gas reserves stand at 11 trillion cubic feet, and while significant progress has been made to develop these resources, much more needs to be done from both an investment and participatory standpoint.

    With the aim of unlocking the true potential of the country’s oil and gas sector, the Government of Angola, through the national oil company Sonangol and the national regulator, the National Agency for Oil, Gas and Biofuels (ANPG), has introduced a six-year licensing round in 2019, offering 50 up for exploration in the hopes of accelerating upstream activities; implemented a series of structural and policy reforms to reawaken new investment in the already competitive market; while offering new rules of engagement, reductions in E&P approval timelines and petroleum tax revisions to secure the participation of a range of international companies.

    “Under the leadership of both the President, João Lourenço, and the Minister of Mineral Resources, Oil and Gas, Diamantino Azevedo, the country continues to witness unprecedented growth across the entire energy value chain, owing largely to the efforts undertaken by the minister and president to establish both and enabling an increasingly competitive environment for investment.” NJ Ayuk, the Executive Chairman of the AEC “Now, in 2022, the country has emerged as the destination of choice for project developers and financiers, and leveraging the significant untapped resources available, Angola is set to awaken a new era of investment and development, all thanks to President Lourenço and Minister Azevedo’s strong development drive.” Concluded Ayuk Building on the reforms implemented, AOG 2022 will provide insight into the country’s regulatory and legal landscape, paving the way for heightened collaboration between local and global stakeholders while unlocking new levels of investment across the entire energy value chain.

    In partnership with the Ministry of Mineral Resources and Petroleum and the African Energy Chamber, the event welcomes the participation of a suite of local, regional and international stakeholders.

    As the country’s official gathering for energy stakeholders and the biggest energy event on the continent post-COP27, AOG 2022 represents a not-to-be-missed energy event.

    Secure your participation at AOG 2022 and be part of the conversation on Angola’s energy future.

    For more information, visit http://bit.ly/3UyBCpP

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