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  •  Nature is in crisis and time is running out The latest round of negotiations for a new Global Biodiversity Framework GBF have just concluded in Nairobi Kenya This was set to be a critical step on the road to the biodiversity convention s Conference of Parties in December in Montreal COP15 hosted by China With nature hellip
    Nairobi’s Nature Deal Negotiation talks stall
     Nature is in crisis and time is running out The latest round of negotiations for a new Global Biodiversity Framework GBF have just concluded in Nairobi Kenya This was set to be a critical step on the road to the biodiversity convention s Conference of Parties in December in Montreal COP15 hosted by China With nature hellip
    Nairobi’s Nature Deal Negotiation talks stall
    General news1 day ago

    Nairobi’s Nature Deal Negotiation talks stall

    Nature is in crisis and time is running out. The latest round of negotiations for a new Global Biodiversity Framework (GBF) have just concluded in Nairobi, Kenya. This was set to be a critical step on the road to the biodiversity convention’s Conference of Parties in December in Montreal (COP15), hosted by China.With nature declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history, with grave impacts particularly on vulnerable people and countries, a consensus has emerged that we must halt and reverse the loss of biodiversity by 2030. We need to have more nature at the end of the decade than at its start - a nature-positive world for people and planet - with governments, businesses and society combining to ensure that biodiversity loss is reversed.The text on the table at the end of these negotiations is inconclusive and woefully inadequate. We are leaving with many of the elements for a strong global deal on the table but needing further negotiations with difficult decisions still to come. We had hoped for more and nature needs more; however, we are far from the path towards a transformative deal at COP15.Agreeing and adopting a truly transformative and inclusive GBF is a once-in-a-decade opportunity that should not be missed. A chance for all of us to be part of a historic moment, for nature and people, considering the precarious state of our planet’s biodiversity.“The world needs to understand how critical it is that an ambitious agreement is adopted at COP15. Climate change and nature are inextricably linked – nature is impacted by climate change but is also part of the solution. We call on leaders to give the nature crisis the attention it requires.Most key elements of an ambitious framework are on the table and consensus is being built - but difficult choices remain, and ambition must build from Nairobi on the road to COP15 for a nature-positive deal that the world needs,” notes Melanie Heath, Director of Science, Policy, and Information at BirdLife International.“Governments and stakeholders have no better chance than now to put in place a framework that will transform the harmful way in which we live, to the detriment of biodiversity and ultimately ourselves. A business-as-usual approach is not an option. The new framework must contain bold, transformative elements including increased, predictable funding to support implementation,” notes Ken Mwathe, Policy and Communications Coordinator, BirdLife International Africa.“The post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework truly takes into account knowledge gathered from science and stakeholders over the last decades. This meeting in Nairobi, billed as a crucial avenue to get our acts together before COP15 in Montreal, provided a chance for Parties present to truly move past sentiments, and replace talk with action by producing text that is ambitious in all ramifications. Unfortunately, this remains to be seen,” says Yemisi Fawibe-Oke, Policy & Advocacy Manager, Nigerian Conservation Foundation (BirdLife Partner in Nigeria).Human activities have led to the loss of 83% of animal species and 50% of plant species since the dawn of civilization. Nature-positive means halting and reversing species loss, and BirdLife International has been at the forefront of addressing this on the African continent. An example is Morocco, where the Griffon Vulture is now breeding after 40 years, thanks to efforts by the BirdLife Partner organization in the country. In Southern Africa, BirdLife Partners are working to save vultures whose populations have declined by up to 97%. Linked to this is the conservation of Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs) which contribute significantly to the global persistence of biodiversity, across terrestrial, freshwater, coastal and marine ecosystems.Agriculture is a critical sector in Africa, employing over 60% of the continent’s workforce. Biodiversity is one of the major drivers of biodiversity loss in Africa. Thus, an effective Global Biodiversity Framework should look at nature-friendly farming methods, which include reducing harmful pesticides and regenerative agriculture, while protecting useful organisms including pollinators and birds.BirdLife International is calling for an ambitious framework in four areas in particular. First, we are calling upon the global community to put in place a framework to halt species extinctions and increase the abundance of species populations, through addressing factors that drive species towards extinction. Such action should reverse species declines so that we are nature-positive by 2030. Secondly, there is a need to effectively manage a scaled-up system of protected and conserved areas covering 30% of the planet’s land and ocean areas by 2030, which focus on KBAs and other areas of importance for biodiversity.Linked to this is the critical role of Indigenous People and Local Communities (IPLCs), who number about 476 million people, approximately 6% of the global population, but inhabit about 85% of areas proposed for biodiversity conservation. Thus, IPLCs are critical partners in helping achieve ecosystem protection, conservation and restoration. By working with Partners and local communities through our ’local to global’ approach, we have demonstrated significant conservation success, and therefore welcome acknowledgement of the rights and critical role played by IPLCs in the Nairobi talks.Finally, the new framework must have an effective mechanism and means for implementation. This includes a clear monitoring and reporting framework and scaled-up predictable financing. Africa faces a huge shortfall in financing biodiversity conservation, estimated at about 700 billion dollars every year, so addressing this finance gap is critical.Given the slow pace of negotiations witnessed in Nairobi, far more commitment and political support at the highest level is needed ahead of Montreal. Tackling biodiversity loss requires ambition, leadership, cooperation and political will from countries, without which the world would be staring at a bleak future. The clock is ticking, and the alarm is set: we must use the coming months wisely to work together to make sure that the final negotiations are a success.

  •  Nigeria has pledged commitment to reducing marine plastic pollution from land based sources and activities President Muhammadu Buhari according to his spokesman Malam Garba Shehu on Saturday in Abuja gave the assurance in a speech delivered on his behalf by the Minister of State for Environment Sharon Ikeazor at the 2022 UN Ocean Conference in Lisbon hellip
    UN Ocean Conference: Nigeria highlights efforts to tackle plastic pollution
     Nigeria has pledged commitment to reducing marine plastic pollution from land based sources and activities President Muhammadu Buhari according to his spokesman Malam Garba Shehu on Saturday in Abuja gave the assurance in a speech delivered on his behalf by the Minister of State for Environment Sharon Ikeazor at the 2022 UN Ocean Conference in Lisbon hellip
    UN Ocean Conference: Nigeria highlights efforts to tackle plastic pollution
    Environment1 day ago

    UN Ocean Conference: Nigeria highlights efforts to tackle plastic pollution

    Nigeria has pledged  commitment to reducing marine plastic pollution from land-based sources and activities.

    President Muhammadu Buhari, according to his spokesman, Malam Garba Shehu, on Saturday in Abuja, gave the assurance in a speech delivered on his behalf by the Minister of State for Environment Sharon Ikeazor at the 2022 UN Ocean Conference, in Lisbon

    While highlighting Nigeria’s effort at ensuring the health and sustainability of oceans, seas and marine resources, the president said that a national policy on plastic pollution and the road map on tackling solid and plastic waste management had been formulated and established.

    Buhari, who lauded the UN for leading the process of effective ocean governance, said that Nigeria had mainstreamed ocean management into the economy, constituting a Presidential Committee on Sustainable Blue Economy.

    He also announced that Nigeria had embarked on creation of two marine protected areas.

    Buhari reaffirmed Nigeria’s commitment to participating constructively in ongoing negotiations for various multilateral agreements, including on conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction.

    ‘‘The entire southern border of Nigeria is the Atlantic Ocean with a coastline of about 853km, being the longest in the West African region.

    ‘‘It is endowed with enormous biodiversity resources such as the freshwater and mangrove forest ecosystems with diverse species of fauna and flora.

    ‘‘We acknowledge the fact that a healthy ocean and coastal environment are key to a sustainable development. We must, therefore, conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources.

    ‘‘The ocean is key to the global economy, with an estimated 40 million people projected to be employed by ocean-based industries by 2030.

    ‘‘Our oceans and seas are repositories of tremendous wealth in terms of natural capital, ecosystem services, living and non-living resources.

    ”We are conscious of the fact that our maritime and aquatic resources are critical for the livelihoods of our people; hence, our commitment to the Africa Union 2063 Agenda and the attainment of United Nations SDG 14,’’ he said.

    The Nigerian leader also called for more partnerships and knowledge-sharing to protect humanity’s common ocean heritage.

    He said: ‘‘Science tells us that in order to stop the downward spiral we are witnessing in the ocean, we must fully and highly protect, at least, 30% of the global ocean by 2030 and dramatically strengthen the management of human activities in the other 70%.

    ‘‘This must be reflected in the text we negotiate here as well as in upcoming negotiations planned in December 2022 at the  Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) of the Conference of Parties (COP).

    ‘‘Nigeria is a member of the High Ambition Coalition for Nature and People and the Blue Leaders Campaign.

    ‘‘The global community needs to agree to the effective protection of 30% of the global ocean by 2030 at the CBD COP in December, and a robust high seas treaty that doesn’t simply endorse the status quo, but the one that ensures all nations manage their activities in the high seas to prevent significant effects on the ocean.

    ‘‘These two steps will go a long way in restoring the health and resilience of our oceans.’’

    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  Climate change and Nigeria s updated Nationally Determined Contribution By Kayode Adebiyi News Agency of Nigeria Nigeria recently updated its Nationally Determined Contribution NDC to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change A statement from the Presidency said President Muhammadu Buhari revealed the update of county s NDC at a virtual meeting hosted by hellip
    Climate change and Nigeria’s updated Nationally Determined Contribution
     Climate change and Nigeria s updated Nationally Determined Contribution By Kayode Adebiyi News Agency of Nigeria Nigeria recently updated its Nationally Determined Contribution NDC to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change A statement from the Presidency said President Muhammadu Buhari revealed the update of county s NDC at a virtual meeting hosted by hellip
    Climate change and Nigeria’s updated Nationally Determined Contribution
    Features3 days ago

    Climate change and Nigeria’s updated Nationally Determined Contribution

    Climate change and Nigeria’s updated Nationally Determined Contribution

     

     

    By Kayode Adebiyi, News Agency of Nigeria

    Nigeria recently updated its Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

    A statement from the Presidency said President Muhammadu Buhari revealed the update of county’s NDC at a virtual meeting hosted by U.S. President Joe Biden.

    The NDC is a country-by-country climate change action plan commitment to cutting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and adapting to climate impacts within the Paris Agreement.

    According to the UN Climate Action, each party to the Paris Agreement is required to establish an NDC and update it every five years.

    Furthermore, at the 2021 UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland, an agreement was reached for all countries to revisit and reinforce their NDC targets in 2022.

    “Each new round of updates is expected to ratchet up ambition through steeper emissions cuts and more expansive adaptation measures,” a statement by UN Climate Action read.

    Nigeria had submitted an interim NDC to the UN in May 2021 and this updated version, in compliance with the Glasgow Climate Pact reached at COP26, shows the country’s commitment to reducing GHG emissions.

    Under the updated NDC, Nigeria intends to eliminate the use of kerosene lighting by 2030, increase the use of buses for public transport and reduce the burning of crop residues by 50 per cent.

    “Our updated NDC includes the waste sector, which is expected to contribute to the reduction of Nigeria’s Greenhouse Gas emissions.

    “This development raised an additional two per cent to the Nationally Determined Contribution from 45 per cent to 47 per cent conditionally and 20 per cent unconditionally below business-as-usual.

    “Other action plans that are inherent in our NDC include: elimination of kerosene lighting by 2030, increase in the use of bus rapid transit as a means of transportation for the public, 50 per cent reduction in the fraction of crop residues burnt by 2030 and implementation of forest programmes,” it said.

    The updated NDC also aims at improving air quality and reducing GHG emissions through specific mitigation measures in eight source sectors.

    The sectors are: transportation, cooking and lighting in households, industry, waste, oil and gas, agriculture, power and Hydrofluorocarbon.

    The prompt update of Nigeria’s NDC shows its global commitment towards embracing sustainable measures which limit the rate of global warming and other negative impacts of climate change.

    Already, the country’s Department of Climate Change has developed and finalised a Sectoral Action Plan (SAP) for the implementation of the updated NDC in priority sectors.

    However, the ambitious and audacious provisions of its updated NDC should be cautiously balanced against its socio-economic realities and reciprocal commitments from developed countries.

    Huge research gaps could have resulted in insufficient understanding of Africa’s exact contribution to GHG emissions. Nevertheless, experts have put that number at around 3 per cent of total global GHG emissions.

    Also, unlike in developed economies, the largest part of Africa’s GHG emissions comes from Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use (AFOLU).

    Sadly, as low as its collective contribution is to GHG emissions, Africa is the most vulnerable continent to climate change impacts under all climate scenarios above 1.5 degrees Celsius.

    Since the Paris Agreement provides adequate framework for financial, technical and capacity building support for countries in need, Nigeria’s commitment to climate change should be based on how much assistance it secures in those areas.

    Experts have warned that individual countries’ NDC will only achieve little if efforts to reduce global warming by wealthy polluting countries are not focused on African countries, which are the least polluters.

    The Glasgow Climate Pact has revealed that developed countries have not matched words with actions when it comes to assisting vulnerable countries.

    Paragraph 44 of the Pact noted with “deep regret” that developed countries failed in their promise to jointly mobilise 100 billion U.S dollars per year by 2020 for mitigation actions.

    It also said transparency in the implementation of finance, technology and capacity-building for mitigation and adaptation had not been met by wealthy countries.

    The pact “calls upon developed country parties to provide greater clarity on their pledges” and urged them to deliver on their pledges.

    It also emphasised transparency in the implementation of wealthy and heavy polluting countries’ pledges.

    Nigeria (and Africa at large) has already been disproportionately vulnerable to the effects of climate change as a result of poor access to financial resources, know-how and capacity to respond to climate change effects.

    Why then should it be more committed to the Paris Agreement’s NDC than wealthy countries who account for the bulk of global GHG emissions?

    For perspective, while Africa contributes a mere 3 per cent to global GHG emissions, the US and China combined are responsible for close to 40 per cent.

    China, the U.S., Japan, Germany and South Korea are all in the top 10 of the list of heaviest polluters and are all deploying finance, technology and capacity building to achieve zero-carbon solutions.

    Unfortunately, they seem to be leaving developing countries behind.

    Eliminating the use of kerosene lighting by 2030, for instance, as stipulated by Nigeria’s updated NDC is desirable.

    After all, a recent report suggested that the use of kerosene and firewood exposes 30 million Nigerian households to severe health hazards.

    Yet, firewood, charcoal and kerosene remain the most used means of domestic cooking in Nigeria.

    With the price of cooking gas out of the reach of the vast majority of Nigerian households, what alternatives are available for Nigerians when that provision of the NDC becomes effective?

    To make households convert to Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), the product will have to be heavily subsidised and made readily available.

    This is one reason, among many others, why the world should address the issue of climate change as a multilateral crisis which requires international cooperation.

    Therefore, to strengthen climate action, wealthy countries should consider the growth and development of vulnerable countries by paying their fair share rather than making endless demands. (NANFeatures)

     

    **** If used, please credit the author as well as News Agency of Nigeria

    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  President Cyril Ramaphosa has successfully concluded a visit to the Federal Republic of Germany where he attended the G7 Leaders Summit at the invitation of the German Chancellor H E Mr Olaf Scholz Together with the leaders of the G7 countries the invited Heads of State and Government of Argentina India Indonesia as well as the hellip
    President Ramaphosa discusses Climate, Energy and Health at G7 Leaders’ Summit
     President Cyril Ramaphosa has successfully concluded a visit to the Federal Republic of Germany where he attended the G7 Leaders Summit at the invitation of the German Chancellor H E Mr Olaf Scholz Together with the leaders of the G7 countries the invited Heads of State and Government of Argentina India Indonesia as well as the hellip
    President Ramaphosa discusses Climate, Energy and Health at G7 Leaders’ Summit
    Africa5 days ago

    President Ramaphosa discusses Climate, Energy and Health at G7 Leaders’ Summit

    President Cyril Ramaphosa has successfully concluded a visit to the Federal Republic of Germany, where he attended the G7 Leaders' Summit, at the invitation of the German Chancellor, H.E. Mr. Olaf Scholz.

    Together with the leaders of the G7 countries, the invited Heads of State and Government of Argentina, India, Indonesia, as well as the President of the African Union, the President of the European Union and leaders of other International Organizations, President Ramaphosa participated in work sessions where Climate, Energy, Health, Global Food Security and Gender Equality were also discussed.

    In these discussions, President Ramaphosa highlighted concerns about the lack of fairness and transparency in the availability of vaccines for African countries, which has been heavily exposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. He urged the international community to work together towards a new international treaty for pandemic preparedness and response.

    In this regard, President Ramaphosa noted that, among other issues, there is a need to close the ACT Accelerator's funding gap, which currently stands at more than $16 billion by 2022.

    On energy, President Ramaphosa warned against the adverse ramifications of the proposed revision of the European Union's Renewable Energy Directive, which is aimed at accelerating investments in green hydrogen.

    The president highlighted that the proposed regulations have the potential to limit the ability of companies to supply sustainable energy solutions to key export industries and impact their global competitiveness.

    "As we seek a just transition, developing economies need development space to address high levels of inequality, unemployment, underdevelopment, and the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic."

    "Abrupt divestment from fossil fuels by international financiers poses a huge risk to Africa due to the impact on jobs, stranded assets, national economies, energy and food security," said President Ramaphosa.

    President Ramaphosa urged that all climate-related actions be expressed in the context of both the right to development and a just transition. He stressed the need for a just transition that is well-resourced to enable the transition to a planned, staged low-carbon economy. “A transition that catalyzes new economic opportunities, while protecting affected workers and communities,” the President said.

    More importantly, the President expressed that South Africa is pleased with the progress that has been made in advancing long-term collaboration under the groundbreaking Just Energy Transition Partnership.

    The President also indicated that South Africa looks forward to a successful COP27 that will deliver much more significant results with respect to the means of supporting implementation, adaptation and addressing loss and damage caused by climate change.

    President Ramaphosa discussed issues of food security, fuel supply and increasing local production of items currently in short supply due to the conflict in Ukraine.

    He expressed the need to improve the resilience of agricultural and food production systems through adaptation, the reduction of agricultural greenhouse gas emissions and the safeguarding of national food security.

    He then made a special proposal that developing countries on the African continent, working together with G7 countries, should be self-sufficient in fertilizer production to ensure food security.

    President Ramaphosa reiterated South Africa's commitment to work with the international community, including the G7 countries, in the collective quest to end world hunger.

    “We also remain committed to forging the necessary partnerships with business, academia, the scientific community and our development partners to build agricultural resilience and increase production, thereby lifting millions of people out of extreme poverty. This includes urgent consideration and support for the proposal to enable the African continent to become self-sufficient in fertilizer production to improve food security,” said President Ramaphosa.

    In addition, the President shared South Africa's commitments and interventions on advancing gender equality, mentioning the public employment program in which 62 per cent of the participants are women. In addition to promoting women's financial inclusion through a national policy requiring 40 percent of all public procurement to go to women-owned businesses and South Africa's successful chairmanship of the 66th session of the Commission on the Legal and Social Status of Women.

    On the sidelines of the Summit, the President met with various Heads of State and Government, including the Prime Minister of Japan and the German Chancellor.

    He also met with the Prime Minister of India, HE Narendra Modi. The leaders discussed the cooperation between the two countries in the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic that resulted in the acceptance of the TRIPS Waiver by the World Trade Organization. They also discussed improving trade relations and engaging in multilateralism and BRICS cooperation.

    President Ramaphosa also met with UK Prime Minister HE Boris Johnson.

    The leaders discussed their commitment to a speedy resolution of the Russia-Ukraine conflict and further improvement of bilateral trade relations. They also discussed opportunities in Green Hydrogen and Fuel Cells.

    In addition, he held talks with the chairman of the African Union, President Macky Sall of Senegal, who shared a report from his recent trip to Russia.

  •  Launch of the Technical Assistance initiative for Pollution Hot Spots in the Mediterranean of the Global Environment Facility prepare projects to reduce marine and coastal pollution focus on Egypt Lebanon and Tunisia The United Nations Environment Program UNEP and the European Investment Bank EIB today launched the Global Environment Facility GEF Mediterranean Pollution Hotspots Technical hellip
    UN Environment Programme and European Investment Bank join forces to reduce pollution in the marine and coastal environment
     Launch of the Technical Assistance initiative for Pollution Hot Spots in the Mediterranean of the Global Environment Facility prepare projects to reduce marine and coastal pollution focus on Egypt Lebanon and Tunisia The United Nations Environment Program UNEP and the European Investment Bank EIB today launched the Global Environment Facility GEF Mediterranean Pollution Hotspots Technical hellip
    UN Environment Programme and European Investment Bank join forces to reduce pollution in the marine and coastal environment
    Africa5 days ago

    UN Environment Programme and European Investment Bank join forces to reduce pollution in the marine and coastal environment

    Launch of the Technical Assistance initiative for Pollution Hot Spots in the Mediterranean of the Global Environment Facility; prepare projects to reduce marine and coastal pollution; focus on Egypt, Lebanon and Tunisia.

    The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the European Investment Bank (EIB) today launched the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Mediterranean Pollution Hotspots Technical Assistance initiative, the aim of which is to is to reduce pollution in the marine and coastal environment of the Mediterranean.

    As part of the USD 4 million Hot Spots Pollution project (https://bit.ly/3y2Mhyj), the initiative aims to promote proper and healthy management of water, wastewater, solid waste and industrial emissions in the southern Mediterranean region, thus reducing health. risks and improve access to drinking water and sanitation services.

    The initiative was launched on the sidelines of the UN Ocean Conference in Lisbon by EIB Vice President Ricardo Mourinho Félix and Susan Gardner, Director of UNEP's Ecosystems Division. The two agreed to support the preparation of priority investment projects to reduce pollution in the marine and coastal environments of the three southern Mediterranean countries, namely Egypt, Lebanon and Tunisia.

    “Untreated wastewater discharges represent a major problem for Mediterranean ecosystems and the health of the population living in the region. Many large coastal cities still lack a wastewater treatment system and many of the existing systems are based on outdated and inefficient technologies,” said Susan Gardner. "This joint GEF-EIB-UNEP project will pool resources to reduce pollution and improve marine ecosystems and the health of people living in the Mediterranean region."

    According to the 2021 State of Finance for Nature report (https://bit.ly/3a07zF2), a total of USD 8.1 trillion is required for the world to meet its climate change, biodiversity and land degradation goals between now and 2050. The Technical Assistance initiative is a step forward to close this gap.

    The Mediterranean basin is one of the most valued seas in the world. The region encompasses a vast array of coastal and marine ecosystems that provide valuable benefits to all of its 250 million coastal inhabitants. But the Mediterranean Sea is facing multiple pressures caused by human activities, including chemical pollution, eutrophication, marine litter pollution and overexploitation.

    The technical assistance provided under the Mediterranean Hot Spot Investment Program (MeHSIP) will be geared towards helping developers accelerate the preparation of bankable projects in the water and environment sectors that address these pressures.

    Ricardo Mourinho Félix (https://bit.ly/3Ns0D0X), Vice President of the European Investment Bank, said: “The state of the Mediterranean Sea is crucial for the conservation of biodiversity, the availability of clean water resources and for maintaining jobs. that depend on it. The EIB is one of the largest lenders in the global water sector. I am very pleased to intensify our long-standing cooperation with UNEP to support the clean-up of the Mediterranean. It will contribute to the goals of the Clean Ocean Initiative established to improve the health of the oceans globally.”

    The USD 4 million Mediterranean Pollution Hotspot Investment Project is one of the sub-projects of the MedProgramme (https://bit.ly/3I4yOe7) funded by the GEF (https://bit.ly/3I4yOe7) of USD 42 million implemented by the UNEP Mediterranean Action Plan – Barcelona Convention.

    The launch of the Technical Assistance initiative marks an advance towards the fulfillment of the commitments (https://bit.ly/3QRbWCW) assumed at the 22nd Meeting of the Contracting Parties (COP 22) of the Barcelona Convention and its Protocols on measures regions for the prevention and reduction of pollution from wastewater treatment plants.