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Ousted Myanmar leader Suu Kyi’s solitary confinement: what we know

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 One of the first moves by the Myanmar military during its coup last year was to place Aung San Suu Kyi the country s de facto civilian leader and a figurehead of democracy who has spent decades fighting the government under house arrest military On Thursday the board announced that the 77 year old Nobel laureate would be hellip
Ousted Myanmar leader Suu Kyi’s solitary confinement: what we know

NNN: One of the first moves by the Myanmar military during its coup last year was to place Aung San Suu Kyi, the country’s de facto civilian leader and a figurehead of democracy who has spent decades fighting the government, under house arrest. military.

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On Thursday, the board announced that the 77-year-old Nobel laureate would be transferred to solitary confinement in a prison in the capital Naypyidaw.

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AFP takes a look at what we know about Suu Kyi’s new lockdown.

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Where is he now? After more than a year of house arrest at an undisclosed location in Naypyidaw, Suu Kyi was transferred Wednesday amid heightened security to a prison complex on the western side of the sprawling military-built capital.

Satellite images show a series of buildings surrounded by a wall and set back from a main road, but details about where in the complex she is stopped are scant.

Richard Horsey of the International Crisis Group (ICG) said reports indicated Suu Kyi would be housed in “specially designed housing” in the prison.

What are your new conditions? Suu Kyi will no longer be cared for by the dozen maids who accompanied her during her house arrest.

Instead, prison authorities will provide three aides to care for her, a source with knowledge of the matter said.

Suu Kyi will also be without her dog Taichido, which was given to her in 2010 by her UK-born youngest son when he made a rare visit to Myanmar, according to local media.

His new conditions are a far cry from the years he spent under house arrest during the previous junta, when he lived in his family’s colonial-era lakeside mansion in Yangon and used to give speeches to crowds on the other side of the wall. his garden.

Why have they moved it? Until now, Suu Kyi, the daughter of independence hero Aung San, had been largely spared the prison time spent by thousands of other democracy activists during decades of military rule.

“It is difficult to explain the reason for this decision after more than a year” of house arrest, a former deputy from Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy party, who did not want to be identified, told AFP.

The move was “cruel and there is definitely malice behind it,” said ICG’s Horsey.

“But there may also be logistical reasons: The regime can easily force her to attend court hearings inside the prison, whereas before she sometimes refused to travel” to court, she said.

Independent analyst David Mathieson said the move was “certainly a sign that they don’t care about their welfare”.

How is it going? Suu Kyi remained optimistic after the transfer to jail, a source with knowledge of the case told AFP.

“She is used to facing any kind of situation calmly,” said the source, who requested anonymity.

Suu Kyi spent around 15 years under house arrest under previous boards, leading a simple life dominated by reading, meditation and prayer.

“It was important to establish a routine and strictly follow it to avoid irresponsible waste of time,” he wrote in the 1990s.

However, she has missed several hearings in her trial and at times seems weary from the frequency of her near-daily court appearances.

And now that? His trial on a host of corruption and other charges, which human rights groups denounce as a sham, will continue inside the prison compound, the board said.

Suu Kyi faces a prison sentence of more than 150 years if convicted on all counts. She has already been convicted of various crimes and sentenced to 11 years in prison.

“What else can you assume other than that the board wants to make sure she spends the rest of her life behind bars,” Human Rights Watch’s Manny Maung told AFP.

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