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  •   Since 2018 MSF has been supporting a series of eye camps in Somalia providing treatment and surgery for a range of debilitating eye conditions Ranging from cataract surgery to treatment for eye diseases to prescribing glasses the camps provide a one stop shop for essential eye healthcare MSF eye camps in Somalia Since 2018 MSF has been supporting a series of eye camps in Somalia providing treatment and surgery for a range of debilitating eye conditions Ranging from cataract surgery to treatment for eye diseases to prescribing glasses the camps provide a one stop shop for essential eye healthcare Eye problems like many other health issues in Somalia often go untreated says Dr Fuad MSF medical coordinator for Somalia Common conditions such as cataracts all too often lead to blindness if left untreated Losing one s sight which often leads to losing one s livelihood can be devastating especially in a country where many people face a daily struggle to survive due to internal conflict and chronic poverty Which is why this relatively simple surgery has a huge impact on patients lives improving their chances of living a dignified and healthy life The eye camps are held at local hospitals and clinics and include screening surgery treatment health education and counselling Since commencing the camps the teams of eye specialists have reached thousands of people living with eye diseases in many cases helping them to regain their sight There is a lot of organisation and preparation for each camp says Dr Fuad especially as we have to manage the camps remotely and work with local partners due to security reasons In the weeks before a camp we will spread the word that an eye camp is going to occur and in the days leading up to it will hold a range of clinics where people are screened to ascertain if they need surgery glasses further examination or medical treatment You can t see your grandchildren and then all of a sudden you can In Burhakaba where MSF is currently conducting a new eye camp Dr Said ophthalmologist for the local eye care service provider that MSF supports explains the initial outreach work Last month we ve been doing outreach activities in the area We ve been talking to community leaders running radio ads getting the word out on social media about the eye camps and encouraging people to come and benefit from the free screening services on offer Nobody has offered services like these here for almost 20 years Because of insecurity we ve had to come into the area discreetly and unnoticed We re about two hours drive from Baidoa and there are some difficult zones to traverse between there and here because of the security situation We have to be very careful when we re driving When we finish the eye camp we will pack up and be just as discreet when we leave So far we have done about 4 000 screenings at the clinic Of those almost 2 000 were adults screened for cataracts and other ocular diseases such as glaucoma Our team includes two ophthalmologists two optometrists and a number of opticians and we ve now started the surgeries We have done about 500 so far and we ll work here for another two weeks It s going very well Weeks of outreach work screening and preparation are needed so that by the time the surgeons arrive everything is in place Cataract surgery is done under local anaesthetic and is a relatively short procedure lasting five to ten minutes On average about 4 000 people are treated during each camp Many of our patients have bilateral cataracts says Dr Said Most days many of them just sit in their houses unable to be productive because they can t see After we operate they re shocked that they simply can see again It s amazing for all of us to witness those moments Every time it happens it is very moving to see the patient s reaction Most of our cataract patients are elderly Some have told us that for a decade or more they haven t been able to see You can t see your children you can t see your grandchildren and then all of a sudden you can It s very special Opening doors What we re doing here is not complicated even the surgery says Dr Fuad But it s completely transformative for the people treated Overnight people can have their vision and their independence restored to them The results are immediate and tangible One man we operated on had been blind for five years but was suddenly able to see MSF also supports providing school age children with free eye services many of whom have never had an eye test before In one eye camp run by MSF in the Hudur region of Somalia more than 4 000 schoolchildren had their eyes tested Every child who needed glasses was provided with prescription lenses and standard plastic frames Many children have been struggling to see the lessons at school says Dr Fuad Then they come to the eye camp they are provided with a prescription and free glasses and their performance their ability to learn their quality of life and their options for the future are all improved The standard plastic frames that we provide are simple and inexpensive but like so much else about this project they are completely lifechanging Over the past five years MSF has supported eye camps in various regional cities including Baidoa Burhakaba Galkayo Garbaharey Dhobley Bardheere Hudur Kismayo Luuq and Mogadishu in Somalia and in Las Anod Buhoodle and Erigavo in Somaliland Along with eye camps in Somalia and Somaliland MSF teams work in hospitals in Baidoa in South West State Galkayo North in Puntland state Galkayo South in Galmudug state and in Somaliland in Las Anod and Hargeisa The main focus of our medical activities are maternal paediatric and emergency care nutritional support and diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis TB MSF also run mobile clinics to deliver care to people living in displacement camps and the surrounding communities In 2021 MSF teams provided around 154 814 medical consultations treated 12 509 children with malnutrition delivered nearly 8 805 babies and treated 74 patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis among other activities Last year MSF supported two eye camps carrying out 4 022 consultations 656 cataract surgeries and prescribed 506 children with glasses In 2022 MSF supported a total of five eye camps with two currently underway
    ‘Lifechanging work restoring eyesight and vision’
      Since 2018 MSF has been supporting a series of eye camps in Somalia providing treatment and surgery for a range of debilitating eye conditions Ranging from cataract surgery to treatment for eye diseases to prescribing glasses the camps provide a one stop shop for essential eye healthcare MSF eye camps in Somalia Since 2018 MSF has been supporting a series of eye camps in Somalia providing treatment and surgery for a range of debilitating eye conditions Ranging from cataract surgery to treatment for eye diseases to prescribing glasses the camps provide a one stop shop for essential eye healthcare Eye problems like many other health issues in Somalia often go untreated says Dr Fuad MSF medical coordinator for Somalia Common conditions such as cataracts all too often lead to blindness if left untreated Losing one s sight which often leads to losing one s livelihood can be devastating especially in a country where many people face a daily struggle to survive due to internal conflict and chronic poverty Which is why this relatively simple surgery has a huge impact on patients lives improving their chances of living a dignified and healthy life The eye camps are held at local hospitals and clinics and include screening surgery treatment health education and counselling Since commencing the camps the teams of eye specialists have reached thousands of people living with eye diseases in many cases helping them to regain their sight There is a lot of organisation and preparation for each camp says Dr Fuad especially as we have to manage the camps remotely and work with local partners due to security reasons In the weeks before a camp we will spread the word that an eye camp is going to occur and in the days leading up to it will hold a range of clinics where people are screened to ascertain if they need surgery glasses further examination or medical treatment You can t see your grandchildren and then all of a sudden you can In Burhakaba where MSF is currently conducting a new eye camp Dr Said ophthalmologist for the local eye care service provider that MSF supports explains the initial outreach work Last month we ve been doing outreach activities in the area We ve been talking to community leaders running radio ads getting the word out on social media about the eye camps and encouraging people to come and benefit from the free screening services on offer Nobody has offered services like these here for almost 20 years Because of insecurity we ve had to come into the area discreetly and unnoticed We re about two hours drive from Baidoa and there are some difficult zones to traverse between there and here because of the security situation We have to be very careful when we re driving When we finish the eye camp we will pack up and be just as discreet when we leave So far we have done about 4 000 screenings at the clinic Of those almost 2 000 were adults screened for cataracts and other ocular diseases such as glaucoma Our team includes two ophthalmologists two optometrists and a number of opticians and we ve now started the surgeries We have done about 500 so far and we ll work here for another two weeks It s going very well Weeks of outreach work screening and preparation are needed so that by the time the surgeons arrive everything is in place Cataract surgery is done under local anaesthetic and is a relatively short procedure lasting five to ten minutes On average about 4 000 people are treated during each camp Many of our patients have bilateral cataracts says Dr Said Most days many of them just sit in their houses unable to be productive because they can t see After we operate they re shocked that they simply can see again It s amazing for all of us to witness those moments Every time it happens it is very moving to see the patient s reaction Most of our cataract patients are elderly Some have told us that for a decade or more they haven t been able to see You can t see your children you can t see your grandchildren and then all of a sudden you can It s very special Opening doors What we re doing here is not complicated even the surgery says Dr Fuad But it s completely transformative for the people treated Overnight people can have their vision and their independence restored to them The results are immediate and tangible One man we operated on had been blind for five years but was suddenly able to see MSF also supports providing school age children with free eye services many of whom have never had an eye test before In one eye camp run by MSF in the Hudur region of Somalia more than 4 000 schoolchildren had their eyes tested Every child who needed glasses was provided with prescription lenses and standard plastic frames Many children have been struggling to see the lessons at school says Dr Fuad Then they come to the eye camp they are provided with a prescription and free glasses and their performance their ability to learn their quality of life and their options for the future are all improved The standard plastic frames that we provide are simple and inexpensive but like so much else about this project they are completely lifechanging Over the past five years MSF has supported eye camps in various regional cities including Baidoa Burhakaba Galkayo Garbaharey Dhobley Bardheere Hudur Kismayo Luuq and Mogadishu in Somalia and in Las Anod Buhoodle and Erigavo in Somaliland Along with eye camps in Somalia and Somaliland MSF teams work in hospitals in Baidoa in South West State Galkayo North in Puntland state Galkayo South in Galmudug state and in Somaliland in Las Anod and Hargeisa The main focus of our medical activities are maternal paediatric and emergency care nutritional support and diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis TB MSF also run mobile clinics to deliver care to people living in displacement camps and the surrounding communities In 2021 MSF teams provided around 154 814 medical consultations treated 12 509 children with malnutrition delivered nearly 8 805 babies and treated 74 patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis among other activities Last year MSF supported two eye camps carrying out 4 022 consultations 656 cataract surgeries and prescribed 506 children with glasses In 2022 MSF supported a total of five eye camps with two currently underway
    ‘Lifechanging work restoring eyesight and vision’
    Africa2 months ago

    ‘Lifechanging work restoring eyesight and vision’

    Since 2018, MSF has been supporting a series of eye camps in Somalia, providing treatment and surgery for a range of debilitating eye conditions.

    Ranging from cataract surgery to treatment for eye diseases to prescribing glasses, the camps provide a one-stop shop for essential eye healthcare.

    MSF eye camps in Somalia Since 2018, MSF has been supporting a series of eye camps in Somalia, providing treatment and surgery for a range of debilitating eye conditions.

    Ranging from cataract surgery to treatment for eye diseases to prescribing glasses, the camps provide a one-stop shop for essential eye healthcare.

    “Eye problems, like many other health issues in Somalia, often go untreated,” says Dr Fuad, MSF medical coordinator for Somalia.

    “Common conditions such as cataracts all too often lead to blindness if left untreated.

    Losing one’s sight – which often leads to losing one’s livelihood – can be devastating, especially in a country where many people face a daily struggle to survive due to internal conflict and chronic poverty.

    Which is why this relatively simple surgery has a huge impact on patients’ lives, improving their chances of living a dignified and healthy life.” The eye camps are held at local hospitals and clinics and include screening, surgery, treatment, health education and counselling.

    Since commencing the camps, the teams of eye specialists have reached thousands of people living with eye diseases, in many cases helping them to regain their sight.

    “There is a lot of organisation and preparation for each camp,” says Dr Fuad “especially as we have to manage the camps remotely and work with local partners due to security reasons.

    In the weeks before a camp, we will spread the word that an eye camp is going to occur and, in the days leading up to it, will hold a range of clinics where people are screened to ascertain if they need surgery, glasses, further examination or medical treatment.” ‘You can’t see your grandchildren, and then all of a sudden you can…’ In Burhakaba, where MSF is currently conducting a new eye camp, Dr Said, ophthalmologist for the local eye care service provider that MSF supports, explains the initial outreach work.

    “Last month, we’ve been doing outreach activities in the area.

    We’ve been talking to community leaders, running radio ads, getting the word out on social media about the eye camps, and encouraging people to come and benefit from the free screening services on offer.

    Nobody has offered services like these here for almost 20 years.” “Because of insecurity, we’ve had to come into the area discreetly and unnoticed.

    We’re about two hours’ drive from Baidoa and there are some difficult zones to traverse between there and here because of the security situation.

    We have to be very careful when we’re driving.

    When we finish the eye camp, we will pack up and be just as discreet when we leave.

    “So far, we have done about 4,000 screenings at the clinic.

    Of those, almost 2,000 were adults screened for cataracts and other ocular diseases such as glaucoma.

    Our team includes two ophthalmologists, two optometrists and a number of opticians, and we’ve now started the surgeries.

    We have done about 500 so far, and we’ll work here for another two weeks.

    It’s going very well.” Weeks of outreach work, screening and preparation are needed so that, by the time the surgeons arrive, everything is in place.

    Cataract surgery is done under local anaesthetic and is a relatively short procedure, lasting five to ten minutes.

    On average, about 4,000 people are treated during each camp.

    “Many of our patients have bilateral cataracts,” says Dr Said. “Most days, many of them just sit in their houses, unable to be productive, because they can’t see.” “After we operate, they’re shocked that they simply can see again.

    It’s amazing for all of us to witness those moments.

    Every time it happens, it is very moving to see the patient’s reaction.

    Most of our cataract patients are elderly.

    Some have told us that for a decade or more they haven’t been able to see.

    You can’t see your children, you can’t see your grandchildren and then, all of a sudden, you can.

    It’s very special.” Opening doors “What we’re doing here is not complicated, even the surgery,” says Dr Fuad “But it’s completely transformative for the people treated.

    Overnight, people can have their vision and their independence restored to them.

    The results are immediate and tangible.

    One man we operated on had been blind for five years but was suddenly able to see.” MSF also supports providing school-age children with free eye services, many of whom have never had an eye test before.

    In one eye camp run by MSF in the Hudur region of Somalia, more than 4,000 schoolchildren had their eyes tested.

    Every child who needed glasses was provided with prescription lenses and standard plastic frames.

    “Many children have been struggling to see the lessons at school,” says Dr Fuad. “Then they come to the eye camp, they are provided with a prescription and free glasses, and their performance, their ability to learn, their quality of life and their options for the future are all improved.

    “The standard plastic frames that we provide are simple and inexpensive but, like so much else about this project, they are completely lifechanging.” Over the past five years, MSF has supported eye camps in various regional cities, including Baidoa, Burhakaba, Galkayo, Garbaharey, Dhobley, Bardheere, Hudur, Kismayo, Luuq and Mogadishu in Somalia and in Las Anod, Buhoodle and Erigavo in Somaliland.

    Along with eye camps in Somalia and Somaliland, MSF teams work in hospitals in Baidoa in South West State, Galkayo North in Puntland state, Galkayo South in Galmudug state, and in Somaliland in Las Anod and Hargeisa.

    The main focus of our medical activities are maternal, paediatric, and emergency care, nutritional support, and diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB).

    MSF also run mobile clinics to deliver care to people living in displacement camps and the surrounding communities.

    In 2021, MSF teams provided around 154,814 medical consultations, treated 12,509 children with malnutrition, delivered nearly 8,805 babies, and treated 74 patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, among other activities.

    Last year, MSF supported two eye camps carrying out 4,022 consultations, 656 cataract surgeries, and prescribed 506 children with glasses.

    In 2022, MSF supported a total of five eye camps with two currently underway.

  •   Following a series of brutal murders seemingly targeting women in the city of Beira Mozambique medical humanitarian organisation Doctors Without Borders Medecins Sans Frontieres MSF expresses shock and alarm at the killing of two sex workers who were part of MSF s community programme with key populations which include sex workers men who have sex with men and at risk youth who are often isolated criminalised or subjected to stigma discrimination and violence We are outraged at the killings seemingly targeted at highly vulnerable women in Beira Two sex workers served by our work have been murdered in a matter of weeks Their peers have identified them as 32 year old migrant sex worker from Zimbabwe who leaves behind a 4 year old daughter and a local 22 year old Mozambican sex worker who leaves behind three daughters and a son Ahead of the 16 Days of Activism Against Sexual amp Gender Based Violence SGBV initiative and the International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers we call for an end to violence and greater safeguarding for sex workers says Jessie Ashay Kurnurkar MSF project coordinator in Beira Mozambican police are investigating the series of killings in various areas of Beira since September 2022 but fear still grips the communities of sex workers in the port city We re not living freely says Maria a sex worker living in Beira We re not leaving our houses anymore When we do leave we try to walk in groups At night we are not opening our doors for customers because we re scared so we re losing work How are we going to make ends meet How are we going to pay rent We are traumatised My peer who was murdered left three daughters behind Following the killings apart from regular project activities in Beira MSF teams which include sex worker peer workers stepped up health promotion activities and trainings on SGBV prevention and care for sex workers and are working with local authorities notably the police and non profit and civil society organisations in Beira The enhanced efforts include awareness raising activities in partnership with local business owners and broadcasters Through MSF s medical humanitarian work in Southern Africa on HIV TB SGBV and migration our teams have witnessed the intense and chronic vulnerability of women men and transgender people engaged in sex work In Mozambique South Africa Malawi and Zimbabwe our teams have seen how they face extreme violence and exploitation precisely because they survive in the shadows especially if they are migrants For as long as sex work remains criminalised and stigmatised hundreds of thousands of sex workers and vulnerable girls and women in Southern Africa remain at great risk for their physical and mental health Just like other highly stigmatised groups in society sex workers mostly avoid making themselves visible to authorities and often delay or avoid healthcare services due to the fear of being detected targeted and rejected explains Lucy O Connell a sexual and reproductive healthcare nurse and key populations advisor at MSF s Southern Africa Medical Unit We have seen how their preventable and treatable illnesses risk becoming more complex and dangerous because of this cruel reality We know that sex workers don t report SGBV or seek treatment after violence because of fear of being victimised again Patients who experience SGBV need medical care within 72 hours after the incident in order to prevent unwanted pregnancies possible HIV infection and to get mental health counselling In addition HIV patients who delay seeking care risk deteriorating health and present a greater risk of community transmission Sex workers and vulnerable women need to have safe spaces to seek healthcare report SGBV cases and freedom from further structural violence In Malawi MSF and partner organisations like Sex Workers Empowerment Alliance in Dedza SWEAD have seen how sex worker communities and authorities notably the police can work together to ensure better safety for sex workers We help sex workers to organise for mutual support and to know their rights That helps them when approaching police for help for victim support services or when they go to clinics for healthcare We have a good relationship with police in Dedza and this helps to keep sex workers safer When they feel unsafe they can approach police for help even walking with them sometimes explains Alice Matambo SWEAD chairperson MSF calls for increased safeguarding of people engaged in sex work in Beira and elsewhere in Southern Africa as well as the mobilisation of authorities civil society and non governmental organisations in the region to advocate for the health and well being of sex workers
    Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) condemns killing of Beira sex workers and calls for their safety
      Following a series of brutal murders seemingly targeting women in the city of Beira Mozambique medical humanitarian organisation Doctors Without Borders Medecins Sans Frontieres MSF expresses shock and alarm at the killing of two sex workers who were part of MSF s community programme with key populations which include sex workers men who have sex with men and at risk youth who are often isolated criminalised or subjected to stigma discrimination and violence We are outraged at the killings seemingly targeted at highly vulnerable women in Beira Two sex workers served by our work have been murdered in a matter of weeks Their peers have identified them as 32 year old migrant sex worker from Zimbabwe who leaves behind a 4 year old daughter and a local 22 year old Mozambican sex worker who leaves behind three daughters and a son Ahead of the 16 Days of Activism Against Sexual amp Gender Based Violence SGBV initiative and the International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers we call for an end to violence and greater safeguarding for sex workers says Jessie Ashay Kurnurkar MSF project coordinator in Beira Mozambican police are investigating the series of killings in various areas of Beira since September 2022 but fear still grips the communities of sex workers in the port city We re not living freely says Maria a sex worker living in Beira We re not leaving our houses anymore When we do leave we try to walk in groups At night we are not opening our doors for customers because we re scared so we re losing work How are we going to make ends meet How are we going to pay rent We are traumatised My peer who was murdered left three daughters behind Following the killings apart from regular project activities in Beira MSF teams which include sex worker peer workers stepped up health promotion activities and trainings on SGBV prevention and care for sex workers and are working with local authorities notably the police and non profit and civil society organisations in Beira The enhanced efforts include awareness raising activities in partnership with local business owners and broadcasters Through MSF s medical humanitarian work in Southern Africa on HIV TB SGBV and migration our teams have witnessed the intense and chronic vulnerability of women men and transgender people engaged in sex work In Mozambique South Africa Malawi and Zimbabwe our teams have seen how they face extreme violence and exploitation precisely because they survive in the shadows especially if they are migrants For as long as sex work remains criminalised and stigmatised hundreds of thousands of sex workers and vulnerable girls and women in Southern Africa remain at great risk for their physical and mental health Just like other highly stigmatised groups in society sex workers mostly avoid making themselves visible to authorities and often delay or avoid healthcare services due to the fear of being detected targeted and rejected explains Lucy O Connell a sexual and reproductive healthcare nurse and key populations advisor at MSF s Southern Africa Medical Unit We have seen how their preventable and treatable illnesses risk becoming more complex and dangerous because of this cruel reality We know that sex workers don t report SGBV or seek treatment after violence because of fear of being victimised again Patients who experience SGBV need medical care within 72 hours after the incident in order to prevent unwanted pregnancies possible HIV infection and to get mental health counselling In addition HIV patients who delay seeking care risk deteriorating health and present a greater risk of community transmission Sex workers and vulnerable women need to have safe spaces to seek healthcare report SGBV cases and freedom from further structural violence In Malawi MSF and partner organisations like Sex Workers Empowerment Alliance in Dedza SWEAD have seen how sex worker communities and authorities notably the police can work together to ensure better safety for sex workers We help sex workers to organise for mutual support and to know their rights That helps them when approaching police for help for victim support services or when they go to clinics for healthcare We have a good relationship with police in Dedza and this helps to keep sex workers safer When they feel unsafe they can approach police for help even walking with them sometimes explains Alice Matambo SWEAD chairperson MSF calls for increased safeguarding of people engaged in sex work in Beira and elsewhere in Southern Africa as well as the mobilisation of authorities civil society and non governmental organisations in the region to advocate for the health and well being of sex workers
    Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) condemns killing of Beira sex workers and calls for their safety
    Africa2 months ago

    Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) condemns killing of Beira sex workers and calls for their safety

    Following a series of brutal murders seemingly targeting women in the city of Beira, Mozambique, medical humanitarian organisation Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) expresses shock and alarm at the killing of two sex workers who were part of MSF's community programme with key populations, which include sex workers, men-who-have-sex-with-men and at-risk youth who are often isolated, criminalised or subjected to stigma, discrimination, and violence. 

    “We are outraged at the killings seemingly targeted at highly vulnerable women in Beira.

    Two sex workers served by our work have been murdered in a matter of weeks.

    Their peers have identified them as 32-year-old migrant sex worker from Zimbabwe who leaves behind a 4-year-old daughter and a local 22-year-old Mozambican sex worker who leaves behind three daughters and a son.

    Ahead of the “16 Days of Activism Against Sexual & Gender-Based Violence (SGBV)” initiative and the International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers, we call for an end to violence and greater safeguarding for sex workers,” says Jessie Ashay Kurnurkar, MSF project coordinator in Beira.

    Mozambican police are investigating the series of killings in various areas of Beira since September 2022, but fear still grips the communities of sex workers in the port city.

    “We’re not living freely,” says *Maria, a sex worker living in Beira.

    “We’re not leaving our houses anymore.

    When we do leave, we try to walk in groups.

    At night, we are not opening our doors for customers because we’re scared, so we’re losing work.

    How are we going to make ends meet?

    How are we going to pay rent?

    We are traumatised.

    My peer who was murdered left three daughters behind.”  Following the killings, apart from regular project activities in Beira, MSF teams, which include sex worker peer workers, stepped up health promotion activities and trainings on SGBV prevention and care for sex workers and are working with local authorities, notably the police, and non-profit and civil society organisations in Beira.

    The enhanced efforts include awareness raising activities in partnership with local business owners and broadcasters. 

    Through MSF’s medical humanitarian work in Southern Africa on HIV/TB, SGBV and migration, our teams have witnessed the intense and chronic vulnerability of women, men and transgender people engaged in sex work.

    In Mozambique, South Africa, Malawi, and Zimbabwe, our teams have seen how they face extreme violence and exploitation precisely because they survive in the shadows, especially if they are migrants.

    For as long as sex work remains criminalised and stigmatised, hundreds of thousands of sex workers and vulnerable girls and women in Southern Africa remain at great risk for their physical and mental health. 

    “Just like other highly stigmatised groups in society, sex workers mostly avoid making themselves visible to authorities and often delay or avoid healthcare services due to the fear of being detected, targeted and rejected,” explains Lucy O’Connell, a sexual and reproductive healthcare nurse and key populations advisor at MSF’s Southern Africa Medical Unit. “We have seen how their preventable and treatable illnesses risk becoming more complex and dangerous because of this cruel reality.

    We know that sex workers don’t report SGBV or seek treatment after violence because of fear of being victimised again.”  Patients who experience SGBV need medical care within 72 hours after the incident in order to prevent unwanted pregnancies, possible HIV infection and to get mental health counselling.

    In addition, HIV patients who delay seeking care risk deteriorating health and present a greater risk of community transmission.

    Sex workers and vulnerable women need to have safe spaces to seek healthcare, report SGBV cases, and freedom from further structural violence.

    In Malawi, MSF and partner organisations like Sex Workers Empowerment Alliance in Dedza (SWEAD) have seen how sex worker communities and authorities, notably the police, can work together to ensure better safety for sex workers.

     “We help sex workers to organise for mutual support and to know their rights.

    That helps them when approaching police for help for victim support services or when they go to clinics for healthcare.

    We have a good relationship with police in Dedza and this helps to keep sex workers safer.

    When they feel unsafe they can approach police for help, even walking with them sometimes,” explains Alice Matambo, SWEAD chairperson. 

    MSF calls for increased safeguarding of people engaged in sex work in Beira and elsewhere in Southern Africa, as well as the mobilisation of authorities, civil society and non-governmental organisations in the region to advocate for the health and well-being of sex workers.

  •   Dr Asma Aweis Abdallah is the medical activity manager with M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Borders MSF in Baidoa Somalia Here she describes the situation the team is responding to The situation in Somalia is very dire catastrophic We are facing one of the worst droughts in 40 years The country experienced famine in 2011 drought in 2017 as well as conflict and health emergencies like cholera measles and malnutrition This is alongside high maternal and child mortality rates We haven t had enough time between one disaster and another The conflict and the possibility that rains will fail for the fifth consecutive year are the main reasons why people are leaving their homes and arriving in Baidoa they are looking for health and humanitarian assistance The city hosts the highest number of displaced people in Somalia second only to Mogadishu In this year alone we have received more than 200 000 new arrivals with some taking long journeys to get here They do so without proper transportation and face security issues along the way Until they reach Baidoa they re going through so much We see mothers who tell us they have lost babies on the way but they continue their journey to bring other children for treatment We have witnessed a lot of critical conditions people going through so much grief and pain One of the patients I remember is a 23 year old mother who came in with her child the mother had measles and the girl had malnutrition Because we don t have adult inpatient care in the hospital we had this mother who had measles in the paediatric isolation room They d walked 180km trying to find care before they arrived we could not turn them away But because they had to travel so far by the time they arrived they already had several other complications The child died two days after admission and the mother died one day later To witness families leaving the hospital with fewer members is one of the saddest things but it s the story of many families because of the impact of malnutrition or other diseases In Baidoa most of the children we receive are already under weight Some lose subcutaneous fat and are skin on bone If this is chronic repeated again and again it affects the development of the brain of the child the productivity of the child for the future and in general the community because children are the asset for tomorrow s generation all because of inadequate nutrition Another thing that malnutrition does to people is to reduce their immune system s response to other infectious diseases so children who have malnutrition are prone to other health issues In Baidoa we are seeing this cycle of people coming in with infectious diseases then coming back for malnutrition or the other way around There are also a lot of outbreaks attributed to the water shortage climate change and the lack of vaccination coverage for children under 15 It s increasing the mortality of children MSF has an emergency programme in Baidoa where we support the regional hospital for paediatrics with an emergency room outpatient and inpatient services We also provide sexual and reproductive healthcare maternity and mental health services Our outreach programme focusses on health and nutrition services we admit 500 children each week into our feeding programmes We build latrines and bring clean water by truck After an outbreak we started supporting a cholera treatment centre With all these programmes we are supporting around 20 of the population but the needs are far more than that It s a difficult feeling for everyone for every human to witness others going through difficult situations But being Somali and this being the situation of the Somali community it makes me feel very sad But it is something we can alleviate if we all work together to establish the required services for the community In Somalia and Somaliland MSF teams work in hospitals in Baidoa in South West State Galkayo North in Puntland state Galkayo South in Galmudug state and in Somaliland in Las Anod and Hargeisa The focus of our medical activities are maternal paediatric and emergency care nutritional support and diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis TB MSF also run mobile clinics to deliver care to people living in displacement camps and the surrounding communities
    Somalia: “We haven’t had enough time between one disaster and another”
      Dr Asma Aweis Abdallah is the medical activity manager with M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Borders MSF in Baidoa Somalia Here she describes the situation the team is responding to The situation in Somalia is very dire catastrophic We are facing one of the worst droughts in 40 years The country experienced famine in 2011 drought in 2017 as well as conflict and health emergencies like cholera measles and malnutrition This is alongside high maternal and child mortality rates We haven t had enough time between one disaster and another The conflict and the possibility that rains will fail for the fifth consecutive year are the main reasons why people are leaving their homes and arriving in Baidoa they are looking for health and humanitarian assistance The city hosts the highest number of displaced people in Somalia second only to Mogadishu In this year alone we have received more than 200 000 new arrivals with some taking long journeys to get here They do so without proper transportation and face security issues along the way Until they reach Baidoa they re going through so much We see mothers who tell us they have lost babies on the way but they continue their journey to bring other children for treatment We have witnessed a lot of critical conditions people going through so much grief and pain One of the patients I remember is a 23 year old mother who came in with her child the mother had measles and the girl had malnutrition Because we don t have adult inpatient care in the hospital we had this mother who had measles in the paediatric isolation room They d walked 180km trying to find care before they arrived we could not turn them away But because they had to travel so far by the time they arrived they already had several other complications The child died two days after admission and the mother died one day later To witness families leaving the hospital with fewer members is one of the saddest things but it s the story of many families because of the impact of malnutrition or other diseases In Baidoa most of the children we receive are already under weight Some lose subcutaneous fat and are skin on bone If this is chronic repeated again and again it affects the development of the brain of the child the productivity of the child for the future and in general the community because children are the asset for tomorrow s generation all because of inadequate nutrition Another thing that malnutrition does to people is to reduce their immune system s response to other infectious diseases so children who have malnutrition are prone to other health issues In Baidoa we are seeing this cycle of people coming in with infectious diseases then coming back for malnutrition or the other way around There are also a lot of outbreaks attributed to the water shortage climate change and the lack of vaccination coverage for children under 15 It s increasing the mortality of children MSF has an emergency programme in Baidoa where we support the regional hospital for paediatrics with an emergency room outpatient and inpatient services We also provide sexual and reproductive healthcare maternity and mental health services Our outreach programme focusses on health and nutrition services we admit 500 children each week into our feeding programmes We build latrines and bring clean water by truck After an outbreak we started supporting a cholera treatment centre With all these programmes we are supporting around 20 of the population but the needs are far more than that It s a difficult feeling for everyone for every human to witness others going through difficult situations But being Somali and this being the situation of the Somali community it makes me feel very sad But it is something we can alleviate if we all work together to establish the required services for the community In Somalia and Somaliland MSF teams work in hospitals in Baidoa in South West State Galkayo North in Puntland state Galkayo South in Galmudug state and in Somaliland in Las Anod and Hargeisa The focus of our medical activities are maternal paediatric and emergency care nutritional support and diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis TB MSF also run mobile clinics to deliver care to people living in displacement camps and the surrounding communities
    Somalia: “We haven’t had enough time between one disaster and another”
    Africa2 months ago

    Somalia: “We haven’t had enough time between one disaster and another”

    Dr Asma Aweis Abdallah is the medical activity manager with Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) in Baidoa, Somalia.

    Here she describes the situation the team is responding to.

    The situation in Somalia is very dire - catastrophic.

    We are facing one of the worst droughts in 40 years.

    The country experienced famine in 2011, drought in 2017 as well as conflict and health emergencies like cholera, measles and malnutrition.

    This is alongside high maternal and child mortality rates.

    We haven't had enough time between one disaster and another.

    The conflict and the possibility that rains will fail for the fifth consecutive year are the main reasons why people are leaving their homes and arriving in Baidoa – they are looking for health and humanitarian assistance.

    The city hosts the highest number of displaced people in Somalia, second only to Mogadishu.

    In this year alone we have received more than 200,000 new arrivals, with some taking long journeys to get here.

    They do so without proper transportation and face security issues along the way.

    Until they reach Baidoa, they're going through so much.

    We see mothers who tell us they have lost babies on the way, but they continue their journey to bring other children for treatment.

    We have witnessed a lot of critical conditions, people going through so much grief and pain.

    One of the patients I remember is a 23-year-old mother who came in with her child – the mother had measles and the girl had malnutrition.

    Because we don't have adult inpatient care in the hospital, we had this mother who had measles in the paediatric isolation room.

    They´d walked 180km trying to find care before they arrived – we could not turn them away.

    But because they had to travel so far, by the time they arrived they already had several other complications.

    The child died two days after admission and the mother died one day later.

    To witness families leaving the hospital with fewer members is one of the saddest things, but it´s the story of many families because of the impact of malnutrition or other diseases.

    In Baidoa, most of the children we receive are already under weight.

    Some lose subcutaneous fat and are skin on bone.

    If this is chronic, repeated again and again it affects the development of the brain of the child, the productivity of the child for the future and in general the community because children are the asset for tomorrow's generation – all because of inadequate nutrition.

    Another thing that malnutrition does to people is to reduce their immune system's response to other infectious diseases, so children who have malnutrition are prone to other health issues. 

    In Baidoa we are seeing this cycle of people coming in with infectious diseases, then coming back for malnutrition or the other way around.

    There are also a lot of outbreaks attributed to the water shortage, climate change and the lack of vaccination coverage for children under 15.

    It´s increasing the mortality of children.

    MSF has an emergency programme in Baidoa where we support the regional hospital for paediatrics with an emergency room, outpatient and inpatient services.

    We also provide sexual and reproductive healthcare, maternity and mental health services.

    Our outreach programme focusses on health and nutrition services - we admit 500 children each week into our feeding programmes.

    We build latrines and bring clean water by truck.

    After an outbreak, we started supporting a cholera treatment centre.

    With all these programmes we are supporting around 20% of the population, but the needs are far more than that.

    It´s a difficult feeling for everyone, for every human to witness others going through difficult situations.

    But being Somali and this being the situation of the Somali community, it makes me feel very sad.

    But it is something we can alleviate if we all work together to establish the required services for the community.

    In Somalia and Somaliland, MSF teams work in hospitals in Baidoa in South West State, Galkayo North in Puntland state, Galkayo South in Galmudug state, and in Somaliland in Las Anod and Hargeisa.

    The focus of our medical activities are maternal, paediatric, and emergency care, nutritional support, and diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB).

    MSF also run mobile clinics to deliver care to people living in displacement camps and the surrounding communities.

  •   In October 2022 M decins Sans Fronti res MSF ended our longstanding medical project in a violent hotspot in the northwest of Central African Republic CAR Here are some highlights from our activities over the past 16 years 1 A project from the coup d tat of 2003 Kabo is a town of 60 000 people close to the border with Chad Our teams first arrived there after the former president Fran ois Boziz took power in 2003 We had previously been running activities in nearby areas such as Moyenne Sido and Bouca This initial emergency response was closed after a few months but in 2006 we returned due to a resurgence of armed violence this time to set up stable medical projects both in Kabo and Batangafo a town 58 km away Over time we transformed the local health centre into a secondary level hospital while supporting health centres in nearby Moyenne Sido and Farazala By working with the local community and slowly gaining their trust we were able to expand our assistance 2 Filling enormous medical gaps Between 2006 and 2022 in Kabo and surrounding areas our teams provided over 1 7 million medical consultations half of which were for malaria the deadliest disease in CAR In addition our midwives assisted 21 000 deliveries our psychologists saw 10 200 patients for mental health related issues and our surgeons performed more than 3 000 surgical interventions We also provided paediatric care treatment for malnourished children vaccination for babies as well as diagnosis and follow up of patients with HIV TB and other chronic diseases Many women came long distances to reach us Sometimes we would see women sitting in the waiting room with labor complications for two or three days says Sylvain Groulx MSF operations manager who worked on different projects in CAR across two decades They believed they would be able to deliver safely here In the beginning only a few women gave birth at the hospital but now many do This increase has contributed to the reduction of maternal mortality in a country that has the second highest maternal mortality in the world says Groulx There were also sudden emergencies One day late in the evening soldiers came urgently to alert us that a truck had overturned at the entrance of the town Two people died and over 40 others were injured All our staff banded together from drivers to medics to help as patients came rushing into the hospital he says 3 A violent hotspot As in other areas in CAR Kabo has been repeatedly hit by conflict and has been controlled by different armed actors It has hosted thousands of displaced people for years Throughout my life I have suffered a lot Since I was seven years old the same story always repeats itself I have been on the move a long time due to the war says Tanguina who has been displaced three times in 25 years I have lost my belongings my farmland everything she says Over time the settlements composed by hundreds of small houses made mostly of sun dried bricks became indistinguishable from the rest of the town Sometimes during outbursts of violence people sought refuge at the hospital There was no other place where they felt safe says Groulx Other times our staff took care of many wounded people who were caught in the crossfire of conflict 4 Insecurity and the closure of projects The constant insecurity in Kabo led to recurrent incidents From kidnappings to armed robberies on the road and within the MSF base as well as intrusions of armed men into our medical structures What we experienced is nothing compared to what the people suffer every day says Groulx We always tried to engage with all parties to the conflict underlining the need for the protection and respect of our staff as well as civilians However sometimes these incidents caused the suspension of our activities A targeted attack last January by unidentified armed men against a convoy of our vehicles on the Batangafo Kabo road set the path for the closure of the project We suspended the movement of our teams along the route which had been the only way to reach Kabo since the beginning of 2021 as the local airfield had been closed shortly after the conflict intensified weeks before In February all non local staff were evacuated and some activities were reduced Without direct supervision of the remaining activities or clear visibility on when we would have secure access to the town it was considered impossible to maintain the support indefinitely 5 A legacy of empowering the community Over the past 16 years our teams continuously trained local and public health staff with the aim of increasing the autonomy of the community Our departure from Kabo which had originally been foreseen to come at a later stage was finally agreed with the authorities and the Ministry of Health and Population MoHP who took over activities from October 2022 In our departure we donated equipment and medicine to Kabo hospital and will continue to support the staff costs there as well as at the other two health structures in the area until the end of 2023
    Departing Kabo after 16 years of medical intervention
      In October 2022 M decins Sans Fronti res MSF ended our longstanding medical project in a violent hotspot in the northwest of Central African Republic CAR Here are some highlights from our activities over the past 16 years 1 A project from the coup d tat of 2003 Kabo is a town of 60 000 people close to the border with Chad Our teams first arrived there after the former president Fran ois Boziz took power in 2003 We had previously been running activities in nearby areas such as Moyenne Sido and Bouca This initial emergency response was closed after a few months but in 2006 we returned due to a resurgence of armed violence this time to set up stable medical projects both in Kabo and Batangafo a town 58 km away Over time we transformed the local health centre into a secondary level hospital while supporting health centres in nearby Moyenne Sido and Farazala By working with the local community and slowly gaining their trust we were able to expand our assistance 2 Filling enormous medical gaps Between 2006 and 2022 in Kabo and surrounding areas our teams provided over 1 7 million medical consultations half of which were for malaria the deadliest disease in CAR In addition our midwives assisted 21 000 deliveries our psychologists saw 10 200 patients for mental health related issues and our surgeons performed more than 3 000 surgical interventions We also provided paediatric care treatment for malnourished children vaccination for babies as well as diagnosis and follow up of patients with HIV TB and other chronic diseases Many women came long distances to reach us Sometimes we would see women sitting in the waiting room with labor complications for two or three days says Sylvain Groulx MSF operations manager who worked on different projects in CAR across two decades They believed they would be able to deliver safely here In the beginning only a few women gave birth at the hospital but now many do This increase has contributed to the reduction of maternal mortality in a country that has the second highest maternal mortality in the world says Groulx There were also sudden emergencies One day late in the evening soldiers came urgently to alert us that a truck had overturned at the entrance of the town Two people died and over 40 others were injured All our staff banded together from drivers to medics to help as patients came rushing into the hospital he says 3 A violent hotspot As in other areas in CAR Kabo has been repeatedly hit by conflict and has been controlled by different armed actors It has hosted thousands of displaced people for years Throughout my life I have suffered a lot Since I was seven years old the same story always repeats itself I have been on the move a long time due to the war says Tanguina who has been displaced three times in 25 years I have lost my belongings my farmland everything she says Over time the settlements composed by hundreds of small houses made mostly of sun dried bricks became indistinguishable from the rest of the town Sometimes during outbursts of violence people sought refuge at the hospital There was no other place where they felt safe says Groulx Other times our staff took care of many wounded people who were caught in the crossfire of conflict 4 Insecurity and the closure of projects The constant insecurity in Kabo led to recurrent incidents From kidnappings to armed robberies on the road and within the MSF base as well as intrusions of armed men into our medical structures What we experienced is nothing compared to what the people suffer every day says Groulx We always tried to engage with all parties to the conflict underlining the need for the protection and respect of our staff as well as civilians However sometimes these incidents caused the suspension of our activities A targeted attack last January by unidentified armed men against a convoy of our vehicles on the Batangafo Kabo road set the path for the closure of the project We suspended the movement of our teams along the route which had been the only way to reach Kabo since the beginning of 2021 as the local airfield had been closed shortly after the conflict intensified weeks before In February all non local staff were evacuated and some activities were reduced Without direct supervision of the remaining activities or clear visibility on when we would have secure access to the town it was considered impossible to maintain the support indefinitely 5 A legacy of empowering the community Over the past 16 years our teams continuously trained local and public health staff with the aim of increasing the autonomy of the community Our departure from Kabo which had originally been foreseen to come at a later stage was finally agreed with the authorities and the Ministry of Health and Population MoHP who took over activities from October 2022 In our departure we donated equipment and medicine to Kabo hospital and will continue to support the staff costs there as well as at the other two health structures in the area until the end of 2023
    Departing Kabo after 16 years of medical intervention
    Africa3 months ago

    Departing Kabo after 16 years of medical intervention

    In October 2022, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) ended our longstanding medical project in a violent hotspot in the northwest of Central African Republic (CAR).

    Here are some highlights from our activities over the past 16 years.

    1- A project from the coup d’État of 2003 Kabo is a town of 60,000 people close to the border with Chad. Our teams first arrived there after the former president François Bozizé took power in 2003.

    We had previously been running activities in nearby areas such as Moyenne Sido and Bouca.

    This initial emergency response was closed after a few months, but in 2006, we returned due to a resurgence of armed violence, this time to set up stable medical projects both in Kabo and Batangafo, a town 58 km away.

    Over time, we transformed the local health centre into a secondary-level hospital, while supporting health centres in nearby Moyenne Sido and Farazala.

    By working with the local community and slowly gaining their trust, we were able to expand our assistance.

    2- Filling enormous medical gaps Between 2006 and 2022 in Kabo and surrounding areas, our teams provided over 1.7 million medical consultations, half of which were for malaria – the deadliest disease in CAR.

    In addition, our midwives assisted 21,000 deliveries, our psychologists saw 10,200 patients for mental health related issues, and our surgeons performed more than 3,000 surgical interventions.

    We also provided paediatric care, treatment for malnourished children, vaccination for babies, as well as diagnosis and follow-up of patients with HIV, TB and other chronic diseases.

    “Many women came long distances to reach us.

    Sometimes we would see women sitting in the waiting room with labor complications for two or three days,” says Sylvain Groulx, MSF operations manager, who worked on different projects in CAR across two decades.

    “They believed they would be able to deliver safely here.

    In the beginning, only a few women gave birth at the hospital, but now many do.

    This increase has contributed to the reduction of maternal mortality in a country that has the second highest maternal mortality in the world,” says Groulx.

    “There were also sudden emergencies.

    One day, late in the evening, soldiers came urgently to alert us that a truck had overturned at the entrance of the town.

    Two people died and over 40 others were injured.

    All our staff banded together, from drivers to medics, to help as patients came rushing into the hospital,” he says.

    3- A violent hotspot As in other areas in CAR, Kabo has been repeatedly hit by conflict and has been controlled by different armed actors.

    It has hosted thousands of displaced people for years.

    “Throughout my life I have suffered a lot.

    Since I was seven years old, the same story always repeats itself...

    I have been on the move a long time due to the war,” says Tanguina, who has been displaced three times in 25 years.

    “I have lost my belongings, my farmland, everything,” she says.

    Over time the settlements, composed by hundreds of small houses made mostly of sun-dried bricks, became indistinguishable from the rest of the town.

    “Sometimes during outbursts of violence people sought refuge at the hospital.

    There was no other place where they felt safe,” says Groulx.

    Other times, our staff took care of many wounded people who were caught in the crossfire of conflict.

    4- Insecurity and the closure of projects The constant insecurity in Kabo led to recurrent incidents.

    From kidnappings to armed robberies on the road and within the MSF base, as well as intrusions of armed men into our medical structures.

    “What we experienced is nothing compared to what the people suffer every day,” says Groulx.

    “We always tried to engage with all parties to the conflict, underlining the need for the protection and respect of our staff as well as civilians.

    However, sometimes, these incidents caused the suspension of our activities.” A targeted attack last January by unidentified armed men against a convoy of our vehicles on the Batangafo-Kabo road set the path for the closure of the project.

    We suspended the movement of our teams along the route, which had been the only way to reach Kabo since the beginning of 2021, as the local airfield had been closed shortly after the conflict intensified weeks before.

    In February, all non-local staff were evacuated, and some activities were reduced.

    Without direct supervision of the remaining activities or clear visibility on when we would have secure access to the town, it was considered impossible to maintain the support indefinitely.

    5- A legacy of empowering the community Over the past 16 years, our teams continuously trained local and public health staff with the aim of increasing the autonomy of the community.

    Our departure from Kabo, which had originally been foreseen to come at a later stage, was finally agreed with the authorities and the Ministry of Health and Population (MoHP), who took over activities from October 2022.

    In our departure, we donated equipment and medicine to Kabo hospital, and will continue to support the staff costs there, as well as at the other two health structures in the area until the end of 2023.

  •  A team of M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Borders MSF has conducted 32 surgeries for noma patients in another round of surgical intervention at the Noma Hospital in Sokoto from 23 October to 4 November 2022 Since the start of the activities in 2014 a total of 1249 major surgeries have been conducted for the noma patients MSF is supporting the Noma Hospital in Sokoto through inpatient care reconstructive surgeries outreach activities nutrition and mental health support Noma is preventable and treatable but people still die from it because of the limited knowledge about the disease and on how to detect it Up to 90 per cent of people affected by noma die in the first two weeks if they don t receive treatment in time That is why early detection is important says MSF project coordinator in Sokoto Dr Sham un Abubakar Early case detection and reporting through Nigeria Centre for Disease Control NCDC can be achieved through increased surveillance activities like training of Disease Surveillance and Notification Officers DSNOs Health Care Workers HCW Traditional Healers Alternative Medicine Practitioners Community Religious and Traditional Rulers and Women and Youth Groups Noma is a disease that shouldn t exist anymore Noma is an infectious and non contagious bacterial disease that starts as an inflammation of the gums similar to a small mouth ulcer In just two weeks the infection starts to destroy bones and tissues potentially affecting the jaw lips cheeks nose or eyes leaving survivors with physical consequences including pain breathing complications and difficulties in eating Malnourished children and members of isolated communities with limited access to healthcare and vaccination are more vulnerable People who survive noma either have to live sequels of the disease or manage to undergo extensive reconstructive surgery to improve quality of life On top of that they deal with the social stigma caused by the disfigurement In collaboration with the health authorities and other stakeholders MSF is commemorating the noma day 5th November in order to raise awareness about the disease address stigmata attached to it and highlight specialized activities on the disease so the patients can access the services Besides over 1000 surgeries since the beginning of the activities in Sokoto MSF teams have held 16857 mental health counselling and 2185 health promotion sessions furthermore admitted 1349 patients for both medical and surgical management of noma In addition a total of 103 survivors were admitted to the Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Centre ITFC and 35 were enrolled in the Ambulatory Therapeutic Feeding Centre ATFC MSF launched an international campaign in 2020 to raise awareness about noma and accelerate the research and advocacy agenda a crucial step being to see the disease included in the World Health Organization WHO list of Neglected Tropical Diseases NTDs The inclusion would shine a spotlight on the disease facilitating the integration of noma prevention and treatment activities into existing public health programmes and the allocation of much needed resources for its eradication Nigeria with the support of MSF and other noma stakeholders has taken the lead as a member state to get noma on the WHO s NTDs list Noma is a neglected disease but it s still not included in the WHO list of Neglected Tropical Diseases although it fits all the criteria We are supporting the Government of Nigeria s GoN call for the World Health Organization to recognize noma as a Neglected Tropical Disease so more attention and more resources will be allocated to eradicate it Dr Sham un added M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Borders MSF is an international independent medical humanitarian organisation that delivers emergency aid to people affected by armed conflict epidemics natural disasters and exclusion from healthcare MSF has worked continuously in Nigeria since 1996 and currently provides medical care free of charge in 11 states across the country Contact Field Communication Officer Abdulkareem Yakubu Email msf nigeria press geneva msf org Phone 234 810 606 6159
    32 major surgeries conducted in Noma Hospital by MSF in two weeks
     A team of M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Borders MSF has conducted 32 surgeries for noma patients in another round of surgical intervention at the Noma Hospital in Sokoto from 23 October to 4 November 2022 Since the start of the activities in 2014 a total of 1249 major surgeries have been conducted for the noma patients MSF is supporting the Noma Hospital in Sokoto through inpatient care reconstructive surgeries outreach activities nutrition and mental health support Noma is preventable and treatable but people still die from it because of the limited knowledge about the disease and on how to detect it Up to 90 per cent of people affected by noma die in the first two weeks if they don t receive treatment in time That is why early detection is important says MSF project coordinator in Sokoto Dr Sham un Abubakar Early case detection and reporting through Nigeria Centre for Disease Control NCDC can be achieved through increased surveillance activities like training of Disease Surveillance and Notification Officers DSNOs Health Care Workers HCW Traditional Healers Alternative Medicine Practitioners Community Religious and Traditional Rulers and Women and Youth Groups Noma is a disease that shouldn t exist anymore Noma is an infectious and non contagious bacterial disease that starts as an inflammation of the gums similar to a small mouth ulcer In just two weeks the infection starts to destroy bones and tissues potentially affecting the jaw lips cheeks nose or eyes leaving survivors with physical consequences including pain breathing complications and difficulties in eating Malnourished children and members of isolated communities with limited access to healthcare and vaccination are more vulnerable People who survive noma either have to live sequels of the disease or manage to undergo extensive reconstructive surgery to improve quality of life On top of that they deal with the social stigma caused by the disfigurement In collaboration with the health authorities and other stakeholders MSF is commemorating the noma day 5th November in order to raise awareness about the disease address stigmata attached to it and highlight specialized activities on the disease so the patients can access the services Besides over 1000 surgeries since the beginning of the activities in Sokoto MSF teams have held 16857 mental health counselling and 2185 health promotion sessions furthermore admitted 1349 patients for both medical and surgical management of noma In addition a total of 103 survivors were admitted to the Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Centre ITFC and 35 were enrolled in the Ambulatory Therapeutic Feeding Centre ATFC MSF launched an international campaign in 2020 to raise awareness about noma and accelerate the research and advocacy agenda a crucial step being to see the disease included in the World Health Organization WHO list of Neglected Tropical Diseases NTDs The inclusion would shine a spotlight on the disease facilitating the integration of noma prevention and treatment activities into existing public health programmes and the allocation of much needed resources for its eradication Nigeria with the support of MSF and other noma stakeholders has taken the lead as a member state to get noma on the WHO s NTDs list Noma is a neglected disease but it s still not included in the WHO list of Neglected Tropical Diseases although it fits all the criteria We are supporting the Government of Nigeria s GoN call for the World Health Organization to recognize noma as a Neglected Tropical Disease so more attention and more resources will be allocated to eradicate it Dr Sham un added M decins Sans Fronti res Doctors Without Borders MSF is an international independent medical humanitarian organisation that delivers emergency aid to people affected by armed conflict epidemics natural disasters and exclusion from healthcare MSF has worked continuously in Nigeria since 1996 and currently provides medical care free of charge in 11 states across the country Contact Field Communication Officer Abdulkareem Yakubu Email msf nigeria press geneva msf org Phone 234 810 606 6159
    32 major surgeries conducted in Noma Hospital by MSF in two weeks
    Health3 months ago

    32 major surgeries conducted in Noma Hospital by MSF in two weeks

    A team of Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders (MSF) has conducted 32 surgeries for noma patients in another round of surgical intervention at the Noma Hospital in Sokoto from 23 October to 4 November 2022. Since the start of the activities in 2014, a total of 1249 major surgeries have been conducted for the noma patients. MSF is supporting the Noma Hospital in Sokoto through inpatient care, reconstructive surgeries, outreach activities, nutrition and mental health support. “Noma is preventable and treatable, but people still die from it because of the limited knowledge about the disease and on how to detect it. Up to 90 per cent of people affected by noma die in the first two weeks if they don’t receive treatment in time. That is why early detection is important,” says MSF project coordinator in Sokoto, Dr Sham`un Abubakar. “Early case detection and reporting through Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) can be achieved through increased surveillance activities like training of Disease Surveillance and Notification Officers (DSNOs), Health Care Workers (HCW), Traditional Healers, Alternative Medicine Practitioners, Community, Religious and Traditional Rulers and Women and Youth Groups. Noma is a disease that shouldn’t exist anymore.” Noma is an infectious and non-contagious bacterial disease that starts as an inflammation of the gums, similar to a small mouth ulcer. In just two weeks the infection starts to destroy bones and tissues, potentially affecting the jaw, lips, cheeks, nose or eyes, leaving survivors with physical consequences including pain, breathing complications and difficulties in eating. Malnourished children and members of isolated communities with limited access to healthcare and vaccination are more vulnerable. People who survive noma either have to live sequels of the disease or manage to undergo extensive reconstructive surgery to improve quality of life. On top of that, they deal with the social stigma caused by the disfigurement. In collaboration with the health authorities and other stakeholders, MSF is commemorating the noma day (5th November), in order to raise awareness about the disease, address stigmata attached to it and highlight specialized activities on the disease, so the patients can access the services. Besides over 1000 surgeries since the beginning of the activities in Sokoto, MSF teams have held 16857 mental health counselling and 2185 health promotion sessions; furthermore, admitted 1349 patients for both medical and surgical management of noma. In addition, a total of 103 survivors were admitted to the Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Centre (ITFC), and 35 were enrolled in the Ambulatory Therapeutic Feeding Centre (ATFC). MSF launched an international campaign in 2020 to raise awareness about noma and accelerate the research and advocacy agenda - a crucial step being to see the disease included in the World Health Organization (WHO) list of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs). The inclusion would shine a spotlight on the disease, facilitating the integration of noma prevention and treatment activities into existing public health programmes and the allocation of much-needed resources for its eradication. Nigeria with the support of MSF and other noma stakeholders has taken the lead as a member state to get noma on the WHO’s NTDs list. “Noma is a neglected disease, but it’s still not included in the WHO list of Neglected Tropical Diseases although it fits all the criteria. We are supporting the Government of Nigeria’s (GoN) call for the World Health Organization to recognize noma as a Neglected Tropical Disease so more attention and more resources will be allocated to eradicate it,” Dr Sham’un added. Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is an international, independent, medical humanitarian organisation that delivers emergency aid to people affected by armed conflict, epidemics, natural disasters and exclusion from healthcare. MSF has worked continuously in Nigeria since 1996, and currently provides medical care, free of charge, in 11 states across the country. Contact: Field Communication Officer, Abdulkareem Yakubu Email: [email protected] Phone: +234 810 606 6159

  •  International medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres MSF on Tuesday warned that living conditions in Kenya s Dadaab refugee complex was worsening with a high risk of disease outbreaks Adrian Guadarrama MSF s Deputy Programme Manager for Kenya called on the UN refugee agency UNHCR and Kenyan authorities to ramp up humanitarian support and urgently launch vaccination campaigns The camps home to more than 233 000 refugees have seen thousands of people arrive since January with hundreds more arriving every week Even a few isolated cases of measles and cholera can cause a full blown outbreak in overcrowded camp settings where clean drinking water is scarce and sanitation and hygiene are poor Guadarrama said in a statement issued in Nairobi the capital of Kenya According to the charity people from Somalia are escaping a severe drought violence and continuing conflict It said many of those arriving were coming from southern Somalia where measles and cholera outbreaks have occurred recently The charity said previous measles vaccinations in the Dadaab camps will provide some protection to children but can still prove life threatening for new arrivals who are unlikely to have been vaccinated Guadarrama said with low vaccination coverage in Somalia no system in place to receive and screen the newly arrived people in Kenya infectious diseases could spread rapidly putting people living in and around the camps particularly children at heightened risk of getting ill The humanitarian situation in the camps and surrounding communities had not yet reached breaking point So we still have a window of opportunity to step up preventive action and avoid an emergency unfolding on top of what is already a long running crisis Guadarrama said He said UNHCR donors and the government of Kenya must all show a sense of urgency now by setting up a dignified reception and screening system for people crossing over to Kenya Humanitarian assistance will also need to be scaled up in order to address the needs of new arrivals and long time refugees and host communities as they have also been suffering under the drought ng NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Charity warns of disease outbreaks at refugee camp in Kenya
     International medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres MSF on Tuesday warned that living conditions in Kenya s Dadaab refugee complex was worsening with a high risk of disease outbreaks Adrian Guadarrama MSF s Deputy Programme Manager for Kenya called on the UN refugee agency UNHCR and Kenyan authorities to ramp up humanitarian support and urgently launch vaccination campaigns The camps home to more than 233 000 refugees have seen thousands of people arrive since January with hundreds more arriving every week Even a few isolated cases of measles and cholera can cause a full blown outbreak in overcrowded camp settings where clean drinking water is scarce and sanitation and hygiene are poor Guadarrama said in a statement issued in Nairobi the capital of Kenya According to the charity people from Somalia are escaping a severe drought violence and continuing conflict It said many of those arriving were coming from southern Somalia where measles and cholera outbreaks have occurred recently The charity said previous measles vaccinations in the Dadaab camps will provide some protection to children but can still prove life threatening for new arrivals who are unlikely to have been vaccinated Guadarrama said with low vaccination coverage in Somalia no system in place to receive and screen the newly arrived people in Kenya infectious diseases could spread rapidly putting people living in and around the camps particularly children at heightened risk of getting ill The humanitarian situation in the camps and surrounding communities had not yet reached breaking point So we still have a window of opportunity to step up preventive action and avoid an emergency unfolding on top of what is already a long running crisis Guadarrama said He said UNHCR donors and the government of Kenya must all show a sense of urgency now by setting up a dignified reception and screening system for people crossing over to Kenya Humanitarian assistance will also need to be scaled up in order to address the needs of new arrivals and long time refugees and host communities as they have also been suffering under the drought ng NewsSourceCredit NAN
    Charity warns of disease outbreaks at refugee camp in Kenya
    Foreign3 months ago

    Charity warns of disease outbreaks at refugee camp in Kenya

    International medical charity, Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), on Tuesday warned that living conditions in Kenya’s Dadaab refugee complex was worsening with a high risk of disease outbreaks.

    Adrian Guadarrama, MSF’s Deputy Programme Manager for Kenya,   called on the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) and Kenyan authorities to ramp up humanitarian support and urgently launch vaccination campaigns.

    The camps, home to more than 233,000 refugees, have seen thousands of people arrive since January, with hundreds more arriving every week.

    “Even a few isolated cases of measles and cholera can cause a full-blown outbreak in overcrowded camp settings, where clean drinking water is scarce and sanitation and hygiene are poor,” Guadarrama said in a statement issued in Nairobi, the capital of Kenya.

    According to the charity, people from Somalia are escaping a severe drought, violence and continuing conflict.

    It said many of those arriving were coming from southern Somalia, where measles and cholera outbreaks have occurred recently.

    The charity said previous measles vaccinations in the Dadaab camps will provide some protection to children but can still prove life-threatening for new arrivals who are unlikely to have been vaccinated.

    Guadarrama said with low vaccination coverage in Somalia, no system in place to receive and screen the newly arrived people in Kenya, infectious diseases could spread rapidly, putting people living in and around the camps, particularly children, at heightened risk of getting ill.

    “The humanitarian situation in the camps and surrounding communities had not yet reached breaking point.

    “So, we still have a window of opportunity to step up preventive action and avoid an emergency unfolding on top of what is already a long-running crisis,” Guadarrama said.

    He said UNHCR, donors and the government of Kenya must all show a sense of urgency now by setting up a dignified reception and screening system for people crossing over to Kenya.

    Humanitarian assistance will also need to be scaled up in order to address the needs of new arrivals and long-time refugees and host communities, as they have also been suffering under the drought.

    ng )
    NewsSourceCredit: NAN

  •   Hundreds of people continue to arrive at the Dadaab camp Kenya where the living conditions of vulnerable people worsen MSF urges the UN Refugee Agency and the Kenyan authorities to launch vaccination campaigns to prevent large scale outbreaks and save lives With hundreds of people from Somalia arriving every week at the Dadaab Refugee Complex in Kenya living conditions in the camps that are hosting more than 233 000 refugees and thousands of new arrivals since January are getting worse Given the conditions in these overcrowded camps there is a high risk of disease outbreaks warns M decins Sans Fronti res MSF MSF urges the UN Refugee Agency and the Kenyan authorities to increase humanitarian support and urgently launch vaccination campaigns The people of Somalia are escaping a crippling drought violence and ongoing conflict in the country Many of those arriving come from southern Somalia where there have been recent outbreaks of measles and cholera With low vaccination coverage in Somalia and no system to receive and test new arrivals in Kenya infectious diseases can spread rapidly putting people living in and around the camps particularly children at higher risk of getting sick says Adri n Guadarrama MSF deputy director of programs for Kenya Even a few isolated cases of measles and cholera can cause a full blown outbreak in overcrowded camps where clean water is scarce and sanitation and hygiene are poor Last week our teams recorded three cases of measles and two suspected cases of cholera in Dagahaley one of the three refugee camps that make up the Dadaab Refugee Complex Previous measles vaccinations in Dadaab camps will provide some protection for children but the situation can still be life threatening for new arrivals who may not have been vaccinated Improving cholera prevention measures including cholera vaccination is even more critical as Kenya has reported ongoing outbreaks in six counties A mass vaccination campaign against measles and cholera in the Dadaab camps and surrounding communities is now required to prevent large scale outbreaks and save lives says Guadarrama We stand ready to support the launch of much needed vaccines in Dagahaley camp where we are the main healthcare provider Our health promotion teams are actively seeking out newcomers to Dagahaley to conduct medical screenings and facilitate referrals for those in need of urgent medical attention But the lack of a reception system to identify and welcome new arrivals makes this task very difficult and further delays their access to humanitarian assistance According to data collected by our outreach teams the number of arrivals from Somalia to Dagahaley has doubled from August to September reaching over 800 people It is estimated that this number will continue to increase steadily in the coming weeks and months Many of the new arrivals say they need shelter food clean water and latrines as open defecation is now common Refugees already living in Dagahaley have generously welcomed many of the new arrivals sharing their meager resources with them But relying solely on hospitality is not a sustainable solution Furthermore those with weak social connections in the camps have no choice but to live on the margins have limited access to food and are vulnerable to harassment and assault The humanitarian situation in the camps and surrounding communities has not yet reached a crisis point so we still have a window of opportunity to step up preventive action and prevent an emergency from developing on top of what is already a protracted crisis He says Guadarrama UNHCR donors and the Kenyan government must show a sense of urgency now by establishing a dignified screening and reception system for people crossing into Kenya Without testing the new arrivals the vaccines will have only little impact Humanitarian assistance will also need to be scaled up to address the needs of new arrivals long term refugees and host communities as they too have been suffering from the drought At the same time the need to find durable solutions for refugees should not be forgotten as emergency preparedness and response measures are implemented Many of those who arrive at the camps have lived through traumatic journeys some may even have lost relatives along the way and others may have been victims of violence says Guadarrama It is therefore vital that we do not overlook the stress suffering and psychological trauma that many have experienced and strive to integrate mental health services into the response
    High risk of outbreaks amid poor living conditions for newly arrived refugees in Dadaab
      Hundreds of people continue to arrive at the Dadaab camp Kenya where the living conditions of vulnerable people worsen MSF urges the UN Refugee Agency and the Kenyan authorities to launch vaccination campaigns to prevent large scale outbreaks and save lives With hundreds of people from Somalia arriving every week at the Dadaab Refugee Complex in Kenya living conditions in the camps that are hosting more than 233 000 refugees and thousands of new arrivals since January are getting worse Given the conditions in these overcrowded camps there is a high risk of disease outbreaks warns M decins Sans Fronti res MSF MSF urges the UN Refugee Agency and the Kenyan authorities to increase humanitarian support and urgently launch vaccination campaigns The people of Somalia are escaping a crippling drought violence and ongoing conflict in the country Many of those arriving come from southern Somalia where there have been recent outbreaks of measles and cholera With low vaccination coverage in Somalia and no system to receive and test new arrivals in Kenya infectious diseases can spread rapidly putting people living in and around the camps particularly children at higher risk of getting sick says Adri n Guadarrama MSF deputy director of programs for Kenya Even a few isolated cases of measles and cholera can cause a full blown outbreak in overcrowded camps where clean water is scarce and sanitation and hygiene are poor Last week our teams recorded three cases of measles and two suspected cases of cholera in Dagahaley one of the three refugee camps that make up the Dadaab Refugee Complex Previous measles vaccinations in Dadaab camps will provide some protection for children but the situation can still be life threatening for new arrivals who may not have been vaccinated Improving cholera prevention measures including cholera vaccination is even more critical as Kenya has reported ongoing outbreaks in six counties A mass vaccination campaign against measles and cholera in the Dadaab camps and surrounding communities is now required to prevent large scale outbreaks and save lives says Guadarrama We stand ready to support the launch of much needed vaccines in Dagahaley camp where we are the main healthcare provider Our health promotion teams are actively seeking out newcomers to Dagahaley to conduct medical screenings and facilitate referrals for those in need of urgent medical attention But the lack of a reception system to identify and welcome new arrivals makes this task very difficult and further delays their access to humanitarian assistance According to data collected by our outreach teams the number of arrivals from Somalia to Dagahaley has doubled from August to September reaching over 800 people It is estimated that this number will continue to increase steadily in the coming weeks and months Many of the new arrivals say they need shelter food clean water and latrines as open defecation is now common Refugees already living in Dagahaley have generously welcomed many of the new arrivals sharing their meager resources with them But relying solely on hospitality is not a sustainable solution Furthermore those with weak social connections in the camps have no choice but to live on the margins have limited access to food and are vulnerable to harassment and assault The humanitarian situation in the camps and surrounding communities has not yet reached a crisis point so we still have a window of opportunity to step up preventive action and prevent an emergency from developing on top of what is already a protracted crisis He says Guadarrama UNHCR donors and the Kenyan government must show a sense of urgency now by establishing a dignified screening and reception system for people crossing into Kenya Without testing the new arrivals the vaccines will have only little impact Humanitarian assistance will also need to be scaled up to address the needs of new arrivals long term refugees and host communities as they too have been suffering from the drought At the same time the need to find durable solutions for refugees should not be forgotten as emergency preparedness and response measures are implemented Many of those who arrive at the camps have lived through traumatic journeys some may even have lost relatives along the way and others may have been victims of violence says Guadarrama It is therefore vital that we do not overlook the stress suffering and psychological trauma that many have experienced and strive to integrate mental health services into the response
    High risk of outbreaks amid poor living conditions for newly arrived refugees in Dadaab
    Africa3 months ago

    High risk of outbreaks amid poor living conditions for newly arrived refugees in Dadaab

    Hundreds of people continue to arrive at the Dadaab camp, Kenya, where the living conditions of vulnerable people worsen; MSF urges the UN Refugee Agency and the Kenyan authorities to launch vaccination campaigns to prevent large-scale outbreaks and save lives.

    With hundreds of people from Somalia arriving every week at the Dadaab Refugee Complex in Kenya, living conditions in the camps that are hosting more than 233,000 refugees and thousands of new arrivals since January are getting worse.

    Given the conditions in these overcrowded camps, there is a high risk of disease outbreaks, warns Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).

    MSF urges the UN Refugee Agency and the Kenyan authorities to increase humanitarian support and urgently launch vaccination campaigns.

    The people of Somalia are escaping a crippling drought, violence and ongoing conflict in the country.

    Many of those arriving come from southern Somalia, where there have been recent outbreaks of measles and cholera.

    “With low vaccination coverage in Somalia and no system to receive and test new arrivals in Kenya, infectious diseases can spread rapidly, putting people living in and around the camps, particularly children.

    , at higher risk of getting sick.

    says Adrián Guadarrama, MSF deputy director of programs for Kenya.

    "Even a few isolated cases of measles and cholera can cause a full-blown outbreak in overcrowded camps, where clean water is scarce and sanitation and hygiene are poor."

    Last week, our teams recorded three cases of measles and two suspected cases of cholera in Dagahaley, one of the three refugee camps that make up the Dadaab Refugee Complex.

    Previous measles vaccinations in Dadaab camps will provide some protection for children, but the situation can still be life-threatening for new arrivals who may not have been vaccinated.

    Improving cholera prevention measures, including cholera vaccination, is even more critical as Kenya has reported ongoing outbreaks in six counties.

    “A mass vaccination campaign against measles and cholera in the Dadaab camps and surrounding communities is now required to prevent large-scale outbreaks and save lives,” says Guadarrama.

    “We stand ready to support the launch of much-needed vaccines in Dagahaley camp, where we are the main healthcare provider.” Our health promotion teams are actively seeking out newcomers to Dagahaley to conduct medical screenings and facilitate referrals for those in need of urgent medical attention.

    But the lack of a reception system to identify and welcome new arrivals makes this task very difficult and further delays their access to humanitarian assistance.

    According to data collected by our outreach teams, the number of arrivals from Somalia to Dagahaley has doubled from August to September, reaching over 800 people.

    It is estimated that this number will continue to increase steadily in the coming weeks and months.

    Many of the new arrivals say they need shelter, food, clean water and latrines, as open defecation is now common.

    Refugees already living in Dagahaley have generously welcomed many of the new arrivals, sharing their meager resources with them.

    But relying solely on hospitality is not a sustainable solution.

    Furthermore, those with weak social connections in the camps have no choice but to live on the margins, have limited access to food and are vulnerable to harassment and assault.

    “The humanitarian situation in the camps and surrounding communities has not yet reached a crisis point, so we still have a window of opportunity to step up preventive action and prevent an emergency from developing on top of what is already a protracted crisis.

    ", He says.

    Guadarrama.

    “UNHCR, donors and the Kenyan government must show a sense of urgency now by establishing a dignified screening and reception system for people crossing into Kenya.

    Without testing the new arrivals, the vaccines will have only little impact.” Humanitarian assistance will also need to be scaled up to address the needs of new arrivals, long-term refugees and host communities, as they too have been suffering from the drought.

    At the same time, the need to find durable solutions for refugees should not be forgotten as emergency preparedness and response measures are implemented.

    “Many of those who arrive at the camps have lived through traumatic journeys, some may even have lost relatives along the way and others may have been victims of violence,” says Guadarrama.

    "It is therefore vital that we do not overlook the stress, suffering and psychological trauma that many have experienced, and strive to integrate mental health services into the response."

  •   Nearly one million people IOM DTM North Mozambique Crisis Round 16 are currently displaced in northern Mozambique after fleeing their homes in search of safety due to the conflict that began in Cabo Delgado province in October 2017 Many people have been displaced multiple times needing to abandon their few possessions livelihoods loved ones and communities with each displacement Living through such prolonged conflict with little or no prospect of a stable future has profound consequences for mental health Five years later some communities in Cabo Delgado still live in constant fear and continue to experience trauma and loss Many have witnessed murders others have lost contact with their relatives and still don t know where they are We are separated from our family and from the rest of our people says a community leader from Moc mboa da Praia a district in northern Cabo Delgado He has had to start from scratch over and over again and currently lives in a temporary settlement in the Palma district We re starting to hear now that there are some people in one place and some in another he says Sometimes we hear about a sick family member but we have no way to visit them Sometimes we hear that someone passed away but we can t reach them Every day that passes we get sadder about it Tatiane Francisco director of mental health activities at M decins Sans Fronti res MSF says that acute stress and anxiety due to uncertainty and lack of perspective as well as loss and grief are the main reasons why people look for mental health consultations in our projects The stories that people bring us are of mothers who had to leave their children during an escape and do not know how they are today children who witnessed the death of their parents people who witnessed the death of other family members says she Tatiane When you are constantly under this fear it is difficult to think about the future it is difficult to plan things You are still living in survival mode People have been living in a kind of limbo for years Maria Maleve an elderly woman from Ancuabe arrived in the city of Montepuez in July after an outbreak of violence that uprooted more than 80 000 people OCHA Situation Report Flow of displacement in Cabo Delgado and Nampula Mozambique June 1 to July 21 2022 for a few weeks When the war broke out we all ran in a different direction says Maria I came here alone with a child I found on the way His father was shot to death Her mother was kidnapped I would like the war to end so that we can return to our land Like Maria many people dream of returning home and rebuilding their lives as farmers fishermen and community members However uncertainty fear and trauma make it difficult to return to normal life Right now in different parts of the province there are people both returning to their places of origin and people who are forced to flee and begin to move again says Tatiane There may be no violence where there are some people but for them there is no guarantee that this will not change in the future In other words psychologically the message our bodies get when we still see violence elsewhere is the attacks are still happening and we have no way of predicting where the next one will be says Tatiane On top of that extreme violence often leaves painful psychological scars for those who suffered it Some people have the courage and desire to return to where they are from but others due to the type of events they have experienced prefer not to risk going back until they are sure that things are fine says Josuel Moreira a MSF psychologist in Palma This shows us that both the experiences and the feelings associated with these past experiences are still vivid and people still carry them You can t even call it post traumatic stress the trauma is still there As the conflict in Cabo Delgado continues these mental health issues as well as access to basic services such as health care water food and shelter continue to be a struggle for many MSF teams have been working in response to the crisis in Cabo Delgado since 2019 In 2021 alone more than 52 000 malaria cases were treated almost 3 500 individual mental health consultations were carried out and more than 64 000 people attended group activities mental health Due to the volatile and constantly changing context our teams have had to be flexible agile and adaptable Humanitarian assistance is disproportionately distributed in Cabo Delgado with more assistance being provided in the south of the province which is considered more stable In some of the districts where we work such as Macomia Palma and Moc mboa da Praia often no or very few organizations have a regular presence More needs to be done so that people in hard to reach areas have access to life support Many people lost not only their possessions their families but also their sense of dignity of living as people says Josuel
    Living in fear continues after five years of conflict in Cabo Delgado
      Nearly one million people IOM DTM North Mozambique Crisis Round 16 are currently displaced in northern Mozambique after fleeing their homes in search of safety due to the conflict that began in Cabo Delgado province in October 2017 Many people have been displaced multiple times needing to abandon their few possessions livelihoods loved ones and communities with each displacement Living through such prolonged conflict with little or no prospect of a stable future has profound consequences for mental health Five years later some communities in Cabo Delgado still live in constant fear and continue to experience trauma and loss Many have witnessed murders others have lost contact with their relatives and still don t know where they are We are separated from our family and from the rest of our people says a community leader from Moc mboa da Praia a district in northern Cabo Delgado He has had to start from scratch over and over again and currently lives in a temporary settlement in the Palma district We re starting to hear now that there are some people in one place and some in another he says Sometimes we hear about a sick family member but we have no way to visit them Sometimes we hear that someone passed away but we can t reach them Every day that passes we get sadder about it Tatiane Francisco director of mental health activities at M decins Sans Fronti res MSF says that acute stress and anxiety due to uncertainty and lack of perspective as well as loss and grief are the main reasons why people look for mental health consultations in our projects The stories that people bring us are of mothers who had to leave their children during an escape and do not know how they are today children who witnessed the death of their parents people who witnessed the death of other family members says she Tatiane When you are constantly under this fear it is difficult to think about the future it is difficult to plan things You are still living in survival mode People have been living in a kind of limbo for years Maria Maleve an elderly woman from Ancuabe arrived in the city of Montepuez in July after an outbreak of violence that uprooted more than 80 000 people OCHA Situation Report Flow of displacement in Cabo Delgado and Nampula Mozambique June 1 to July 21 2022 for a few weeks When the war broke out we all ran in a different direction says Maria I came here alone with a child I found on the way His father was shot to death Her mother was kidnapped I would like the war to end so that we can return to our land Like Maria many people dream of returning home and rebuilding their lives as farmers fishermen and community members However uncertainty fear and trauma make it difficult to return to normal life Right now in different parts of the province there are people both returning to their places of origin and people who are forced to flee and begin to move again says Tatiane There may be no violence where there are some people but for them there is no guarantee that this will not change in the future In other words psychologically the message our bodies get when we still see violence elsewhere is the attacks are still happening and we have no way of predicting where the next one will be says Tatiane On top of that extreme violence often leaves painful psychological scars for those who suffered it Some people have the courage and desire to return to where they are from but others due to the type of events they have experienced prefer not to risk going back until they are sure that things are fine says Josuel Moreira a MSF psychologist in Palma This shows us that both the experiences and the feelings associated with these past experiences are still vivid and people still carry them You can t even call it post traumatic stress the trauma is still there As the conflict in Cabo Delgado continues these mental health issues as well as access to basic services such as health care water food and shelter continue to be a struggle for many MSF teams have been working in response to the crisis in Cabo Delgado since 2019 In 2021 alone more than 52 000 malaria cases were treated almost 3 500 individual mental health consultations were carried out and more than 64 000 people attended group activities mental health Due to the volatile and constantly changing context our teams have had to be flexible agile and adaptable Humanitarian assistance is disproportionately distributed in Cabo Delgado with more assistance being provided in the south of the province which is considered more stable In some of the districts where we work such as Macomia Palma and Moc mboa da Praia often no or very few organizations have a regular presence More needs to be done so that people in hard to reach areas have access to life support Many people lost not only their possessions their families but also their sense of dignity of living as people says Josuel
    Living in fear continues after five years of conflict in Cabo Delgado
    Africa4 months ago

    Living in fear continues after five years of conflict in Cabo Delgado

    Nearly one million people (IOM – DTM North Mozambique Crisis – Round 16) are currently displaced in northern Mozambique after fleeing their homes in search of safety, due to the conflict that began in Cabo Delgado province in October 2017.

    Many people have been displaced multiple times, needing to abandon their few possessions, livelihoods, loved ones and communities with each displacement.

    Living through such prolonged conflict, with little or no prospect of a stable future, has profound consequences for mental health.

    Five years later, some communities in Cabo Delgado still live in constant fear and continue to experience trauma and loss.

    Many have witnessed murders; others have lost contact with their relatives and still don't know where they are.

    “We are separated from our family and from the rest of our people,” says a community leader from Mocímboa da Praia, a district in northern Cabo Delgado.

    He has had to start from scratch over and over again, and currently lives in a temporary settlement in the Palma district.

    "We're starting to hear now that there are some people in one place and some in another," he says.

    “Sometimes we hear about a sick family member, but we have no way to visit them.

    Sometimes we hear that someone passed away, but we can't reach them.

    Every day that passes, we get sadder about it.” Tatiane Francisco, director of mental health activities at Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), says that acute stress and anxiety due to uncertainty and lack of perspective, as well as loss and grief, are the main reasons why people look for mental health consultations in our projects.

    “The stories that people bring us are of mothers who had to leave their children during an escape and do not know how they are today; children who witnessed the death of their parents; people who witnessed the death of other family members, ”says she Tatiane.

    “When you are constantly under this fear, it is difficult to think about the future, it is difficult to plan things.

    You are still living in survival mode.

    People have been living in a kind of limbo for years."

    Maria Maleve, an elderly woman from Ancuabe, arrived in the city of Montepuez in July after an outbreak of violence that uprooted more than 80,000 people (OCHA Situation Report - Flow of displacement in Cabo Delgado and Nampula, Mozambique, June 1 to July 21, 2022) for a few weeks.

    “When the war broke out, we all ran in a different direction,” says Maria.

    “I came here alone, with a child I found on the way.

    His father was shot to death.

    Her mother was kidnapped.

    I would like the war to end so that we can return to our land.” Like Maria, many people dream of returning home and rebuilding their lives as farmers, fishermen and community members.

    However, uncertainty, fear and trauma make it difficult to return to normal life.

    “Right now, in different parts of the province, there are people both returning to their places of origin and people who are forced to flee and begin to move again,” says Tatiane.

    “There may be no violence where there are some people, but for them there is no guarantee that this will not change in the future.” “In other words, psychologically, the message our bodies get when we still see violence elsewhere is 'the attacks are still happening and we have no way of predicting where the next one will be,'” says Tatiane.

    On top of that, extreme violence often leaves painful psychological scars for those who suffered it.

    "Some people have the courage and desire to return to where they are from, but others, due to the type of events they have experienced, prefer not to risk going back until they are sure that things are fine," says Josuel Moreira, a MSF psychologist in Palma.

    “This shows us that both the experiences and the feelings associated with these past experiences are still vivid and people still carry them.

    You can't even call it post-traumatic stress; the trauma is still there.” As the conflict in Cabo Delgado continues, these mental health issues, as well as access to basic services such as health care, water, food and shelter, continue to be a struggle for many.

    MSF teams have been working in response to the crisis in Cabo Delgado since 2019.

    In 2021 alone, more than 52,000 malaria cases were treated, almost 3,500 individual mental health consultations were carried out, and more than 64,000 people attended group activities.

    mental health.

    Due to the volatile and constantly changing context, our teams have had to be flexible, agile and adaptable.

    Humanitarian assistance is disproportionately distributed in Cabo Delgado, with more assistance being provided in the south of the province, which is considered more stable.

    In some of the districts where we work, such as Macomia, Palma and Mocímboa da Praia, often no or very few organizations have a regular presence.

    More needs to be done so that people in hard-to-reach areas have access to life support.

    “Many people lost not only their possessions, their families, but also their sense of dignity, of living as people,” says Josuel.

  •   When the violence broke out in February 2022 thousands of people fled Agok a town in the Abyei Special Administrative Area ASAA Many found refuge in the town of Abyei approximately 65km north of Agok Others fled further south to various villages in Twic County in Warrap State In Abyei City the humanitarian situation remains dire due to unmet basic needs for food and shelter compounded by the unstable and fragile security situation in the area Living conditions are dire for both residents and new internally displaced IDP populations as access to clean water latrines and health care remains a challenge At the start of the violence and mass population movement MSF temporarily moved its operations center from Agok where it has worked since 2008 to Abyei MSF teams are currently working at AmethBek Hospital supporting Ministry of Health staff to provide basic medical care When the Agok people fled to Abyei and Twic we followed them to both places The needs of the displaced people were massive so we continued to where we were needed said Gabrielle Powers MSF head of mission in South Sudan Our goal is to ensure access to quality health care for both host and displaced communities MSF teams are working in the many wards from the emergency room and observation room surgical and obstetric care delivery with a focus on complicated deliveries mental health and sexual violence as well as supporting the various hospital services such as the laboratory and the blood transfusion department At the community level MSF is working to ensure access to healthcare for host communities by deploying outreach teams and community health workers The host communities that took in the displaced people have little or nothing to spare and the services available to them do not meet the needs of the newly arrived Due to its unresolved political status ASAA remains underfunded and underresourced with little international attention More support is needed from governments as well as humanitarian and development organizations to respond to the critical situation here in ASAA Powers explained The ASAA hosts some 143 000 people in addition to tens of thousands of internally displaced people In August 2022 photojournalist Christina Simons followed the MSF team in Abyei for two days documenting the dramatic humanitarian situation in the area and the medical activities carried out by MSF to respond to the needs of the community
    30 hours with Doctors Without Borders (MSF) teams in Abyei, South Sudan
      When the violence broke out in February 2022 thousands of people fled Agok a town in the Abyei Special Administrative Area ASAA Many found refuge in the town of Abyei approximately 65km north of Agok Others fled further south to various villages in Twic County in Warrap State In Abyei City the humanitarian situation remains dire due to unmet basic needs for food and shelter compounded by the unstable and fragile security situation in the area Living conditions are dire for both residents and new internally displaced IDP populations as access to clean water latrines and health care remains a challenge At the start of the violence and mass population movement MSF temporarily moved its operations center from Agok where it has worked since 2008 to Abyei MSF teams are currently working at AmethBek Hospital supporting Ministry of Health staff to provide basic medical care When the Agok people fled to Abyei and Twic we followed them to both places The needs of the displaced people were massive so we continued to where we were needed said Gabrielle Powers MSF head of mission in South Sudan Our goal is to ensure access to quality health care for both host and displaced communities MSF teams are working in the many wards from the emergency room and observation room surgical and obstetric care delivery with a focus on complicated deliveries mental health and sexual violence as well as supporting the various hospital services such as the laboratory and the blood transfusion department At the community level MSF is working to ensure access to healthcare for host communities by deploying outreach teams and community health workers The host communities that took in the displaced people have little or nothing to spare and the services available to them do not meet the needs of the newly arrived Due to its unresolved political status ASAA remains underfunded and underresourced with little international attention More support is needed from governments as well as humanitarian and development organizations to respond to the critical situation here in ASAA Powers explained The ASAA hosts some 143 000 people in addition to tens of thousands of internally displaced people In August 2022 photojournalist Christina Simons followed the MSF team in Abyei for two days documenting the dramatic humanitarian situation in the area and the medical activities carried out by MSF to respond to the needs of the community
    30 hours with Doctors Without Borders (MSF) teams in Abyei, South Sudan
    Africa4 months ago

    30 hours with Doctors Without Borders (MSF) teams in Abyei, South Sudan

    When the violence broke out in February 2022, thousands of people fled Agok, a town in the Abyei Special Administrative Area (ASAA).

    Many found refuge in the town of Abyei, approximately 65km north of Agok. Others fled further south to various villages in Twic County in Warrap State.

    In Abyei City, the humanitarian situation remains dire due to unmet basic needs for food and shelter, compounded by the unstable and fragile security situation in the area.

    Living conditions are dire for both residents and new internally displaced (IDP) populations, as access to clean water, latrines and health care remains a challenge.

    At the start of the violence and mass population movement, MSF temporarily moved its operations center from Agok, where it has worked since 2008, to Abyei.

    MSF teams are currently working at AmethBek Hospital, supporting Ministry of Health staff to provide basic medical care.

    “When the Agok people fled to Abyei and Twic, we followed them to both places.

    The needs of the displaced people were massive; so we continued to where we were needed,” said Gabrielle Powers, MSF head of mission in South Sudan.

    "Our goal is to ensure access to quality health care for both host and displaced communities."

    MSF teams are working in the many wards: from the emergency room and observation room, surgical and obstetric care, delivery with a focus on complicated deliveries, mental health and sexual violence, as well as supporting the various hospital services such as the laboratory and the blood transfusion department.

    At the community level, MSF is working to ensure access to healthcare for host communities by deploying outreach teams and community health workers.

    The host communities that took in the displaced people have little or nothing to spare, and the services available to them do not meet the needs of the newly arrived.

    “Due to its unresolved political status, ASAA remains underfunded and underresourced, with little international attention.

    More support is needed from governments as well as humanitarian and development organizations to respond to the critical situation here in ASAA,” Powers explained.

    The ASAA hosts some 143,000 people, in addition to tens of thousands of internally displaced people.

    In August 2022, photojournalist Christina Simons followed the MSF team in Abyei for two days, documenting the dramatic humanitarian situation in the area and the medical activities carried out by MSF to respond to the needs of the community.

  •   A malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria described as catastrophic and a critical emergency has yet to be recognized by the UN The lack of recognition means that there is no funding and few organizations can respond to the crisis in an area where thousands of children are seriously ill The UN must include northwestern Nigeria in the humanitarian response plan and the international community must urgently respond to the emergency As the malnutrition crisis in northwestern Nigeria continues at catastrophic levels M decins Sans Fronti res MSF is calling on the humanitarian community to respond to the emergency needs of people in the region and for northwestern Nigeria to be included in the UN humanitarian response plan allowing a broader and more sustained response Since the beginning of 2022 MSF teams have witnessed an extraordinarily high number of malnourished children in MSF programs located in five northwestern Nigerian states Multiple factors have led to a sharp increase in malnutrition in the region over the past year With rising insecurity climate change and global food price inflation in a post pandemic world we can only imagine this crisis getting worse says Dr Simba Tirima MSF representative in Nigeria The Nigerian authorities need support to deal with a crisis of this magnitude This must now include emergency humanitarian funding for organizations capable of responding and a commitment to include north western Nigeria in the UN humanitarian response plan for 2023 says Dr Tirima Since January MSF teams working in collaboration with Nigerian health authorities have treated nearly 100 000 children suffering from acute malnutrition in 34 outpatient centres We have also admitted around 17 000 children requiring hospital care in 10 hospitalization centers in Kano Zamfara Katsina Sokoto and Kebbi states In Zamfara state one of the areas most affected by ongoing violence and banditry we recorded a 64 increase in the number of severely malnourished children treated in MSF supported outpatient nutrition departments from January to August 2022 compared to January to August 2022 August 2021 Our nutrition surveys have also underlined the severity of the crisis even in areas less affected by violence and insecurity In the Mashi local government area of Katsina state MSF found a global acute malnutrition rate of 27 4 and a severe acute malnutrition rate of 7 1 in June despite the community being relatively free from violence and forced displacement These rates indicate a critical emergency The current UN humanitarian response plan for Nigeria focuses on the critical situation in the northeast region of the country excluding the northwest Unlike MSF which is not funded by the humanitarian response plan many organizations are currently unable to respond to acute needs in the northwest because they rely on the response plan for funding We understand that the United Nations donors and other stakeholders are increasingly aware of the scope of the crisis in the northwest but it is necessary to go beyond discussions said Froukje Pelsma MSF head of mission in Nigeria It is essential that the North West be included in Nigeria s next humanitarian response plan for 2023 because it plays a key role in mobilizing resources to save lives
    UN must recognize ‘critical emergency’ malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria
      A malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria described as catastrophic and a critical emergency has yet to be recognized by the UN The lack of recognition means that there is no funding and few organizations can respond to the crisis in an area where thousands of children are seriously ill The UN must include northwestern Nigeria in the humanitarian response plan and the international community must urgently respond to the emergency As the malnutrition crisis in northwestern Nigeria continues at catastrophic levels M decins Sans Fronti res MSF is calling on the humanitarian community to respond to the emergency needs of people in the region and for northwestern Nigeria to be included in the UN humanitarian response plan allowing a broader and more sustained response Since the beginning of 2022 MSF teams have witnessed an extraordinarily high number of malnourished children in MSF programs located in five northwestern Nigerian states Multiple factors have led to a sharp increase in malnutrition in the region over the past year With rising insecurity climate change and global food price inflation in a post pandemic world we can only imagine this crisis getting worse says Dr Simba Tirima MSF representative in Nigeria The Nigerian authorities need support to deal with a crisis of this magnitude This must now include emergency humanitarian funding for organizations capable of responding and a commitment to include north western Nigeria in the UN humanitarian response plan for 2023 says Dr Tirima Since January MSF teams working in collaboration with Nigerian health authorities have treated nearly 100 000 children suffering from acute malnutrition in 34 outpatient centres We have also admitted around 17 000 children requiring hospital care in 10 hospitalization centers in Kano Zamfara Katsina Sokoto and Kebbi states In Zamfara state one of the areas most affected by ongoing violence and banditry we recorded a 64 increase in the number of severely malnourished children treated in MSF supported outpatient nutrition departments from January to August 2022 compared to January to August 2022 August 2021 Our nutrition surveys have also underlined the severity of the crisis even in areas less affected by violence and insecurity In the Mashi local government area of Katsina state MSF found a global acute malnutrition rate of 27 4 and a severe acute malnutrition rate of 7 1 in June despite the community being relatively free from violence and forced displacement These rates indicate a critical emergency The current UN humanitarian response plan for Nigeria focuses on the critical situation in the northeast region of the country excluding the northwest Unlike MSF which is not funded by the humanitarian response plan many organizations are currently unable to respond to acute needs in the northwest because they rely on the response plan for funding We understand that the United Nations donors and other stakeholders are increasingly aware of the scope of the crisis in the northwest but it is necessary to go beyond discussions said Froukje Pelsma MSF head of mission in Nigeria It is essential that the North West be included in Nigeria s next humanitarian response plan for 2023 because it plays a key role in mobilizing resources to save lives
    UN must recognize ‘critical emergency’ malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria
    Africa4 months ago

    UN must recognize ‘critical emergency’ malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria

    A malnutrition crisis in northwest Nigeria, described as catastrophic and a critical emergency, has yet to be recognized by the UN.

    The lack of recognition means that there is no funding and few organizations can respond to the crisis in an area where thousands of children are seriously ill.

    The UN must include northwestern Nigeria in the humanitarian response plan and the international community must urgently respond to the emergency.

    As the malnutrition crisis in northwestern Nigeria continues at catastrophic levels, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is calling on the humanitarian community to respond to the emergency needs of people in the region and for northwestern Nigeria to be included in the UN humanitarian response plan.

    allowing a broader and more sustained response.

    Since the beginning of 2022, MSF teams have witnessed an extraordinarily high number of malnourished children in MSF programs located in five northwestern Nigerian states.

    Multiple factors have led to a sharp increase in malnutrition in the region over the past year.

    “With rising insecurity, climate change and global food price inflation in a post-pandemic world, we can only imagine this crisis getting worse,” says Dr Simba Tirima, MSF representative in Nigeria.

    "The Nigerian authorities need support to deal with a crisis of this magnitude."

    “This must now include emergency humanitarian funding for organizations capable of responding and a commitment to include north-western Nigeria in the UN humanitarian response plan for 2023,” says Dr Tirima.

    Since January, MSF teams working in collaboration with Nigerian health authorities have treated nearly 100,000 children suffering from acute malnutrition in 34 outpatient centres.

    We have also admitted around 17,000 children requiring hospital care in 10 hospitalization centers in Kano, Zamfara, Katsina, Sokoto and Kebbi states.

    In Zamfara state, one of the areas most affected by ongoing violence and banditry, we recorded a 64% increase in the number of severely malnourished children treated in MSF-supported outpatient nutrition departments from January to August 2022, compared to January to August 2022.

    August 2021.

    Our nutrition surveys have also underlined the severity of the crisis, even in areas less affected by violence and insecurity.

    In the Mashi local government area of ​​Katsina state, MSF found a global acute malnutrition rate of 27.4% and a severe acute malnutrition rate of 7.1% in June, despite the community being relatively free from violence and forced displacement.

    These rates indicate a critical emergency.

    The current UN humanitarian response plan for Nigeria focuses on the critical situation in the northeast region of the country, excluding the northwest.

    Unlike MSF, which is not funded by the humanitarian response plan, many organizations are currently unable to respond to acute needs in the northwest because they rely on the response plan for funding.

    "We understand that the United Nations, donors and other stakeholders are increasingly aware of the scope of the crisis in the northwest, but it is necessary to go beyond discussions," said Froukje Pelsma, MSF head of mission in Nigeria.

    "It is essential that the North West be included in Nigeria's next humanitarian response plan for 2023, because it plays a key role in mobilizing resources to save lives."

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