Connect with us

CAR

  •   With the projected long trajectory of the Covid pandemic there is even more need to adapt the system to reduce service interruptions GENEVA Switzerland October 31 2021 APO Group To counter the low rate of people living with HIV on treatment in the Central African Republic CAR the country has tested new treatment approaches One dispenses up to 6 months of medication which is called the multi month distribution The other is community ARV dispensing CAR s National HIV Strategic Plan 2021 2025 identified these differentiated approaches at community and hospital level and tested it In the capital Bangui four pilots have been opened and 15 sites will gradually offer MMD multi monthly dispensing health checks and local actions thanks to funding from the Global Fund This follows the success of the Community Based Treatment Groups CAG set up by the Ministry of Public Health and Population and the National AIDS Control Council CNLS in 2015 with the support of the NGO M decins Sans Fronti res Some community members provide antiretroviral therapy to people living with HIV especially in rural and conflict affected areas The results showed that treatment was much more regular and that people living with HIV had a viral suppression rate of 75 In addition with the support of UNAIDS as part of a Luxembourg grant the country has set up a steering committee to oversee the extension of differentiated services developed and validated national guidelines on the delivery of differentiated services and two guides on multi month distribution and the possibility of obtaining refills in a non hospital setting At the end of October clinicians laboratory technicians health care providers community health workers from the four pilot health centers participated in a workshop to review the new approaches and guidelines The CNLS and the Communicable Disease Control Division DLMT of the country were convinced that adapting to the HIV epidemic in this way was a good step in keeping patients on treatment Currently less than half of people living with HIV take life saving medicines 88 000 to 100 000 people are living with HIV in CAR DLMT s Dr Marie Charlotte Banthas said that differentiated treatment models have demonstrated consistent improvement in patient engagement and retention of care while freeing up time for the care of people with disease advanced She then added It is a model of care for people living with HIV and staff working in HIV a model of life These approaches came at the right time given the lockdowns caused by COVID 19 noted UNAIDS interim CAR country director Marie Engel With the long predicted trajectory of the Covid pandemic there is even more need to adapt the system to reduce service disruptions and not see recent gains in the HIV response blocked she said
    Adapting to keep people living with HIV on treatment in the Central African Republic
      With the projected long trajectory of the Covid pandemic there is even more need to adapt the system to reduce service interruptions GENEVA Switzerland October 31 2021 APO Group To counter the low rate of people living with HIV on treatment in the Central African Republic CAR the country has tested new treatment approaches One dispenses up to 6 months of medication which is called the multi month distribution The other is community ARV dispensing CAR s National HIV Strategic Plan 2021 2025 identified these differentiated approaches at community and hospital level and tested it In the capital Bangui four pilots have been opened and 15 sites will gradually offer MMD multi monthly dispensing health checks and local actions thanks to funding from the Global Fund This follows the success of the Community Based Treatment Groups CAG set up by the Ministry of Public Health and Population and the National AIDS Control Council CNLS in 2015 with the support of the NGO M decins Sans Fronti res Some community members provide antiretroviral therapy to people living with HIV especially in rural and conflict affected areas The results showed that treatment was much more regular and that people living with HIV had a viral suppression rate of 75 In addition with the support of UNAIDS as part of a Luxembourg grant the country has set up a steering committee to oversee the extension of differentiated services developed and validated national guidelines on the delivery of differentiated services and two guides on multi month distribution and the possibility of obtaining refills in a non hospital setting At the end of October clinicians laboratory technicians health care providers community health workers from the four pilot health centers participated in a workshop to review the new approaches and guidelines The CNLS and the Communicable Disease Control Division DLMT of the country were convinced that adapting to the HIV epidemic in this way was a good step in keeping patients on treatment Currently less than half of people living with HIV take life saving medicines 88 000 to 100 000 people are living with HIV in CAR DLMT s Dr Marie Charlotte Banthas said that differentiated treatment models have demonstrated consistent improvement in patient engagement and retention of care while freeing up time for the care of people with disease advanced She then added It is a model of care for people living with HIV and staff working in HIV a model of life These approaches came at the right time given the lockdowns caused by COVID 19 noted UNAIDS interim CAR country director Marie Engel With the long predicted trajectory of the Covid pandemic there is even more need to adapt the system to reduce service disruptions and not see recent gains in the HIV response blocked she said
    Adapting to keep people living with HIV on treatment in the Central African Republic
    Africa1 year ago

    Adapting to keep people living with HIV on treatment in the Central African Republic

    With the projected long trajectory of the Covid pandemic, there is even more need to adapt the system to reduce service interruptions

    GENEVA, Switzerland, October 31, 2021 / APO Group / -

    To counter the low rate of people living with HIV on treatment in the Central African Republic (CAR), the country has tested new treatment approaches.

    One dispenses up to 6 months of medication, which is called the multi-month distribution. The other is community ARV dispensing. CAR's National HIV Strategic Plan 2021-2025 identified these differentiated approaches at community and hospital level and tested it.

    In the capital, Bangui, four pilots have been opened and 15 sites will gradually offer MMD (multi-monthly dispensing), health checks and local actions thanks to funding from the Global Fund. This follows the success of the Community Based Treatment Groups (CAG) set up by the Ministry of Public Health and Population and the National AIDS Control Council (CNLS) in 2015, with the support of the NGO Médecins Sans Frontières.

    Some community members provide antiretroviral therapy to people living with HIV, especially in rural and conflict-affected areas. The results showed that treatment was much more regular and that people living with HIV had a viral suppression rate of 75%.

    In addition, with the support of UNAIDS as part of a Luxembourg grant, the country has set up a steering committee to oversee the extension of differentiated services, developed and validated national guidelines on the delivery of differentiated services. and two guides on multi-month distribution and the possibility of obtaining refills in a non-hospital setting.

    At the end of October, clinicians, laboratory technicians, health care providers, community health workers from the four pilot health centers participated in a workshop to review the new approaches and guidelines. The CNLS and the Communicable Disease Control Division (DLMT) of the country were convinced that adapting to the HIV epidemic in this way was a good step in keeping patients on treatment. Currently, less than half of people living with HIV take life-saving medicines (88,000 to 100,000 people are living with HIV in CAR).

    DLMT's Dr Marie-Charlotte Banthas said that “differentiated treatment models have demonstrated consistent improvement in patient engagement and retention of care, while freeing up time for the care of people with disease. advanced ". She then added: “It is a model of care for people living with HIV and staff working in HIV, a model of life. "

    These approaches came at the right time given the lockdowns caused by COVID-19, noted UNAIDS interim CAR country director Marie Engel.

    “With the long predicted trajectory of the Covid pandemic, there is even more need to adapt the system to reduce service disruptions and not see recent gains in the HIV response blocked,” she said.

  •   By Ginika Okoye The Central Bank of Nigeria CBN says the country s banks have remained stable robust and resilient despite the COVID 19 pandemic CBN Director of Banking Supervision Mr Haruna Mustafa said this at the 2021 Nigeria Fiscal Correspondents Association FICAN workshop in Ibadan on Friday Mustapha represented by Mr Adekunle Adeniji Deputy Director of Banking Supervision CBN said the capital adequacy ratio CAR rose to 15 21 in August the liquidity ratio LR to 42 23 He said the ratio of non performing loans rose from 6 58 percent to 5 9 percent in August 2021 while the banking system s credit to the economy rose to 10 99 percent between January and August Mustafa noted that regulatory actions taken by CBN have contributed to the growth He listed some of the apex bank s interventions to mitigate the impact of the pandemic including cutting interest rates to five percent The others are a target credit facility of N50 billion for households and small and medium sized enterprises SMEs and the enactment of the Banking and Other Financial Institutions Act BOFIA 2020 to strengthen the architecture of regulation and resolution for banks and other financial institutions The director said the CBN would continue to develop additional countercyclical policy options that could be used in times of stress Mustafa explained that macroprudential regulation and supervision are more critical than ever We expect public services to be delivered more digitally We will continuously update and evaluate our prudential rules and policies to strengthen responses to economic and financial shocks We will continue to deploy effective stress testing methodologies to detect vulnerabilities early to enable appropriate preventive action he said Mustafa explained that the banking sector has also supported the growth of key economic activities which have been affected by the pandemic in agriculture manufacturing retail healthcare hospitality and tourism Source NAN
    COVID-19: Banks still stable, resilient, says CBN
      By Ginika Okoye The Central Bank of Nigeria CBN says the country s banks have remained stable robust and resilient despite the COVID 19 pandemic CBN Director of Banking Supervision Mr Haruna Mustafa said this at the 2021 Nigeria Fiscal Correspondents Association FICAN workshop in Ibadan on Friday Mustapha represented by Mr Adekunle Adeniji Deputy Director of Banking Supervision CBN said the capital adequacy ratio CAR rose to 15 21 in August the liquidity ratio LR to 42 23 He said the ratio of non performing loans rose from 6 58 percent to 5 9 percent in August 2021 while the banking system s credit to the economy rose to 10 99 percent between January and August Mustafa noted that regulatory actions taken by CBN have contributed to the growth He listed some of the apex bank s interventions to mitigate the impact of the pandemic including cutting interest rates to five percent The others are a target credit facility of N50 billion for households and small and medium sized enterprises SMEs and the enactment of the Banking and Other Financial Institutions Act BOFIA 2020 to strengthen the architecture of regulation and resolution for banks and other financial institutions The director said the CBN would continue to develop additional countercyclical policy options that could be used in times of stress Mustafa explained that macroprudential regulation and supervision are more critical than ever We expect public services to be delivered more digitally We will continuously update and evaluate our prudential rules and policies to strengthen responses to economic and financial shocks We will continue to deploy effective stress testing methodologies to detect vulnerabilities early to enable appropriate preventive action he said Mustafa explained that the banking sector has also supported the growth of key economic activities which have been affected by the pandemic in agriculture manufacturing retail healthcare hospitality and tourism Source NAN
    COVID-19: Banks still stable, resilient, says CBN
    Economy1 year ago

    COVID-19: Banks still stable, resilient, says CBN

    By Ginika Okoye

    The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) says the country's banks have remained stable, robust and resilient despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

    CBN Director of Banking Supervision Mr. Haruna Mustafa said this at the 2021 Nigeria Fiscal Correspondents Association (FICAN) workshop in Ibadan on Friday.

    Mustapha, represented by Mr. Adekunle Adeniji, Deputy Director of Banking Supervision, CBN, said the capital adequacy ratio (CAR) rose to 15.21% in August, the liquidity ratio (LR) to 42 , 23%.

    He said the ratio of non-performing loans rose from 6.58 percent to 5.9 percent in August 2021, while the banking system's credit to the economy rose to 10.99 percent between January and August.

    Mustafa noted that regulatory actions taken by CBN have contributed to the growth.

    He listed some of the apex bank's interventions to mitigate the impact of the pandemic, including cutting interest rates to five percent.

    The others are: a target credit facility of N50 billion for households and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the enactment of the Banking and Other Financial Institutions Act (BOFIA 2020) to strengthen the architecture of regulation and resolution for banks and other financial institutions.

    The director said the CBN would continue to develop additional countercyclical policy options that could be used in times of stress.

    Mustafa explained that macroprudential regulation and supervision are more critical than ever.

    “We expect public services to be delivered more digitally.

    “We will continuously update and evaluate our prudential rules and policies to strengthen responses to economic and financial shocks.

    “We will continue to deploy effective stress testing methodologies to detect vulnerabilities early to enable appropriate preventive action,” he said.

    Mustafa explained that the banking sector has also supported the growth of key economic activities, which have been affected by the pandemic in agriculture, manufacturing, retail, healthcare, hospitality and tourism.

    Source: NAN

  •   The Central Bank of Nigeria CBN says the country s banks have remained stable robust and resilient despite the COVID 19 pandemic CBN Director of Banking Supervision Haruna Mustafa said this during the Nigeria Financial Correspondents Association 2021 FICAN workshop in Ibadan on Friday Mustapha represented by Adekunle Adeniji Deputy Director Banking Supervision CBN said the capital adequacy ratio CAR rose to 15 21 in August the liquidity ratio LR to 42 23 He said the ratio of non performing loans rose from 6 58 percent to 5 9 percent in August 2021 while the banking system s credit to the economy rose to 10 99 percent between January and August Mustafa noted that regulatory actions taken by CBN have contributed to the growth He listed some of the apex bank s interventions to mitigate the impact of the pandemic including cutting interest rates to five percent The others are a target credit facility of N50 billion for households and small and medium enterprises SMEs and the enactment of the Banking and Other Financial Institutions Act BOFIA 2020 to strengthen the architecture of regulation and resolution of banks and other financial institutions The director said the CBN would continue to develop additional countercyclical policy options that could be used in times of stress Mr Mustafa explained that macroprudential regulation and supervision were more critical than ever We expect financial services to be delivered more digitally We will continuously update and evaluate our prudential rules and policies to strengthen responses to economic and financial shocks We will continue to deploy effective stress testing methodologies to detect vulnerabilities early to enable appropriate preventive action he said Mr Mustafa explained that the banking sector has also supported the growth of key economic activities which have been affected by the pandemic in agriculture manufacturing retail healthcare hospitality and tourism NOPE
    CBN says banks remain stable, resilient despite pandemic
      The Central Bank of Nigeria CBN says the country s banks have remained stable robust and resilient despite the COVID 19 pandemic CBN Director of Banking Supervision Haruna Mustafa said this during the Nigeria Financial Correspondents Association 2021 FICAN workshop in Ibadan on Friday Mustapha represented by Adekunle Adeniji Deputy Director Banking Supervision CBN said the capital adequacy ratio CAR rose to 15 21 in August the liquidity ratio LR to 42 23 He said the ratio of non performing loans rose from 6 58 percent to 5 9 percent in August 2021 while the banking system s credit to the economy rose to 10 99 percent between January and August Mustafa noted that regulatory actions taken by CBN have contributed to the growth He listed some of the apex bank s interventions to mitigate the impact of the pandemic including cutting interest rates to five percent The others are a target credit facility of N50 billion for households and small and medium enterprises SMEs and the enactment of the Banking and Other Financial Institutions Act BOFIA 2020 to strengthen the architecture of regulation and resolution of banks and other financial institutions The director said the CBN would continue to develop additional countercyclical policy options that could be used in times of stress Mr Mustafa explained that macroprudential regulation and supervision were more critical than ever We expect financial services to be delivered more digitally We will continuously update and evaluate our prudential rules and policies to strengthen responses to economic and financial shocks We will continue to deploy effective stress testing methodologies to detect vulnerabilities early to enable appropriate preventive action he said Mr Mustafa explained that the banking sector has also supported the growth of key economic activities which have been affected by the pandemic in agriculture manufacturing retail healthcare hospitality and tourism NOPE
    CBN says banks remain stable, resilient despite pandemic
    Headlines1 year ago

    CBN says banks remain stable, resilient despite pandemic

    The Central Bank of Nigeria, CBN, says the country's banks have remained stable, robust and resilient despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

    CBN Director of Banking Supervision Haruna Mustafa said this during the Nigeria Financial Correspondents Association 2021, FICAN, workshop in Ibadan on Friday.

    Mustapha, represented by Adekunle Adeniji, Deputy Director, Banking Supervision, CBN, said the capital adequacy ratio, CAR, rose to 15.21% in August, the liquidity ratio (LR) to 42.23% .

    He said the ratio of non-performing loans rose from 6.58 percent to 5.9 percent in August 2021, while the banking system's credit to the economy rose to 10.99 percent between January and August.

    Mustafa noted that regulatory actions taken by CBN have contributed to the growth.

    He listed some of the apex bank's interventions to mitigate the impact of the pandemic, including cutting interest rates to five percent.

    The others are: a target credit facility of N50 billion for households and small and medium enterprises, SMEs, and the enactment of the Banking and Other Financial Institutions Act (BOFIA 2020) to strengthen the architecture of regulation and resolution of banks and other financial institutions.

    The director said the CBN would continue to develop additional countercyclical policy options that could be used in times of stress.

    Mr Mustafa explained that macroprudential regulation and supervision were more critical than ever.

    “We expect financial services to be delivered more digitally.

    “We will continuously update and evaluate our prudential rules and policies to strengthen responses to economic and financial shocks.

    “We will continue to deploy effective stress testing methodologies to detect vulnerabilities early to enable appropriate preventive action,” he said.

    Mr. Mustafa explained that the banking sector has also supported the growth of key economic activities, which have been affected by the pandemic in agriculture, manufacturing, retail, healthcare, hospitality and tourism.

    NOPE

  •   The UN mission s mandate expires next month and Mr Ndiaye said an extension is particularly needed to help with local elections which have not been held for more than 30 years NEW YORK United States of America October 18 2021 APO Group The announcement last week of a unilateral ceasefire in the Central African Republic is part of recent positive steps in the country the senior UN official told the Security Council on Monday urging continued support for the efforts of peace and reconciliation Mankeur Ndiaye Special Representative of the Secretary General and Head of the United Nations peacekeeping operation MINUSCA stressed the need to maintain positive momentum as authorities strive to build democracy and peace stability following presidential and parliamentary elections To not have enough time The UN mission s mandate expires next month and Mr Ndiaye said an extension is particularly needed to help with local elections which have not been held for more than 30 years The extension together with the strong determination of the government and the commitment of international partners are also essential for the adoption of durable political solutions in CAR With the support of all Council members we will work hard to make the best use of our good offices to promote a transparent coordinated and coherent approach to generate the necessary contributions to resolve the crisis in CAR He said speaking through an interpreter Roadmap for peace Mr Ndiaye described President Faustin Archange Touad ra s October 15 ceasefire declaration as a major step towards dialogue in CAR a country plagued by armed violence for nearly a decade The truce is in line with a common roadmap for peace adopted a month earlier by the countries that make up the International Conference of the Great Lakes Region ICGLR This in turn helped re energize a February 2019 peace accord signed by the government and 14 armed groups in the country It could also contribute to the enabling environment necessary for the planned launch by the Government of an inclusive dialogue with all political parties It is essential that all armed groups and their leaders without exception subscribe in good faith to the peace process by fulfilling in good faith all their obligations under the February 6 agreement and the common road map he said declared Mr Ndiaye emphasizing the need for accountability President Touad ra who also addressed the ambassadors by video conference said he was counting on the Council s support to safeguard the integrity of the two peace agreements My declaration of a ceasefire demonstrates once again if there was such a need that our only ambition is to eventually find a lasting political solution in the CAR to the crisis we are undergoing he said he declared speaking through an interpreter Rampant insecurity Insecurity persists in various areas of CAR affecting the delivery of humanitarian aid Although some 3 1 million people are in need of protection and assistance a humanitarian appeal for the country is only about 60 percent funded Military operations have been carried out in response to the activities of armed groups particularly in the western and central regions Some groups are also trying to reclaim former strongholds in the northwest center and southeast where increased human rights violations have been reported We are also aware that the essential contribution of the mandate and the strong posture of MINUSCA help to make the political process more credible Ndiaye said urging the Council to provide additional personnel and resources Zero tolerance for abuse However he also highlighted the increase in sexual exploitation and abuse by staff serving the mission Last month the UN announced the immediate repatriation of all military units from Gabon following credible reports of alleged abuse of girls by unidentified peacekeepers Mr Ndiaye underlined the need to rigorously apply the Secretary General s zero tolerance policy for such incidents We are counting on the members of the Council and the effective cooperation of troop contributing countries to put an end to the scourge by strictly respecting the obligations incumbent on each one
    The positive momentum in the Central African Republic must be maintained
      The UN mission s mandate expires next month and Mr Ndiaye said an extension is particularly needed to help with local elections which have not been held for more than 30 years NEW YORK United States of America October 18 2021 APO Group The announcement last week of a unilateral ceasefire in the Central African Republic is part of recent positive steps in the country the senior UN official told the Security Council on Monday urging continued support for the efforts of peace and reconciliation Mankeur Ndiaye Special Representative of the Secretary General and Head of the United Nations peacekeeping operation MINUSCA stressed the need to maintain positive momentum as authorities strive to build democracy and peace stability following presidential and parliamentary elections To not have enough time The UN mission s mandate expires next month and Mr Ndiaye said an extension is particularly needed to help with local elections which have not been held for more than 30 years The extension together with the strong determination of the government and the commitment of international partners are also essential for the adoption of durable political solutions in CAR With the support of all Council members we will work hard to make the best use of our good offices to promote a transparent coordinated and coherent approach to generate the necessary contributions to resolve the crisis in CAR He said speaking through an interpreter Roadmap for peace Mr Ndiaye described President Faustin Archange Touad ra s October 15 ceasefire declaration as a major step towards dialogue in CAR a country plagued by armed violence for nearly a decade The truce is in line with a common roadmap for peace adopted a month earlier by the countries that make up the International Conference of the Great Lakes Region ICGLR This in turn helped re energize a February 2019 peace accord signed by the government and 14 armed groups in the country It could also contribute to the enabling environment necessary for the planned launch by the Government of an inclusive dialogue with all political parties It is essential that all armed groups and their leaders without exception subscribe in good faith to the peace process by fulfilling in good faith all their obligations under the February 6 agreement and the common road map he said declared Mr Ndiaye emphasizing the need for accountability President Touad ra who also addressed the ambassadors by video conference said he was counting on the Council s support to safeguard the integrity of the two peace agreements My declaration of a ceasefire demonstrates once again if there was such a need that our only ambition is to eventually find a lasting political solution in the CAR to the crisis we are undergoing he said he declared speaking through an interpreter Rampant insecurity Insecurity persists in various areas of CAR affecting the delivery of humanitarian aid Although some 3 1 million people are in need of protection and assistance a humanitarian appeal for the country is only about 60 percent funded Military operations have been carried out in response to the activities of armed groups particularly in the western and central regions Some groups are also trying to reclaim former strongholds in the northwest center and southeast where increased human rights violations have been reported We are also aware that the essential contribution of the mandate and the strong posture of MINUSCA help to make the political process more credible Ndiaye said urging the Council to provide additional personnel and resources Zero tolerance for abuse However he also highlighted the increase in sexual exploitation and abuse by staff serving the mission Last month the UN announced the immediate repatriation of all military units from Gabon following credible reports of alleged abuse of girls by unidentified peacekeepers Mr Ndiaye underlined the need to rigorously apply the Secretary General s zero tolerance policy for such incidents We are counting on the members of the Council and the effective cooperation of troop contributing countries to put an end to the scourge by strictly respecting the obligations incumbent on each one
    The positive momentum in the Central African Republic must be maintained
    Africa1 year ago

    The positive momentum in the Central African Republic must be maintained

    The UN mission's mandate expires next month, and Mr. Ndiaye said an extension is particularly needed to help with local elections, which have not been held for more than 30 years.

    NEW YORK, United States of America, October 18, 2021 / APO Group / -

    The announcement last week of a unilateral ceasefire in the Central African Republic is part of recent positive steps in the country, the senior UN official told the Security Council on Monday, urging continued support for the efforts. of peace and reconciliation.

    Mankeur Ndiaye, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations peacekeeping operation, MINUSCA, stressed the need to maintain "positive momentum" as authorities strive to build democracy and peace. stability following presidential and parliamentary elections.

    To not have enough time

    The UN mission's mandate expires next month, and Mr. Ndiaye said an extension is particularly needed to help with local elections, which have not been held for more than 30 years.

    The extension, together with the strong determination of the government and the commitment of international partners, are also essential for the adoption of durable political solutions in CAR.

    “With the support of all Council members, we will work hard to make the best use of our good offices to promote a transparent, coordinated and coherent approach to generate the necessary contributions to resolve the crisis in CAR. He said, speaking through an interpreter.

    Roadmap for peace

    Mr. Ndiaye described President Faustin Archange Touadéra's October 15 ceasefire declaration as “a major step” towards dialogue in CAR, a country plagued by armed violence for nearly a decade.

    The truce is in line with a common roadmap for peace adopted a month earlier by the countries that make up the International Conference of the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR). This in turn helped re-energize a February 2019 peace accord signed by the government and 14 armed groups in the country.

    It could also contribute to the enabling environment necessary for the planned launch by the Government of an inclusive dialogue with all political parties.

    "It is essential that all armed groups and their leaders, without exception, subscribe in good faith to the peace process by fulfilling in good faith all their obligations under the February 6 agreement and the common road map," he said. declared Mr. Ndiaye. , emphasizing the need for accountability.

    President Touadéra, who also addressed the ambassadors by video conference, said he was counting on the Council's support to “safeguard the integrity” of the two peace agreements.

    "My declaration of a ceasefire demonstrates once again, if there was such a need, that our only ambition is to eventually find a lasting political solution in the CAR to the crisis we are undergoing," he said. he declared, speaking through an interpreter.

    Rampant insecurity

    Insecurity persists in various areas of CAR, affecting the delivery of humanitarian aid. Although some 3.1 million people are in need of protection and assistance, a humanitarian appeal for the country is only about 60 percent funded.

    Military operations have been carried out in response to the activities of armed groups, particularly in the western and central regions. Some groups are also trying to “reclaim” former strongholds in the northwest, center and southeast, where increased human rights violations have been reported.

    "We are also aware that the essential contribution of the mandate and the strong posture of MINUSCA help to make the political process more credible," Ndiaye said, urging the Council to provide additional personnel and resources.

    Zero tolerance for abuse

    However, he also highlighted the increase in sexual exploitation and abuse by staff serving the mission. Last month, the UN announced the immediate repatriation of all military units from Gabon following credible reports of alleged abuse of girls by unidentified "peacekeepers".

    Mr. Ndiaye underlined the need to rigorously apply the Secretary-General's zero tolerance policy for such incidents. “We are counting on the members of the Council and the effective cooperation of (troop-contributing countries) to put an end to the scourge by strictly respecting the obligations incumbent on each one.

  •   Make no mistake we are going to Glasgow and will proudly support the African energy sector and demand a just transition JOHANNESBURG South Africa October 18 2021 APO Group By NJ Ayuk Executive Chairman of the African Energy Chamber www EnergyChamber org Make no mistake we are going to Glasgow and will proudly support the African energy sector and demand a just transition We have just received our winter jackets and gloves Despite all the signs of global warming Europeans are bracing for the overwhelming effect a colder than normal winter could have on their wallets This year they have faced one natural gas price shock after another with mainland gas prices hitting multi level highs and futures contracts trading at 73 150 85 69 per megawatt hour towards the end of September If the winter months bring anything other than the mildest temperatures Europeans are likely to struggle to pay their bills or shiver in the dark There is no single reason for the substantial rise in natural gas prices Instead the recovery reflects the confluence of climate change awareness reduced investment in fossil fuels and humanity s inability to control the weather As Europe finds out a funny thing can happen in the way of well meaning plans for net zero emissions When an unusually cold winter depletes the already limited gas reserves and is followed by a summer where there is not much wind to convert to electricity the only choice is to reconsider using coal Yes that s what a rushed shift to renewables can do a switch back to the most carbon intensive fuel in the world Yet the prospect of burning coal this winter hasn t stopped Europe from trying to impose its climate change agenda on Africa Either way Europe expects Africa which produces the smallest fraction of global greenhouse gas emissions to accept an equal burden to eliminate them even if it does means giving up the economic potential of its vast hydrocarbon resources Oh and they want Africa to get on the renewable energy train now At the same time Europe itself is taking a giant step backwards What Europe forgets is that for the energy transition to be fair Africa must first overcome significant obstacles including those that the African Energy Chamber describes in its Africa Energy Outlook 2022 The State of Energy in Africa 2022 which will be published this month and available at African Energy Week in Cape Town South Africa Here are some of the issues discussed in the report The effect of COVID 19 on Africa s energy development Africa is still reeling from the economic hardships caused by COVID 19 While the rest of global GDP has largely returned to pre pandemic levels sub Saharan Africa s recovery is expected to take until 2023 The difference may lie in the force with which the effects of the pandemic have hit Africa s oil exporting countries It could be described as a one two punch Together the continent s four major oil exporters Nigeria Libya Angola and Algeria produce more than 4 5 million barrels of oil per day much of which is imported by the EU and Asia Yes the irony that Europe is trying to cut off its own source of energy is not wasted on anyone For these countries and a handful of others that have entered the oil production market more recently oil revenues make a significant or growing contribution to public treasures in some cases such as in Nigeria the economy is centered on oil exports which account for up to 70 of government revenue As energy demand fell and prices bottomed out amid the lockdowns oil revenues declined rapidly making it harder for oil producing countries to maintain government funded programs and even meet demands the pandemic Nigeria and Angola have cut production by up to 30 compared to 2019 As the African Energy Chamber s Outlook report in 2022 notes COVID 19 has done what years of civil war in Angola could not by stopping offshore drilling and reducing the total number of wells drilled to half of what it was in 2014 At the same time the low prices have forced international E P companies operating in Africa to cut their development budgets and delay final decisions to invest and sanction projects According to the Energy Outlook 2022 this alone would have eliminated up to 150 billion in exploration and development spending in Africa between 2020 and 2025 Fortunately the recovery has already started as oil prices have risen slightly Activity is on the rise Nigeria is expected to launch more than 25 new projects by 2026 the Libyan government has given the green light to 1 6 billion dollars for the development of oil fields and the maintenance of infrastructure Angola encourages exploration and the Algerian government is working to create a more favorable environment to reverse the decline in upstream investment by international energy companies This is all great news stemming from the dark days of the pandemic But there is a very real risk that pressure from climate activists and ESG investors will dampen expansion in the region and cause a serious and prolonged financial setback for oil producing Africa Dangerous regulation of Forex in the Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa CEMAC As we face the challenges of the market we also have to deal with the regulatory issues that will hold us back There is also another risk led by the Bank of Central African States the BEAC and the IMF over their anti investment Forex regulations which will essentially prevent all international energy companies from investing in the region and put endanger current projects Countries like Gabon Equatorial Guinea Cameroon Congo Chad and CAR must repeal this dangerous regulation as it is no longer needed and will cripple the region s energy sector kill investments create unemployment and will reduce government revenues They should consider having new hydrocarbon regulations to individually exempt energy companies and service companies Investors sit on the sidelines or travel to other African regions and avoid CEMAC given the uncertainty created by the IMF and BEAC Energy companies operating in the Forex markets conduct international transactions and want liquidity to flow freely and quickly without going back and forth significant transaction costs and delays which will only have an impact on the investment The BEAC has given no assurances that it won t mess up and their track record predicts that they will mess for sure What is troubling for investors considering energy projects in CEMAC is that their investment will become more expensive with additional significant transactional risks There is no doubt that the CEMAC region will become less competitive and all the data shows it except those of bureaucrats playing politics with the lives of Africans This regulation driven by the BEAC and the IMF will put a stop to investment in fossil fuels and increase energy poverty at a time when many want to see increased investment in energy In the end the countries of the regions will be forced to compensate energy companies at a time when they have no funds The threat of increased energy poverty for Africans The fact that Africa is struggling harder than the West to recover from the pandemic exposes the growing wealth gap in the world There is no doubt that many African countries do not have the economic cushion to rebound easily or quickly Experts have long believed that one way to speed up the economies of impoverished countries is to provide electricity Yet the pandemic has not only erased the progress many African countries have made towards reliable electrification but it has also increased the number of people without access to electricity As unemployment rose in 2020 even the most basic of services have become unaffordable for many There is no better example of how poverty and fuel poverty are intertwined I don t mean to say that there hasn t been progress in electrifying Africa lately The percentage of Sub Saharan Africans with access to electricity has indeed increased in recent years the figure currently stands at 46 down from 33 a decade ago Yet Africa lags considerably behind the global average of 90 If the percentages look bad the raw numbers are astonishing the United Nations estimates that 97 million people living in urban areas in Africa do not have access to electricity in rural areas the population without electricity is more than four times greater than 471 million Considering how Africa s population is expected to double by 2050 current efforts are not enough to achieve full electrification The 2022 energy outlook indicates that current electrification rates will need to be tripled connecting 60 million people each year to achieve a universal access target by 2030 But if Africa is under pressure to meet external climate change timetables cannot use its oil and gas resources domestically and has to switch to renewables before it is ready how will that play out From today at least this type of energy transition will create an undue financial burden for Africa in addition to its already significant economic difficulties Things are made even worse by the fact that sub Saharan countries are not receiving their fair share of international financing for renewable energy and that financial flows to least developed countries were in fact lower in 2018 than they are were a year earlier In fact reports the Brookings Institute 46 of the least developed countries combined received only 20 percent of commitments So this is it A rush to transition to renewables at Africa s expense with pressure to leave precious oil and gas in the ground and less financial support for companies extracting it It s like a cold winter in Europe followed by calm winds economically unmanageable and likely to leave people in the dark
    Lessons from Europe: Africans must go to COP26 Glasgow; The rush to ban fossil fuels will backfire on Africa. African Energy Chamber to Release Africa Energy Outlook 2022 (By NJ Ayuk)
      Make no mistake we are going to Glasgow and will proudly support the African energy sector and demand a just transition JOHANNESBURG South Africa October 18 2021 APO Group By NJ Ayuk Executive Chairman of the African Energy Chamber www EnergyChamber org Make no mistake we are going to Glasgow and will proudly support the African energy sector and demand a just transition We have just received our winter jackets and gloves Despite all the signs of global warming Europeans are bracing for the overwhelming effect a colder than normal winter could have on their wallets This year they have faced one natural gas price shock after another with mainland gas prices hitting multi level highs and futures contracts trading at 73 150 85 69 per megawatt hour towards the end of September If the winter months bring anything other than the mildest temperatures Europeans are likely to struggle to pay their bills or shiver in the dark There is no single reason for the substantial rise in natural gas prices Instead the recovery reflects the confluence of climate change awareness reduced investment in fossil fuels and humanity s inability to control the weather As Europe finds out a funny thing can happen in the way of well meaning plans for net zero emissions When an unusually cold winter depletes the already limited gas reserves and is followed by a summer where there is not much wind to convert to electricity the only choice is to reconsider using coal Yes that s what a rushed shift to renewables can do a switch back to the most carbon intensive fuel in the world Yet the prospect of burning coal this winter hasn t stopped Europe from trying to impose its climate change agenda on Africa Either way Europe expects Africa which produces the smallest fraction of global greenhouse gas emissions to accept an equal burden to eliminate them even if it does means giving up the economic potential of its vast hydrocarbon resources Oh and they want Africa to get on the renewable energy train now At the same time Europe itself is taking a giant step backwards What Europe forgets is that for the energy transition to be fair Africa must first overcome significant obstacles including those that the African Energy Chamber describes in its Africa Energy Outlook 2022 The State of Energy in Africa 2022 which will be published this month and available at African Energy Week in Cape Town South Africa Here are some of the issues discussed in the report The effect of COVID 19 on Africa s energy development Africa is still reeling from the economic hardships caused by COVID 19 While the rest of global GDP has largely returned to pre pandemic levels sub Saharan Africa s recovery is expected to take until 2023 The difference may lie in the force with which the effects of the pandemic have hit Africa s oil exporting countries It could be described as a one two punch Together the continent s four major oil exporters Nigeria Libya Angola and Algeria produce more than 4 5 million barrels of oil per day much of which is imported by the EU and Asia Yes the irony that Europe is trying to cut off its own source of energy is not wasted on anyone For these countries and a handful of others that have entered the oil production market more recently oil revenues make a significant or growing contribution to public treasures in some cases such as in Nigeria the economy is centered on oil exports which account for up to 70 of government revenue As energy demand fell and prices bottomed out amid the lockdowns oil revenues declined rapidly making it harder for oil producing countries to maintain government funded programs and even meet demands the pandemic Nigeria and Angola have cut production by up to 30 compared to 2019 As the African Energy Chamber s Outlook report in 2022 notes COVID 19 has done what years of civil war in Angola could not by stopping offshore drilling and reducing the total number of wells drilled to half of what it was in 2014 At the same time the low prices have forced international E P companies operating in Africa to cut their development budgets and delay final decisions to invest and sanction projects According to the Energy Outlook 2022 this alone would have eliminated up to 150 billion in exploration and development spending in Africa between 2020 and 2025 Fortunately the recovery has already started as oil prices have risen slightly Activity is on the rise Nigeria is expected to launch more than 25 new projects by 2026 the Libyan government has given the green light to 1 6 billion dollars for the development of oil fields and the maintenance of infrastructure Angola encourages exploration and the Algerian government is working to create a more favorable environment to reverse the decline in upstream investment by international energy companies This is all great news stemming from the dark days of the pandemic But there is a very real risk that pressure from climate activists and ESG investors will dampen expansion in the region and cause a serious and prolonged financial setback for oil producing Africa Dangerous regulation of Forex in the Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa CEMAC As we face the challenges of the market we also have to deal with the regulatory issues that will hold us back There is also another risk led by the Bank of Central African States the BEAC and the IMF over their anti investment Forex regulations which will essentially prevent all international energy companies from investing in the region and put endanger current projects Countries like Gabon Equatorial Guinea Cameroon Congo Chad and CAR must repeal this dangerous regulation as it is no longer needed and will cripple the region s energy sector kill investments create unemployment and will reduce government revenues They should consider having new hydrocarbon regulations to individually exempt energy companies and service companies Investors sit on the sidelines or travel to other African regions and avoid CEMAC given the uncertainty created by the IMF and BEAC Energy companies operating in the Forex markets conduct international transactions and want liquidity to flow freely and quickly without going back and forth significant transaction costs and delays which will only have an impact on the investment The BEAC has given no assurances that it won t mess up and their track record predicts that they will mess for sure What is troubling for investors considering energy projects in CEMAC is that their investment will become more expensive with additional significant transactional risks There is no doubt that the CEMAC region will become less competitive and all the data shows it except those of bureaucrats playing politics with the lives of Africans This regulation driven by the BEAC and the IMF will put a stop to investment in fossil fuels and increase energy poverty at a time when many want to see increased investment in energy In the end the countries of the regions will be forced to compensate energy companies at a time when they have no funds The threat of increased energy poverty for Africans The fact that Africa is struggling harder than the West to recover from the pandemic exposes the growing wealth gap in the world There is no doubt that many African countries do not have the economic cushion to rebound easily or quickly Experts have long believed that one way to speed up the economies of impoverished countries is to provide electricity Yet the pandemic has not only erased the progress many African countries have made towards reliable electrification but it has also increased the number of people without access to electricity As unemployment rose in 2020 even the most basic of services have become unaffordable for many There is no better example of how poverty and fuel poverty are intertwined I don t mean to say that there hasn t been progress in electrifying Africa lately The percentage of Sub Saharan Africans with access to electricity has indeed increased in recent years the figure currently stands at 46 down from 33 a decade ago Yet Africa lags considerably behind the global average of 90 If the percentages look bad the raw numbers are astonishing the United Nations estimates that 97 million people living in urban areas in Africa do not have access to electricity in rural areas the population without electricity is more than four times greater than 471 million Considering how Africa s population is expected to double by 2050 current efforts are not enough to achieve full electrification The 2022 energy outlook indicates that current electrification rates will need to be tripled connecting 60 million people each year to achieve a universal access target by 2030 But if Africa is under pressure to meet external climate change timetables cannot use its oil and gas resources domestically and has to switch to renewables before it is ready how will that play out From today at least this type of energy transition will create an undue financial burden for Africa in addition to its already significant economic difficulties Things are made even worse by the fact that sub Saharan countries are not receiving their fair share of international financing for renewable energy and that financial flows to least developed countries were in fact lower in 2018 than they are were a year earlier In fact reports the Brookings Institute 46 of the least developed countries combined received only 20 percent of commitments So this is it A rush to transition to renewables at Africa s expense with pressure to leave precious oil and gas in the ground and less financial support for companies extracting it It s like a cold winter in Europe followed by calm winds economically unmanageable and likely to leave people in the dark
    Lessons from Europe: Africans must go to COP26 Glasgow; The rush to ban fossil fuels will backfire on Africa. African Energy Chamber to Release Africa Energy Outlook 2022 (By NJ Ayuk)
    Africa1 year ago

    Lessons from Europe: Africans must go to COP26 Glasgow; The rush to ban fossil fuels will backfire on Africa. African Energy Chamber to Release Africa Energy Outlook 2022 (By NJ Ayuk)

    Make no mistake, we are going to Glasgow and will proudly support the African energy sector and demand a just transition

    JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, October 18, 2021 / APO Group / -

    By NJ Ayuk, Executive Chairman of the African Energy Chamber (www.EnergyChamber.org)

    Make no mistake, we are going to Glasgow and will proudly support the African energy sector and demand a just transition. We have just received our winter jackets and gloves.

    Despite all the signs of global warming, Europeans are bracing for the overwhelming effect a colder-than-normal winter could have on their wallets. This year they have faced one natural gas price shock after another, with mainland gas prices hitting multi-level highs and futures contracts trading at € 73.150 ($ 85.69) per megawatt hour towards the end of September.

    If the winter months bring anything other than the mildest temperatures, Europeans are likely to struggle to pay their bills or shiver in the dark.

    There is no single reason for the substantial rise in natural gas prices. Instead, the recovery reflects the confluence of climate change awareness, reduced investment in fossil fuels, and humanity's inability to control the weather. As Europe finds out, a funny thing can happen in the way of well-meaning plans for net zero emissions. When an unusually cold winter depletes the already limited gas reserves and is followed by a summer where there is not much wind to convert to electricity, the only choice is to reconsider using coal.

    Yes, that's what a rushed shift to renewables can do - a switch back to the most carbon-intensive fuel in the world.

    Yet the prospect of burning coal this winter hasn't stopped Europe from trying to impose its climate change agenda on Africa. Either way, Europe expects Africa, which produces the smallest fraction of global greenhouse gas emissions, to accept an equal burden to eliminate them, even if it does. means giving up the economic potential of its vast hydrocarbon resources.

    Oh, and they want Africa to get on the renewable energy train now.

    At the same time, Europe itself is taking a giant step backwards.

    What Europe forgets is that for the energy transition to be fair, Africa must first overcome significant obstacles, including those that the African Energy Chamber describes in its Africa Energy Outlook 2022. , (“The State of Energy in Africa 2022”) which will be published this month. and available at African Energy Week in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Here are some of the issues discussed in the report.

    The effect of COVID-19 on Africa's energy development: Africa is still reeling from the economic hardships caused by COVID-19. While the rest of global GDP has largely returned to pre-pandemic levels, sub-Saharan Africa's recovery is expected to take until 2023.

    The difference may lie in the force with which the effects of the pandemic have hit Africa's oil-exporting countries. It could be described as a one-two punch.

    Together, the continent's four major oil exporters - Nigeria, Libya, Angola and Algeria - produce more than 4.5 million barrels of oil per day, much of which is imported by the EU and Asia. (Yes, the irony that Europe is trying to cut off its own source of energy is not wasted on anyone.) For these countries, and a handful of others that have entered the oil production market more recently, oil revenues make a significant or growing contribution. to public treasures; in some cases, such as in Nigeria, the economy is centered on oil exports, which account for up to 70% of government revenue.

    As energy demand fell and prices bottomed out amid the lockdowns, oil revenues declined rapidly, making it harder for oil-producing countries to maintain government-funded programs and even meet demands. the pandemic. Nigeria and Angola have cut production by up to 30% compared to 2019. As the African Energy Chamber's Outlook report in 2022 notes, COVID-19 has done what years of civil war in Angola could not, by stopping offshore drilling and reducing the total number of wells drilled to half of what it was in 2014.

    At the same time, the low prices have forced international E&P companies operating in Africa to cut their development budgets and delay final decisions to invest and sanction projects. According to the Energy Outlook 2022, this alone would have eliminated up to $ 150 billion in exploration and development spending in Africa between 2020 and 2025.

    Fortunately, the recovery has already started as oil prices have risen slightly. Activity is on the rise: Nigeria is expected to launch more than 25 new projects by 2026; the Libyan government has given the green light to 1.6 billion dollars for the development of oil fields and the maintenance of infrastructure; Angola encourages exploration; and the Algerian government is working to create a more favorable environment to reverse the decline in upstream investment by international energy companies.

    This is all great news stemming from the dark days of the pandemic. But there is a very real risk that pressure from climate activists and ESG investors will dampen expansion in the region and cause a serious and prolonged financial setback for oil-producing Africa.

    Dangerous regulation of Forex in the Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa (CEMAC).

    As we face the challenges of the market, we also have to deal with the regulatory issues that will hold us back. There is also another risk led by the Bank of Central African States, the BEAC and the IMF, over their anti-investment Forex regulations, which will essentially prevent all international energy companies from investing in the region and put endanger current projects.

    Countries like Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, Cameroon, Congo, Chad and CAR must repeal this dangerous regulation as it is no longer needed and will cripple the region's energy sector, kill investments, create unemployment and will reduce government revenues. They should consider having new hydrocarbon regulations to individually exempt energy companies and service companies. Investors sit on the sidelines or travel to other African regions and avoid CEMAC given the uncertainty created by the IMF and BEAC.

    Energy companies operating in the Forex markets conduct international transactions and want liquidity to flow freely and quickly without going back and forth; significant transaction costs and delays which will only have an impact on the investment. The BEAC has given no assurances that it won't mess up and their track record predicts that they will mess for sure. What is troubling for investors considering energy projects in CEMAC is that their investment will become more expensive, with additional significant transactional risks. There is no doubt that the CEMAC region will become less competitive, and all the data shows it except those of bureaucrats playing politics with the lives of Africans.

    This regulation driven by the BEAC and the IMF will put a stop to investment in fossil fuels and increase energy poverty at a time when many want to see increased investment in energy. In the end, the countries of the regions will be forced to compensate energy companies at a time when they have no funds.

    The threat of increased energy poverty for Africans

    The fact that Africa is struggling harder than the West to recover from the pandemic exposes the growing wealth gap in the world. There is no doubt that many African countries do not have the economic cushion to rebound easily or quickly.

    Experts have long believed that one way to speed up the economies of impoverished countries is to provide electricity. Yet the pandemic has not only erased the progress many African countries have made towards reliable electrification, but it has also increased the number of people without access to electricity. As unemployment rose in 2020, even the most basic of services have become unaffordable for many.

    There is no better example of how poverty and fuel poverty are intertwined.

    I don't mean to say that there hasn't been progress in electrifying Africa lately.

    The percentage of Sub-Saharan Africans with access to electricity has indeed increased in recent years - the figure currently stands at 46%, down from 33% a decade ago. Yet Africa lags considerably behind the global average of 90%. If the percentages look bad, the raw numbers are astonishing: the United Nations estimates that 97 million people living in urban areas in Africa do not have access to electricity; in rural areas, the population without electricity is more than four times greater than 471 million.

    Considering how Africa's population is expected to double by 2050, current efforts are not enough to achieve full electrification. The 2022 energy outlook indicates that current electrification rates will need to be tripled, connecting 60 million people each year to achieve a universal access target by 2030.

    But if Africa is under pressure to meet external climate change timetables, cannot use its oil and gas resources domestically, and has to switch to renewables before it is ready, how will that play out? From today, at least, this type of energy transition will create an undue financial burden for Africa, in addition to its already significant economic difficulties. Things are made even worse by the fact that sub-Saharan countries are not receiving their fair share of international financing for renewable energy, and that financial flows to least developed countries were in fact lower in 2018 than they are. were a year earlier. In fact, reports the Brookings Institute, 46 of the least developed countries combined received only 20 percent of commitments.

    So this is it. A rush to transition to renewables at Africa's expense, with pressure to leave precious oil and gas in the ground and less financial support for companies extracting it.

    It's like a cold winter in Europe followed by calm winds: economically unmanageable and likely to leave people in the dark.

  •   Some leaders of the main rebel alliance the CCP reportedly hailed the ceasefire NEW YORK United States of America October 17 2021 APO Group President Faustin Archange Touad ra announced the agreement with the armed groups on Friday saying he hoped it would lead to dialogue and greater protection of civilians according to media reports The Secretary General welcomed this development calling it a critical step in line with the roadmap for peace adopted in September by the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region an intergovernmental organization of 12 African countries Some leaders of the main rebel alliance the CCP have reportedly welcomed the ceasefire CAR has faced cycles of rebel violence since the 2013 ousting of former leader Fran ois Bozize and despite the signing of an agreement between the government and 14 armed groups two years ago A UN mission known by the French acronym MINUSCA has been present in the country since 2014 with a mandate to protect civilians and support peace processes Respect the ceasefire The Secretary General calls on all other parties to respect this ceasefire immediately and to redouble their efforts to advance the implementation of the 2019 Political Agreement for Peace and Reconciliation the statement said He further called on the parties to engage constructively in an inclusive political dialogue The UN chief reiterated his commitment to continue to mobilize international support for the government and people of CAR as they pursue peace reconciliation and development
    Central African Republic ceasefire is “critical step”, UN chief says
      Some leaders of the main rebel alliance the CCP reportedly hailed the ceasefire NEW YORK United States of America October 17 2021 APO Group President Faustin Archange Touad ra announced the agreement with the armed groups on Friday saying he hoped it would lead to dialogue and greater protection of civilians according to media reports The Secretary General welcomed this development calling it a critical step in line with the roadmap for peace adopted in September by the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region an intergovernmental organization of 12 African countries Some leaders of the main rebel alliance the CCP have reportedly welcomed the ceasefire CAR has faced cycles of rebel violence since the 2013 ousting of former leader Fran ois Bozize and despite the signing of an agreement between the government and 14 armed groups two years ago A UN mission known by the French acronym MINUSCA has been present in the country since 2014 with a mandate to protect civilians and support peace processes Respect the ceasefire The Secretary General calls on all other parties to respect this ceasefire immediately and to redouble their efforts to advance the implementation of the 2019 Political Agreement for Peace and Reconciliation the statement said He further called on the parties to engage constructively in an inclusive political dialogue The UN chief reiterated his commitment to continue to mobilize international support for the government and people of CAR as they pursue peace reconciliation and development
    Central African Republic ceasefire is “critical step”, UN chief says
    Africa1 year ago

    Central African Republic ceasefire is “critical step”, UN chief says

    Some leaders of the main rebel alliance, the CCP, reportedly hailed the ceasefire

    NEW YORK, United States of America, October 17, 2021 / APO Group / -

    President Faustin Archange Touadéra announced the agreement with the armed groups on Friday, saying he hoped it would lead to dialogue and greater protection of civilians, according to media reports.

    The Secretary-General welcomed this development, calling it a "critical step" in line with the roadmap for peace adopted in September by the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region, an intergovernmental organization of 12 African countries.

    Some leaders of the main rebel alliance, the CCP, have reportedly welcomed the ceasefire.

    CAR has faced cycles of rebel violence since the 2013 ousting of former leader François Bozize, and despite the signing of an agreement between the government and 14 armed groups two years ago.

    A UN mission, known by the French acronym MINUSCA, has been present in the country since 2014 with a mandate to protect civilians and support peace processes.

    Respect the ceasefire

    "The Secretary-General calls on all other parties to respect this ceasefire immediately and to redouble their efforts to advance the implementation of the 2019 Political Agreement for Peace and Reconciliation," the statement said.

    He further called on the parties to engage constructively in an inclusive political dialogue.

    The UN chief reiterated his commitment to continue to mobilize international support for the government and people of CAR as they pursue peace, reconciliation and development.

  •  Africa Union Member States 55 reporting COVID 19 cases 3 555 356 deaths 90 529 and recoveries 3 037 832 by region Central 87 718 cases 1 604 deaths 73 940 recoveries Burundi 1 613 2 1 155 Cameroon 29 617 462 28 045 CAR 4 989 63 4 908 Chad 3 321 117 2 372 Congo 7 887 118 5 860 DRC 22 771 671 15 031 Equatorial Guinea 5 516 86 5 286 Gabon 10 748 68 10 260 Sao Tome and Principe 1 256 17 1 023 Eastern 360 223 6 835 287 779 Comoros 2 718 90 1 678 Djibouti 5 932 63 5 845 Eritrea 2 135 7 1 594 Ethiopia 137 021 2 091 122 588 Kenya 100 675 1 755 83 855 Madagascar 18 743 279 17 930 Mauritius 569 10 528 Rwanda 15 118 193 9 804 Seychelles 1 186 4 987 Somalia 4 784 130 3 700 South Sudan 3 929 64 3 613 Sudan 27 371 1 804 21 300 Tanzania 509 21 178 Uganda 39 533 324 14 179 Northern 1 085 885 29 397 921 565 Algeria 107 030 2 890 73 152 Egypt 165 418 9 263 129 293 Libya 118 631 1 877 98 706 Mauritania 16 608 422 15 596 Morocco 470 691 8 259 448 628 Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic 39 6 30 Southern 1 698 226 48 645 1 478 936 Angola 19 782 464 18 015 Botswana 21 293 134 17 198 Eswatini nbsp 15 666 562 10 238 Lesotho 8 664 172 2 552 Malawi 23 497 687 8 318 Mozambique 38 654 367 23 955 Namibia 33 944 352 32 378 South Africa 1 449 236 43 951 1 292 921 Zambia 54 217 763 48 000 Zimbabwe 33 273 1 193 25 361 Western 323 304 4 048 275 612 Benin 3 786 48 3 398 Burkina Faso 10 580 120 9 052 Cabo Verde 13 981 133 13 103 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 28 178 152 25 818 Gambia 4 090 128 3 792 Ghana 65 427 405 60 357 Guinea 14 475 82 14 064 Guinea Bissau 2 614 45 2 421 Liberia 1 939 84 1 760 Mali 8 069 330 5 937 Niger 4 516 159 3 726 Nigeria 130 557 1 578 103 712 Senegal 26 523 628 21 970 Sierra Leone 3 528 79 2 278 Togo 5 041 77 4 224 No update since 7 May 2020 Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention Africa CDC Media filesDownload logo
    Coronavirus: African Union Member States reporting COVID-19 cases as of 31 January 2021, 6 pm EAT
     Africa Union Member States 55 reporting COVID 19 cases 3 555 356 deaths 90 529 and recoveries 3 037 832 by region Central 87 718 cases 1 604 deaths 73 940 recoveries Burundi 1 613 2 1 155 Cameroon 29 617 462 28 045 CAR 4 989 63 4 908 Chad 3 321 117 2 372 Congo 7 887 118 5 860 DRC 22 771 671 15 031 Equatorial Guinea 5 516 86 5 286 Gabon 10 748 68 10 260 Sao Tome and Principe 1 256 17 1 023 Eastern 360 223 6 835 287 779 Comoros 2 718 90 1 678 Djibouti 5 932 63 5 845 Eritrea 2 135 7 1 594 Ethiopia 137 021 2 091 122 588 Kenya 100 675 1 755 83 855 Madagascar 18 743 279 17 930 Mauritius 569 10 528 Rwanda 15 118 193 9 804 Seychelles 1 186 4 987 Somalia 4 784 130 3 700 South Sudan 3 929 64 3 613 Sudan 27 371 1 804 21 300 Tanzania 509 21 178 Uganda 39 533 324 14 179 Northern 1 085 885 29 397 921 565 Algeria 107 030 2 890 73 152 Egypt 165 418 9 263 129 293 Libya 118 631 1 877 98 706 Mauritania 16 608 422 15 596 Morocco 470 691 8 259 448 628 Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic 39 6 30 Southern 1 698 226 48 645 1 478 936 Angola 19 782 464 18 015 Botswana 21 293 134 17 198 Eswatini nbsp 15 666 562 10 238 Lesotho 8 664 172 2 552 Malawi 23 497 687 8 318 Mozambique 38 654 367 23 955 Namibia 33 944 352 32 378 South Africa 1 449 236 43 951 1 292 921 Zambia 54 217 763 48 000 Zimbabwe 33 273 1 193 25 361 Western 323 304 4 048 275 612 Benin 3 786 48 3 398 Burkina Faso 10 580 120 9 052 Cabo Verde 13 981 133 13 103 C ocirc te d 039 Ivoire 28 178 152 25 818 Gambia 4 090 128 3 792 Ghana 65 427 405 60 357 Guinea 14 475 82 14 064 Guinea Bissau 2 614 45 2 421 Liberia 1 939 84 1 760 Mali 8 069 330 5 937 Niger 4 516 159 3 726 Nigeria 130 557 1 578 103 712 Senegal 26 523 628 21 970 Sierra Leone 3 528 79 2 278 Togo 5 041 77 4 224 No update since 7 May 2020 Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention Africa CDC Media filesDownload logo
    Coronavirus: African Union Member States reporting COVID-19 cases as of 31 January 2021, 6 pm EAT
    Africa2 years ago

    Coronavirus: African Union Member States reporting COVID-19 cases as of 31 January 2021, 6 pm EAT

    Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC)

    Africa Union Member States (55) reporting COVID-19 cases (3,555,356), deaths (90,529) and recoveries (3,037,832) by region:
    Central (87,718 cases; 1,604 deaths; 73,940 recoveries): Burundi (1,613; 2; 1,155), Cameroon (29,617; 462; 28,045), CAR (4,989; 63; 4,908), Chad (3,321; 117; 2,372), Congo (7,887; 118; 5,860), DRC (22,771; 671; 15,031), Equatorial Guinea (5,516; 86; 5,286), Gabon (10,748; 68; 10,260), Sao Tome and Principe (1,256; 17; 1,023)
    Eastern (360,223; 6,835; 287,779): Comoros (2,718; 90; 1,678), Djibouti (5,932; 63; 5,845), Eritrea (2,135; 7; 1,594), Ethiopia (137,021; 2,091; 122,588), Kenya (100,675; 1,755; 83,855), Madagascar (18,743; 279; 17,930), Mauritius (569; 10; 528), Rwanda (15,118; 193; 9,804), Seychelles (1,186; 4; 987), Somalia (4,784; 130; 3,700), South Sudan (3,929; 64; 3,613), Sudan (27,371; 1,804; 21,300), Tanzania* (509; 21; 178), Uganda (39,533; 324; 14,179)
    Northern (1,085,885; 29,397; 921,565): Algeria (107,030; 2,890; 73,152), Egypt (165,418; 9,263; 129,293), Libya (118,631; 1,877; 98,706), Mauritania (16,608; 422; 15,596), Morocco (470,691; 8,259; 448,628), Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic (39; 6; 30)
    Southern (1,698,226; 48,645; 1,478,936): Angola (19,782; 464; 18,015), Botswana (21,293; 134; 17,198), Eswatini  (15,666; 562; 10,238), Lesotho (8,664; 172; 2,552), Malawi (23,497; 687; 8,318), Mozambique (38,654; 367; 23,955), Namibia (33,944; 352; 32,378), South Africa (1,449,236; 43,951; 1,292,921), Zambia (54,217; 763; 48,000), Zimbabwe (33,273; 1,193; 25,361)
    Western (323,304; 4,048; 275,612): Benin (3,786; 48; 3,398), Burkina Faso (10,580; 120; 9,052), Cabo Verde (13,981; 133; 13,103), Côte d'Ivoire (28,178; 152; 25,818), Gambia (4,090; 128; 3,792), Ghana (65,427; 405; 60,357), Guinea (14,475; 82; 14,064), Guinea Bissau (2,614; 45; 2,421), Liberia (1,939; 84; 1,760), Mali (8,069; 330; 5,937), Niger (4,516; 159; 3,726), Nigeria (130,557; 1,578; 103,712), Senegal (26,523; 628; 21,970), Sierra Leone (3,528; 79; 2,278), Togo (5,041; 77; 4,224)
    *No update since 7 May 2020.
    Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC).

    Media files
    Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC)
    Download logo

  •   Brazil has been an important market for VW ever since it began exporting its iconic Beetle and VW van there back in the 1950s Strong sales in the South American country helped make the German carmaker one of the biggest manufacturers in the world For more Drive it go to
    Vintage: VW Brasilia | DW English
      Brazil has been an important market for VW ever since it began exporting its iconic Beetle and VW van there back in the 1950s Strong sales in the South American country helped make the German carmaker one of the biggest manufacturers in the world For more Drive it go to
    Vintage: VW Brasilia | DW English
    Videos5 years ago

    Vintage: VW Brasilia | DW English


    Brazil has been an important market for VW ever since it began exporting its iconic Beetle and VW van there back in the 1950s. Strong sales in the South American country helped make the German carmaker one of the biggest manufacturers in the world. For more Drive it! go to:

naija news today and breaking 9jabetshop english and hausa link shortner free download tiktok video