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Ethiopia-Tigray: Belgian contribution through the Special Fund for Emergency and Rehabilitation Activities (SFERA)

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  The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO and Belgium support the timely delivery of agricultural inputs in the Tigray region The Tigray region of northern Ethiopia continues to face a precarious humanitarian situation Ongoing conflict recurring environmental impacts and residual impacts from a rise in Desert Locust and the COVID 19 pandemic have led to widespread disruption to markets and agricultural activities loss of livestock and inconsistent access to food humanitarian assistance which has a negative impact on the food security and livelihoods of people living in the affected areas As a result the region is currently classified at an Emergency level IPC Phase 4 of acute food insecurity according to the Famine Early Warning Systems Network FEWS NET Agriculture remains the main source of livelihood for nearly 80 percent of Tigray s population especially farmers living in rural areas whose produce feeds the nation Rural families in Tigray including some 1 8 million internally displaced people nearly 60 percent of whom reside in host communities have relied on rain fed production and irrigated vegetables to survive in the face of limited access to humanitarian assistance and commercial supplies In 2021 Tigray farmers produced 900 000 tonnes of staple food just 40 percent of their normal output equivalent to seven to eight months of the region s annual grain needs despite challenges Farmers were able to access 27 000 tons of staple crop seeds of which 7 600 tons were improved seeds and 54 000 tons of fertilizer thanks to the Ethiopian Government and Agricultural Cluster partners who made production possible But without access to both improved seeds and fertilizer in amounts similar to 2021 farmers are likely to see a sizeable drop in production this year putting them at risk of losing any gains made and further exacerbating insecurity acute food In 2022 FAO and the Agriculture Cluster partners have focused especially on the procurement and distribution of fertilizers and seeds for the Meher season which is the most important agricultural season for most farmers in Tigray With a favorable normal to above normal rainfall outlook the 2022 Meher season and subsequent irrigation and Belg seasons offer a critical and cost effective opportunity to improve food availability across the region However limited access to seeds fertilizers and other agricultural inputs is a major threat to agricultural production If farmers receive the inputs they need they will be able to harvest and start consuming their own produce from October 2022 Thanks to its resource partners FAO has procured more than 19 300 tonnes of Basal Fertilizer NPS and Fertilizer from urea approximately 40 percent of the total requirement which is enough to meet the needs of about 300 000 households Of this total approximately 11 000 tonnes have reached Tigray farmers to date for use during the Meher season Although increasing humanitarian access restrictions since late August have disrupted the movement of additional fertilizer into Tigray FAO is working closely with partners to ensure the remaining amount of fertilizer can be delivered as soon as possible as well as exploring other contingency plans that can be implemented pursued as required Through SFERA the Government of the Kingdom of Belgium contributed USD 510 000 to FAO to help ensure the timely supply of fertilizers to meet the input needs of farmers Belgium s generous support will help cover transportation related costs to deliver approximately 1 896 tons of urea fertilizer to help 37 926 crisis affected households 189 639 people In turn this is expected to have a positive effect on the food security and resilience of crisis affected populations by increasing local food production and food availability Complementing these efforts FAO also continues to support a range of other interventions in Tigray Afar and Amhara including the distribution of seeds the provision of complementary feed for livestock and support for animal health and livestock vaccination services
Ethiopia-Tigray: Belgian contribution through the Special Fund for Emergency and Rehabilitation Activities (SFERA)

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Food and Agriculture Organization

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and Belgium support the timely delivery of agricultural inputs in the Tigray region.

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The Tigray region of northern Ethiopia continues to face a precarious humanitarian situation.

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Ongoing conflict, recurring environmental impacts, and residual impacts from a rise in Desert Locust and the COVID-19 pandemic have led to widespread disruption to markets and agricultural activities, loss of livestock, and inconsistent access to food.

humanitarian assistance, which has a negative impact on the food security and livelihoods of people living in the affected areas.

As a result, the region is currently classified at an Emergency level (IPC Phase 4) of acute food insecurity, according to the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET).

Agriculture remains the main source of livelihood for nearly 80 percent of Tigray’s population, especially farmers living in rural areas, whose produce feeds the nation.

Rural families in Tigray, including some 1.8 million internally displaced people, nearly 60 percent of whom reside in host communities, have relied on rain-fed production and irrigated vegetables to survive in the face of limited access to humanitarian assistance and commercial supplies.

In 2021, Tigray farmers produced 900,000 tonnes of staple food, just 40 percent of their normal output, equivalent to seven to eight months of the region’s annual grain needs, despite challenges.

Farmers were able to access 27,000 tons of staple crop seeds, of which 7,600 tons were improved seeds, and 54,000 tons of fertilizer thanks to the Ethiopian Government and Agricultural Cluster partners, who made production possible.

But without access to both improved seeds and fertilizer in amounts similar to 2021, farmers are likely to see a sizeable drop in production this year, putting them at risk of losing any gains made and further exacerbating insecurity.

acute food.

In 2022, FAO and the Agriculture Cluster partners have focused especially on the procurement and distribution of fertilizers and seeds for the Meher season, which is the most important agricultural season for most farmers in Tigray.

With a favorable (normal to above normal) rainfall outlook, the 2022 Meher season and subsequent irrigation and Belg seasons offer a critical and cost-effective opportunity to improve food availability across the region.

However, limited access to seeds, fertilizers and other agricultural inputs is a major threat to agricultural production.

If farmers receive the inputs they need, they will be able to harvest and start consuming their own produce from October 2022.

Thanks to its resource partners, FAO has procured more than 19,300 tonnes of Basal Fertilizer (NPS) and Fertilizer from urea (approximately 40 percent of the total requirement), which is enough to meet the needs of about 300,000 households.

Of this total, approximately 11,000 tonnes have reached Tigray farmers to date for use during the Meher season.

Although increasing humanitarian access restrictions since late August have disrupted the movement of additional fertilizer into Tigray, FAO is working closely with partners to ensure the remaining amount of fertilizer can be delivered as soon as possible, as well as exploring other contingency plans that can be implemented.

pursued as required.

Through SFERA, the Government of the Kingdom of Belgium contributed USD 510,000 to FAO to help ensure the timely supply of fertilizers to meet the input needs of farmers.

Belgium’s generous support will help cover transportation-related costs to deliver approximately 1,896 tons of urea fertilizer to help 37,926 crisis-affected households (189,639 people).

In turn, this is expected to have a positive effect on the food security and resilience of crisis-affected populations by increasing local food production and food availability.

Complementing these efforts, FAO also continues to support a range of other interventions in Tigray, Afar and Amhara, including the distribution of seeds, the provision of complementary feed for livestock, and support for animal health and livestock vaccination services.

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