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  •   The Congolese state and its international partners must take responsibility for reversing the dynamics of this vicious circle GENEVA Switzerland January 25 2022 APO Group Since 2017 the Djugu territory of Ituri province in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo DRC has been wracked by conflict In November 2021 rising community tensions resulted in four unprecedented bouts of violence in Tch Drodro Paroisse Luko and Ivo This new escalation has pushed vulnerable people already displaced by the conflict to their limits M decins Sans Fronti res M decins Sans Fronti res MSF is expanding its response in the area to meet the growing and massive humanitarian needs People have been facing a lot of difficulties the cold the lack of shelters and latrines said MSF doctor Benjamin Safari in Drodro Clashes between armed groups have led to the massive displacement of people including health workers who are no longer at their patients bedsides The health needs are enormous We have launched various activities to strengthen our response especially for children under the age of 15 Coping with trauma and isolation I am left to my own fate Without food my children and I have been sick since we arrived at the site said Suzanne a 52 year old farmer from Dhedja who fled to Ivo with her three children In Ivo she saw bystanders being shot and heard her neighbors being attacked with machetes while she managed to escape with her family Images of her massacred neighbors play repeatedly in her mind as she struggles to support her children with little prospect for the future This is the second time she has been forced to flee this time to the displaced persons camp in Rhoe Like Suzanne more than 40 000 people have been forced to take refuge in this camp in the Blukwa State Health Area This region is difficult to access and humanitarian groups have a reduced presence due to recurring insecurity MSF adapts the project to meet changing needs Originally the MSF clinic in the camp was intended to refer patients requiring more intensive care to the better equipped general referral hospital in Drodro town However following the latest clashes that destroyed parts of Drodro and forced people to move into the camp our teams converted the clinic into a field hospital to help some 65 000 people there an increase of 40 000 people in two months In recent weeks our teams have performed an average of more than 800 consultations per week attended 35 births and treated several dozen patients requiring mental health care In addition our health promotion teams have carried out health awareness sessions at the site with the aim of detecting cases of acute malnutrition diseases with epidemic potential and providing information on support services to potential victims of sexual violence call for an end to violence Although some people are beginning to return to their homes in the relative and fragile calm of the last few weeks needs remain high and our access to people is limited said Davide Occhipinti MSF project coordinator in Drodro We will not be able to follow these people to Drodro if it is not safe for the health personnel he said Those who stay in Rhoe have nowhere to go The struggling communities in the area have been neglected for too long and we will not solve their problems with bandages and medicine The Congolese state and its international partners must take responsibility for reversing the dynamics of this vicious circle that is leading to more and more deaths injuries and displacement Occhipinti said In Ituri MSF supports four general referral hospitals 12 health centres three health posts and 32 community care sites in the Drodro Nizi Bambu and Angumu health zones for the management of pediatric diseases malnutrition malaria sexual violence and mental health
    DRC: As long-simmering conflict escalates, MSF scales up response in Northeastern Ituri
      The Congolese state and its international partners must take responsibility for reversing the dynamics of this vicious circle GENEVA Switzerland January 25 2022 APO Group Since 2017 the Djugu territory of Ituri province in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo DRC has been wracked by conflict In November 2021 rising community tensions resulted in four unprecedented bouts of violence in Tch Drodro Paroisse Luko and Ivo This new escalation has pushed vulnerable people already displaced by the conflict to their limits M decins Sans Fronti res M decins Sans Fronti res MSF is expanding its response in the area to meet the growing and massive humanitarian needs People have been facing a lot of difficulties the cold the lack of shelters and latrines said MSF doctor Benjamin Safari in Drodro Clashes between armed groups have led to the massive displacement of people including health workers who are no longer at their patients bedsides The health needs are enormous We have launched various activities to strengthen our response especially for children under the age of 15 Coping with trauma and isolation I am left to my own fate Without food my children and I have been sick since we arrived at the site said Suzanne a 52 year old farmer from Dhedja who fled to Ivo with her three children In Ivo she saw bystanders being shot and heard her neighbors being attacked with machetes while she managed to escape with her family Images of her massacred neighbors play repeatedly in her mind as she struggles to support her children with little prospect for the future This is the second time she has been forced to flee this time to the displaced persons camp in Rhoe Like Suzanne more than 40 000 people have been forced to take refuge in this camp in the Blukwa State Health Area This region is difficult to access and humanitarian groups have a reduced presence due to recurring insecurity MSF adapts the project to meet changing needs Originally the MSF clinic in the camp was intended to refer patients requiring more intensive care to the better equipped general referral hospital in Drodro town However following the latest clashes that destroyed parts of Drodro and forced people to move into the camp our teams converted the clinic into a field hospital to help some 65 000 people there an increase of 40 000 people in two months In recent weeks our teams have performed an average of more than 800 consultations per week attended 35 births and treated several dozen patients requiring mental health care In addition our health promotion teams have carried out health awareness sessions at the site with the aim of detecting cases of acute malnutrition diseases with epidemic potential and providing information on support services to potential victims of sexual violence call for an end to violence Although some people are beginning to return to their homes in the relative and fragile calm of the last few weeks needs remain high and our access to people is limited said Davide Occhipinti MSF project coordinator in Drodro We will not be able to follow these people to Drodro if it is not safe for the health personnel he said Those who stay in Rhoe have nowhere to go The struggling communities in the area have been neglected for too long and we will not solve their problems with bandages and medicine The Congolese state and its international partners must take responsibility for reversing the dynamics of this vicious circle that is leading to more and more deaths injuries and displacement Occhipinti said In Ituri MSF supports four general referral hospitals 12 health centres three health posts and 32 community care sites in the Drodro Nizi Bambu and Angumu health zones for the management of pediatric diseases malnutrition malaria sexual violence and mental health
    DRC: As long-simmering conflict escalates, MSF scales up response in Northeastern Ituri
    Africa1 year ago

    DRC: As long-simmering conflict escalates, MSF scales up response in Northeastern Ituri

    The Congolese state and its international partners must take responsibility for reversing the dynamics of this vicious circle.

    GENEVA, Switzerland, January 25, 2022/APO Group/ --

    Since 2017, the Djugu territory of Ituri province in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has been wracked by conflict. In November 2021, rising community tensions resulted in four unprecedented bouts of violence in Tché, Drodro, Paroisse, Luko and Ivo.

    This new escalation has pushed vulnerable people already displaced by the conflict to their limits. Médecins Sans Frontières/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is expanding its response in the area to meet the growing and massive humanitarian needs.

    “People have been facing a lot of difficulties; the cold, the lack of shelters and latrines,” said MSF doctor Benjamin Safari in Drodro. “Clashes between armed groups have led to the massive displacement of people, including health workers who are no longer at their patients' bedsides. The health needs are enormous. We have launched various activities to strengthen our response, especially for children under the age of 15.”

    Coping with trauma and isolation

    “I am left to my own fate. Without food, my children and I have been sick since we arrived at the site,” said Suzanne, a 52-year-old farmer from Dhedja, who fled to Ivo with her three children.

    In Ivo, she saw bystanders being shot and heard her neighbors being attacked with machetes while she managed to escape with her family. Images of her massacred neighbors play repeatedly in her mind as she struggles to support her children with little prospect for the future. This is the second time she has been forced to flee, this time to the displaced persons camp in Rhoe.

    Like Suzanne, more than 40,000 people have been forced to take refuge in this camp, in the Blukwa State Health Area. This region is difficult to access and humanitarian groups have a reduced presence due to recurring insecurity.

    MSF adapts the project to meet changing needs

    Originally, the MSF clinic in the camp was intended to refer patients requiring more intensive care to the better-equipped general referral hospital in Drodro town. However, following the latest clashes that destroyed parts of Drodro and forced people to move into the camp, our teams converted the clinic into a field hospital to help some 65,000 people there, an increase of 40,000 people in two months. .

    In recent weeks, our teams have performed an average of more than 800 consultations per week, attended 35 births and treated several dozen patients requiring mental health care. In addition, our health promotion teams have carried out health awareness sessions at the site, with the aim of detecting cases of acute malnutrition, diseases with epidemic potential, and providing information on support services to potential victims of sexual violence.

    call for an end to violence

    “Although some people are beginning to return to their homes, in the relative and fragile calm of the last few weeks, needs remain high and our access to people is limited,” said Davide Occhipinti, MSF project coordinator in Drodro. “We will not be able to follow these people to Drodro if it is not safe for the health personnel,” he said.

    “Those who stay in Rhoe have nowhere to go. The struggling communities in the area have been neglected for too long and we will not solve their problems with bandages and medicine. The Congolese state and its international partners must take responsibility for reversing the dynamics of this vicious circle that is leading to more and more deaths, injuries and displacement,” Occhipinti said.

    In Ituri, MSF supports four general referral hospitals, 12 health centres, three health posts and 32 community care sites in the Drodro, Nizi, Bambu and Angumu health zones for the management of pediatric diseases, malnutrition, malaria , sexual violence and mental health.

  •  A horrible airstrike on a Yemeni prison has left many dead or missing aid workers said on Friday after a night of deadly airstrikes underscored a dramatic escalation in violence Gruesome scenes came to light in Saada the heartland of the Houthi rebel movement as rescuers pulled bodies from destroyed prison buildings and piled up mangled corpses according to footage released by insurgents Further south in Hodeidah video footage showed bodies in the rubble and stunned survivors after an airstrike by the Saudi led pro government coalition destroyed a telecommunications center Yemen suffered an internet blackout across the country a web monitor said The Saada hospital has received some 200 people injured in the prison attack and they are so overwhelmed that they cannot receive more patients said Doctors Without Borders known by its French acronym MSF There are still many bodies at the scene of the airstrike many missing people Ahmed Mahat MSF s head of mission in Yemen said in a statement It is impossible to know how many people have died It appears to have been a horrific act of violence The attacks come five days after the Iranian backed Houthis claimed a drone and missile attack in the United Arab Emirates that killed three people and prompted warnings of retaliation The United Nations Security Council will meet on Friday at 1500 GMT in an emergency session on the Houthi attacks on the United Arab Emirates at the request of the Gulf state which has held one of the non permanent seats on the council since January 1st The United Arab Emirates is part of the Saudi led coalition that has been fighting the rebels since 2015 in an intractable conflict that has displaced millions of Yemenis and left them on the brink of famine The coalition claimed responsibility for the attack on Hodeida a vital port for the shattered country but did not say it had carried out any attacks on Saada Saudi Arabia s state news agency said the coalition carried out precision air strikes to destroy the capabilities of the Houthi militia in Hodeidah The global internet watchdog NetBlocks reported a collapse of internet connectivity on a national scale AFP correspondents in Hodeida and Sanaa confirmed the blackout Right to defend Yemen s civil war began in 2014 when the Houthis descended from their base in Saada to invade the capital Sanaa prompting Saudi led forces to intervene to prop up the government the following year Tensions have soared in recent weeks after the UAE backed Giants Brigade drove rebels out of Shabwa province undermining their months long campaign to take the key northern city of Marib On January 3 the Houthis hijacked a UAE flagged ship in the Red Sea prompting a warning from the coalition that it would attack rebel held ports And on Monday they claimed a long range attack that hit oil facilities and the airport in the UAE capital Abu Dhabi killing two Indians and a Pakistani and wounding six others The attack the UAE s first acknowledged deadly assault within its borders and claimed by Houthi insurgents opened a new front in the Yemen war and fueled regional tensions In retaliation the coalition carried out airstrikes on rebel held Sanaa killing 14 people Yemen s civil war has been a catastrophe for millions of its citizens who have fled their homes many on the brink of famine in what the UN calls the world s worst humanitarian crisis The UN has estimated that the war killed 377 000 people by the end of 2021 both directly and indirectly through famine and disease UAE presidential adviser Anwar Gargash warned that the country would exercise its right to defend itself after the Abu Dhabi attack The Emirates have the legal and moral right to defend their lands population and sovereignty and they will exercise this right to defend themselves and prevent terrorist acts pursued by the Houthi group he told US special envoy Hans Grundberg according to the official WAM news agency Source Credit TheGuardian
    Many dead or missing as ‘horrific’ air strike destroys Yemen jail
     A horrible airstrike on a Yemeni prison has left many dead or missing aid workers said on Friday after a night of deadly airstrikes underscored a dramatic escalation in violence Gruesome scenes came to light in Saada the heartland of the Houthi rebel movement as rescuers pulled bodies from destroyed prison buildings and piled up mangled corpses according to footage released by insurgents Further south in Hodeidah video footage showed bodies in the rubble and stunned survivors after an airstrike by the Saudi led pro government coalition destroyed a telecommunications center Yemen suffered an internet blackout across the country a web monitor said The Saada hospital has received some 200 people injured in the prison attack and they are so overwhelmed that they cannot receive more patients said Doctors Without Borders known by its French acronym MSF There are still many bodies at the scene of the airstrike many missing people Ahmed Mahat MSF s head of mission in Yemen said in a statement It is impossible to know how many people have died It appears to have been a horrific act of violence The attacks come five days after the Iranian backed Houthis claimed a drone and missile attack in the United Arab Emirates that killed three people and prompted warnings of retaliation The United Nations Security Council will meet on Friday at 1500 GMT in an emergency session on the Houthi attacks on the United Arab Emirates at the request of the Gulf state which has held one of the non permanent seats on the council since January 1st The United Arab Emirates is part of the Saudi led coalition that has been fighting the rebels since 2015 in an intractable conflict that has displaced millions of Yemenis and left them on the brink of famine The coalition claimed responsibility for the attack on Hodeida a vital port for the shattered country but did not say it had carried out any attacks on Saada Saudi Arabia s state news agency said the coalition carried out precision air strikes to destroy the capabilities of the Houthi militia in Hodeidah The global internet watchdog NetBlocks reported a collapse of internet connectivity on a national scale AFP correspondents in Hodeida and Sanaa confirmed the blackout Right to defend Yemen s civil war began in 2014 when the Houthis descended from their base in Saada to invade the capital Sanaa prompting Saudi led forces to intervene to prop up the government the following year Tensions have soared in recent weeks after the UAE backed Giants Brigade drove rebels out of Shabwa province undermining their months long campaign to take the key northern city of Marib On January 3 the Houthis hijacked a UAE flagged ship in the Red Sea prompting a warning from the coalition that it would attack rebel held ports And on Monday they claimed a long range attack that hit oil facilities and the airport in the UAE capital Abu Dhabi killing two Indians and a Pakistani and wounding six others The attack the UAE s first acknowledged deadly assault within its borders and claimed by Houthi insurgents opened a new front in the Yemen war and fueled regional tensions In retaliation the coalition carried out airstrikes on rebel held Sanaa killing 14 people Yemen s civil war has been a catastrophe for millions of its citizens who have fled their homes many on the brink of famine in what the UN calls the world s worst humanitarian crisis The UN has estimated that the war killed 377 000 people by the end of 2021 both directly and indirectly through famine and disease UAE presidential adviser Anwar Gargash warned that the country would exercise its right to defend itself after the Abu Dhabi attack The Emirates have the legal and moral right to defend their lands population and sovereignty and they will exercise this right to defend themselves and prevent terrorist acts pursued by the Houthi group he told US special envoy Hans Grundberg according to the official WAM news agency Source Credit TheGuardian
    Many dead or missing as ‘horrific’ air strike destroys Yemen jail
    Foreign1 year ago

    Many dead or missing as ‘horrific’ air strike destroys Yemen jail

    A "horrible" airstrike on a Yemeni prison has left many dead or missing, aid workers said on Friday after a night of deadly airstrikes underscored a dramatic escalation in violence.

    Gruesome scenes came to light in Saada, the heartland of the Houthi rebel movement, as rescuers pulled bodies from destroyed prison buildings and piled up mangled corpses, according to footage released by insurgents.

    Further south, in Hodeidah, video footage showed bodies in the rubble and stunned survivors after an airstrike by the Saudi-led pro-government coalition destroyed a telecommunications center. Yemen suffered an internet blackout across the country, a web monitor said.

    The Saada hospital has received some 200 people injured in the prison attack and "they are so overwhelmed that they cannot receive more patients," said Doctors Without Borders, known by its French acronym MSF.

    "There are still many bodies at the scene of the airstrike, many missing people," Ahmed Mahat, MSF's head of mission in Yemen, said in a statement.

    “It is impossible to know how many people have died. It appears to have been a horrific act of violence.”

    The attacks come five days after the Iranian-backed Houthis claimed a drone and missile attack in the United Arab Emirates that killed three people and prompted warnings of retaliation.

    The United Nations Security Council will meet on Friday at 1500 GMT in an emergency session on the Houthi attacks on the United Arab Emirates, at the request of the Gulf state, which has held one of the non-permanent seats on the council since January 1st. .

    The United Arab Emirates is part of the Saudi-led coalition that has been fighting the rebels since 2015, in an intractable conflict that has displaced millions of Yemenis and left them on the brink of famine.

    The coalition claimed responsibility for the attack on Hodeida, a vital port for the shattered country, but did not say it had carried out any attacks on Saada.

    Saudi Arabia's state news agency said the coalition carried out "precision air strikes... to destroy the capabilities of the Houthi militia in Hodeidah."

    The global internet watchdog, NetBlocks, reported a "collapse of internet connectivity on a national scale". AFP correspondents in Hodeida and Sanaa confirmed the blackout.

    'Right to defend'

    Yemen's civil war began in 2014 when the Houthis descended from their base in Saada to invade the capital, Sanaa, prompting Saudi-led forces to intervene to prop up the government the following year.

    Tensions have soared in recent weeks after the UAE-backed Giants Brigade drove rebels out of Shabwa province, undermining their months-long campaign to take the key northern city of Marib. .

    On January 3, the Houthis hijacked a UAE-flagged ship in the Red Sea, prompting a warning from the coalition that it would attack rebel-held ports.

    And on Monday, they claimed a long-range attack that hit oil facilities and the airport in the UAE capital Abu Dhabi, killing two Indians and a Pakistani, and wounding six others.

    The attack, the UAE's first acknowledged deadly assault within its borders and claimed by Houthi insurgents, opened a new front in the Yemen war and fueled regional tensions.

    In retaliation, the coalition carried out airstrikes on rebel-held Sanaa, killing 14 people.

    Yemen's civil war has been a catastrophe for millions of its citizens who have fled their homes, many on the brink of famine in what the UN calls the world's worst humanitarian crisis.

    The UN has estimated that the war killed 377,000 people by the end of 2021, both directly and indirectly through famine and disease.

    UAE presidential adviser Anwar Gargash warned that the country would exercise its right to defend itself after the Abu Dhabi attack.

    "The Emirates have the legal and moral right to defend their lands, population and sovereignty, and they will exercise this right to defend themselves and prevent terrorist acts pursued by the Houthi group," he told US special envoy Hans Grundberg, according to the official WAM. news agency.

    Source Credit: TheGuardian

  •   We will not be able to track these people to Drodro if it is not safe for healthcare personnel GENEVA Switzerland January 19 2022 APO Group Overwhelming violence has plagued people in the Djugu territory Ituri province northeast of the Democratic Republic of Congo DRC since 2017 as community tensions have sparked a resurgence of armed conflict Four consecutive attacks of unprecedented violence hit the sites of Tch Drodro Paroisse Luko and Ivo between November 12 and 28 2021 This new escalation of the conflict has worsened the humanitarian and security situation in the sites of displaced inmates in the area while increasing people s vulnerability and isolation I am left to my own fate Without food my children and I have been sick since we arrived at the site says Suzanne a 52 year old farmer from Dhedja who fled to Ivo with her three children This is the second time she has been forced to flee this time to the Rhoe displaced persons camp In Ivo he saw bystanders being shot and heard his neighbors being attacked with machetes while he managed to escape with his family Images of her massacred neighbors play repeatedly in her mind as she struggles to support her children with little prospect for the future Like Suzanne more than 40 000 people have been forced to take refuge in Rhoe camp in the Blukwa State Health Area an area that is difficult to access and where humanitarian groups have a reduced presence due to recurring security concerns People have been facing a lot of difficulties the cold the lack of shelters and latrines Clashes between armed groups have led to the massive displacement of people including health workers who are no longer at their patients bedsides says Dr Benjamin Safari of M decins Sans Fronti res MSF in Drodro The health needs are enormous We have launched several activities to strengthen our response especially for children under 15 years of age says Dr Safari Originally the clinic set up in the camp was intended to refer patients requiring more intensive care to the better equipped general referral hospital in Drodro town However after recent fighting destroyed parts of Drodro and forced people to move to Rhoe camp our teams converted the clinic into a field hospital to help the more than 65 000 people who are now an increase of 40 000 people in two months In recent weeks our teams have performed an average of more than 800 consultations per week attended 35 births and treated several dozen patients requiring mental health care In addition our health promotion teams have carried out health awareness sessions at the site with the aim of detecting cases of acute malnutrition diseases with epidemic potential and providing information on support services to potential victims of sexual violence Those who stay in Rhoe have nowhere to go The struggling communities in the area have been neglected for too long and we will not solve their problems with bandages and medicine said Davide Occhipinti MSF project coordinator in Drodro Although some people are beginning to return to their homes in the relative and fragile calm of the last few weeks needs remain high and our access to people is limited says Davide Occhipinti MSF project coordinator in Drodro We will not be able to follow these people to Drodro if it is not safe for the health personnel he says Those who stay in Rhoe have nowhere to go The struggling communities in the area have been neglected for too long and we will not solve their problems with bandages and medicine The Congolese state and its international partners must take responsibility for reversing the dynamics of this vicious circle that leads to more and more deaths injuries and displacement says Occhipinti
    Thousands of people in precarious conditions as violence set to repeat in Ituri
      We will not be able to track these people to Drodro if it is not safe for healthcare personnel GENEVA Switzerland January 19 2022 APO Group Overwhelming violence has plagued people in the Djugu territory Ituri province northeast of the Democratic Republic of Congo DRC since 2017 as community tensions have sparked a resurgence of armed conflict Four consecutive attacks of unprecedented violence hit the sites of Tch Drodro Paroisse Luko and Ivo between November 12 and 28 2021 This new escalation of the conflict has worsened the humanitarian and security situation in the sites of displaced inmates in the area while increasing people s vulnerability and isolation I am left to my own fate Without food my children and I have been sick since we arrived at the site says Suzanne a 52 year old farmer from Dhedja who fled to Ivo with her three children This is the second time she has been forced to flee this time to the Rhoe displaced persons camp In Ivo he saw bystanders being shot and heard his neighbors being attacked with machetes while he managed to escape with his family Images of her massacred neighbors play repeatedly in her mind as she struggles to support her children with little prospect for the future Like Suzanne more than 40 000 people have been forced to take refuge in Rhoe camp in the Blukwa State Health Area an area that is difficult to access and where humanitarian groups have a reduced presence due to recurring security concerns People have been facing a lot of difficulties the cold the lack of shelters and latrines Clashes between armed groups have led to the massive displacement of people including health workers who are no longer at their patients bedsides says Dr Benjamin Safari of M decins Sans Fronti res MSF in Drodro The health needs are enormous We have launched several activities to strengthen our response especially for children under 15 years of age says Dr Safari Originally the clinic set up in the camp was intended to refer patients requiring more intensive care to the better equipped general referral hospital in Drodro town However after recent fighting destroyed parts of Drodro and forced people to move to Rhoe camp our teams converted the clinic into a field hospital to help the more than 65 000 people who are now an increase of 40 000 people in two months In recent weeks our teams have performed an average of more than 800 consultations per week attended 35 births and treated several dozen patients requiring mental health care In addition our health promotion teams have carried out health awareness sessions at the site with the aim of detecting cases of acute malnutrition diseases with epidemic potential and providing information on support services to potential victims of sexual violence Those who stay in Rhoe have nowhere to go The struggling communities in the area have been neglected for too long and we will not solve their problems with bandages and medicine said Davide Occhipinti MSF project coordinator in Drodro Although some people are beginning to return to their homes in the relative and fragile calm of the last few weeks needs remain high and our access to people is limited says Davide Occhipinti MSF project coordinator in Drodro We will not be able to follow these people to Drodro if it is not safe for the health personnel he says Those who stay in Rhoe have nowhere to go The struggling communities in the area have been neglected for too long and we will not solve their problems with bandages and medicine The Congolese state and its international partners must take responsibility for reversing the dynamics of this vicious circle that leads to more and more deaths injuries and displacement says Occhipinti
    Thousands of people in precarious conditions as violence set to repeat in Ituri
    Africa1 year ago

    Thousands of people in precarious conditions as violence set to repeat in Ituri

    We will not be able to track these people to Drodro if it is not safe for healthcare personnel

    GENEVA, Switzerland, January 19, 2022/APO Group/ --

    Overwhelming violence has plagued people in the Djugu territory, Ituri province, northeast of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) since 2017, as community tensions have sparked a resurgence of armed conflict.

    Four consecutive attacks of unprecedented violence hit the sites of Tché, Drodro, Paroisse, Luko and Ivo, between November 12 and 28, 2021. This new escalation of the conflict has worsened the humanitarian and security situation in the sites of displaced inmates in the area while increasing people's vulnerability and isolation.

    “I am left to my own fate. Without food, my children and I have been sick since we arrived at the site,” says Suzanne, a 52-year-old farmer from Dhedja who fled to Ivo with her three children.

    This is the second time she has been forced to flee, this time to the Rhoe displaced persons camp. In Ivo, he saw bystanders being shot and heard his neighbors being attacked with machetes while he managed to escape with his family. Images of her massacred neighbors play repeatedly in her mind as she struggles to support her children with little prospect for the future.

    Like Suzanne, more than 40,000 people have been forced to take refuge in Rhoe camp in the Blukwa State Health Area, an area that is difficult to access and where humanitarian groups have a reduced presence due to recurring security concerns. .

    “People have been facing a lot of difficulties; the cold, the lack of shelters and latrines. Clashes between armed groups have led to the massive displacement of people, including health workers who are no longer at their patients' bedsides,” says Dr. Benjamin Safari of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Drodro.

    “The health needs are enormous. We have launched several activities to strengthen our response, especially for children under 15 years of age,” says Dr. Safari.

    Originally, the clinic set up in the camp was intended to refer patients requiring more intensive care to the better-equipped general referral hospital in Drodro town. However, after recent fighting destroyed parts of Drodro and forced people to move to Rhoe camp, our teams converted the clinic into a field hospital to help the more than 65,000 people who are now, an increase of 40,000 people in two months.

    In recent weeks, our teams have performed an average of more than 800 consultations per week, attended 35 births and treated several dozen patients requiring mental health care. In addition, our health promotion teams have carried out health awareness sessions at the site, with the aim of detecting cases of acute malnutrition, diseases with epidemic potential, and providing information on support services to potential victims of sexual violence.

    “Those who stay in Rhoe have nowhere to go. The struggling communities in the area have been neglected for too long and we will not solve their problems with bandages and medicine,” said Davide Occhipinti, MSF project coordinator in Drodro.

    “Although some people are beginning to return to their homes, in the relative and fragile calm of the last few weeks, needs remain high and our access to people is limited,” says Davide Occhipinti, MSF project coordinator in Drodro. “We will not be able to follow these people to Drodro if it is not safe for the health personnel,” he says.

    “Those who stay in Rhoe have nowhere to go. The struggling communities in the area have been neglected for too long and we will not solve their problems with bandages and medicine. The Congolese state and its international partners must take responsibility for reversing the dynamics of this vicious circle that leads to more and more deaths, injuries and displacement,” says Occhipinti.

  •   We have no place to sleep and we have no material to cover our house GENEVA Switzerland January 12 2022 APO Group More than 835 000 people have been affected by the worst floods in decades in South Sudan Nyatuak Koang is one of them She was displaced by floods in Unity State and now lives in a makeshift camp in the city of Rubkona with her five children Every day he walks through the submerged part of the city where he spends hours gathering wood while sifting through debris The collection of firewood is a source of income in addition to being used for cooking When the water hit us for the first time we moved to where it was dry Then the water caught up with us again and we moved to another dry place Nyatuak said We don t have where to sleep and we don t have material to cover our house This is how we are currently living We are suffering a lot Doctors Without Borders M decins Sans Fronti res MSF runs a hospital in the Bentiu camp for internally displaced persons and our teams are running mobile clinics visiting the camps in and around the Mayom Bentiu and Rubkona region responding to malaria malnutrition and acute watery diarrhea
    Surviving flooding in South Sudan: “We are suffering a lot”
      We have no place to sleep and we have no material to cover our house GENEVA Switzerland January 12 2022 APO Group More than 835 000 people have been affected by the worst floods in decades in South Sudan Nyatuak Koang is one of them She was displaced by floods in Unity State and now lives in a makeshift camp in the city of Rubkona with her five children Every day he walks through the submerged part of the city where he spends hours gathering wood while sifting through debris The collection of firewood is a source of income in addition to being used for cooking When the water hit us for the first time we moved to where it was dry Then the water caught up with us again and we moved to another dry place Nyatuak said We don t have where to sleep and we don t have material to cover our house This is how we are currently living We are suffering a lot Doctors Without Borders M decins Sans Fronti res MSF runs a hospital in the Bentiu camp for internally displaced persons and our teams are running mobile clinics visiting the camps in and around the Mayom Bentiu and Rubkona region responding to malaria malnutrition and acute watery diarrhea
    Surviving flooding in South Sudan: “We are suffering a lot”
    Africa1 year ago

    Surviving flooding in South Sudan: “We are suffering a lot”

    We have no place to sleep and we have no material to cover our house

    GENEVA, Switzerland, January 12, 2022 / APO Group / -

    More than 835,000 people have been affected by the worst floods in decades in South Sudan. Nyatuak Koang is one of them. She was displaced by floods in Unity State and now lives in a makeshift camp in the city of Rubkona with her five children. Every day he walks through the submerged part of the city, where he spends hours gathering wood while sifting through debris. The collection of firewood is a source of income, in addition to being used for cooking.

    “When the water hit us for the first time, we moved to where it was dry. Then the water caught up with us again and we moved to another dry place, ”Nyatuak said. “We don't have where to sleep and we don't have material to cover our house. This is how we are currently living. We are suffering a lot ”.

    Doctors Without Borders / Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) runs a hospital in the Bentiu camp for internally displaced persons and our teams are running mobile clinics visiting the camps in and around the Mayom, Bentiu and Rubkona region, responding to malaria, malnutrition and acute watery diarrhea.

  •   When you walk through the camps you see malnourished children people collecting dirty flood water to drink collapsing cattle and their corpses everywhere GENEVA Switzerland January 7 2022 APO Group When floodwaters began to rise in their village 21 year old Nyabeel and her husband did not know what to do Leaving their land on which they depended for food was a difficult decision We spent three days moving It was a challenge with four children and a herd of goats he says Eight months after the floods began people in Unity State in northern South Sudan continue to suffer trapped in poor living conditions and at risk of outbreaks of infectious and water borne diseases Spread out in various makeshift camps they face food insecurity loss of income malnutrition and lack of clean water An estimated 835 000 people have been affected In his village Nyabeel had depended on cultivating his land and the milk of his goats for food We had a more stable life than here now we eat one meal a day of corn Nyabeel had brought her one year old son to the MSF mobile clinic in Kuermendoke camp Rubkona city for treatment for severe malnutrition and essential vaccinations Kuermendoke is one of three camps that have a high percentage of children under the age of five who suffer from severe acute malnutrition Our nutritional survey showed that the prevalence of severe acute malnutrition in the camps is well above the WHO emergency threshold of 2 says Dr Reza Eshaghian leader of MSF s emergency flood response medical team The impact of the floods is palpable says Dr Eshaghian When you walk through the camps you see malnourished children people collecting dirty flood water to drink collapsing cattle and their corpses everywhere These bad conditions are damaging people s health Initial FAO studies suggest that some 65 000 hectares of cultivated land have been damaged by the floods while more than 800 000 head of livestock died in eight of the 10 states of South Sudan Having lost so much livestock many displaced women are turning to firewood gathering to generate income However increases in food prices make it more difficult for displaced people to obtain food With an 80 increase in admissions to the Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Center ITFC MSF has opened a third ITFC ward at its hospital in the Bentiu IDP camp MSF teams are also running mobile clinics visiting camps in and around Mayom Bentiu and Rubkona region responding to malaria malnutrition and acute watery diarrhea For most of the displaced it is almost impossible to find safe drinking water Our only source of water for drinking cooking and washing is flood water says Nyapal a mother of four Before the floods around Bentiu the sanitation facilities in the IDP camp were already in critical condition and rarely maintained For a time the floods prevented access to the waste treatment ponds This led to an accumulation of sewage in the camp latrines which then overflowed into the open sewage channels where the children often play says Cawo Yassin Ali leader of the water and sanitation team of the MSF emergency team deployed for flood response To reduce the risk of outbreaks MSF has installed a sewage treatment plant within the camp to contain and treat fecal waste With water levels slowly beginning to drop around Bentiu it is still unclear when Nyabeel Nyapal and thousands of other displaced people will be able to return home We have nothing here we arrived empty handed the town is covered in water and we don t know when it will dry up says Nyabeel Until people can return to their homes they will be forced to continue living in such precarious conditions This poses an additional challenge for humanitarian actors requiring them not to lose sight of responding to immediate needs while recognizing the protracted nature of this crisis and meeting corresponding standards beyond the initial emergency threshold There are immense needs including the need for adequate shelter clean water and sanitation infrastructure quality health care food security and support for livelihoods Humanitarians donors and the Government of South Sudan must act now before it is too late They can t afford to wait any longer says Dr Eshaghian
    South Sudan: hundreds of thousands still living in precarious conditions months after floods
      When you walk through the camps you see malnourished children people collecting dirty flood water to drink collapsing cattle and their corpses everywhere GENEVA Switzerland January 7 2022 APO Group When floodwaters began to rise in their village 21 year old Nyabeel and her husband did not know what to do Leaving their land on which they depended for food was a difficult decision We spent three days moving It was a challenge with four children and a herd of goats he says Eight months after the floods began people in Unity State in northern South Sudan continue to suffer trapped in poor living conditions and at risk of outbreaks of infectious and water borne diseases Spread out in various makeshift camps they face food insecurity loss of income malnutrition and lack of clean water An estimated 835 000 people have been affected In his village Nyabeel had depended on cultivating his land and the milk of his goats for food We had a more stable life than here now we eat one meal a day of corn Nyabeel had brought her one year old son to the MSF mobile clinic in Kuermendoke camp Rubkona city for treatment for severe malnutrition and essential vaccinations Kuermendoke is one of three camps that have a high percentage of children under the age of five who suffer from severe acute malnutrition Our nutritional survey showed that the prevalence of severe acute malnutrition in the camps is well above the WHO emergency threshold of 2 says Dr Reza Eshaghian leader of MSF s emergency flood response medical team The impact of the floods is palpable says Dr Eshaghian When you walk through the camps you see malnourished children people collecting dirty flood water to drink collapsing cattle and their corpses everywhere These bad conditions are damaging people s health Initial FAO studies suggest that some 65 000 hectares of cultivated land have been damaged by the floods while more than 800 000 head of livestock died in eight of the 10 states of South Sudan Having lost so much livestock many displaced women are turning to firewood gathering to generate income However increases in food prices make it more difficult for displaced people to obtain food With an 80 increase in admissions to the Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Center ITFC MSF has opened a third ITFC ward at its hospital in the Bentiu IDP camp MSF teams are also running mobile clinics visiting camps in and around Mayom Bentiu and Rubkona region responding to malaria malnutrition and acute watery diarrhea For most of the displaced it is almost impossible to find safe drinking water Our only source of water for drinking cooking and washing is flood water says Nyapal a mother of four Before the floods around Bentiu the sanitation facilities in the IDP camp were already in critical condition and rarely maintained For a time the floods prevented access to the waste treatment ponds This led to an accumulation of sewage in the camp latrines which then overflowed into the open sewage channels where the children often play says Cawo Yassin Ali leader of the water and sanitation team of the MSF emergency team deployed for flood response To reduce the risk of outbreaks MSF has installed a sewage treatment plant within the camp to contain and treat fecal waste With water levels slowly beginning to drop around Bentiu it is still unclear when Nyabeel Nyapal and thousands of other displaced people will be able to return home We have nothing here we arrived empty handed the town is covered in water and we don t know when it will dry up says Nyabeel Until people can return to their homes they will be forced to continue living in such precarious conditions This poses an additional challenge for humanitarian actors requiring them not to lose sight of responding to immediate needs while recognizing the protracted nature of this crisis and meeting corresponding standards beyond the initial emergency threshold There are immense needs including the need for adequate shelter clean water and sanitation infrastructure quality health care food security and support for livelihoods Humanitarians donors and the Government of South Sudan must act now before it is too late They can t afford to wait any longer says Dr Eshaghian
    South Sudan: hundreds of thousands still living in precarious conditions months after floods
    Africa1 year ago

    South Sudan: hundreds of thousands still living in precarious conditions months after floods

    When you walk through the camps, you see malnourished children, people collecting dirty flood water to drink, collapsing cattle and their corpses everywhere.

    GENEVA, Switzerland, January 7, 2022 / APO Group / -

    When floodwaters began to rise in their village, 21-year-old Nyabeel * and her husband did not know what to do. Leaving their land, on which they depended for food, was a difficult decision. “We spent three days moving. It was a challenge, with four children and a herd of goats, "he says.

    Eight months after the floods began, people in Unity State in northern South Sudan continue to suffer, trapped in poor living conditions and at risk of outbreaks of infectious and water-borne diseases. Spread out in various makeshift camps, they face food insecurity, loss of income, malnutrition and lack of clean water. An estimated 835,000 people have been affected.

    In his village, Nyabeel had depended on cultivating his land and the milk of his goats for food. "We had a more stable life than here, now we eat one meal a day of corn." Nyabeel had brought her one-year-old son to the MSF mobile clinic in Kuermendoke camp, Rubkona city, for treatment for severe malnutrition and essential vaccinations. Kuermendoke is one of three camps that have a high percentage of children under the age of five who suffer from severe acute malnutrition. "Our nutritional survey showed that the prevalence of severe acute malnutrition in the camps is well above the WHO emergency threshold of 2%," says Dr. Reza Eshaghian, leader of MSF's emergency flood response medical team. .

    The impact of the floods is palpable, says Dr. Eshaghian. “When you walk through the camps, you see malnourished children, people collecting dirty flood water to drink, collapsing cattle and their corpses everywhere. These bad conditions are damaging people's health ”.

    Initial FAO studies suggest that some 65,000 hectares of cultivated land have been damaged by the floods, while more than 800,000 head of livestock died in eight of the 10 states of South Sudan. Having lost so much livestock, many displaced women are turning to firewood gathering to generate income. However, increases in food prices make it more difficult for displaced people to obtain food.

    With an 80% increase in admissions to the Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Center (ITFC), MSF has opened a third ITFC ward at its hospital in the Bentiu IDP camp. MSF teams are also running mobile clinics visiting camps in and around Mayom, Bentiu and Rubkona region, responding to malaria, malnutrition and acute watery diarrhea.

    For most of the displaced, it is almost impossible to find safe drinking water. “Our only source of water for drinking, cooking and washing is flood water,” says Nyapal, a mother of four.

    Before the floods around Bentiu, the sanitation facilities in the IDP camp were already in critical condition and rarely maintained. “For a time, the floods prevented access to the waste treatment ponds. This led to an accumulation of sewage in the camp latrines, which then overflowed into the open sewage channels, where the children often play, ”says Cawo Yassin Ali, leader of the water and sanitation team of the MSF emergency team. deployed for flood response. To reduce the risk of outbreaks, MSF has installed a sewage treatment plant within the camp to contain and treat fecal waste.

    With water levels slowly beginning to drop around Bentiu, it is still unclear when Nyabeel, Nyapal and thousands of other displaced people will be able to return home. "We have nothing here, we arrived empty-handed, the town is covered in water and we don't know when it will dry up," says Nyabeel.

    Until people can return to their homes, they will be forced to continue living in such precarious conditions. This poses an additional challenge for humanitarian actors, requiring them not to lose sight of responding to immediate needs, while recognizing the protracted nature of this crisis and meeting corresponding standards beyond the initial emergency threshold.

    “There are immense needs, including the need for adequate shelter, clean water and sanitation infrastructure, quality health care, food security and support for livelihoods. Humanitarians, donors and the Government of South Sudan must act now before it is too late. They can't afford to wait any longer, ”says Dr. Eshaghian.

  •   Handover of MSF medical activities in Al Hashaba transit camp does not mean the end of our activities in Gedaref state KHARTOUM Sudan January 5 2022 APO Group At the end of December 2021 the international emergency medical organization M decins Sans Fronti res MSF handed over its remaining medical activities in the Al Hashaba transit camp also known as Village 8 in Gedaref state Sudan to Premi re Urgence Internationale The Al Hashaba transit camp near the Ethiopian border is home to thousands of refugees from Tigray While it was originally intended to be a transit camp it has become semi permanent and currently houses some 3 000 refugees Following an influx of refugees in early December 2020 MSF began providing emergency medical care as well as support to the outpatient and hospital departments of the Ministry of Health s medical center including hospital therapeutic feeding services sexual and reproductive health and mental health In early June 2021 MSF opened a reception center within the camp which provides outpatient medical care while guaranteeing water and sanitation services Earlier this year MSF had delivered some support activities of its reproductive health and nutrition program to Premi re Urgence Internationale with its water supply and water supply and sanitation activities delivered to CARE international and Solidarit International in association with Premi re Urgence Internationale with respect All of MSF s remaining medical activities were handed over to Premi re Urgence Internationale in late 2021 The handover of MSF s medical activities in the Al Hashaba transit camp does not mean the end of our activities in Gedaref state said Joachim Tisch MSF s Head of Mission in Sudan MSF remains committed to the people of the region and continues to work in the Um Rakuba and Al Tanideba refugee camps as well as the Hamdayet transit center providing medical services to both the Tigray refugees and the Sudanese communities local In the Um Rakuba and Al Tanideba camps MSF medical staff run clinics that provide basic and specialized medical care outpatient and hospital care including maternity mental health services vaccinations for children under 18 months and treatment of malnutrition for Tigray refugees and local Sudanese communities In addition MSF is supporting with water and sanitation and operating an emergency water treatment plant to provide clean water to refugees At the Hamdayet transit center MSF provides medical care including mental health activities and nutritional screenings to both the Tigray refugees and local Sudanese communities
    Sudan: MSF hands over medical activities in Al-Hashaba transit camp
      Handover of MSF medical activities in Al Hashaba transit camp does not mean the end of our activities in Gedaref state KHARTOUM Sudan January 5 2022 APO Group At the end of December 2021 the international emergency medical organization M decins Sans Fronti res MSF handed over its remaining medical activities in the Al Hashaba transit camp also known as Village 8 in Gedaref state Sudan to Premi re Urgence Internationale The Al Hashaba transit camp near the Ethiopian border is home to thousands of refugees from Tigray While it was originally intended to be a transit camp it has become semi permanent and currently houses some 3 000 refugees Following an influx of refugees in early December 2020 MSF began providing emergency medical care as well as support to the outpatient and hospital departments of the Ministry of Health s medical center including hospital therapeutic feeding services sexual and reproductive health and mental health In early June 2021 MSF opened a reception center within the camp which provides outpatient medical care while guaranteeing water and sanitation services Earlier this year MSF had delivered some support activities of its reproductive health and nutrition program to Premi re Urgence Internationale with its water supply and water supply and sanitation activities delivered to CARE international and Solidarit International in association with Premi re Urgence Internationale with respect All of MSF s remaining medical activities were handed over to Premi re Urgence Internationale in late 2021 The handover of MSF s medical activities in the Al Hashaba transit camp does not mean the end of our activities in Gedaref state said Joachim Tisch MSF s Head of Mission in Sudan MSF remains committed to the people of the region and continues to work in the Um Rakuba and Al Tanideba refugee camps as well as the Hamdayet transit center providing medical services to both the Tigray refugees and the Sudanese communities local In the Um Rakuba and Al Tanideba camps MSF medical staff run clinics that provide basic and specialized medical care outpatient and hospital care including maternity mental health services vaccinations for children under 18 months and treatment of malnutrition for Tigray refugees and local Sudanese communities In addition MSF is supporting with water and sanitation and operating an emergency water treatment plant to provide clean water to refugees At the Hamdayet transit center MSF provides medical care including mental health activities and nutritional screenings to both the Tigray refugees and local Sudanese communities
    Sudan: MSF hands over medical activities in Al-Hashaba transit camp
    Africa1 year ago

    Sudan: MSF hands over medical activities in Al-Hashaba transit camp

    Handover of MSF medical activities in Al-Hashaba transit camp does not mean the end of our activities in Gedaref state

    KHARTOUM, Sudan, January 5, 2022 / APO Group / -

    At the end of December 2021, the international emergency medical organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) handed over its remaining medical activities in the Al-Hashaba transit camp (also known as Village 8) in Gedaref state, Sudan, to Première Urgence Internationale.

    The Al-Hashaba transit camp, near the Ethiopian border, is home to thousands of refugees from Tigray. While it was originally intended to be a transit camp, it has become semi-permanent and currently houses some 3,000 refugees.

    Following an influx of refugees in early December 2020, MSF began providing emergency medical care, as well as support to the outpatient and hospital departments of the Ministry of Health's medical center, including; hospital therapeutic feeding services, sexual and reproductive health and mental health. In early June 2021, MSF opened a reception center within the camp, which provides outpatient medical care while guaranteeing water and sanitation services.

    Earlier this year, MSF had delivered some support activities of its reproductive health and nutrition program to Première Urgence Internationale, with its water supply and water supply and sanitation activities, delivered to CARE international and Solidarité International in association with Première Urgence Internationale with respect. All of MSF's remaining medical activities were handed over to Première Urgence Internationale in late 2021.

    “The handover of MSF's medical activities in the Al-Hashaba transit camp does not mean the end of our activities in Gedaref state,” said Joachim Tisch, MSF's Head of Mission in Sudan. “MSF remains committed to the people of the region and continues to work in the Um Rakuba and Al-Tanideba refugee camps, as well as the Hamdayet transit center, providing medical services to both the Tigray refugees and the Sudanese communities. local".

    In the Um Rakuba and Al-Tanideba camps, MSF medical staff run clinics that provide basic and specialized medical care, outpatient and hospital care, including maternity, mental health services, vaccinations for children under 18 months and treatment of malnutrition for Tigray refugees and local Sudanese communities. In addition, MSF is supporting with water and sanitation, and operating an emergency water treatment plant to provide clean water to refugees. At the Hamdayet transit center, MSF provides medical care, including mental health activities and nutritional screenings, to both the Tigray refugees and local Sudanese communities.

  •   The first inter community conflicts between Mousgoum fishermen and Arab herders in Cameroon began in August this year GENEVA Switzerland January 4 2022 APO Group In recent weeks thousands of Cameroonian people have crossed the Logone and Chari rivers to seek refuge in Chad due to the ongoing violence There are currently around 100 000 people the vast majority of whom are women and children living in some 20 informal locations We are mobilizing teams in response to provide care to people in need The first inter community conflicts between Mousgoum fishermen and Arab herders in Cameroon started in August this year says Jessie Gaffric MSF s head of mission in Chad For a few weeks we organized mobile clinics to provide basic medical care to 11 000 refugees in Chad before the situation calmed down However the violence suddenly and brutally resumed as it happened on December 8 in Kousseri a city in Cameroon on the border with the Chadian capital N Djamena due to tensions over agricultural pastoral and fishing resources that have not been resolved Forty three people were injured by knives bullets or arrows Twenty five of them had to be hospitalized in N Djamena due to the lack of adequate care in Kousseri
    Tens of thousands of people flee Cameroon as violence spreads
      The first inter community conflicts between Mousgoum fishermen and Arab herders in Cameroon began in August this year GENEVA Switzerland January 4 2022 APO Group In recent weeks thousands of Cameroonian people have crossed the Logone and Chari rivers to seek refuge in Chad due to the ongoing violence There are currently around 100 000 people the vast majority of whom are women and children living in some 20 informal locations We are mobilizing teams in response to provide care to people in need The first inter community conflicts between Mousgoum fishermen and Arab herders in Cameroon started in August this year says Jessie Gaffric MSF s head of mission in Chad For a few weeks we organized mobile clinics to provide basic medical care to 11 000 refugees in Chad before the situation calmed down However the violence suddenly and brutally resumed as it happened on December 8 in Kousseri a city in Cameroon on the border with the Chadian capital N Djamena due to tensions over agricultural pastoral and fishing resources that have not been resolved Forty three people were injured by knives bullets or arrows Twenty five of them had to be hospitalized in N Djamena due to the lack of adequate care in Kousseri
    Tens of thousands of people flee Cameroon as violence spreads
    Africa1 year ago

    Tens of thousands of people flee Cameroon as violence spreads

    The first inter-community conflicts between Mousgoum fishermen and Arab herders in Cameroon began in August this year.

    GENEVA, Switzerland, January 4, 2022 / APO Group / -

    In recent weeks, thousands of Cameroonian people have crossed the Logone and Chari rivers to seek refuge in Chad due to the ongoing violence. There are currently around 100,000 people, the vast majority of whom are women and children, living in some 20 informal locations. We are mobilizing teams in response to provide care to people in need.

    "The first inter-community conflicts between Mousgoum fishermen and Arab herders in Cameroon started in August this year," says Jessie Gaffric, MSF's head of mission in Chad. "For a few weeks, we organized mobile clinics to provide basic medical care to 11,000 refugees in Chad, before the situation calmed down."

    However, the violence suddenly and brutally resumed, as it happened on December 8 in Kousseri, a city in Cameroon on the border with the Chadian capital, N'Djamena, due to tensions over agricultural, pastoral and fishing resources, that have not been resolved.

    Forty-three people were injured by knives, bullets or arrows. Twenty-five of them had to be hospitalized in N'Djamena due to the lack of adequate care in Kousseri.

  •   We have contacted the authorities to understand the reason for the lack of communication with this reference GENEVA Switzerland December 28 2021 APO Group On Saturday 25 December the emergency call center of the humanitarian medical organization Doctors Without Borders Doctors Without Borders MSF received a call related to an injured person who needed urgent assistance in the health area of Tinto One of our ambulances managed to pick up the patient the next morning in the Ashum area Given his serious condition he had to be transferred to Mutengene via Kumba for surgical care As agreed and done regularly MSF had contacted the local military authorities in advance informed them about the transfer of an injured patient to Mutengene and shared the patient s age and gender as requested However Cameroonian security forces stopped the ambulance at the Nguti checkpoint and forced it back to Mamfe where the patient had to be treated and stabilized Since then to avoid further incidents with our ambulances we have contacted the authorities to understand the reason for the miscommunication with this reference Regarding this incident and the complaints published in some media MSF reminds all relevant parties that In our work in Cameroon and other parts of the world MSF treats people based on their medical needs regardless of their backgrounds or affiliations This impartial and neutral humanitarian medical work is especially protected by the Geneva Conventions which specify that persons not actively participating in hostilities including members of the armed forces who have laid down their arms and those who are knocked out due to illness injuries arrest or any other cause will be treated humanely in all circumstances without any adverse distinction based on race color religion or faith sex birth or wealth or any other similar criteria Impeding and obstructing our work puts the lives of patients at risk Accusations of complicity with any actor in a conflict put MSF patients and staff in serious and immediate danger We call on everyone to be responsible in their statements and publications related to our humanitarian action in the country In an already highly sensitive context the dissemination of information that damages our reputation as a neutral impartial and independent humanitarian organization endangers the lives of our teams and patients
    MSF Clarifies Incident in Transporting wounded patient in South-West Cameroon
      We have contacted the authorities to understand the reason for the lack of communication with this reference GENEVA Switzerland December 28 2021 APO Group On Saturday 25 December the emergency call center of the humanitarian medical organization Doctors Without Borders Doctors Without Borders MSF received a call related to an injured person who needed urgent assistance in the health area of Tinto One of our ambulances managed to pick up the patient the next morning in the Ashum area Given his serious condition he had to be transferred to Mutengene via Kumba for surgical care As agreed and done regularly MSF had contacted the local military authorities in advance informed them about the transfer of an injured patient to Mutengene and shared the patient s age and gender as requested However Cameroonian security forces stopped the ambulance at the Nguti checkpoint and forced it back to Mamfe where the patient had to be treated and stabilized Since then to avoid further incidents with our ambulances we have contacted the authorities to understand the reason for the miscommunication with this reference Regarding this incident and the complaints published in some media MSF reminds all relevant parties that In our work in Cameroon and other parts of the world MSF treats people based on their medical needs regardless of their backgrounds or affiliations This impartial and neutral humanitarian medical work is especially protected by the Geneva Conventions which specify that persons not actively participating in hostilities including members of the armed forces who have laid down their arms and those who are knocked out due to illness injuries arrest or any other cause will be treated humanely in all circumstances without any adverse distinction based on race color religion or faith sex birth or wealth or any other similar criteria Impeding and obstructing our work puts the lives of patients at risk Accusations of complicity with any actor in a conflict put MSF patients and staff in serious and immediate danger We call on everyone to be responsible in their statements and publications related to our humanitarian action in the country In an already highly sensitive context the dissemination of information that damages our reputation as a neutral impartial and independent humanitarian organization endangers the lives of our teams and patients
    MSF Clarifies Incident in Transporting wounded patient in South-West Cameroon
    Africa1 year ago

    MSF Clarifies Incident in Transporting wounded patient in South-West Cameroon

    We have contacted the authorities to understand the reason for the lack of communication with this reference.

    GENEVA, Switzerland, December 28, 2021 / APO Group / -

    On Saturday 25 December, the emergency call center of the humanitarian medical organization Doctors Without Borders / Doctors Without Borders (MSF) received a call related to an injured person who needed urgent assistance in the health area of ​​Tinto. One of our ambulances managed to pick up the patient the next morning in the Ashum area. Given his serious condition, he had to be transferred to Mutengene via Kumba for surgical care.

    As agreed and done regularly, MSF had contacted the local military authorities in advance, informed them about the transfer of an injured patient to Mutengene, and shared the patient's age and gender as requested. However, Cameroonian security forces stopped the ambulance at the Nguti checkpoint and forced it back to Mamfe, where the patient had to be treated and stabilized.

    Since then, to avoid further incidents with our ambulances, we have contacted the authorities to understand the reason for the miscommunication with this reference.

    Regarding this incident and the complaints published in some media, MSF reminds all relevant parties that:

    In our work in Cameroon and other parts of the world, MSF treats people based on their medical needs, regardless of their backgrounds or affiliations. This impartial and neutral humanitarian medical work is especially protected by the Geneva Conventions, which specify that persons not actively participating in hostilities, including members of the armed forces who have laid down their arms and those who are knocked out due to illness , injuries, arrest, or any other cause, will be treated humanely in all circumstances, without any adverse distinction based on race, color, religion or faith, sex, birth or wealth, or any other similar criteria. Impeding and obstructing our work puts the lives of patients at risk. Accusations of complicity with any actor in a conflict put MSF patients and staff in serious and immediate danger. We call on everyone to be responsible in their statements and publications related to our humanitarian action in the country. In an already highly sensitive context, the dissemination of information that damages our reputation as a neutral, impartial and independent humanitarian organization endangers the lives of our teams and patients.

  •  Automatic weapons were fired and Captain Miraj a peacemaker from Bangladesh told everyone to run Some 20 local Red Cross workers had gathered in Dhedja a village in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo They had come to help bury the bodies that had been rotting since a massacre three weeks earlier and the killers had now returned Abandoning their shovels the terrified helpers fled through fields and burning houses hiding behind a wall as UN MONUSCO peacekeepers fired random bursts into the tall grass UN armored vehicles broke through to aid the terrified group and were attacked as they advanced After a 20 minute exchange of shots silence returned No one was injured and no one was missing Bloodshed in the hillside villages of Ituri province has accelerated in the past two years driven by a political religious sect called CODECO Its innocuous sounding name the Cooperative for the Development of Congo CODECO hides a bitter ethnic dispute between the Lendu which the group claims to defend and the Hema Clashes between the two communities erupted between 1999 and 2003 claiming tens of thousands of lives before being quelled by a European Union peacekeeping force Artemis The violence then resumed in 2017 attributed to the rise of CODECO Since October CODECO has intensified attacks in the Djugu area bordering Lake Albert and Uganda which lie to the east At least 82 people died in the last 10 days of November according to a respected monitor the Kivu Security Tracker KST DevastationUN vehicles stopped in a devastated camp for displaced people in Drodro Less than a month ago the camp was home to 16 000 people He was then attacked by militiamen on November 21 who set fire to huts and shelters and killed 26 people Today some women and young children forage on the rubble in search of food or recoverable materials while flocks of crows circle and squawk overhead A child was clutching a school notebook on the cover of which was written in French Time for classes a sad irony given that the camp s schools have been closed since the attack as has a hospital supported by the French medical charity MSF The convoy arrived at a UN base on the flanks of Mount Rhoo a peak 2 000 meters 6 500 feet high Makeshift shelters made from plastic sheeting and branches cover some 50 acres 20 hectares around the base where desperate people have fled the violence Waiting for the death The area is completely fenced off said Audrey Riviere local coordinator for the French NGO Action Contre la Faim Action Against Hunger Riviere one of the few humanitarian workers there had only been able to reach Rhoo by helicopter There is less than three square meters 33 square feet per person he said People here lack everything water food places to go to the bathroom At least three displaced people have died in the past two weeks when venturing out of the camp to forage for food in nearby fields or fetch water Despite the risks we have to leave the camp to look for food but there is no security said Constant Ngaz a merchant At Rhoo people are waiting for death The World Food Program WFP managed to get the first trucks to Rhoo on Monday Last week a truck driver seeking to deliver buckets and soap to Rhoo told AFP that he had been extorted at CODECO checkpoints Source Credit TheGuardian
    Death stalks displaced people in eastern DR Congo
     Automatic weapons were fired and Captain Miraj a peacemaker from Bangladesh told everyone to run Some 20 local Red Cross workers had gathered in Dhedja a village in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo They had come to help bury the bodies that had been rotting since a massacre three weeks earlier and the killers had now returned Abandoning their shovels the terrified helpers fled through fields and burning houses hiding behind a wall as UN MONUSCO peacekeepers fired random bursts into the tall grass UN armored vehicles broke through to aid the terrified group and were attacked as they advanced After a 20 minute exchange of shots silence returned No one was injured and no one was missing Bloodshed in the hillside villages of Ituri province has accelerated in the past two years driven by a political religious sect called CODECO Its innocuous sounding name the Cooperative for the Development of Congo CODECO hides a bitter ethnic dispute between the Lendu which the group claims to defend and the Hema Clashes between the two communities erupted between 1999 and 2003 claiming tens of thousands of lives before being quelled by a European Union peacekeeping force Artemis The violence then resumed in 2017 attributed to the rise of CODECO Since October CODECO has intensified attacks in the Djugu area bordering Lake Albert and Uganda which lie to the east At least 82 people died in the last 10 days of November according to a respected monitor the Kivu Security Tracker KST DevastationUN vehicles stopped in a devastated camp for displaced people in Drodro Less than a month ago the camp was home to 16 000 people He was then attacked by militiamen on November 21 who set fire to huts and shelters and killed 26 people Today some women and young children forage on the rubble in search of food or recoverable materials while flocks of crows circle and squawk overhead A child was clutching a school notebook on the cover of which was written in French Time for classes a sad irony given that the camp s schools have been closed since the attack as has a hospital supported by the French medical charity MSF The convoy arrived at a UN base on the flanks of Mount Rhoo a peak 2 000 meters 6 500 feet high Makeshift shelters made from plastic sheeting and branches cover some 50 acres 20 hectares around the base where desperate people have fled the violence Waiting for the death The area is completely fenced off said Audrey Riviere local coordinator for the French NGO Action Contre la Faim Action Against Hunger Riviere one of the few humanitarian workers there had only been able to reach Rhoo by helicopter There is less than three square meters 33 square feet per person he said People here lack everything water food places to go to the bathroom At least three displaced people have died in the past two weeks when venturing out of the camp to forage for food in nearby fields or fetch water Despite the risks we have to leave the camp to look for food but there is no security said Constant Ngaz a merchant At Rhoo people are waiting for death The World Food Program WFP managed to get the first trucks to Rhoo on Monday Last week a truck driver seeking to deliver buckets and soap to Rhoo told AFP that he had been extorted at CODECO checkpoints Source Credit TheGuardian
    Death stalks displaced people in eastern DR Congo
    Foreign1 year ago

    Death stalks displaced people in eastern DR Congo

    Automatic weapons were fired and Captain Miraj, a peacemaker from Bangladesh, told everyone to run.

    Some 20 local Red Cross workers had gathered in Dhedja, a village in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    They had come to help bury the bodies that had been rotting since a massacre three weeks earlier, and the killers had now returned.

    Abandoning their shovels, the terrified helpers fled through fields and burning houses, hiding behind a wall as UN MONUSCO peacekeepers fired random bursts into the tall grass.

    UN armored vehicles broke through to aid the terrified group, and were attacked as they advanced.

    After a 20-minute exchange of shots, silence returned. No one was injured and no one was missing.

    Bloodshed in the hillside villages of Ituri province has accelerated in the past two years, driven by a political-religious sect called CODECO.

    Its innocuous-sounding name, the Cooperative for the Development of Congo (CODECO), hides a bitter ethnic dispute between the Lendu, which the group claims to defend, and the Hema.

    Clashes between the two communities erupted between 1999 and 2003, claiming tens of thousands of lives before being quelled by a European Union peacekeeping force, Artemis.

    The violence then resumed in 2017, attributed to the rise of CODECO.

    Since October, CODECO has intensified attacks in the Djugu area, bordering Lake Albert and Uganda, which lie to the east.

    At least 82 people died in the last 10 days of November, according to a respected monitor, the Kivu Security Tracker (KST).

    Devastation
    UN vehicles stopped in a devastated camp for displaced people in Drodro.

    Less than a month ago, the camp was home to 16,000 people. He was then attacked by militiamen on November 21, who set fire to huts and shelters and killed 26 people.

    Today, some women and young children forage on the rubble in search of food or recoverable materials, while flocks of crows circle and squawk overhead.

    A child was clutching a school notebook on the cover of which was written, in French: "Time for classes!" - a sad irony, given that the camp's schools have been closed since the attack, as has a hospital supported by the French medical charity MSF.

    The convoy arrived at a UN base on the flanks of Mount Rhoo, a peak 2,000 meters (6,500 feet) high.

    Makeshift shelters, made from plastic sheeting and branches, cover some 50 acres (20 hectares) around the base, where desperate people have fled the violence.

    'Waiting for the death'
    "The area is completely fenced off," said Audrey Riviere, local coordinator for the French NGO Action Contre la Faim (Action Against Hunger).

    Riviere, one of the few humanitarian workers there, had only been able to reach Rhoo by helicopter.

    "There is less than three square meters (33 square feet) per person," he said. "People here lack everything: water, food, places to go to the bathroom."

    At least three displaced people have died in the past two weeks when venturing out of the camp to forage for food in nearby fields or fetch water.

    "Despite the risks, we have to leave the camp to look for food, but there is no security," said Constant Ngaz, a merchant. "At Rhoo, people are waiting for death."

    The World Food Program (WFP) managed to get the first trucks to Rhoo on Monday. Last week, a truck driver seeking to deliver buckets and soap to Rhoo told AFP that he had been extorted at CODECO checkpoints.

    Source Credit: TheGuardian

  •   Over the past seven years MSF teams has provided nearly 500 000 outpatient consultations and admitted more than 20 000 people to the hospital for treatment GENEVA Switzerland December 20 2021 APO Group Since 2013 Sudan s White Nile state has hosted tens of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in South Sudan s Upper Nile state For the past seven years international medical organisation M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Border MSF has provided the refugees and local communities with medical care This month MSF teams hand over their medical activities in White Nile state including Al Kashafa hospital to the Sudanese Ministry of Health Soon after some 30 000 South Sudanese refugees arrived in White Nile state in 2013 MSF launched an emergency response providing general healthcare and clean drinking water for the refugees and constructing latrines in the camp known as Kilo 10 As more people fled across the border from South Sudan more camps were established in the region MSF expanded its assistance to the refugee and host communities by running clinics that provided general healthcare and vaccinating tens of thousands of children against measles and other diseases Teams ran health promotion activities while MSF engineers provided clean drinking water and constructed latrines In 2016 MSF and the Ministry of Health upgraded a health facility in Al Kashafa camp to become a hospital and in 2019 they opened a newly constructed 100 bed hospital in the camp Its services include general and specialist healthcare malnutrition treatment maternity care and treatment for people with chronic infectious diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis TB Today patients come to the hospital from the surrounding villages and nine camps for South Sudanese refugees in the area People stay in their homes they can t make money says Zakina Adam Ali MSF nutritional supervisor As a result children get a lot of diseases This means that our inpatient therapeutic feeding centre is full of children We receive 45 to 50 each week and as many as 150 children each month It can make things difficult I m unhappy when a baby suffers a lot but I m very happy when a baby who is brought to me gets better and returns home in a good physical condition Previously the local community had little access to medical care MSF s Al Kashafa hospital has become the main referral hospital for the refugee and host communities living in the Al Salam and Al Jebelin localities in White Nile state Currently the hospital serves the majority of the approximately 270 000 South Sudanese refugees living in White Nile State according to UNHCR and around 450 000 people from the local communities who account for nearly half of the consultations most of them are from the El Salam locality which is closer to the hospital My children Daoud Al Hadi and Hammouda were born before MSF s hospital opened says Zahra who is from a village nearby I m pregnant again and my future son who we re going to name Ahmed will be born here in the hospital We suffered before without the MSF hospital but now we can get continuous care from day one of the pregnancy until the baby is born The medics monitor your condition very carefully They do regular check ups and if you have a blood deficiency they give medicines to counter it Over the past seven years MSF teams has provided nearly 500 000 outpatient consultations and admitted more than 20 000 people to the hospital for treatment More than 8 000 malnourished children under five have received treatment in the hospital s therapeutic feeding centre and nearly 5 000 women have given birth in the maternity unit MSF staffs have vaccinated more than 25 000 children to protect them against common childhood diseases MSF mental health staff have provided more than 6 000 mental health consultations and health promoters have held more than 10 000 health promotion sessions The major success in Al Kashafa has been the construction of the new hospital which led to improved inpatient and outpatient care says MSF project coordinator Kennedy Olela who first worked for MSF in Al Kashafa in 2016 17 Back in 2016 and 2017 we started to receive more and more patients and space and services became increasingly stretched says Olela I came back this year and was proud to see the changes in the provision of medical care in the hospital with its high hygiene standards We are able to provide quality of care to patients without worrying about weather conditions which can impact infection prevention and control The standard of care has improved significantly and more patients are able to access comfortable care in a very good environment This month MSF is handing over its medical activities in White Nile state including Al Kashafa hospital to the Sudanese Ministry of Health Speaking at the handover ceremony on 15 December Claudia Stephan MSF s country representative in Sudan said We have been able to save many lives and provide medical assistance for both refugees and host communities We have reduced the burden of disease and improved people s access to quality medical care in White Nile state It has been a joint achievement working hand in hand with the Ministry of Health the Commission of Refugees the Humanitarian Affairs Commission and other partners towards a common goal to respond to medical and humanitarian emergencies Even though MSF is ending its medical support in the area services will continue thanks to the Sudanese health authorities and other national and international partners Our teams remain committed to continue providing essential lifesaving assistance to the Sudanese population said Stephan We continuously adapt to address the most acute humanitarian and health needs in an impartial manner and in the best possible way We are confident that our partners will ensure the continuity of this successful project and allocate the necessary resources and healthcare staff As an emergency medical organisation MSF s actions are guided by medical ethics and the principles of neutrality independence and impartiality Assistance is offered based on medical needs irrespective of race religion gender or political affiliation MSF has worked in Sudan since 1978 and today runs projects in Khartoum Gedaref Blue Nile East Darfur Central Darfur West Darfur South Darfur and Kassala with emergency teams launching responses in other areas as needed
    Sudan: MSF leaves lasting legacy of a hospital for the community in White Nile state
      Over the past seven years MSF teams has provided nearly 500 000 outpatient consultations and admitted more than 20 000 people to the hospital for treatment GENEVA Switzerland December 20 2021 APO Group Since 2013 Sudan s White Nile state has hosted tens of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in South Sudan s Upper Nile state For the past seven years international medical organisation M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Border MSF has provided the refugees and local communities with medical care This month MSF teams hand over their medical activities in White Nile state including Al Kashafa hospital to the Sudanese Ministry of Health Soon after some 30 000 South Sudanese refugees arrived in White Nile state in 2013 MSF launched an emergency response providing general healthcare and clean drinking water for the refugees and constructing latrines in the camp known as Kilo 10 As more people fled across the border from South Sudan more camps were established in the region MSF expanded its assistance to the refugee and host communities by running clinics that provided general healthcare and vaccinating tens of thousands of children against measles and other diseases Teams ran health promotion activities while MSF engineers provided clean drinking water and constructed latrines In 2016 MSF and the Ministry of Health upgraded a health facility in Al Kashafa camp to become a hospital and in 2019 they opened a newly constructed 100 bed hospital in the camp Its services include general and specialist healthcare malnutrition treatment maternity care and treatment for people with chronic infectious diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis TB Today patients come to the hospital from the surrounding villages and nine camps for South Sudanese refugees in the area People stay in their homes they can t make money says Zakina Adam Ali MSF nutritional supervisor As a result children get a lot of diseases This means that our inpatient therapeutic feeding centre is full of children We receive 45 to 50 each week and as many as 150 children each month It can make things difficult I m unhappy when a baby suffers a lot but I m very happy when a baby who is brought to me gets better and returns home in a good physical condition Previously the local community had little access to medical care MSF s Al Kashafa hospital has become the main referral hospital for the refugee and host communities living in the Al Salam and Al Jebelin localities in White Nile state Currently the hospital serves the majority of the approximately 270 000 South Sudanese refugees living in White Nile State according to UNHCR and around 450 000 people from the local communities who account for nearly half of the consultations most of them are from the El Salam locality which is closer to the hospital My children Daoud Al Hadi and Hammouda were born before MSF s hospital opened says Zahra who is from a village nearby I m pregnant again and my future son who we re going to name Ahmed will be born here in the hospital We suffered before without the MSF hospital but now we can get continuous care from day one of the pregnancy until the baby is born The medics monitor your condition very carefully They do regular check ups and if you have a blood deficiency they give medicines to counter it Over the past seven years MSF teams has provided nearly 500 000 outpatient consultations and admitted more than 20 000 people to the hospital for treatment More than 8 000 malnourished children under five have received treatment in the hospital s therapeutic feeding centre and nearly 5 000 women have given birth in the maternity unit MSF staffs have vaccinated more than 25 000 children to protect them against common childhood diseases MSF mental health staff have provided more than 6 000 mental health consultations and health promoters have held more than 10 000 health promotion sessions The major success in Al Kashafa has been the construction of the new hospital which led to improved inpatient and outpatient care says MSF project coordinator Kennedy Olela who first worked for MSF in Al Kashafa in 2016 17 Back in 2016 and 2017 we started to receive more and more patients and space and services became increasingly stretched says Olela I came back this year and was proud to see the changes in the provision of medical care in the hospital with its high hygiene standards We are able to provide quality of care to patients without worrying about weather conditions which can impact infection prevention and control The standard of care has improved significantly and more patients are able to access comfortable care in a very good environment This month MSF is handing over its medical activities in White Nile state including Al Kashafa hospital to the Sudanese Ministry of Health Speaking at the handover ceremony on 15 December Claudia Stephan MSF s country representative in Sudan said We have been able to save many lives and provide medical assistance for both refugees and host communities We have reduced the burden of disease and improved people s access to quality medical care in White Nile state It has been a joint achievement working hand in hand with the Ministry of Health the Commission of Refugees the Humanitarian Affairs Commission and other partners towards a common goal to respond to medical and humanitarian emergencies Even though MSF is ending its medical support in the area services will continue thanks to the Sudanese health authorities and other national and international partners Our teams remain committed to continue providing essential lifesaving assistance to the Sudanese population said Stephan We continuously adapt to address the most acute humanitarian and health needs in an impartial manner and in the best possible way We are confident that our partners will ensure the continuity of this successful project and allocate the necessary resources and healthcare staff As an emergency medical organisation MSF s actions are guided by medical ethics and the principles of neutrality independence and impartiality Assistance is offered based on medical needs irrespective of race religion gender or political affiliation MSF has worked in Sudan since 1978 and today runs projects in Khartoum Gedaref Blue Nile East Darfur Central Darfur West Darfur South Darfur and Kassala with emergency teams launching responses in other areas as needed
    Sudan: MSF leaves lasting legacy of a hospital for the community in White Nile state
    Africa1 year ago

    Sudan: MSF leaves lasting legacy of a hospital for the community in White Nile state

    Over the past seven years, MSF teams has provided nearly 500,000 outpatient consultations and admitted more than 20,000 people to the hospital for treatment

    GENEVA, Switzerland, December 20, 2021/APO Group/ --

    Since 2013, Sudan’s White Nile state has hosted tens of thousands of refugees fleeing conflict in South Sudan’s Upper Nile state. For the past seven years, international medical organisation Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Border (MSF) has provided the refugees and local communities with medical care. This month MSF teams hand over their medical activities in White Nile state, including Al-Kashafa hospital, to the Sudanese Ministry of Health.  

    Soon after some 30,000 South Sudanese refugees arrived in White Nile state in 2013, MSF launched an emergency response, providing general healthcare and clean drinking water for the refugees and constructing latrines in the camp known as Kilo 10.  

    As more people fled across the border from South Sudan, more camps were established in the region. MSF expanded its assistance to the refugee and host communities by running clinics that provided general healthcare and vaccinating tens of thousands of children against measles and other diseases. Teams ran health promotion activities while MSF engineers provided clean drinking water and constructed latrines.   

    In 2016, MSF and the Ministry of Health upgraded a health facility in Al-Kashafa camp to become a hospital, and in 2019 they opened a newly constructed 100-bed hospital in the camp. Its services include general and specialist healthcare, malnutrition treatment, maternity care and treatment for people with chronic infectious diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis (TB). Today patients come to the hospital from the surrounding villages and nine camps for South Sudanese refugees in the area. 

    “People stay in their homes, they can’t make money,” says Zakina Adam Ali, MSF nutritional supervisor. “As a result, children get a lot of diseases. This means that our inpatient therapeutic feeding centre is full of children. We receive 45 to 50 each week, and as many as 150 children each month. It can make things difficult. I’m unhappy when a baby suffers a lot, but I’m very happy when a baby who is brought to me gets better and returns home in a good physical condition.” 

    Previously, the local community had little access to medical care. MSF’s Al-Kashafa hospital has become the main referral hospital for the refugee and host communities living in the Al-Salam and Al-Jebelin localities in White Nile state.  

    Currently the hospital serves the majority of the approximately 270,000 South Sudanese refugees living in White Nile State according to UNHCR and around 450,000 people from the local communities, who account for nearly half of the consultations, most of them are from the El-Salam locality, which is closer to the hospital. 

    “My children Daoud, Al Hadi and Hammouda were born before MSF’s hospital opened,” says Zahra who is from a village nearby. “I’m pregnant again and my future son, who we’re going to name Ahmed, will be born here in the hospital. We suffered before, without the MSF hospital, but now we can get continuous care, from day one of the pregnancy until the baby is born. The medics monitor your condition very carefully. They do regular check-ups and, if you have a blood deficiency, they give medicines to counter it.” 

    Over the past seven years, MSF teams has provided nearly 500,000 outpatient consultations and admitted more than 20,000 people to the hospital for treatment. More than 8,000 malnourished children under five have received treatment in the hospital’s therapeutic feeding centre and nearly 5,000 women have given birth in the maternity unit. MSF staffs have vaccinated more than 25,000 children to protect them against common childhood diseases. MSF mental health staff have provided more than 6,000 mental health consultations and health promoters have held more than 10,000 health promotion sessions. 

    “The major success in Al-Kashafa has been the construction of the new hospital, which led to improved inpatient and outpatient care,” says MSF project coordinator Kennedy Olela, who first worked for MSF in Al-Kashafa in 2016-17.  

    “Back in 2016 and 2017, we started to receive more and more patients and space and services became increasingly stretched,” says Olela. “I came back this year and was proud to see the changes in the provision of medical care in the hospital with its high hygiene standards. We are able to provide quality of care to patients without worrying about weather conditions, which can impact infection prevention and control. The standard of care has improved significantly, and more patients are able to access comfortable care in a very good environment.” 

    This month, MSF is handing over its medical activities in White Nile state, including Al-Kashafa hospital, to the Sudanese Ministry of Health. Speaking at the handover ceremony on 15 December Claudia Stephan, MSF’s country representative in Sudan, said: “We have been able to save many lives and provide medical assistance for both refugees and host communities. We have reduced the burden of disease and improved people’s access to quality medical care in White Nile state. It has been a joint achievement, working hand in hand with the Ministry of Health, the Commission of Refugees, the Humanitarian Affairs Commission and other partners towards a common goal to respond to medical and humanitarian emergencies.”  

    Even though MSF is ending its medical support in the area, services will continue thanks to the Sudanese health authorities and other national and international partners. 

    “Our teams remain committed to continue providing essential lifesaving assistance to the Sudanese population,” said Stephan. “We continuously adapt to address the most acute humanitarian and health needs in an impartial manner and in the best possible way. We are confident that our partners will ensure the continuity of this successful project and allocate the necessary resources and healthcare staff.”  

    As an emergency medical organisation, MSF’s actions are guided by medical ethics and the principles of neutrality, independence and impartiality. Assistance is offered based on medical needs, irrespective of race, religion, gender or political affiliation. 

    MSF has worked in Sudan since 1978 and today runs projects in Khartoum, Gedaref, Blue Nile, East Darfur, Central Darfur, West Darfur, South Darfur and Kassala, with emergency teams launching responses in other areas as needed.

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