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  •   Ethiopia is commemorating the 2022 World Antimicrobial Awareness Week WAAW through a series of events that are aimed at raising the awareness of health professionals and the community in general on Antimicrobial Resistance AMR its hazards containment and prevention The country has also launched Sector Specific Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance prevention and containment which is the first of its kind in the World Health Organization African Region In her keynote address during the launch of the commemoration event WHO Deputy Representative Dr Nonhlanhla Rose Dlamini said The global and regional burden of AMR is alarming and sub Saharan African countries are bearing the heaviest burden of resistant bacterial infections With 99 deaths per 100 000 population Sub Saharan Africa as compared to other regions has the highest AMR associated deaths which is far exceeding the previous global projections of 700 000 annual deaths from AMR Compounding the challenge is that more than half of all deaths recorded in the WHO African Region are caused by communicable diseases that are managed with antimicrobial medicines Dr Dlamini said adding that AMR puts at risk decades of advances towards the control of diseases such as malaria HIV AIDS tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections She also stressed the importance of water sanitation and hygiene WaSH vaccines and waste management as an essential component in addressing AMR The Government of Ethiopia is working with development partners to implement the third edition of National Antimicrobial Containment and Prevention Strategic Plan the One Health Approach 2021 2025 in line with global and regional action plans WHO is honored to be part of the process where Ethiopia is the first country in the WHO African region to launch sector specific plan on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control Dr Nonhlanhla Rose Dlamini said Ethiopia has faced its huge share of multifaceted problems that are associated with AMR Deputy Director General of Ethiopian Environmental Protection Authority Mrs Frenesh Mekuria said and expressed hope that the sector specific AMR Prevention and Containment Action Plan would help alleviate the various problems AMR is causing to human animal and environmental health Expressing the determination of the various ministerial and sector offices working on AMR the Deputy Director General called upon all national and international partners and stakeholders to enhance their collaboration and coordination in controlling the impacts of AMR in Ethiopia and beyond The commemoration and launching ceremony was attended by representatives from the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health Ministry of Agriculture the Environmental Protection Authority and international partners WAAW 2022 is being observed from November 18th to 24th 2022 across the globe with the theme Preventing Antimicrobial Resistance Together with the aim of raising awareness on the risks posed by overuse and misuse of antimicrobials including antibiotics and to encourage their more responsible use WAAW also aims at calling for urgent multisectoral collaboration and action to preserve the efficacy of this fundamental component of modern medicine through a One Health approach Antimicrobial resistance known more commonly as drug resistance occurs when disease causing germs become resistant to traditional medication making infections harder to treat and increasing the risk of disease spread severe illness and death Lack of effective antimicrobials will also negatively impact treatment of diseases in animals with potentially dire consequences for food security and overall economic growth Other than misuse and overuse of antimicrobials in human and animal health other drivers include limited availability and uptake of vaccines limited diagnostic capacity to support appropriate treatment lack of access to clean water sanitation and hygiene poor infection prevention and control practices poor disposal practices and the presence of antimicrobials in the environment and water bodies Guided by the Global Action Plan on AMR and in line with WHO s 13th General Programme of Work GPW WHO in the African Region continues to support regional and national interventions to combat AMR WHO collaborated with Food and Agriculture Organization FAO the World Organisation for Animal Health WHOA the UN Environment Programme UNEP USAID the African Centres for Disease Control and the African Union Inter African Bureau for Animal Resources in high level advocacy and a continental appeal for increased high level political advocacy to highlight the depth of the AMR threat The partners also enabled the country to mobilize significant amounts of funds from MPTF AMR project 2021 2023 and Kingdom of Saudia Arabia to support implementation of the National AMR strategic and containment plan 2021 2025 at national and sub national level In 2019 more than 4 9 million deaths were globally attributed to drug resistant bacterial infections with over 1 2 million of them directly related to AMR which is more than HIV AIDS and malaria combined Various reports also suggest that the management of COVID 19 patients with antibiotics has fueled the global AMR threat
    Ethiopia commemorates World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, launches Sector-Specific Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Containment
      Ethiopia is commemorating the 2022 World Antimicrobial Awareness Week WAAW through a series of events that are aimed at raising the awareness of health professionals and the community in general on Antimicrobial Resistance AMR its hazards containment and prevention The country has also launched Sector Specific Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance prevention and containment which is the first of its kind in the World Health Organization African Region In her keynote address during the launch of the commemoration event WHO Deputy Representative Dr Nonhlanhla Rose Dlamini said The global and regional burden of AMR is alarming and sub Saharan African countries are bearing the heaviest burden of resistant bacterial infections With 99 deaths per 100 000 population Sub Saharan Africa as compared to other regions has the highest AMR associated deaths which is far exceeding the previous global projections of 700 000 annual deaths from AMR Compounding the challenge is that more than half of all deaths recorded in the WHO African Region are caused by communicable diseases that are managed with antimicrobial medicines Dr Dlamini said adding that AMR puts at risk decades of advances towards the control of diseases such as malaria HIV AIDS tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections She also stressed the importance of water sanitation and hygiene WaSH vaccines and waste management as an essential component in addressing AMR The Government of Ethiopia is working with development partners to implement the third edition of National Antimicrobial Containment and Prevention Strategic Plan the One Health Approach 2021 2025 in line with global and regional action plans WHO is honored to be part of the process where Ethiopia is the first country in the WHO African region to launch sector specific plan on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control Dr Nonhlanhla Rose Dlamini said Ethiopia has faced its huge share of multifaceted problems that are associated with AMR Deputy Director General of Ethiopian Environmental Protection Authority Mrs Frenesh Mekuria said and expressed hope that the sector specific AMR Prevention and Containment Action Plan would help alleviate the various problems AMR is causing to human animal and environmental health Expressing the determination of the various ministerial and sector offices working on AMR the Deputy Director General called upon all national and international partners and stakeholders to enhance their collaboration and coordination in controlling the impacts of AMR in Ethiopia and beyond The commemoration and launching ceremony was attended by representatives from the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health Ministry of Agriculture the Environmental Protection Authority and international partners WAAW 2022 is being observed from November 18th to 24th 2022 across the globe with the theme Preventing Antimicrobial Resistance Together with the aim of raising awareness on the risks posed by overuse and misuse of antimicrobials including antibiotics and to encourage their more responsible use WAAW also aims at calling for urgent multisectoral collaboration and action to preserve the efficacy of this fundamental component of modern medicine through a One Health approach Antimicrobial resistance known more commonly as drug resistance occurs when disease causing germs become resistant to traditional medication making infections harder to treat and increasing the risk of disease spread severe illness and death Lack of effective antimicrobials will also negatively impact treatment of diseases in animals with potentially dire consequences for food security and overall economic growth Other than misuse and overuse of antimicrobials in human and animal health other drivers include limited availability and uptake of vaccines limited diagnostic capacity to support appropriate treatment lack of access to clean water sanitation and hygiene poor infection prevention and control practices poor disposal practices and the presence of antimicrobials in the environment and water bodies Guided by the Global Action Plan on AMR and in line with WHO s 13th General Programme of Work GPW WHO in the African Region continues to support regional and national interventions to combat AMR WHO collaborated with Food and Agriculture Organization FAO the World Organisation for Animal Health WHOA the UN Environment Programme UNEP USAID the African Centres for Disease Control and the African Union Inter African Bureau for Animal Resources in high level advocacy and a continental appeal for increased high level political advocacy to highlight the depth of the AMR threat The partners also enabled the country to mobilize significant amounts of funds from MPTF AMR project 2021 2023 and Kingdom of Saudia Arabia to support implementation of the National AMR strategic and containment plan 2021 2025 at national and sub national level In 2019 more than 4 9 million deaths were globally attributed to drug resistant bacterial infections with over 1 2 million of them directly related to AMR which is more than HIV AIDS and malaria combined Various reports also suggest that the management of COVID 19 patients with antibiotics has fueled the global AMR threat
    Ethiopia commemorates World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, launches Sector-Specific Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Containment
    Africa2 days ago

    Ethiopia commemorates World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, launches Sector-Specific Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Containment

    Ethiopia is commemorating the 2022 World Antimicrobial Awareness Week (WAAW) through a series of events that are aimed at raising the awareness of health professionals and the community in general on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR), its hazards, containment and prevention.

    The country has also launched Sector Specific Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance prevention and containment which is the first of its kind in the World Health Organization African Region.

    In her keynote address during the launch of the commemoration event, WHO Deputy Representative Dr. Nonhlanhla Rose Dlamini said, “The global and regional burden of AMR is alarming, and sub-Saharan African countries are bearing the heaviest burden of resistant bacterial infections.”With 99 deaths per 100 000 population, Sub-Saharan Africa, as compared to other regions, has the highest AMR associated deaths, which is far exceeding the previous global projections of 700 000 annual deaths from AMR.

    “Compounding the challenge is that more than half of all deaths recorded in the WHO African Region are caused by communicable diseases that are managed with antimicrobial medicines,” Dr Dlamini said, adding that AMR puts at risk decades of advances towards the control of diseases such as malaria, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and sexually-transmitted infections.

    She also stressed the importance of water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH), vaccines and waste management as an essential component in addressing AMR. 

    The Government of Ethiopia is working with development partners to implement the third edition of National Antimicrobial Containment and Prevention Strategic Plan: the One Health Approach 2021-2025 in line with global and regional action plans.

    “WHO is honored to be part of the process, where Ethiopia is the first country in the WHO African region to launch sector-specific plan on Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control,” Dr. Nonhlanhla Rose Dlamini said.

    “Ethiopia has faced its huge share of multifaceted problems that are associated with AMR” Deputy Director General of Ethiopian Environmental Protection Authority Mrs. Frenesh Mekuria said and expressed hope that the sector-specific AMR Prevention and Containment Action Plan would help alleviate the various problems AMR is causing to human, animal and environmental health.

    Expressing the determination of the various ministerial and sector offices working on AMR, the Deputy Director General called upon all national and international partners and stakeholders to enhance their collaboration and coordination in controlling the impacts of AMR in Ethiopia and beyond.

    The commemoration and launching ceremony was attended by representatives from the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health, Ministry of Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Authority and international partners.

    WAAW 2022 is being observed from November 18th to 24th 2022 across the globe with the theme “Preventing Antimicrobial Resistance Together” with the aim of raising awareness on the risks posed by overuse and misuse of antimicrobials, including antibiotics, and to encourage their more responsible use.

    WAAW also aims at calling for urgent multisectoral collaboration and action to preserve the efficacy of this fundamental component of modern medicine through a One-Health approach.

    Antimicrobial resistance, known more commonly as “drug resistance”, occurs when disease-causing germs become resistant to traditional medication, making infections harder to treat, and increasing the risk of disease spread, severe illness and death.

    Lack of effective antimicrobials will also negatively impact treatment of diseases in animals, with potentially dire consequences for food security, and overall economic growth.

    Other than misuse and overuse of antimicrobials in human and animal health, other drivers include limited availability and uptake of vaccines; limited diagnostic capacity to support appropriate treatment; lack of access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene; poor infection prevention and control practices; poor disposal practices; and the presence of antimicrobials in the environment and water bodies. 

    Guided by the Global Action Plan on AMR, and in line with WHO’s 13th General Programme of Work (GPW), WHO in the African Region continues to support regional and national interventions to combat AMR.

    WHO collaborated with Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (WHOA), the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), USAID, the African Centres for Disease Control and the African Union Inter-African Bureau for Animal Resources, in high level advocacy and a continental appeal for increased high-level political advocacy to highlight the depth of the AMR threat. 

    The partners also enabled the country to mobilize significant amounts of funds from MPTF AMR project 2021-2023 and Kingdom of Saudia Arabia to support implementation of the National AMR strategic and containment plan 2021-2025 at national and sub-national level.

    In 2019, more than 4.9 million deaths were globally attributed to drug-resistant bacterial infections, with over 1.2 million of them directly related to AMR, which is more than HIV/AIDS and malaria combined.

    Various reports also suggest that the management of COVID-19 patients with antibiotics has fueled the global AMR threat.

  •   A new project launched today in Kampala by national authorities and international organizations aims to advance a more responsible artisanal gold mining sector across the country The five year planetGOLD Uganda project https www PlanetGOLD org Uganda is funded by the Global Environment Facility GEF https www theGEF org and implemented by the UN Environment Programme UNEP www UNEP org The planetGOLD Uganda project will be executed by the international non profit organization IMPACT https IMPACTTransform org in partnership with Uganda s National Environment Management Authority NEMA and the country s Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines DGSM The project will work together with local communities to reduce the use of mercury in artisanal and small scale gold mining the world s largest source of anthropogenic emissions of mercury pollution while improving the health and lives of local mining communities The Ugandan project is part of a global program similarly implemented in 23 countries The planetGOLD Uganda project plans to support 4 500 men and women at 11 mine sites in the country reducing mercury use by 15 tonnes over five years The project aims to reduce the use of mercury by supporting formalization of the artisanal gold mining sector and increasing access to finance This will lead to adoption of mercury free technologies and allow access to more responsible and traceable gold supply chains Artisanal gold mining is a critical source of livelihood for many in Uganda and an important opportunity for economic development Through the planetGOLD Uganda project miners will be introduced to solutions to the environmental and social challenges in the sector helping to transition toward more responsible gold mining practices said Ludovic Bernaudat Head of UNEP s GEF Chemicals and Waste Portfolio A virtual inaugural inception workshop on November 23 brought together Ugandan mining governance authorities and the technical services of the mining administration to introduce the key themes and priorities of the project According to the World Health Organization WHO https bit ly 2QfzkhL exposure to mercury even small amounts may have toxic effects on the nervous digestive and immune systems and on lungs kidneys skin and eyes as well as pose a threat to the development of the child https bit ly 3V1SdCc in utero and early in life In Uganda an estimated 90 percent of the country s gold production https bit ly 3i8zO8h is mined artisanally with over 31 000 miners in the artisanal gold sector While the quantities that miners are extracting and processing are very small the use of mercury is very common 73 percent of Uganda s artisanal gold is produced using mercury https bit ly 3ExiNvT resulting in more than 15 tonnes of mercury being released annually Mercury contaminates the soil water air and the equipment that is used It is highly toxic to miners and others who come in direct contact with it particularly when vaporized or among children and pregnant women Mercury emitted to the air can also circulate around the world and contaminate water fish and wildlife far from the mine from which it was released In 2019 Uganda ratified the Minamata Convention on Mercury https www MercuryConvention org We are eager to partner with the planetGOLD Uganda project to implement our commitments to reduce and eliminate the use of mercury in artisanal gold mining We look forward to introducing a cleaner more responsible and more prosperous artisanal mining sector that benefits both the people and the planet said Barirega Akankwasa PhD Executive Director of the National Environmental Management Authority NEMA With the growth of the artisanal mining sector over the past decade Uganda has had to reform its legislative approach to keep up with the changing context of the mining sector The Mining and Minerals Act 2022 provides the opportunity to support responsible development in the sector which includes gazetting of artisanal mine sites for easy management environmental stewardship improved health and safety at mine sites and elimination of hazardous chemicals such as mercury said Agnes Alaba Acting Director of the Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines DGSM
    Uganda Kicks-Off Project to Reduce Mercury Use in Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining
      A new project launched today in Kampala by national authorities and international organizations aims to advance a more responsible artisanal gold mining sector across the country The five year planetGOLD Uganda project https www PlanetGOLD org Uganda is funded by the Global Environment Facility GEF https www theGEF org and implemented by the UN Environment Programme UNEP www UNEP org The planetGOLD Uganda project will be executed by the international non profit organization IMPACT https IMPACTTransform org in partnership with Uganda s National Environment Management Authority NEMA and the country s Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines DGSM The project will work together with local communities to reduce the use of mercury in artisanal and small scale gold mining the world s largest source of anthropogenic emissions of mercury pollution while improving the health and lives of local mining communities The Ugandan project is part of a global program similarly implemented in 23 countries The planetGOLD Uganda project plans to support 4 500 men and women at 11 mine sites in the country reducing mercury use by 15 tonnes over five years The project aims to reduce the use of mercury by supporting formalization of the artisanal gold mining sector and increasing access to finance This will lead to adoption of mercury free technologies and allow access to more responsible and traceable gold supply chains Artisanal gold mining is a critical source of livelihood for many in Uganda and an important opportunity for economic development Through the planetGOLD Uganda project miners will be introduced to solutions to the environmental and social challenges in the sector helping to transition toward more responsible gold mining practices said Ludovic Bernaudat Head of UNEP s GEF Chemicals and Waste Portfolio A virtual inaugural inception workshop on November 23 brought together Ugandan mining governance authorities and the technical services of the mining administration to introduce the key themes and priorities of the project According to the World Health Organization WHO https bit ly 2QfzkhL exposure to mercury even small amounts may have toxic effects on the nervous digestive and immune systems and on lungs kidneys skin and eyes as well as pose a threat to the development of the child https bit ly 3V1SdCc in utero and early in life In Uganda an estimated 90 percent of the country s gold production https bit ly 3i8zO8h is mined artisanally with over 31 000 miners in the artisanal gold sector While the quantities that miners are extracting and processing are very small the use of mercury is very common 73 percent of Uganda s artisanal gold is produced using mercury https bit ly 3ExiNvT resulting in more than 15 tonnes of mercury being released annually Mercury contaminates the soil water air and the equipment that is used It is highly toxic to miners and others who come in direct contact with it particularly when vaporized or among children and pregnant women Mercury emitted to the air can also circulate around the world and contaminate water fish and wildlife far from the mine from which it was released In 2019 Uganda ratified the Minamata Convention on Mercury https www MercuryConvention org We are eager to partner with the planetGOLD Uganda project to implement our commitments to reduce and eliminate the use of mercury in artisanal gold mining We look forward to introducing a cleaner more responsible and more prosperous artisanal mining sector that benefits both the people and the planet said Barirega Akankwasa PhD Executive Director of the National Environmental Management Authority NEMA With the growth of the artisanal mining sector over the past decade Uganda has had to reform its legislative approach to keep up with the changing context of the mining sector The Mining and Minerals Act 2022 provides the opportunity to support responsible development in the sector which includes gazetting of artisanal mine sites for easy management environmental stewardship improved health and safety at mine sites and elimination of hazardous chemicals such as mercury said Agnes Alaba Acting Director of the Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines DGSM
    Uganda Kicks-Off Project to Reduce Mercury Use in Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining
    Africa3 days ago

    Uganda Kicks-Off Project to Reduce Mercury Use in Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining

    A new project launched today in Kampala by national authorities and international organizations aims to advance a more responsible artisanal gold mining sector across the country.

    The five-year planetGOLD Uganda project (https://www.PlanetGOLD.org/Uganda) is funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) (https://www.theGEF.org) and implemented by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) (www.UNEP.org).

    The planetGOLD Uganda project will be executed by the international non-profit organization, IMPACT (https://IMPACTTransform.org), in partnership with Uganda’s National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) and the country’s Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines (DGSM).

    The project will work together with local communities to reduce the use of mercury in artisanal and small-scale gold mining—the world’s largest source of anthropogenic emissions of mercury pollution— while improving the health and lives of local mining communities.

    The Ugandan project is part of a global program similarly implemented in 23 countries.

    The planetGOLD Uganda project plans to support 4,500 men and women at 11 mine sites in the country, reducing mercury use by 15 tonnes over five years.

    The project aims to reduce the use of mercury by supporting formalization of the artisanal gold mining sector and increasing access to finance.

    This will lead to adoption of mercury-free technologies and allow access to more responsible and traceable gold supply chains.

    “Artisanal gold mining is a critical source of livelihood for many in Uganda and an important opportunity for economic development.

    Through the planetGOLD Uganda project, miners will be introduced to solutions to the environmental and social challenges in the sector, helping to transition toward more responsible gold mining practices,” said Ludovic Bernaudat, Head of UNEP’s GEF Chemicals and Waste Portfolio.

    A virtual inaugural inception workshop on November 23 brought together Ugandan mining governance authorities and the technical services of the mining administration to introduce the key themes and priorities of the project.

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) (https://bit.ly/2QfzkhL), exposure to mercury – even small amounts – may have toxic effects on the nervous, digestive, and immune systems, and on lungs, kidneys, skin and eyes, as well as pose a threat to the development of the child (https://bit.ly/3V1SdCc) in utero and early in life.

    In Uganda, an estimated 90 percent of the country’s gold production (https://bit.ly/3i8zO8h) is mined artisanally, with over 31,000 miners in the artisanal gold sector.

    While the quantities that miners are extracting and processing are very small, the use of mercury is very common.

    73 percent of Uganda’s artisanal gold is produced using mercury (https://bit.ly/3ExiNvT) —resulting in more than 15 tonnes of mercury being released annually.

    Mercury contaminates the soil, water, air, and the equipment that is used.

    It is highly toxic to miners and others who come in direct contact with it—particularly when vaporized or among children and pregnant women.

    Mercury emitted to the air can also circulate around the world and contaminate water, fish, and wildlife far from the mine from which it was released.

    “In 2019, Uganda ratified the Minamata Convention on Mercury (https://www.MercuryConvention.org).

    We are eager to partner with the planetGOLD Uganda project to implement our commitments to reduce and eliminate the use of mercury in artisanal gold mining.

    We look forward to introducing a cleaner, more responsible, and more prosperous artisanal mining sector that benefits both the people and the planet,” said Barirega Akankwasa, PhD, Executive Director of the National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA).

    “With the growth of the artisanal mining sector over the past decade, Uganda has had to reform its legislative approach to keep up with the changing context of the mining sector.

    The Mining and Minerals Act 2022 provides the opportunity to support responsible development in the sector, which includes gazetting of artisanal mine sites for easy management, environmental stewardship, improved health and safety at mine sites, and elimination of hazardous chemicals such as mercury,” said Agnes Alaba, Acting Director of the Directorate of Geological Survey and Mines (DGSM).

     

  •   The UN Environment Programme UNEP today announced its 2022 Champions of the Earth honouring a conservationist an enterprise an economist a women s rights activist and a wildlife biologist for their transformative action to prevent halt and reverse ecosystem degradation Since its inception in 2005 the annual Champions of the Earth award has been awarded to trailblazers at the forefront of efforts to protect our natural world It is the UN s highest environmental honour To date the award has recognized 111 laureates 26 world leaders 69 individuals and 16 organizations This year a record 2 200 nominations from around the world were received Healthy functional ecosystems are critical to preventing the climate emergency and loss of biodiversity from causing irreversible damage to our planet This year s Champions of the Earth give us hope that our relationship with nature can be repaired said Inger Andersen Executive Director of UNEP This year s Champions demonstrate how reviving ecosystems and supporting nature s remarkable capacity for regeneration is everyone s job governments the private sector scientists communities NGOs and individuals UNEP s 2022 Champions of the Earth are Arcenciel Lebanon honoured in the Inspiration and Action category is a leading environmental enterprise whose work to create a cleaner healthier environment has laid the foundation for the country s national waste management strategy Today arcenciel recycles more than 80 per cent of Lebanon s potentially infectious hospital waste every year Constantino Tino Aucca Chutas Peru also honoured in the Inspiration and Action category has pioneered a community reforestation model driven by local and Indigenous communities which has led to three million trees being planted in the country He is also leading ambitious reforestation efforts in other Andean countries Sir Partha Dasgupta United Kingdom honoured in the Science and Innovation category is an eminent economist whose landmark review on the economics of biodiversity calls for a fundamental rethink of humanity s relationship with the natural world to prevent critical ecosystems from reaching dangerous tipping points Dr Purnima Devi Barman India honoured in the Entrepreneurial Vision category is a wildlife biologist who leads the Hargila Army an all female grassroots conservation movement dedicated to protecting the Greater Adjutant Stork from extinction The women create and sell textiles with motifs of the bird helping to raise awareness about the species while building their own financial independence C cile Bibiane Ndjebet Cameroon honoured in the Inspiration and Action category is a tireless advocate for the rights of women in Africa to secure land tenure which is essential if they are to play a role in restoring ecosystems fighting poverty and mitigating climate change She is also leading efforts to influence policy on gender equality in forest management across 20 African countries Following the launch of the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration 2021 2030 this year s awards shine a spotlight on efforts to prevent halt and reverse ecosystem degradation globally Ecosystems on every continent and in every ocean face massive threats Every year the planet loses forest cover equivalent to the size of Portugal Oceans are being overfished and polluted with 11 million tonnes of plastic alone ending up in marine environments annually One million species are at risk of extinction as their habitats disappear or become polluted Ecosystem restoration is essential for keeping global warming below 2 C and helping societies and economies to adapt to climate change It is also crucial to fighting hunger restoration through agroforestry alone has the potential to increase food security for 1 3 billion people Restoring just 15 per cent of converted lands could reduce the risk of species extinction by 60 per cent Ecosystem restoration will only succeed if everyone joins the GenerationRestoration movement
    United Nation’s (UN) highest environmental honour celebrates ecosystem restoration
      The UN Environment Programme UNEP today announced its 2022 Champions of the Earth honouring a conservationist an enterprise an economist a women s rights activist and a wildlife biologist for their transformative action to prevent halt and reverse ecosystem degradation Since its inception in 2005 the annual Champions of the Earth award has been awarded to trailblazers at the forefront of efforts to protect our natural world It is the UN s highest environmental honour To date the award has recognized 111 laureates 26 world leaders 69 individuals and 16 organizations This year a record 2 200 nominations from around the world were received Healthy functional ecosystems are critical to preventing the climate emergency and loss of biodiversity from causing irreversible damage to our planet This year s Champions of the Earth give us hope that our relationship with nature can be repaired said Inger Andersen Executive Director of UNEP This year s Champions demonstrate how reviving ecosystems and supporting nature s remarkable capacity for regeneration is everyone s job governments the private sector scientists communities NGOs and individuals UNEP s 2022 Champions of the Earth are Arcenciel Lebanon honoured in the Inspiration and Action category is a leading environmental enterprise whose work to create a cleaner healthier environment has laid the foundation for the country s national waste management strategy Today arcenciel recycles more than 80 per cent of Lebanon s potentially infectious hospital waste every year Constantino Tino Aucca Chutas Peru also honoured in the Inspiration and Action category has pioneered a community reforestation model driven by local and Indigenous communities which has led to three million trees being planted in the country He is also leading ambitious reforestation efforts in other Andean countries Sir Partha Dasgupta United Kingdom honoured in the Science and Innovation category is an eminent economist whose landmark review on the economics of biodiversity calls for a fundamental rethink of humanity s relationship with the natural world to prevent critical ecosystems from reaching dangerous tipping points Dr Purnima Devi Barman India honoured in the Entrepreneurial Vision category is a wildlife biologist who leads the Hargila Army an all female grassroots conservation movement dedicated to protecting the Greater Adjutant Stork from extinction The women create and sell textiles with motifs of the bird helping to raise awareness about the species while building their own financial independence C cile Bibiane Ndjebet Cameroon honoured in the Inspiration and Action category is a tireless advocate for the rights of women in Africa to secure land tenure which is essential if they are to play a role in restoring ecosystems fighting poverty and mitigating climate change She is also leading efforts to influence policy on gender equality in forest management across 20 African countries Following the launch of the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration 2021 2030 this year s awards shine a spotlight on efforts to prevent halt and reverse ecosystem degradation globally Ecosystems on every continent and in every ocean face massive threats Every year the planet loses forest cover equivalent to the size of Portugal Oceans are being overfished and polluted with 11 million tonnes of plastic alone ending up in marine environments annually One million species are at risk of extinction as their habitats disappear or become polluted Ecosystem restoration is essential for keeping global warming below 2 C and helping societies and economies to adapt to climate change It is also crucial to fighting hunger restoration through agroforestry alone has the potential to increase food security for 1 3 billion people Restoring just 15 per cent of converted lands could reduce the risk of species extinction by 60 per cent Ecosystem restoration will only succeed if everyone joins the GenerationRestoration movement
    United Nation’s (UN) highest environmental honour celebrates ecosystem restoration
    Africa4 days ago

    United Nation’s (UN) highest environmental honour celebrates ecosystem restoration

    The UN Environment Programme (UNEP) today announced its 2022 Champions of the Earth, honouring a conservationist, an enterprise, an economist, a women’s rights activist, and a wildlife biologist for their transformative action to prevent, halt and reverse ecosystem degradation.

    Since its inception in 2005, the annual Champions of the Earth award has been awarded to trailblazers at the forefront of efforts to protect our natural world.

    It is the UN’s highest environmental honour.

    To date, the award has recognized 111 laureates: 26 world leaders, 69 individuals and 16 organizations.

    This year a record 2,200 nominations from around the world were received.

    “Healthy, functional ecosystems are critical to preventing the climate emergency and loss of biodiversity from causing irreversible damage to our planet.

    This year’s Champions of the Earth give us hope that our relationship with nature can be repaired,” said Inger Andersen, Executive Director of UNEP.

    “This year’s Champions demonstrate how reviving ecosystems and supporting nature’s remarkable capacity for regeneration is everyone’s job: governments, the private sector, scientists, communities, NGOs and individuals.”UNEP’s 2022 Champions of the Earth are:Arcenciel (Lebanon), honoured in the Inspiration and Action category, is a leading environmental enterprise whose work to create a cleaner, healthier environment has laid the foundation for the country’s national waste management strategy.

    Today, arcenciel recycles more than 80 per cent of Lebanon’s potentially infectious hospital waste every year.

    Constantino (Tino) Aucca Chutas (Peru), also honoured in the Inspiration and Action category, has pioneered a community reforestation model driven by local and Indigenous communities, which has led to three million trees being planted in the country.

    He is also leading ambitious reforestation efforts in other Andean countries.

    Sir Partha Dasgupta (United Kingdom), honoured in the Science and Innovation category, is an eminent economist whose landmark review on the economics of biodiversity calls for a fundamental rethink of humanity’s relationship with the natural world to prevent critical ecosystems from reaching dangerous tipping points.

    Dr Purnima Devi Barman (India), honoured in the Entrepreneurial Vision category, is a wildlife biologist who leads the “Hargila Army”, an all-female grassroots conservation movement dedicated to protecting the Greater Adjutant Stork from extinction.

    The women create and sell textiles with motifs of the bird, helping to raise awareness about the species while building their own financial independence.

    Cécile Bibiane Ndjebet (Cameroon), honoured in the Inspiration and Action category, is a tireless advocate for the rights of women in Africa to secure land tenure, which is essential if they are to play a role in restoring ecosystems, fighting poverty and mitigating climate change.

    She is also leading efforts to influence policy on gender equality in forest management across 20 African countries.

    Following the launch of the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration (2021-2030), this year’s awards shine a spotlight on efforts to prevent, halt and reverse ecosystem degradation globally.

    Ecosystems on every continent and in every ocean face massive threats.

    Every year, the planet loses forest cover equivalent to the size of Portugal.

    Oceans are being overfished and polluted, with 11 million tonnes of plastic alone ending up in marine environments annually.

    One million species are at risk of extinction as their habitats disappear or become polluted.

    Ecosystem restoration is essential for keeping global warming below 2°C and helping societies and economies to adapt to climate change.

    It is also crucial to fighting hunger: restoration through agroforestry alone has the potential to increase food security for 1.3 billion people.

    Restoring just 15 per cent of converted lands could reduce the risk of species extinction by 60 per cent. 

    Ecosystem restoration will only succeed if everyone joins the #GenerationRestoration movement.

  •   An Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa released today by the Climate and Clean Air Coalition CCAC the United Nations Environment Programme UNEP and the African Union Commission shows how African leaders can act quickly across 5 key areas transport residential energy agriculture and waste to fight climate change prevent air pollution and protect human health Air pollutants and greenhouse gases often share the same sources and can be even more dangerous when combined By following the Assessment s recommended actions to cut air pollution and prevent climate change African governments could prevent 200 000 premature deaths per year by 2030 and 880 000 deaths per year by 2063 reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 55 methane emissions by 74 and nitrous oxide emissions 40 by 2063 improve food security by reducing desertification and increasing crop yields for rice maize soy and wheat and contribute significantly to global efforts to keep warming below 1 5 C limiting the negative effects of regional climate change Air pollution is a climate and health emergency in Africa and around the world By cutting short lived climate pollutants we can slow down the worst effects of climate change in the very near term while protecting human lives We must come together to work with African nations to reduce emissions from short lived climate pollutants and eliminate air pollution as much as possible this decade said Inger Andersen Executive Director of UNEP Air pollution is the one of the greatest environmental threats to human health and is responsible for about 7 million deaths each year globally Air pollutants and greenhouse gases often share the same sources and drivers including fossil fuel driven economic growth Some pollutants including methane and black carbon directly contribute to both impacts simultaneously And because Africa is particularly vulnerable to climate change preventing emissions from short lived climate pollutants like methane and black carbon will help both save lives and protect the environment Air pollution and climate change are a deadly duo and must be tackled together said Soipan Tuya Cabinet Secretary for Environment and Forestry Government of Kenya We welcome the release of this Assessment and its findings which demonstrate how Kenya and African nations can achieve the air pollution and climate goals without compromising on the livelihoods and development objectives of the continent she added The Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa is the first ever integrated assessment of air pollution and climate change for the continent and provides a robust scientific basis for action towards clean air in Africa The report was developed by a pan African team of researchers with contributions from international scientists and experts coordinated by CCAC partner Stockholm Environment Institute SEI The Assessment s recommendations are closely aligned with key priorities of Agenda 2063 and with the goals and targets of the Sustainable Development Goals SDG Nearly all the recommendations can be found in at least one African Nationally Determined Contribution NDC and are currently identified as contributing to achieving national climate change mitigation goals This Assessment shows that Africa has a huge opportunity to continue developing sustainably improve human well being and protect nature by investing in solutions to fight climate change and air pollution together said H E Amb Josefa Sacko Commissioner of Agriculture Rural Development Blue Economy and Sustainable Environment African Union Commission We look forward to working with countries and funders to develop the AUC s Clean Air Program for implementation of the Assessment measures as supported by the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment she added The Assessment demonstrates a sustainable path forward despite the huge increases in economic activity urbanization and population that will accompany development Across five key areas the Assessment suggests 37 measures that are cost effective and proven including Shifting to cleaner vehicles and to safe and affordable public transport as well as safe cycling and walking Transitioning to sustainable clean cooking and efficient household appliances for refrigeration and air conditioning in the residential sector Moving to renewable energy and increasing energy efficiency capturing methane from oil gas and coal and drastically reducing other GHG and SLCP emissions Reducing methane emissions from agriculture with better livestock and manure practices reducing crop losses and food waste and promoting healthy diets Developing better waste management systems generating less organic waste and reducing open burning African nations are responsible for a small fraction of global greenhouse gas emissions but bear an outsized burden of negative climate impacts Importantly the Assessment shows that countries outside of Africa must drastically reduce their own emissions to limit warming to 1 5 C help Africa avoid the worst impacts of climate change and reduce the cost of adaptation Scientific business finance non state actors governments development and other actors must join forces to pool resources and implement the Assessment s measures to achieve significant impactful change This assessment comes at a timely moment as COP27 is focused on implementation said M ns Nilsson Executive Director Stockholm Environment Institute SEI Through this report African governments the private sector non governmental organizations and local communities now have the scientific evidence on different options for action that can enable the continent to meet its development objectives while mitigating pollution and GHG emissions he added Without changes in policy the Assessment finds that greenhouse gas emissions will triple by 2063 causing a ripple effect outdoor air pollution will get worse causing about 930 000 premature deaths per year in 2030 and about 1 6 million premature deaths per year in 2063 Without action pressures on resources the environment and human health could increase inequalities and limit Africa s ability to achieve sustainable development
    Africa could prevent 880,000 deaths per year by taking action on air pollution and climate change – Report
      An Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa released today by the Climate and Clean Air Coalition CCAC the United Nations Environment Programme UNEP and the African Union Commission shows how African leaders can act quickly across 5 key areas transport residential energy agriculture and waste to fight climate change prevent air pollution and protect human health Air pollutants and greenhouse gases often share the same sources and can be even more dangerous when combined By following the Assessment s recommended actions to cut air pollution and prevent climate change African governments could prevent 200 000 premature deaths per year by 2030 and 880 000 deaths per year by 2063 reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 55 methane emissions by 74 and nitrous oxide emissions 40 by 2063 improve food security by reducing desertification and increasing crop yields for rice maize soy and wheat and contribute significantly to global efforts to keep warming below 1 5 C limiting the negative effects of regional climate change Air pollution is a climate and health emergency in Africa and around the world By cutting short lived climate pollutants we can slow down the worst effects of climate change in the very near term while protecting human lives We must come together to work with African nations to reduce emissions from short lived climate pollutants and eliminate air pollution as much as possible this decade said Inger Andersen Executive Director of UNEP Air pollution is the one of the greatest environmental threats to human health and is responsible for about 7 million deaths each year globally Air pollutants and greenhouse gases often share the same sources and drivers including fossil fuel driven economic growth Some pollutants including methane and black carbon directly contribute to both impacts simultaneously And because Africa is particularly vulnerable to climate change preventing emissions from short lived climate pollutants like methane and black carbon will help both save lives and protect the environment Air pollution and climate change are a deadly duo and must be tackled together said Soipan Tuya Cabinet Secretary for Environment and Forestry Government of Kenya We welcome the release of this Assessment and its findings which demonstrate how Kenya and African nations can achieve the air pollution and climate goals without compromising on the livelihoods and development objectives of the continent she added The Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa is the first ever integrated assessment of air pollution and climate change for the continent and provides a robust scientific basis for action towards clean air in Africa The report was developed by a pan African team of researchers with contributions from international scientists and experts coordinated by CCAC partner Stockholm Environment Institute SEI The Assessment s recommendations are closely aligned with key priorities of Agenda 2063 and with the goals and targets of the Sustainable Development Goals SDG Nearly all the recommendations can be found in at least one African Nationally Determined Contribution NDC and are currently identified as contributing to achieving national climate change mitigation goals This Assessment shows that Africa has a huge opportunity to continue developing sustainably improve human well being and protect nature by investing in solutions to fight climate change and air pollution together said H E Amb Josefa Sacko Commissioner of Agriculture Rural Development Blue Economy and Sustainable Environment African Union Commission We look forward to working with countries and funders to develop the AUC s Clean Air Program for implementation of the Assessment measures as supported by the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment she added The Assessment demonstrates a sustainable path forward despite the huge increases in economic activity urbanization and population that will accompany development Across five key areas the Assessment suggests 37 measures that are cost effective and proven including Shifting to cleaner vehicles and to safe and affordable public transport as well as safe cycling and walking Transitioning to sustainable clean cooking and efficient household appliances for refrigeration and air conditioning in the residential sector Moving to renewable energy and increasing energy efficiency capturing methane from oil gas and coal and drastically reducing other GHG and SLCP emissions Reducing methane emissions from agriculture with better livestock and manure practices reducing crop losses and food waste and promoting healthy diets Developing better waste management systems generating less organic waste and reducing open burning African nations are responsible for a small fraction of global greenhouse gas emissions but bear an outsized burden of negative climate impacts Importantly the Assessment shows that countries outside of Africa must drastically reduce their own emissions to limit warming to 1 5 C help Africa avoid the worst impacts of climate change and reduce the cost of adaptation Scientific business finance non state actors governments development and other actors must join forces to pool resources and implement the Assessment s measures to achieve significant impactful change This assessment comes at a timely moment as COP27 is focused on implementation said M ns Nilsson Executive Director Stockholm Environment Institute SEI Through this report African governments the private sector non governmental organizations and local communities now have the scientific evidence on different options for action that can enable the continent to meet its development objectives while mitigating pollution and GHG emissions he added Without changes in policy the Assessment finds that greenhouse gas emissions will triple by 2063 causing a ripple effect outdoor air pollution will get worse causing about 930 000 premature deaths per year in 2030 and about 1 6 million premature deaths per year in 2063 Without action pressures on resources the environment and human health could increase inequalities and limit Africa s ability to achieve sustainable development
    Africa could prevent 880,000 deaths per year by taking action on air pollution and climate change – Report
    Africa1 week ago

    Africa could prevent 880,000 deaths per year by taking action on air pollution and climate change – Report

    An Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa released today by the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and the African Union Commission shows how African leaders can act quickly across 5 key areas—transport, residential, energy, agriculture, and waste—to fight climate change, prevent air pollution, and protect human health. 

    Air pollutants and greenhouse gases often share the same sources and can be even more dangerous when combined.

    By following the Assessment’s recommended actions to cut air pollution and prevent climate change, African governments could prevent 200,000 premature deaths per year by 2030 and 880,000 deaths per year by 2063; reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 55%, methane emissions by 74%, and nitrous oxide emissions 40% by 2063; improve food security by reducing desertification and increasing crop yields for rice, maize, soy, and wheat; and contribute significantly to global efforts to keep warming below 1.5°C, limiting the negative effects of regional climate change.

    “Air pollution is a climate and health emergency, in Africa and around the world.

    By cutting short-lived climate pollutants, we can slow down the worst effects of climate change in the very near term while protecting human lives.

    We must come together to work with African nations to reduce emissions from short-lived climate pollutants and eliminate air pollution as much as possible this decade,” said Inger Andersen, Executive Director of UNEP.

    Air pollution is the one of the greatest environmental threats to human health and is responsible for about 7 million deaths each year globally.

    Air pollutants and greenhouse gases often share the same sources and drivers, including fossil-fuel driven economic growth. 

    Some pollutants, including methane and black carbon, directly contribute to both impacts simultaneously.

    And because Africa is particularly vulnerable to climate change, preventing emissions from short-lived climate pollutants, like methane and black carbon, will help both save lives and protect the environment.

    “Air pollution and climate change are a deadly duo, and must be tackled together,” said Soipan Tuya, Cabinet Secretary for Environment and Forestry, Government of Kenya.

    “We welcome the release of this Assessment and its findings, which demonstrate how Kenya and African nations can achieve the air pollution and climate goals without compromising on the livelihoods and development objectives of the continent” she added.

    The Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa is the first-ever integrated assessment of air pollution and climate change for the continent and provides a robust scientific basis for action towards clean air in Africa.

    The report was developed by a pan-African team of researchers with contributions from international scientists and experts, coordinated by CCAC partner Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI).

    The Assessment’s recommendations are closely aligned with key priorities of Agenda 2063 and with the goals and targets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

    Nearly all the recommendations can be found in at least one African Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) and are currently identified as contributing to achieving national climate change mitigation goals.

    “This Assessment shows that Africa has a huge opportunity to continue developing sustainably, improve human well-being, and protect nature by investing in solutions to fight climate change and air pollution together,” said H.E. Amb Josefa Sacko, Commissioner of Agriculture, Rural Development, Blue Economy and Sustainable Environment, African Union Commission.

    “We look forward to working with countries and funders to develop the AUC’s Clean Air Program for implementation of the Assessment measures, as supported by the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment,” she added.

    The Assessment demonstrates a sustainable path forward, despite the huge increases in economic activity, urbanization, and population that will accompany development.

    Across five key areas, the Assessment suggests 37 measures that are cost-effective and proven, including: Shifting to cleaner vehicles and to safe and affordable public transport, as well as safe cycling and walking Transitioning to sustainable clean cooking and efficient household appliances for refrigeration and air conditioning in the residential sector Moving to renewable energy and increasing energy efficiency, capturing methane from oil, gas, and coal, and drastically reducing other GHG and SLCP emissions Reducing methane emissions from agriculture with better livestock and manure practices, reducing crop losses and food waste, and promoting healthy diets Developing better waste management systems, generating less organic waste, and reducing open burning African nations are responsible for a small fraction of global greenhouse gas emissions but bear an outsized burden of negative climate impacts.

    Importantly, the Assessment shows that countries outside of Africa must drastically reduce their own emissions to limit warming to 1.5°C, help Africa avoid the worst impacts of climate change, and reduce the cost of adaptation.

    Scientific, business, finance, non-state actors, governments, development, and other actors must join forces to pool resources and implement the Assessment’s measures to achieve significant, impactful change.

    “This assessment comes at a timely moment, as COP27 is focused on implementation,” said Måns Nilsson, Executive Director, Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI).

    “Through this report, African governments, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, and local communities now have the scientific evidence on different options for action that can enable the continent to meet its development objectives while mitigating pollution and GHG emissions,” he added.

    Without changes in policy, the Assessment finds that greenhouse gas emissions will triple by 2063, causing a ripple effect: outdoor air pollution will get worse, causing about 930,000 premature deaths per year in 2030 and about 1.6 million premature deaths per year in 2063.

    Without action, pressures on resources, the environment, and human health could increase inequalities and limit Africa’s ability to achieve sustainable development.

  •   At the 27th Conference of the Parties of the UNFCCC COP 27 ministers and leaders from more than 40 Climate and Clean Air Coalition CCAC countries came together alongside dozens of partners from intergovernmental organizations businesses scientific institutions and civil society organizations to announce new collaborative efforts report actions undertaken at home and reaffirm their commitment to slashing short lived climate pollutants SLCPs for human and planetary health As the devastating impacts of climate change have become increasingly more apparent around the globe and against a backdrop of the UN Environment s Emissions Gap report which indicates that we are on a 2 8 C track the CCAC s work to reduce SLCP emissions has become more important than ever Reducing short lived climate pollutants is the fastest solution the world has to reduce global temperatures From working to secure the Kigali Amendment to implementing the Global Methane Pledge CCAC has been an instrumental partner in enhancing ambition on these critical greenhouse gases We congratulate CCAC on a successful year and look forward to moving further and faster together in the year ahead said John Kerry U S Special Presidential Envoy for Climate The CCAC works to build a healthier safer and more prosperous world by crossing the bridge between climate and air quality action and to harness multiple benefits from the fast mitigation of short lived climate pollutants including the protection of ecosystems Reducing SLCP emissions is the most effective pathway to avoid 0 6 C of predicted global warming in the near term and slow sea level rise by 20 by mid century SLCP reductions can slow the rate of Arctic warming by up to two thirds and the rate of global warming by half Reducing short lived climate pollutants such as methane black carbon and HFC is one of the surest ways to cut the rate of warming in the near term slow self reinforcing feedback and avoid irreversible tipping points Thanks to the CCAC GMI and their partners these issues have been taken head on and I want to use this opportunity to call leaders for further action and commitment said Dr Kwaku Afriyie Minister of the Environment Science Technology and Innovation Ghana New Research At the Ministerial two new pieces of CCAC research were launched EU Commissioner for Energy Kadri Simson launched the new CCAC UNEP Baseline CH4 Emissions Projections through 2030 report which shows that the amount of methane in the atmosphere is increasing at record rates and makes an ever stronger case for urgent action Under business as usual scenarios methane emissions are projected to increase by 5 13 by 2030 from 2020 levels whereas they need to decline by at least 30 to meet the Global Methane Pledge If global emissions were cut by 30 as set out in Global Methane Pledge warming would be reduced by at least 0 2 degrees C between 2040 and 2070 compared to baseline projected methane emissions In addition to keeping the planet cool meeting the Global Methane Pledge would provide additional benefits worldwide through 2050 including Prevention of roughly 5 6 million premature deaths due to tropospheric ozone exposure Avoidance of 580 million tons of yield losses to wheat maize corn rice and soybeans Avoidance of 520 billion USD in losses due to non mortality health impacts forestry and agriculture Avoidance of 1600 billion lost work hours due to heat exposure Slow climate tipping points Alioune Ndoye Minister of the Environment Sustainable Development and of the Ecological Transition Senegal announced the CCAC s forthcoming Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa a collaboration between the African Union the CCAC and UNEP The Assessment shows how African leaders can act quickly to fight climate change prevent air pollution and protect human health By following the Assessment s recommended actions to cut air pollution and prevent climate change African governments can reap many benefits including Preventing 200 000 premature deaths per year by 2030 and 880 000 deaths per year by 2063 Cutting carbon dioxide emissions by 55 methane emissions by 74 and nitrous oxide emissions 40 by 2063 Improving food security by reducing desertification and increasing crop yields for rice maize soy and wheat Significantly contributing to global efforts to keep warming below 1 5 C and limiting the negative effects of regional climate change We are in a climate emergency Scientists tell us that the only way to protect people is to reduce the rate of warming now We can achieve this by focusing our efforts on actions that reduce super climate pollutants and build resilience said Minister Ndoye This is why Senegal joined the CCAC and proposed to create a Working Group to identify the best available accessible and affordable technologies to reduce methane Methane is 80 times more powerful than CO2 Reducing it is one of the best ways to stay below 1 5 C this decade which is critical for Africa At the Ministerial leaders reflected on progress made in the one year since the Global Methane Pledge was announced At this COP we saw additional countries joining bringing the count to 140 Over half of the top 20 methane emitters are now part of the Pledge representing half of global methane emissions and nearly two thirds of the global economy The CCAC is a core implementing partner of the Pledge serving as first port of call for participating countries and providing scientific analysis advocacy and technical and institutional strengthening support The science is clear We are sliding from climate chaos to climate disaster As we seek to scale up aggressive and ambitious climate action addressing short lived climate pollutants is vital said Inger Andersen Executive Director UNEP At COP26 in Glasgow the Climate and Clean Air Coalition launched the 2030 strategy aiming to step up implementation It is critical that we see countries now come together to build capacities tap into solutions that we already have and implement transformative mitigation actions Ministers also noted the importance of engaging subnational governments calling on all partners to solicit their engagement and further welcomed efforts to include gender youth and justice considerations into the CCAC s work Ministers recognized the CCAC s strong leadership role globally on Clean Air especially the role played in raising further awareness in the context of the International Day on Clean Air for blue skies and noted efforts supported by the CCAC on transboundary air pollution welcoming this work as a step to improve the science policy interface and further scientific advocacy for action on air quality Ministers also expressed support for increased energy efficiency in the cooling sector while transitioning away from HFCs welcoming the ratification of the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol from at least 6 nation states in 2022 More than half of the first 20 Parties who ratified the amendment and thus brought it into force were CCAC State Partners Additionally ministers acknowledged the CCAC s work with the private sector including a brand new guide to include air pollution into inventories and actions across supply chains New Announcements Ministers from several countries announced new commitments to the CCAC Trust Fund and encouraged countries in a position to do so to make additional pledges Among these was a pledge from the US CCAC co chair who said that the United States is proud to announce our intention to provide 3 million to the Climate and Clean Air Coalition subject to Congressional notification and the completion of domestic procedures Additionally the CCAC presented the brand new 2021 2022 Annual Report which looks at the work done over the past year to set the Coalition up to achieve the 2030 strategy Ministers encouraged developing countries to respond to the CCAC s Expression of Interest process to identify potential new projects that address CCAC priorities Ministers reaffirmed their commitments to supporting innovative new ways to advance mitigation Senegal suggested the formation of a Technology and Economic Assessment Panel on Methane which was met with approval The Coalition emphasized that the oil and gas sector will need to achieve the fastest and deepest methane emissions reductions to stay aligned with a 1 5C trajectory and reconfirmed their intent to continue to work within the sector to realize the significant mitigation potential Finally the Coalition of ministers requested that CCAC partners work together develop a concept for a program or activities including regional cooperation and agreements on clean air action to launch at the 2024 CCAC Ministerial
    Ministers from 40+ countries join forces for the 2022 Climate and Clean Air Ministerial
      At the 27th Conference of the Parties of the UNFCCC COP 27 ministers and leaders from more than 40 Climate and Clean Air Coalition CCAC countries came together alongside dozens of partners from intergovernmental organizations businesses scientific institutions and civil society organizations to announce new collaborative efforts report actions undertaken at home and reaffirm their commitment to slashing short lived climate pollutants SLCPs for human and planetary health As the devastating impacts of climate change have become increasingly more apparent around the globe and against a backdrop of the UN Environment s Emissions Gap report which indicates that we are on a 2 8 C track the CCAC s work to reduce SLCP emissions has become more important than ever Reducing short lived climate pollutants is the fastest solution the world has to reduce global temperatures From working to secure the Kigali Amendment to implementing the Global Methane Pledge CCAC has been an instrumental partner in enhancing ambition on these critical greenhouse gases We congratulate CCAC on a successful year and look forward to moving further and faster together in the year ahead said John Kerry U S Special Presidential Envoy for Climate The CCAC works to build a healthier safer and more prosperous world by crossing the bridge between climate and air quality action and to harness multiple benefits from the fast mitigation of short lived climate pollutants including the protection of ecosystems Reducing SLCP emissions is the most effective pathway to avoid 0 6 C of predicted global warming in the near term and slow sea level rise by 20 by mid century SLCP reductions can slow the rate of Arctic warming by up to two thirds and the rate of global warming by half Reducing short lived climate pollutants such as methane black carbon and HFC is one of the surest ways to cut the rate of warming in the near term slow self reinforcing feedback and avoid irreversible tipping points Thanks to the CCAC GMI and their partners these issues have been taken head on and I want to use this opportunity to call leaders for further action and commitment said Dr Kwaku Afriyie Minister of the Environment Science Technology and Innovation Ghana New Research At the Ministerial two new pieces of CCAC research were launched EU Commissioner for Energy Kadri Simson launched the new CCAC UNEP Baseline CH4 Emissions Projections through 2030 report which shows that the amount of methane in the atmosphere is increasing at record rates and makes an ever stronger case for urgent action Under business as usual scenarios methane emissions are projected to increase by 5 13 by 2030 from 2020 levels whereas they need to decline by at least 30 to meet the Global Methane Pledge If global emissions were cut by 30 as set out in Global Methane Pledge warming would be reduced by at least 0 2 degrees C between 2040 and 2070 compared to baseline projected methane emissions In addition to keeping the planet cool meeting the Global Methane Pledge would provide additional benefits worldwide through 2050 including Prevention of roughly 5 6 million premature deaths due to tropospheric ozone exposure Avoidance of 580 million tons of yield losses to wheat maize corn rice and soybeans Avoidance of 520 billion USD in losses due to non mortality health impacts forestry and agriculture Avoidance of 1600 billion lost work hours due to heat exposure Slow climate tipping points Alioune Ndoye Minister of the Environment Sustainable Development and of the Ecological Transition Senegal announced the CCAC s forthcoming Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa a collaboration between the African Union the CCAC and UNEP The Assessment shows how African leaders can act quickly to fight climate change prevent air pollution and protect human health By following the Assessment s recommended actions to cut air pollution and prevent climate change African governments can reap many benefits including Preventing 200 000 premature deaths per year by 2030 and 880 000 deaths per year by 2063 Cutting carbon dioxide emissions by 55 methane emissions by 74 and nitrous oxide emissions 40 by 2063 Improving food security by reducing desertification and increasing crop yields for rice maize soy and wheat Significantly contributing to global efforts to keep warming below 1 5 C and limiting the negative effects of regional climate change We are in a climate emergency Scientists tell us that the only way to protect people is to reduce the rate of warming now We can achieve this by focusing our efforts on actions that reduce super climate pollutants and build resilience said Minister Ndoye This is why Senegal joined the CCAC and proposed to create a Working Group to identify the best available accessible and affordable technologies to reduce methane Methane is 80 times more powerful than CO2 Reducing it is one of the best ways to stay below 1 5 C this decade which is critical for Africa At the Ministerial leaders reflected on progress made in the one year since the Global Methane Pledge was announced At this COP we saw additional countries joining bringing the count to 140 Over half of the top 20 methane emitters are now part of the Pledge representing half of global methane emissions and nearly two thirds of the global economy The CCAC is a core implementing partner of the Pledge serving as first port of call for participating countries and providing scientific analysis advocacy and technical and institutional strengthening support The science is clear We are sliding from climate chaos to climate disaster As we seek to scale up aggressive and ambitious climate action addressing short lived climate pollutants is vital said Inger Andersen Executive Director UNEP At COP26 in Glasgow the Climate and Clean Air Coalition launched the 2030 strategy aiming to step up implementation It is critical that we see countries now come together to build capacities tap into solutions that we already have and implement transformative mitigation actions Ministers also noted the importance of engaging subnational governments calling on all partners to solicit their engagement and further welcomed efforts to include gender youth and justice considerations into the CCAC s work Ministers recognized the CCAC s strong leadership role globally on Clean Air especially the role played in raising further awareness in the context of the International Day on Clean Air for blue skies and noted efforts supported by the CCAC on transboundary air pollution welcoming this work as a step to improve the science policy interface and further scientific advocacy for action on air quality Ministers also expressed support for increased energy efficiency in the cooling sector while transitioning away from HFCs welcoming the ratification of the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol from at least 6 nation states in 2022 More than half of the first 20 Parties who ratified the amendment and thus brought it into force were CCAC State Partners Additionally ministers acknowledged the CCAC s work with the private sector including a brand new guide to include air pollution into inventories and actions across supply chains New Announcements Ministers from several countries announced new commitments to the CCAC Trust Fund and encouraged countries in a position to do so to make additional pledges Among these was a pledge from the US CCAC co chair who said that the United States is proud to announce our intention to provide 3 million to the Climate and Clean Air Coalition subject to Congressional notification and the completion of domestic procedures Additionally the CCAC presented the brand new 2021 2022 Annual Report which looks at the work done over the past year to set the Coalition up to achieve the 2030 strategy Ministers encouraged developing countries to respond to the CCAC s Expression of Interest process to identify potential new projects that address CCAC priorities Ministers reaffirmed their commitments to supporting innovative new ways to advance mitigation Senegal suggested the formation of a Technology and Economic Assessment Panel on Methane which was met with approval The Coalition emphasized that the oil and gas sector will need to achieve the fastest and deepest methane emissions reductions to stay aligned with a 1 5C trajectory and reconfirmed their intent to continue to work within the sector to realize the significant mitigation potential Finally the Coalition of ministers requested that CCAC partners work together develop a concept for a program or activities including regional cooperation and agreements on clean air action to launch at the 2024 CCAC Ministerial
    Ministers from 40+ countries join forces for the 2022 Climate and Clean Air Ministerial
    Africa1 week ago

    Ministers from 40+ countries join forces for the 2022 Climate and Clean Air Ministerial

    At the 27th Conference of the Parties of the UNFCCC (COP 27), ministers and leaders from more than 40 Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) countries came together alongside dozens of partners from intergovernmental organizations, businesses, scientific institutions and civil society organizations to announce new collaborative efforts, report actions undertaken at home, and reaffirm their commitment to slashing short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) for human and planetary health.

    As the devastating impacts of climate change have become increasingly more apparent around the globe, and against a backdrop of the UN Environment’s Emissions Gap report which indicates that we are on a 2.8° C track, the CCAC’s work to reduce SLCP emissions has become more important than ever. 

    "Reducing short-lived climate pollutants is the fastest solution the world has to reduce global temperatures.

    From working to secure the Kigali Amendment to implementing the Global Methane Pledge, CCAC has been an instrumental partner in enhancing ambition on these critical greenhouse gases.

    We congratulate CCAC on a successful year and look forward to moving further and faster together in the year ahead," said John Kerry, U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for Climate. 

     The CCAC works to build a healthier, safer, and more prosperous world by crossing the bridge between climate and air quality action, and to harness multiple benefits from the fast mitigation of short-lived climate pollutants, including the protection of ecosystems.

    Reducing SLCP emissions is the most effective pathway to avoid 0.6 ̊C of predicted global warming in the near term and slow sea-level rise by 20% by mid-century.

    SLCP reductions can slow the rate of Arctic warming by up to two-thirds and the rate of global warming by half. 

    “Reducing short-lived climate pollutants such as methane, black carbon, and HFC is one of the surest ways to cut the rate of warming in the near-term, slow self-reinforcing feedback and avoid irreversible tipping points.

    Thanks to the CCAC, GMI and their partners, these issues have been taken head-on and I want to use this opportunity to call leaders for further action and commitment,” said Dr. Kwaku Afriyie, Minister of the Environment, Science, Technology, and Innovation, Ghana. 

     New Research  At the Ministerial, two new pieces of CCAC research were launched.

    EU Commissioner for Energy Kadri Simson launched the new CCAC-UNEP Baseline CH4 Emissions Projections through 2030 report, which shows that the amount of methane in the atmosphere is increasing at record rates and makes an ever-stronger case for urgent action: Under business-as-usual scenarios, methane emissions are projected to increase by 5-13% by 2030 from 2020 levels, whereas they need to decline by at least 30% to meet the Global Methane Pledge. 

      If global emissions were cut by 30% as set out in Global Methane Pledge, warming would be reduced by at least 0.2 degrees C between 2040 and 2070, compared to baseline projected methane emissions. 

    In addition to keeping the planet cool, meeting the Global Methane Pledge would provide additional benefits worldwide through 2050, including:  Prevention of roughly 5.6 million premature deaths due to tropospheric ozone exposure   Avoidance of ~580 million tons of yield losses to wheat, maize (corn), rice and soybeans   Avoidance of ~$520 billion USD in losses due to non-mortality health impacts, forestry, and agriculture   Avoidance of ~1600 billion lost work hours due to heat exposure  Slow climate tipping points Alioune Ndoye, Minister of the Environment, Sustainable Development and of the Ecological Transition, Senegal, announced the CCAC’s forthcoming Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution and Climate Change for Sustainable Development in Africa, a collaboration between the African Union, the CCAC, and UNEP.

    The Assessment shows how African leaders can act quickly to fight climate change, prevent air pollution, and protect human health.

    By following the Assessment’s recommended actions to cut air pollution and prevent climate change, African governments can reap many benefits, including:   Preventing 200,000 premature deaths per year by 2030 and 880,000 deaths per year by 2063   Cutting carbon dioxide emissions by 55%, methane emissions by 74%, and nitrous oxide emissions 40% by 2063   Improving food security by reducing desertification and increasing crop yields for rice, maize, soy, and wheat    Significantly contributing to global efforts to keep warming below 1.5°C and limiting the negative effects of regional climate change  “We are in a climate emergency.

    Scientists tell us that the only way to protect people is to reduce the rate of warming now.

    We can achieve this by focusing our efforts on actions that reduce super climate pollutants and build resilience,” said Minister Ndoye. 

    “This is why Senegal joined the CCAC and proposed to create a Working Group to identify the best available, accessible, and affordable technologies to reduce methane.

    Methane is 80 times more powerful than CO2.

    Reducing it is one of the best ways to stay below 1.5°C this decade, which is critical for Africa.” At the Ministerial, leaders reflected on progress made in the one year since the Global Methane Pledge was announced.

    At this COP, we saw additional countries joining, bringing the count to 140.

    Over half of the top 20 methane emitters are now part of the Pledge, representing half of global methane emissions and nearly two-thirds of the global economy.

    The CCAC is a core implementing partner of the Pledge, serving as first port of call for participating countries and providing scientific analysis, advocacy, and technical and institutional strengthening support. 

     “The science is clear.

    We are sliding from climate chaos to climate disaster.

    As we seek to scale up aggressive and ambitious climate action, addressing short-lived climate pollutants is vital,” said Inger Andersen, Executive Director, UNEP.

    “At COP26 in Glasgow, the Climate and Clean Air Coalition launched the 2030 strategy aiming to step up implementation.

    It is critical that we see countries now come together to build capacities, tap into solutions that we already have, and implement transformative mitigation actions.” Ministers also noted the importance of engaging subnational governments, calling on all partners to solicit their engagement, and further welcomed efforts to include gender, youth, and justice considerations into the CCAC’s work.

    Ministers recognized the CCAC’s strong leadership role globally on Clean Air, especially the role played in raising further awareness in the context of the International Day on Clean Air for blue skies, and noted efforts supported by the CCAC on transboundary air pollution, welcoming this work as a step to improve the science-policy interface and further scientific advocacy for action on air quality. 

     Ministers also expressed support for increased energy efficiency in the cooling sector while transitioning away from HFCs, welcoming the ratification of the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol from at least 6 nation states in 2022.

    More than half of the first 20 Parties who ratified the amendment and thus brought it into force were CCAC State Partners.

    Additionally, ministers acknowledged the CCAC’s work with the private sector, including a brand-new guide to include air pollution into inventories and actions across supply chains. 

    New Announcements Ministers from several countries announced new commitments to the CCAC Trust Fund, and encouraged countries in a position to do so to make additional pledges.

    Among these was a pledge from the US, CCAC co-chair, who said that the “United States is proud to announce our intention to provide $3 million to the Climate and Clean Air Coalition, subject to Congressional notification and the completion of domestic procedures.”  Additionally, the CCAC presented the brand-new 2021-2022 Annual Report, which looks at the work done over the past year to set the Coalition up to achieve the 2030 strategy.

    Ministers encouraged developing countries to respond to the CCAC’s Expression of Interest process to identify potential new projects that address CCAC priorities.

    Ministers reaffirmed their commitments to supporting innovative, new ways to advance mitigation.

    Senegal suggested the formation of a Technology and Economic Assessment Panel on Methane, which was met with approval.

    The Coalition emphasized that the oil and gas sector will need to achieve the fastest and deepest methane emissions reductions to stay aligned with a 1.5C trajectory, and reconfirmed their intent to continue to work within the sector to realize the significant mitigation potential.

    Finally, the Coalition of ministers requested that CCAC partners work together develop a concept for a program or activities, including regional cooperation and agreements, on ‘clean air action’ to launch at the 2024 CCAC Ministerial. 

     

  •  UN agencies have lamented the number of people in South Sudan who are going hungry noting that it is at the highest level ever The UN agencies said this on Thursday in their latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification IPC report The IPC report is the work of the Food and Agriculture Organisation FAO the World Food Programme WFP and UNICEF Hunger and malnutrition are on the rise in areas affected by flood drought and conflicts and some communities are likely to face starvation unless aid is sustained and climate adaptation measures are scaled up Roughly two thirds of the population or more than 7 7 million people will not have enough to eat during the lean season next April through July while 1 4 million children will be malnourished the report stated It was released on the same day the UN Environment Programme UNEP published a report that urges the international community to make climate adaptation a priority The record proportion of South Sudan s citizens facing crisis levels of food insecurity and malnourishment surpasses levels seen during conflicts in 2013 and in 2016 the report stated It noted that while violence poor macroeconomic conditions extreme climate events and spiralling costs of food and fuel had contributed to the crisis funding for humanitarian programmes had also declined despite the rise in needs We ve been in famine prevention mode all year and have staved off the worst outcomes but this is not enough South Sudan is on the frontlines of the climate crisis and day in day out families are losing their homes cattle fields and hope to extreme weather Without humanitarian food assistance millions more will find themselves in an increasingly dire situation and unable to provide even the most basic food for their families Makena Walker WFP Acting Country Director said in the report The world s youngest nation has been confronting a multi year flood that is exacerbating already high levels of hunger caused by on going conflicts and the global food crisis The flooding has heavily impacted central areas of the country which also have the highest levels of food insecurity FAO Representative Meshack Malo emphasised the critical need for livelihood support to boost self reliance in food production This potential exists he said as South Sudan produced some 840 000 tonnes of cereals in 2021 a difficult year with climate change floods conflict and other factors Despite marginal improvements in food security across some parts of the country the nutrition crisis is deepening he noted All counties except for one are showing deterioration in their nutrition situation through June 2023 including 44 counties where the situation is critical The UN agencies underscored the urgent need for funding warning that they would be unable to preposition humanitarian assistance in time for the next year which could push millions of families even deeper into hunger nannew NewsSourceCredit NAN
    UN agencies lament high level of hunger in South Sudan
     UN agencies have lamented the number of people in South Sudan who are going hungry noting that it is at the highest level ever The UN agencies said this on Thursday in their latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification IPC report The IPC report is the work of the Food and Agriculture Organisation FAO the World Food Programme WFP and UNICEF Hunger and malnutrition are on the rise in areas affected by flood drought and conflicts and some communities are likely to face starvation unless aid is sustained and climate adaptation measures are scaled up Roughly two thirds of the population or more than 7 7 million people will not have enough to eat during the lean season next April through July while 1 4 million children will be malnourished the report stated It was released on the same day the UN Environment Programme UNEP published a report that urges the international community to make climate adaptation a priority The record proportion of South Sudan s citizens facing crisis levels of food insecurity and malnourishment surpasses levels seen during conflicts in 2013 and in 2016 the report stated It noted that while violence poor macroeconomic conditions extreme climate events and spiralling costs of food and fuel had contributed to the crisis funding for humanitarian programmes had also declined despite the rise in needs We ve been in famine prevention mode all year and have staved off the worst outcomes but this is not enough South Sudan is on the frontlines of the climate crisis and day in day out families are losing their homes cattle fields and hope to extreme weather Without humanitarian food assistance millions more will find themselves in an increasingly dire situation and unable to provide even the most basic food for their families Makena Walker WFP Acting Country Director said in the report The world s youngest nation has been confronting a multi year flood that is exacerbating already high levels of hunger caused by on going conflicts and the global food crisis The flooding has heavily impacted central areas of the country which also have the highest levels of food insecurity FAO Representative Meshack Malo emphasised the critical need for livelihood support to boost self reliance in food production This potential exists he said as South Sudan produced some 840 000 tonnes of cereals in 2021 a difficult year with climate change floods conflict and other factors Despite marginal improvements in food security across some parts of the country the nutrition crisis is deepening he noted All counties except for one are showing deterioration in their nutrition situation through June 2023 including 44 counties where the situation is critical The UN agencies underscored the urgent need for funding warning that they would be unable to preposition humanitarian assistance in time for the next year which could push millions of families even deeper into hunger nannew NewsSourceCredit NAN
    UN agencies lament high level of hunger in South Sudan
    Foreign3 weeks ago

    UN agencies lament high level of hunger in South Sudan

    UN agencies have lamented the number of people in South Sudan who are going hungry, noting that it is at the highest level ever.

    The UN agencies said this on Thursday in their latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) report.

    The IPC report is the work of the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), the World Food Programme (WFP) and UNICEF.

    “Hunger and malnutrition are on the rise in areas affected by flood, drought and conflicts, and some communities are likely to face starvation unless aid is sustained, and climate adaptation measures are scaled up.

    “Roughly two-thirds of the population, or more than 7.7 million people, will not have enough to eat during the lean season next April through July, while 1.4 million children will be malnourished,’’ the report stated.

    It was released on the same day the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) published a report that urges the international community to make climate adaptation a priority.

    The record proportion of South Sudan’s citizens facing crisis levels of food insecurity and malnourishment surpasses levels seen during conflicts in 2013 and in 2016, the report stated.

    It noted that while violence, poor macroeconomic conditions, extreme climate events, and spiralling costs of food and fuel had contributed to the crisis, funding for humanitarian programmes had also declined despite the rise in needs.

    “We’ve been in famine prevention mode all-year and have staved off the worst outcomes, but this is not enough.

    “South Sudan is on the frontlines of the climate crisis and day in, day out families are losing their homes, cattle, fields and hope to extreme weather.

    “Without humanitarian food assistance, millions more will find themselves in an increasingly dire situation and unable to provide even the most basic food for their families,’’ Makena Walker, WFP Acting Country Director, said in the report.

    The world’s youngest nation has been confronting a multi-year flood that is exacerbating already high levels of hunger caused by on-going conflicts and the global food crisis.

    The flooding has heavily impacted central areas of the country, which also have the highest levels of food insecurity.

    FAO Representative Meshack Malo emphasised the critical need for livelihood support to boost self-reliance in food production.

    This potential exists, he said, as South Sudan produced some 840,000 tonnes of cereals in 2021, a difficult year with climate change, floods, conflict and other factors.

    Despite marginal improvements in food security across some parts of the country, the nutrition crisis is deepening, he noted.

    All counties, except for one, are showing deterioration in their nutrition situation through June 2023, including 44 counties where the situation is critical.

    The UN agencies underscored the urgent need for funding, warning that they would be unable to preposition humanitarian assistance in time for the next year, which could push millions of families even deeper into hunger.

    nannew.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  Dr Richard Munang Deputy Regional Director of the United Nations Environment Programme UNEP has said that Biosecurity threats cost Africa over US 420 billion Munang disclosed this on Tuesday in Lagos at the 8th African Conference on Health and Biosecurity with the theme Strengthening Health Security and Mitigating Biological Threats in Africa The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the Lagos State Government through its Ministry of Health partnered with a non governmental organisation the Global Emerging Pathogens Treatment GET Consortium to organise the conference He said that the urgency for solutions is at an all time high and the urgency for one health cannot be overemphasized He also disclosed that Africa s biosecurity and biosafety capacity is scored at only 32 per cent The Deputy Regional Director said that the One health approach which integrates human environmental animal planet and health were critical to averting managing and treating biosafety risks on the continent He said that climate change pollution and Environmental degradation are aggravating infectious diseases in Africa and globally He said that the solution was One Health an integrated approach complementing human medicine According to him our UNEP work on climate action nature action and pollution action offers a strategic pathway for One Health He said the contribution of the environment as a solution to biosecurity threats cuts across controlling temperatures which catalyse the growth of pathogens restoring degraded areas to minimise the impact of habitat loss that increases the risk of pathogens transfer to humans Prof Akin Abayomi the Lagos State Commissioner for Health said that the conference is the fourth in a series of conferences organised by the Lagos State Government in partnership with GET Abayomi said that the conference seeks to develop a biosecurity roadmap and increase the African continent s resilience towards building the capacity to deal with pathogens of high consequence He said that the conference would ensure that the continent strengthens its health security to mitigate biological threats and consolidate the gains made in tackling different emerging infectious diseases A city like Lagos is vulnerable to biological threats making it important for us to improve its preparedness against biological threats and build appropriate infrastructure to manage and mitigate dangerous pathogens of high consequence he explained According to him the continents have continued to work to build the appropriate infrastructure train and improve the capacity of appropriate personnel to be able to manage dangerous pathogens such as Ebola Lassa Fever COVID Yellow Fever Marburg Fever and any agent that is considered to be a pathogen of high consequence Dr Ayodotun Bobadoye Chief Operating Officer of GET Consortium said the conference brought together policy makers scientists academia non governmental organizations and security experts both within and outside the country Bobadoye said that the conference discussed how the continent can effectively mitigate the impact of emerging biosecurity threats He called on governments to take the issue of biosecurity very seriously He said that with the increase in frequency and intensity of biological threats in infectious diseases in recent years there is no better time to have the conference to discuss mitigating biological threats than now NAN recalls that no fewer than 400 global health security and environmental experts including policy makers and researchers in various fields from Africa and continents around the world attended the conference The conference has been organized in different cities in Africa in the last eight years in Accra Ghana Freetown Sierra Leone Dakar Senegal and in Abuja Nigeria NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Biosecurity threats cost Africa over 0billion, says UNEP
     Dr Richard Munang Deputy Regional Director of the United Nations Environment Programme UNEP has said that Biosecurity threats cost Africa over US 420 billion Munang disclosed this on Tuesday in Lagos at the 8th African Conference on Health and Biosecurity with the theme Strengthening Health Security and Mitigating Biological Threats in Africa The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the Lagos State Government through its Ministry of Health partnered with a non governmental organisation the Global Emerging Pathogens Treatment GET Consortium to organise the conference He said that the urgency for solutions is at an all time high and the urgency for one health cannot be overemphasized He also disclosed that Africa s biosecurity and biosafety capacity is scored at only 32 per cent The Deputy Regional Director said that the One health approach which integrates human environmental animal planet and health were critical to averting managing and treating biosafety risks on the continent He said that climate change pollution and Environmental degradation are aggravating infectious diseases in Africa and globally He said that the solution was One Health an integrated approach complementing human medicine According to him our UNEP work on climate action nature action and pollution action offers a strategic pathway for One Health He said the contribution of the environment as a solution to biosecurity threats cuts across controlling temperatures which catalyse the growth of pathogens restoring degraded areas to minimise the impact of habitat loss that increases the risk of pathogens transfer to humans Prof Akin Abayomi the Lagos State Commissioner for Health said that the conference is the fourth in a series of conferences organised by the Lagos State Government in partnership with GET Abayomi said that the conference seeks to develop a biosecurity roadmap and increase the African continent s resilience towards building the capacity to deal with pathogens of high consequence He said that the conference would ensure that the continent strengthens its health security to mitigate biological threats and consolidate the gains made in tackling different emerging infectious diseases A city like Lagos is vulnerable to biological threats making it important for us to improve its preparedness against biological threats and build appropriate infrastructure to manage and mitigate dangerous pathogens of high consequence he explained According to him the continents have continued to work to build the appropriate infrastructure train and improve the capacity of appropriate personnel to be able to manage dangerous pathogens such as Ebola Lassa Fever COVID Yellow Fever Marburg Fever and any agent that is considered to be a pathogen of high consequence Dr Ayodotun Bobadoye Chief Operating Officer of GET Consortium said the conference brought together policy makers scientists academia non governmental organizations and security experts both within and outside the country Bobadoye said that the conference discussed how the continent can effectively mitigate the impact of emerging biosecurity threats He called on governments to take the issue of biosecurity very seriously He said that with the increase in frequency and intensity of biological threats in infectious diseases in recent years there is no better time to have the conference to discuss mitigating biological threats than now NAN recalls that no fewer than 400 global health security and environmental experts including policy makers and researchers in various fields from Africa and continents around the world attended the conference The conference has been organized in different cities in Africa in the last eight years in Accra Ghana Freetown Sierra Leone Dakar Senegal and in Abuja Nigeria NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Biosecurity threats cost Africa over 0billion, says UNEP
    General news3 weeks ago

    Biosecurity threats cost Africa over $420billion, says UNEP

    Dr Richard Munang, Deputy Regional Director of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), has said that Biosecurity threats cost Africa over US$ 420 billion.

    Munang disclosed this on Tuesday in Lagos at the 8th African Conference on Health and Biosecurity, with the theme: “Strengthening Health Security and Mitigating Biological Threats in Africa”.

    The News Agency of Nigeria reports that the Lagos State Government, through its Ministry of Health, partnered with a non-governmental organisation, the Global Emerging Pathogens Treatment (GET) Consortium, to organise the conference.

    He said that the urgency for solutions is at an all-time high and the urgency for one-health cannot be overemphasized.

    He also disclosed that Africa’s biosecurity and biosafety capacity is scored at only 32 per cent.

    The Deputy Regional Director said that the One health approach, which integrates human, environmental, animal, planet and health, were critical to averting, managing and treating biosafety risks on the continent.

    He said that climate change, pollution, and Environmental degradation are aggravating infectious diseases in Africa and globally.

    He said that the solution was One Health, an integrated approach complementing human medicine.

    According to him, “our UNEP work on climate action nature action and pollution action offers a strategic pathway for One Health.

    ” He said the contribution of the environment as a solution to biosecurity threats cuts across controlling temperatures which catalyse the growth of pathogens, restoring degraded areas to minimise the impact of habitat loss that increases the risk of pathogens transfer to humans.

    Prof. Akin Abayomi, the Lagos State Commissioner for Health, said that the conference is the fourth in a series of conferences organised by the Lagos State Government in partnership with GET.

    Abayomi said that the conference seeks to develop a biosecurity roadmap and increase the African continent’s resilience towards building the capacity to deal with pathogens of high consequence.

    He said that the conference would ensure that the continent strengthens its health security to mitigate biological threats and consolidate the gains made in tackling different emerging infectious diseases.

    “A city like Lagos is vulnerable to biological threats making it important for us to improve its preparedness against biological threats and build appropriate infrastructure to manage and mitigate dangerous pathogens of high consequence,” he explained.

    According to him, the continents have continued to work to build the appropriate infrastructure, train and improve the capacity of appropriate personnel to be able to manage dangerous pathogens such as Ebola, Lassa Fever, COVID, Yellow Fever, Marburg Fever and any agent that is considered to be a pathogen of high consequence.

    Dr Ayodotun Bobadoye, Chief Operating Officer of GET Consortium, said the conference brought together policy makers, scientists, academia, non-governmental organizations, and security experts both within and outside the country.

    Bobadoye said that the conference discussed how the continent can effectively mitigate the impact of emerging biosecurity threats.

    He called on governments to take the issue of biosecurity very seriously.

    He said that with the increase in frequency and intensity of biological threats in infectious diseases in recent years, there is no better time to have the conference to discuss mitigating biological threats than now.

    NAN recalls that no fewer than 400 global health, security and environmental experts, including policy makers and researchers in various fields from Africa and continents around the world, attended the conference.

    The conference has been organized in different cities in Africa in the last eight years; in Accra-Ghana, Freetown-Sierra Leone, Dakar-Senegal and in Abuja-Nigeria.


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •  The Director General Nigerian Meteorological Agency NiMET Prof Mansur Matazu on Thursday charged architects to design buidings that could cope with the effects of climate change Matazu said this while delivering a keynote address virtually at the 2022 Association of Consulting Architects of Nigeria ACAN symposium and business forum in Lagos with the theme Rethinking Buildings For Climate Change He explained that climate change was an existential threat to mankind globally and its effects were already evident in Nigeria ranging from temperature increase increased rainfall variability sea level rise flooding drought and desertification Modern architectural slogan should be designing for climate change as climate change would render most magnificient buildings a waste and inhabitable in future Night temperature hitherto known to be minimum are becoming high making sleep difficult and uncomfortable in most houses he said According to him building operations are responsible for 27 per cent of Greenhouse Gasses GHG and the potential of the building sector as effective GHG emission reduction agent is significant The NiMET boss stated that the 2021 UNEP and Global Status report revealed that 27 per cent of building operations 10 per cent of building materials and construction and 10 per cent of other construction industry s activities contributed to the annual global carbondioxide emission Matazu noted that buildings had relatively longer lifespan and action taken to reduce carbon footprint from design to construction would have the desired effect The professor said for climate resilient buildings the number of hours air conditioners and bulbs were used must be reduced through the use of natural day light during the day Design buildings with cross ventilation and natural gas to cool off the house thereby reducing energy while the roof must be designed to withstand and cope with high intensity rainfall ACAN members must also trade off between climate resilient buildings and climate risk fanciful buildings while advocating that individuals and communities rethink importation of foreign designs Adopt architectural designs influenced by culture local climate and weather pattern that promote natural ventilation air movement within the house in hot and dry climate he said He said ACAN members should take advantage of the NiMET products and services such as Wind Rose Wind Forecast which predicted weather conditions for proper planning of construction activities The DG assured that NiMET would continue to support the built environment by providing weather forecast early warning and detection mechanism that would guide the operations of practitioners Matazu also urged the federal government to emphasise and approve only climate Smart Designs and Climate Smart Housing Estates CSHE through policy and regulation In his address Mr Chikezie Nwosu Managing Director Watersmith Petroman Oil Ltd said architects must work towards designing buildings with less or zero carbon emission by considering the manufacturing process and certification of materials for buildings Nwosu also an engineer stated that there must be partnership between the energy and construction industries to ensure that sustainable and renewable energy was delivered into buildings While the energy sector ensures that sustainable and renewable energy is delivered into buildings architects must ensure that the buildings designed are in accordance with energy efficiency and conservative guidelines he said In his welcome address Mr Ayoola Onajide president ACAN Nigeria said the symposium was organised in furtherance of the objective of promoting architectural practice at its highest level in the country Onajide stated the recent flooding in Nigeria though blamed on the opening of the dams in Camereon was a ramification of climate change We are in a new world and as Architects must contribute to solving the ever important problems of climate change We also strive to protect the society from quacks and unqualified architects and firms who offer services in our country without following the law and ethics of the profession the ACAN president said NewsSourceCredit NAN
    NiMET DG tasks architects on climate resilient buildings
     The Director General Nigerian Meteorological Agency NiMET Prof Mansur Matazu on Thursday charged architects to design buidings that could cope with the effects of climate change Matazu said this while delivering a keynote address virtually at the 2022 Association of Consulting Architects of Nigeria ACAN symposium and business forum in Lagos with the theme Rethinking Buildings For Climate Change He explained that climate change was an existential threat to mankind globally and its effects were already evident in Nigeria ranging from temperature increase increased rainfall variability sea level rise flooding drought and desertification Modern architectural slogan should be designing for climate change as climate change would render most magnificient buildings a waste and inhabitable in future Night temperature hitherto known to be minimum are becoming high making sleep difficult and uncomfortable in most houses he said According to him building operations are responsible for 27 per cent of Greenhouse Gasses GHG and the potential of the building sector as effective GHG emission reduction agent is significant The NiMET boss stated that the 2021 UNEP and Global Status report revealed that 27 per cent of building operations 10 per cent of building materials and construction and 10 per cent of other construction industry s activities contributed to the annual global carbondioxide emission Matazu noted that buildings had relatively longer lifespan and action taken to reduce carbon footprint from design to construction would have the desired effect The professor said for climate resilient buildings the number of hours air conditioners and bulbs were used must be reduced through the use of natural day light during the day Design buildings with cross ventilation and natural gas to cool off the house thereby reducing energy while the roof must be designed to withstand and cope with high intensity rainfall ACAN members must also trade off between climate resilient buildings and climate risk fanciful buildings while advocating that individuals and communities rethink importation of foreign designs Adopt architectural designs influenced by culture local climate and weather pattern that promote natural ventilation air movement within the house in hot and dry climate he said He said ACAN members should take advantage of the NiMET products and services such as Wind Rose Wind Forecast which predicted weather conditions for proper planning of construction activities The DG assured that NiMET would continue to support the built environment by providing weather forecast early warning and detection mechanism that would guide the operations of practitioners Matazu also urged the federal government to emphasise and approve only climate Smart Designs and Climate Smart Housing Estates CSHE through policy and regulation In his address Mr Chikezie Nwosu Managing Director Watersmith Petroman Oil Ltd said architects must work towards designing buildings with less or zero carbon emission by considering the manufacturing process and certification of materials for buildings Nwosu also an engineer stated that there must be partnership between the energy and construction industries to ensure that sustainable and renewable energy was delivered into buildings While the energy sector ensures that sustainable and renewable energy is delivered into buildings architects must ensure that the buildings designed are in accordance with energy efficiency and conservative guidelines he said In his welcome address Mr Ayoola Onajide president ACAN Nigeria said the symposium was organised in furtherance of the objective of promoting architectural practice at its highest level in the country Onajide stated the recent flooding in Nigeria though blamed on the opening of the dams in Camereon was a ramification of climate change We are in a new world and as Architects must contribute to solving the ever important problems of climate change We also strive to protect the society from quacks and unqualified architects and firms who offer services in our country without following the law and ethics of the profession the ACAN president said NewsSourceCredit NAN
    NiMET DG tasks architects on climate resilient buildings
    Economy4 weeks ago

    NiMET DG tasks architects on climate resilient buildings

    The Director-General, Nigerian Meteorological Agency (NiMET) Prof. Mansur Matazu, on Thursday charged architects to design buidings that could cope with the effects of climate change.

    Matazu said this while delivering a keynote address virtually at the 2022 Association of Consulting Architects of Nigeria (ACAN) symposium and business forum in Lagos, with the theme: ‘Rethinking Buildings For Climate Change.

    ’ He explained that climate change was an existential threat to mankind globally and its effects were already evident in Nigeria, ranging from temperature increase, increased rainfall variability, sea level rise, flooding, drought and desertification.

    “Modern architectural slogan should be ‘designing for climate change’ as climate change would render most magnificient buildings a waste and inhabitable in future.

    “Night temperature hitherto known to be minimum are becoming high, making sleep difficult and uncomfortable in most houses,” he said.

    According to him, building operations are responsible for 27 per cent of Greenhouse Gasses (GHG) and the potential of the building sector as effective GHG emission reduction agent is significant.

    The NiMET boss stated that the 2021 UNEP and Global Status report revealed that 27 per cent of building operations, 10 per cent of building materials and construction, and 10 per cent of other construction industry’s activities contributed to the annual global carbondioxide emission.

    Matazu noted that buildings had relatively longer lifespan and action taken to reduce carbon footprint from design to construction would have the desired effect.

    The professor said for climate resilient buildings, the number of hours air conditioners and bulbs were used must be reduced through the use of natural day light during the day.

    “Design buildings with cross ventilation and natural gas to cool off the house, thereby reducing energy while the roof must be designed to withstand and cope with high intensity rainfall.

    “ACAN members must also trade off between climate resilient buildings and climate risk fanciful buildings, while advocating that individuals and communities rethink importation of foreign designs.

    “Adopt architectural designs influenced by culture, local climate and weather pattern that promote natural ventilation, air movement within the house in hot and dry climate,” he said.

    He said ACAN members should take advantage of the NiMET products and services such as Wind Rose, Wind Forecast, which predicted weather conditions for proper planning of construction activities.

    The DG assured that NiMET would continue to support the built environment by providing weather forecast, early warning and detection mechanism that would guide the operations of practitioners.

    Matazu also urged the federal government to emphasise and approve only climate Smart Designs and Climate Smart Housing Estates (CSHE) through policy and regulation.

    In his address, Mr Chikezie Nwosu, Managing Director, Watersmith Petroman Oil Ltd., said architects must work towards designing buildings with less or zero carbon emission by considering the manufacturing process and certification of materials for buildings.

    Nwosu, also an engineer, stated that there must be partnership between the energy and construction industries to ensure that sustainable and renewable energy was delivered into buildings.

    “While the energy sector ensures that sustainable and renewable energy is delivered into buildings, architects must ensure that the buildings’ designed are in accordance with energy efficiency and conservative guidelines,” he said.

    In his welcome address, Mr Ayoola Onajide, president, ACAN Nigeria, said the symposium was organised in furtherance of the objective of promoting architectural practice at its highest level in the country.

    Onajide stated the recent flooding in Nigeria, though blamed on the opening of the dams in Camereon, was a ramification of climate change.

    “We are in a new world and as Architects must contribute to solving the ever important problems of climate change.

    “We also strive to protect the society from quacks and unqualified architects and firms who offer services in our country without following the law and ethics of the profession,” the ACAN president said. 


    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   The United Nations Environment Program UNEP and the Green Finance Institute GFI are partnering to present a special podcast series to highlight the role of finance and natural climate solutions in the run up to COP27 This five episode series Financing Nature COP27 Special will raise awareness of the need for private finance to achieve the positive results for nature that we urgently need for climate mitigation and adaptation The first episode will air today Wednesday 5 October and will feature Sagarika Chatterjee Secretary of the Glasgow Finance Alliance for Net Zero GFANZ and Finance Lead Climate Action Champions UNEP has identified that if the world is to meet its climate change biodiversity and land degradation goals it needs to close a 4 1 trillion financing gap in nature by 2050 The stakes are higher than ever biodiversity and nature must be at the center of attention forefront of the COP27 climate agenda Egypt represents a unique opportunity to accelerate the implementation of effective nature positive solutions for people economies and the well being of future generations said Susan Gardner Director of the UNEP Division of Ecosystems Investments in nature restoration protection and nature based solutions are increasing but not on the scale required to address the interdependent crises of climate change and biodiversity loss We can and must channel private capital into nature based solutions This will require policy and regulatory support catalytic capital and financial innovation Ahead of COP27 in Egypt Financing Nature COP27 Special will showcase examples of where this is already happening and discuss what we need to do collectively to mobilize capital at scale said Dr Rhian Mari Thomas Executive Director of GFI Financial nature COP27 Special will feature leading voices and examples of people offering solutions on the ground This includes Episode 1 Sagarika Chatterjee GFANZ Secretariat and Finance Leader Climate Action Champions and Jos Pugas Partner and ESG Executive Director of JGP Asset and signatory to the Innovative Finance Initiative for the Cerrado Amazon and Chaco IFACC The IFACC initiative is working to increase innovative financing for deforestation and conversion free agricultural production in South America Episode 2 Andrew Deutz Director of Global Policy Institutions and Conservation Financing at The Nature Conservancy and Yasmine Sagita Director of Sustainability PT Royal Lestari Utama RLU presenting the work of the Tropical Landscape Finance Fund with sustainability bonds and blended finance in Indonesia Episode 3 Kaddu Sebbunya CEO African Wildlife Foundation and David Cheboriot E4Impact Business Support Organization for The Restoration Factory an initiative working to unlock and increase investment in sustainable land use and forest management in Africa Episode 4 Karen Sack Executive Director Ocean Risk and Resilience Action Alliance and Yabanex Batista Deputy Director of the United Nations Global Team on the Global Coral Reef Fund a catalytic financing instrument for reef positive investment projects Episode 5 Susan Gardner Director Ecosystems Division UNEP
    The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the Green Finance Institute partner on nature podcast series ahead of COP27
      The United Nations Environment Program UNEP and the Green Finance Institute GFI are partnering to present a special podcast series to highlight the role of finance and natural climate solutions in the run up to COP27 This five episode series Financing Nature COP27 Special will raise awareness of the need for private finance to achieve the positive results for nature that we urgently need for climate mitigation and adaptation The first episode will air today Wednesday 5 October and will feature Sagarika Chatterjee Secretary of the Glasgow Finance Alliance for Net Zero GFANZ and Finance Lead Climate Action Champions UNEP has identified that if the world is to meet its climate change biodiversity and land degradation goals it needs to close a 4 1 trillion financing gap in nature by 2050 The stakes are higher than ever biodiversity and nature must be at the center of attention forefront of the COP27 climate agenda Egypt represents a unique opportunity to accelerate the implementation of effective nature positive solutions for people economies and the well being of future generations said Susan Gardner Director of the UNEP Division of Ecosystems Investments in nature restoration protection and nature based solutions are increasing but not on the scale required to address the interdependent crises of climate change and biodiversity loss We can and must channel private capital into nature based solutions This will require policy and regulatory support catalytic capital and financial innovation Ahead of COP27 in Egypt Financing Nature COP27 Special will showcase examples of where this is already happening and discuss what we need to do collectively to mobilize capital at scale said Dr Rhian Mari Thomas Executive Director of GFI Financial nature COP27 Special will feature leading voices and examples of people offering solutions on the ground This includes Episode 1 Sagarika Chatterjee GFANZ Secretariat and Finance Leader Climate Action Champions and Jos Pugas Partner and ESG Executive Director of JGP Asset and signatory to the Innovative Finance Initiative for the Cerrado Amazon and Chaco IFACC The IFACC initiative is working to increase innovative financing for deforestation and conversion free agricultural production in South America Episode 2 Andrew Deutz Director of Global Policy Institutions and Conservation Financing at The Nature Conservancy and Yasmine Sagita Director of Sustainability PT Royal Lestari Utama RLU presenting the work of the Tropical Landscape Finance Fund with sustainability bonds and blended finance in Indonesia Episode 3 Kaddu Sebbunya CEO African Wildlife Foundation and David Cheboriot E4Impact Business Support Organization for The Restoration Factory an initiative working to unlock and increase investment in sustainable land use and forest management in Africa Episode 4 Karen Sack Executive Director Ocean Risk and Resilience Action Alliance and Yabanex Batista Deputy Director of the United Nations Global Team on the Global Coral Reef Fund a catalytic financing instrument for reef positive investment projects Episode 5 Susan Gardner Director Ecosystems Division UNEP
    The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the Green Finance Institute partner on nature podcast series ahead of COP27
    Africa2 months ago

    The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the Green Finance Institute partner on nature podcast series ahead of COP27

    The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the Green Finance Institute (GFI) are partnering to present a special podcast series to highlight the role of finance and natural climate solutions in the run-up to COP27.

    This five-episode series, Financing Nature: COP27 Special, will raise awareness of the need for private finance to achieve the positive results for nature that we urgently need for climate mitigation and adaptation.

    The first episode will air today, Wednesday 5 October, and will feature Sagarika Chatterjee, Secretary of the Glasgow Finance Alliance for Net Zero (GFANZ) and Finance Lead, Climate Action Champions.

    “UNEP has identified that if the world is to meet its climate change, biodiversity and land degradation goals, it needs to close a $4.1 trillion financing gap in nature by 2050.

    The stakes are higher than ever.

    , biodiversity and nature must be at the center of attention.

    forefront of the COP27 climate agenda.

    Egypt represents a unique opportunity to accelerate the implementation of effective nature-positive solutions for people, economies and the well-being of future generations,” said Susan Gardner, Director of the UNEP Division of Ecosystems.

    Investments in nature restoration, protection and nature-based solutions are increasing, but not on the scale required to address the interdependent crises of climate change and biodiversity loss.

    “We can and must channel private capital into nature-based solutions.

    This will require policy and regulatory support, catalytic capital, and financial innovation.

    Ahead of COP27 in Egypt, Financing Nature: COP27 Special will showcase examples of where this is already happening and discuss what we need to do collectively to mobilize capital at scale,” said Dr. Rhian-Mari Thomas, Executive Director of GFI.

    Financial nature: COP27 Special will feature leading voices and examples of people offering solutions on the ground.

    This includes: Episode 1: Sagarika Chatterjee, GFANZ Secretariat and Finance Leader, Climate Action Champions and José Pugas, Partner and ESG Executive Director of JGP Asset and signatory to the Innovative Finance Initiative for the Cerrado Amazon and Chaco (IFACC) .

    The IFACC initiative is working to increase innovative financing for deforestation- and conversion-free agricultural production in South America Episode 2: Andrew Deutz, Director of Global Policy, Institutions and Conservation Financing at The Nature Conservancy and Yasmine Sagita, Director of Sustainability, PT Royal Lestari Utama (RLU), presenting the work of the Tropical Landscape Finance Fund with sustainability bonds and blended finance in Indonesia.

    Episode 3: Kaddu Sebbunya, CEO, African Wildlife Foundation and David Cheboriot, E4Impact, Business Support Organization for The Restoration Factory, an initiative working to unlock and increase investment in sustainable land use and forest management in Africa.

    Episode 4: Karen Sack, Executive Director, Ocean Risk and Resilience Action Alliance and Yabanex Batista, Deputy Director of the United Nations Global Team on the Global Coral Reef Fund, a catalytic financing instrument for reef-positive investment projects.

    Episode 5: Susan Gardner, Director, Ecosystems Division, UNEP

  •   In C te d Ivoire the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO celebrated in Niaga Sassandra department the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem through the Coastal Fisheries Initiative in West Africa IFC WA Dr Yacoub Issola of the Abidjan Convention coordinator of the mangrove component of the IPC AO project took this important opportunity to invite all localities with mangroves in C te d Ivoire to follow the successful model of the Ni ga people Unlike other towns in Sassandra Niaga is one of the towns that has managed to preserve its mangroves in their natural state due to their uses and customs For this reason we have chosen this town to host the first edition of the International Conservation Day of the Mangrove Ecosystem to encourage and show our gratitude to the local population for their efforts to protect this unique special and fragile ecosystem he said Mr Lamine Coulibaly Prefect of the Gb kl region Prefect of the Sassandra department invited the women of the region to contribute to the preservation of the mangroves by putting an end to the use of the mangroves for smoking fish In order to encourage the people of Nega to continue their efforts to conserve the mangrove and keep the town clean they received from the ICP AO project a large batch of 132 item maintenance equipment consisting of wheelbarrows dustbins boots rakes machetes and shovels worth an estimated CFAF 3 500 000 The donation was presented in the presence of many administrative authorities including the departmental director of the Ministry of Water and Forests who oversees mangrove management In 2000 2020 mangrove forests increased by 2 7 2 at project sites in Senegal while they decreased by 10 in C te d Ivoire On the sidelines of this official celebration a workshop on the restitution of various mangrove studies carried out by the IPC AO project was organized in the conference room at Sassandra Landing in the presence of some forty stakeholders including artisanal fishermen and women processors These studies conducted over the period 2000 2020 revealed that mangrove forests increased by 2 72 in IPC AO project sites in Senegal while they decreased by 10 in C te d Ivoire The studies also listed the factors of destruction such as agriculture with the expansion of export plantations infrastructure construction roads ports urbanization and especially logging for various uses including smoking of fish products If nothing is done to protect them all mangrove areas will disappear and with them all the biodiversity they contain with their ecosystem functions goods and services that they provide to local populations to C te d Ivoire and to humanity he said Dr Issola warned Mangrove forests are typical ecosystems of tropical and subtropical areas These ecosystems are vital for the conservation of various animal and plant species and in the fight against coastal erosion and climate change However they are one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world so steps are being taken to protect them The IPC AO project is funded by the Global Environment Facility GEF and is implemented in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Program UNEP through the Abidjan Convention
    Mangrove conservation in Côte d’Ivoire: the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) share a successful model in the village of Nega
      In C te d Ivoire the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO celebrated in Niaga Sassandra department the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem through the Coastal Fisheries Initiative in West Africa IFC WA Dr Yacoub Issola of the Abidjan Convention coordinator of the mangrove component of the IPC AO project took this important opportunity to invite all localities with mangroves in C te d Ivoire to follow the successful model of the Ni ga people Unlike other towns in Sassandra Niaga is one of the towns that has managed to preserve its mangroves in their natural state due to their uses and customs For this reason we have chosen this town to host the first edition of the International Conservation Day of the Mangrove Ecosystem to encourage and show our gratitude to the local population for their efforts to protect this unique special and fragile ecosystem he said Mr Lamine Coulibaly Prefect of the Gb kl region Prefect of the Sassandra department invited the women of the region to contribute to the preservation of the mangroves by putting an end to the use of the mangroves for smoking fish In order to encourage the people of Nega to continue their efforts to conserve the mangrove and keep the town clean they received from the ICP AO project a large batch of 132 item maintenance equipment consisting of wheelbarrows dustbins boots rakes machetes and shovels worth an estimated CFAF 3 500 000 The donation was presented in the presence of many administrative authorities including the departmental director of the Ministry of Water and Forests who oversees mangrove management In 2000 2020 mangrove forests increased by 2 7 2 at project sites in Senegal while they decreased by 10 in C te d Ivoire On the sidelines of this official celebration a workshop on the restitution of various mangrove studies carried out by the IPC AO project was organized in the conference room at Sassandra Landing in the presence of some forty stakeholders including artisanal fishermen and women processors These studies conducted over the period 2000 2020 revealed that mangrove forests increased by 2 72 in IPC AO project sites in Senegal while they decreased by 10 in C te d Ivoire The studies also listed the factors of destruction such as agriculture with the expansion of export plantations infrastructure construction roads ports urbanization and especially logging for various uses including smoking of fish products If nothing is done to protect them all mangrove areas will disappear and with them all the biodiversity they contain with their ecosystem functions goods and services that they provide to local populations to C te d Ivoire and to humanity he said Dr Issola warned Mangrove forests are typical ecosystems of tropical and subtropical areas These ecosystems are vital for the conservation of various animal and plant species and in the fight against coastal erosion and climate change However they are one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world so steps are being taken to protect them The IPC AO project is funded by the Global Environment Facility GEF and is implemented in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Program UNEP through the Abidjan Convention
    Mangrove conservation in Côte d’Ivoire: the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) share a successful model in the village of Nega
    Africa2 months ago

    Mangrove conservation in Côte d’Ivoire: the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) share a successful model in the village of Nega

    In Côte d'Ivoire, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) celebrated in Niaga, Sassandra department, the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem through the Coastal Fisheries Initiative in West Africa (IFC-WA).

    Dr. Yacoub Issola of the Abidjan Convention, coordinator of the mangrove component of the IPC-AO project, took this important opportunity to invite all localities with mangroves in Côte d'Ivoire to follow the successful model of the Niéga people.

    “Unlike other towns in Sassandra, Niaga is one of the towns that has managed to preserve its mangroves in their natural state due to their uses and customs.

    For this reason, we have chosen this town to host the first edition of the International Conservation Day. of the Mangrove Ecosystem to encourage and show our gratitude to the local population for their efforts to protect this unique, special and fragile ecosystem", he said.

    Mr. Lamine Coulibaly, Prefect of the Gbôklè region, Prefect of the Sassandra department, invited the women of the region to contribute to the preservation of the mangroves by putting an end to the use of the mangroves for smoking fish.In order to encourage the people of Nega to continue their efforts to conserve the mangrove and keep the town clean, they received from the ICP-AO project, a large batch of 132-item maintenance equipment consisting of wheelbarrows, dustbins, boots, rakes, machetes and shovels worth an estimated CFAF 3,500,000.

    The donation was presented in the presence of many administrative authorities, including the departmental director of the Ministry of Water and Forests, who oversees mangrove management In 2000-2020, mangrove forests increased by 2.7 2% at project sites in Senegal, while they decreased by 10% in Côte d'Ivoire.

    On the sidelines of this official celebration, a workshop on the restitution of various mangrove studies carried out by the IPC-AO project was organized in the conference room at Sassandra Landing in the presence of some forty stakeholders, including artisanal fishermen and women.

    processors These studies, conducted over the period 2000-2020, revealed that mangrove forests increased by 2.72% in IPC-AO project sites in Senegal, while they decreased by 10% in Côte d'Ivoire.

    The studies also listed the factors of destruction such as agriculture with the expansion of export plantations, infrastructure construction (roads, ports), urbanization, and especially logging for various uses, including smoking of fish products.

    “If nothing is done to protect them, all mangrove areas will disappear, and with them all the biodiversity they contain with their ecosystem functions, goods and services that they provide to local populations, to Côte d'Ivoire and to humanity,” he said.

    Dr. Issola warned.

    Mangrove forests are typical ecosystems of tropical and subtropical areas.

    These ecosystems are vital for the conservation of various animal and plant species and in the fight against coastal erosion and climate change.

    However, they are one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world, so steps are being taken to protect them.

    The IPC-AO project is funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and is implemented in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) through the Abidjan Convention.

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